Tennessee

States - Big Screen

Tennessee is the Volunteer State, and its outstanding Employment First initiatives for individuals with disabilities show why this state exemplifies "America at its Best!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Tennessee’s VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
0.77%
Change from
2015 to 2016
6,651,194
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.46%
Change from
2015 to 2016
558,852
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.12%
Change from
2015 to 2016
174,370
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.69%
Change from
2015 to 2016
31.20%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.17%
Change from
2015 to 2016
76.09%

General

2014 2015 2016
Population. 6,549,352 6,600,299 6,651,194
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 563,863 550,696 558,852
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 168,683 167,179 174,370
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,557,629 2,632,997 2,640,999
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 29.92% 30.36% 31.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.41% 75.96% 76.09%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.70% 5.60% 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 26.10% 24.10% 22.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.90% 15.40% 14.60%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 483,056 489,181 486,269
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 529,442 519,602 529,763
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 815,721 821,098 829,448
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 161,345 150,942 149,092
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 19,799 23,298 21,457
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,255 4,147 4,255
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,347 7,211 8,863
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 568
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 19,929 19,638 18,165
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 4,332 5,212 4,641

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,508 4,813 4,932
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.60% 2.80% 2.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 252,231 251,021 249,055

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,075 10,107 12,330
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 21,113 23,774 27,376
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 43,402 47,093 54,059
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 18.60% 21.50% 22.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.30% 0.30%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.80% 0.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 0.30% 0.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 35.90% 30.60% 51.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,014 503 484
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,026 1,368 1,150
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 318 423 232
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 52,191 51,242 92,792

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,806 8,544 9,133
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 108 95 87
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 59 70 55
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 74.00% 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.91 1.06 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,369
3,648
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 202 282 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 244 272 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,039 794 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,445 1,160 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,250 992 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 189 148 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 28.10% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,455 7,463 7,728
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 371,708 370,137 366,628
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 473 409 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,372,000 $11,247,000 $11,124,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $24,128,000 $24,012,000 $23,338,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $64,877,000 $58,460,000 $52,890,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 19.00% 19.00% 18.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 6,464 6,667 6,257
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 N/A 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,745 3,742 3,408
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 20.40 20.50 19.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.07% 70.06% 70.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.27% 10.74% 11.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.76% 1.79% 1.78%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 73.68% 71.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 21.27% 22.10% 33.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 55.59% 58.22% 64.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.70% 69.26% 73.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.32% 36.12% 30.50%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 871,430
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,411
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 56,166
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 136,631
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 192,797
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 86
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 190
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 276
AbilityOne wages (products). $490,797
AbilityOne wages (services). $1,584,403

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 62 37 44
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 2 5
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 64 39 49
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,999 1,760 2,356
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 42 11 46
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,041 1,771 2,402

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

One-Stop Design and Delivery: The increased use of technology allows the Tennessee Workforce System to seamlessly integrate services, system and program changes in accordance with WIOA. The connection in Jobs4TN and VOS leverage the case management processes for all participants and programs that are involved in WIOA implementation across the state. The efficiencies realized with the common intake process and reporting will enable all programs and partners included in this Combined State Plan to mutually benefit from electronic referrals and reporting and coordinate services and tracking of co-enrolled participants, to name a few. Additionally, the centralized and coordinated efforts from all program partners eases the communication and engagement of job seekers, employers, local government support, community partners, and additional external clients. As it pertains to individuals with disabilities, Tennessee serves as an Employment First state, allowing seamless integration and support for this hard to serve population. (Page 41)    

Tennessee is an Employment First State, and there is an established Employment First Task Force. The Employment First Task force facilitated the completion of a Memorandum of Understanding for services to youth with disabilities between the following State agencies:

  • Vocational Rehabilitation
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Labor and Workforce Development
  • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
  • Council on Developmental Disabilities (Oversees the Implementation of the MOU) (Page 206)       
Customized Employment

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry.    (Page 203)                                                                                                                          

Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school and after-school opportunities and experiences outside of the traditional school settings. Examples of Work-Based Learning Experiences include On-the-Job Trainings, Apprenticeships, Internships, Summer Work Experiences, Work-Based Trainings, Job Search Assistance, Job Placement Assistance, On-the-Job Supports and Customized Employment. (Page 205)                                          

Continuing the practice of ensuring the availability of appropriate training activities and resources to meet the individualized needs of clients by seeking out and developing partnerships with other private and public entities to provide specialized education and training activities, to include those that can be provided through self-employment, on-the-job-training by employers, and customized employment. (Page 239)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/DRC

Providing cross training to the career center staff in regard to meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. Continue to provide consultation on career center accessibility and accommodation needs in regard to the accessibility needs in the building(s), and accommodations in terms of appropriate technology needed to serve individuals with the disabilities. Continue to partner with the American Job Centers (AJCs) in employment initiatives such as the summer youth employment project and the DEI grant. (Pages 240-241)

Competitive Integrated Employment

All SCSEP participants are required to develop an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) at the time of enrollment. The IEP serves as a personal road-map to success and is designed to specifically assist the participant in meeting both personal and program goals. Each participant receives specialized training that fits under his or her IEP and is assigned to a host agency to develop or improve skills. The plan also determines if the Host Agency has met the participant’s requirements. In addition, the Host Agency provides services to low-income older persons, to the economically disadvantaged and to organizations offering services which provide positive contributions to the welfare of the general community. Opportunities to serve other groups will also be provided through placement in schools, day-care programs, health and hospital programs, and agencies serving individuals with physical and developmental disabilities. (Page 385)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

In addition, although many of the SCSEP participants need or want to work they may be long-term consumers of government assistance programs for income or other supports. The finding is recipients of these government assistance programs such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Disability Insurance or Housing and Urban Development (HUD) never leaves, especially for employment, once on these programs. Even when there is an opportunity for the individual to move off government assistance into economic self-sufficiency, there is fear that if government assistance is needed again the process is so long and tedious it will not be available. SCSEP then becomes just a program to supplement the income of those participants receiving benefits from these programs. (Page 397)

Economic self-sufficiency through leveraging of all resources including tax incentives, financial education, social security work incentives, benefits planning, and other strategies to enhance profitable employment. The use of a universal design as a framework for the organization of employment policy and services in Tennessee. Customized and other flexible work options for individuals with disabilities. The assurance that the structural and technological accessibility of all AJC’s for persons with disabilities who are seeking employment services is further enhanced by participation in disability awareness/sensitivity training to assist AJC staff to understand how to provide quality employment services for this targeted population. The concept immediately increased the use of AJC by persons with disabilities. Outreach and education also increased throughout the centers. (Page 123)

  • Tennessee Disability Coalition Benefits to Work (Page 201)
Career Pathways

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

Tennessee will compete Section 225 according to the narrative set forth in (5)(B)(i). The grants awarded may be for up to 20% of the available federal dollars as set forth in section 222(a)(1).  The funds described in section 225(a) shall be used for the cost of educational programs for criminal offenders in correctional institutions and for other institutionalized individuals, including academic programs for:

  1. adult education and literacy activities;
  2. special education, as determined by the agency;
  3. secondary school credit;
  4. integrated education and training;
  5. career pathways;
  6. concurrent enrollment;
  7. peer tutoring; and
  8. transition to re-entry initiatives and other post release services with the goal of reducing recidivism. (Page 174) 

This will be done by having by eligible providers partnering with their local AJC for the referral of potential students; there, students will be assisted in building a resume and creating an account in Jobs4TN. Eligible providers will also refer students completing the program to the Tennessee Career Center for career information and job placement. Eligible providers will refer eligible students completing the program to the Local Workforce Board or Vocational Rehabilitation as set forth in this State Plan; this will include the development of career pathways to provide access to employment and training services for individuals in adult education and literacy activities. (Page 177)

Employer Engagement

The Division will continue to encourage CRPs to become Employment Networks as possible funding source for on-going support needs. The Division will continue to train CRPs and VR staff to increase usage of SSA PASS plan.

The Division will assure that funds are made available will only be used to provide Supported Employment services to individuals who are eligible to receive such services. (Page 249)

511

The department’s web-based Virtual One-Stop System (VOS) is the most advanced and comprehensive statewide workforce development information and reporting system available today. Using a set of core proprietary software components created by Geographic Solutions Inc., the department and its partners have modernized and integrated workforce services into a single computing platform referred to as Jobs4TN. Working from the WIOA statutes, we have moved forward with establishing needed data points in our systems, such as those spelled out in the draft PIRL, data specifications, and the Section 188 NPRM. (Page 96)  

 Our goal is to carry out all data-collection and reporting processes under this plan using a single virtual system, specifically, the Jobs4TN system which is being deployed by Geographic Solutions, Inc., TDLWD’s system of record for workforce data across all core programs. And to the extent possible, recognizing cost and infrastructure limitations, also to be deployed for certain mandatory and optional partners as WIOA takes shape in the future. (Page 96)

Information such as the FEIN, is founded in compliance with confidentiality provisions in 20 CFR Section 603, as well as in accordance with the emerging requirements of the SWIS (State Wage Interchange System) data sharing agreement. TEGL 7-16, Data Matching to Facilitate WIOA Performance Reporting, also is being used to guide the process and direction of partnership agreements, similar to MOUs, which define, if needed, authorized data share staff among program and IT staff of the TN agencies noted above. (Page 119)

Mental Health

REGION AND LOCAL LEVEL ACCOUNTABILITY

Tennessee’s workforce development system, both regional and local, requires that programs and providers co-locate, coordinate, and integrate activities and information, so that the system is cohesive and accessible for individuals and businesses alike. Accountability goals increase the long-term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment; to improve services to employers; and to demonstrate continuous improvement. The certification policy is the foundation to aligning programs, policies, and activities in the State’s Workforce System. This policy will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) and will undergird continuous improvement of one stop centers. It specifies minimum standards for the service menu and customer service to be met and branding requirements that demonstrate a statewide Workforce System. This certification process will demonstrate that the local workforce development boards can ensure that employment and training programs in their communities operate at the highest level of quality and consistency, while satisfying the expectations and needs of their customers. (Page 106)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Physical accessibility for people with disabilities was implemented and upgraded with the assistance of Tennessee Department Human Services (DHS) - Vocational Rehabilitation Program. Tennessee will be undergoing an accessibility study to ensure all AJC’s can be accessed. (Page 123)

Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Annual Report 2018 - 10/01/2018

~The  Department  of  Intellectual  and  Developmental  Disabilities  (DIDD)  is  the  state department  responsible  for  administration  and  oversight  of  community-based services  for  Tennesseans  with  intellectual  and  developmental  disabilities.  The department  operates  with  more  than  1,400  state  employees  and  400  community providers to serve approximately 7,800 people with intellectual disabilities through ts  Home  and  Community  Based  Waivers  and  4,500  people  through  the  Family Support  Program.    It  also  operates  38  Intermediate  Care  Facilities  for  Individuals with  Intellectual  Disabilities  (ICF/IID)  program  including  the  Harold  Jordan  Center, and three seating and positioning clinics across Tennessee.DIDD strives to support people with disabilities to live fulfilling and rewarding lives and become the nation’s most person-centered and cost-effective state support system for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Services (ages 14-24) - 09/12/2018

~~Title I of WIOA affirms the Department of Labor’s (DOL) commitment to providing high-quality services for youth (age 14-24), beginning with career exploration and guidance, continued support for educational attainment, opportunities for skills training, such as pre-apprenticeships or internships, for in-demand industries and occupations, and culminating with employment, enrollment in postsecondary education, or a Registered Apprenticeship.

To be eligible for Youth Services, an individual must meet specific requirements related to age and income and school statuses that result in an employment barrier. Program participation is assessed by distinct for in-school youth (ISY) or out-of-school youth (OSY)…..ISY must be:a. 14-21 years of ageb. Attending secondary or post-secondary schoolc. Low-income…

7.Individual with a disability

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Notice of Change in TennCare II Demonstration: Amendment 37 - 09/05/2018

~~Amendment 37 also includes a number of other adjustments to ECF CHOICES based  on  learnings  from  the  first  two  years  of  the  program’s  implementation. The otherchanges to the ECF CHOICES program proposed in Amendment 37 are:•Modifying   the   Expenditure   Caps   for   the   existing   ECF   CHOICES   Groups   5   and   6. These modifications will give  the  State  additional flexibility to target services  based  on  a  person’s identified   needs   and   will enhance access to Supported Employment and/or Individual Employment Support benefits.•Expanding the existing exception for persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES Group 6 from one of the State’s 1915(c) waiver programs and who are “at risk” of institutionalization to also apply to persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES from an Intermediate Care Facilityfor Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities.•Clarifying that a person who meets the nursing facility level of care criteria may be enrolled in ECF CHOICES Group 5 so long as the person’s needs can be safely met in Group 5.•Modifications and clarifications to certain ECF CHOICES service definitions. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DIDD Launches State Employment Mentorship Program - 08/02/2018

~~‘The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) launched a new mentorship program today, designed to leverage in-state employment expertise to increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities in Tennessee for years to come.

The focus of the Tennessee Employment First Leadership Initiative (TEFLI) is to provide consultation and mentoring to intellectual and developmental disability providers around the state as they transition people with disabilities from sheltered workshops to competitive integrated employment opportunities in the community. Persons who work at sheltered workshops typically make subminimum wage, as opposed to earning minimum wage or higher in community employment.’

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Tennessee Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan (11/2015) Amended Based on Public Comment (2/2016) - 07/31/2018

~~1915 (c) waiver settings assessed included:• Residential Habilitation• Employment and Day (Community and Facility Based Day, In-home Day, and Supported Employment)• Family Model Residential Support• Medical Residential Services• Supported Living

1115 CHOICES waiver settings assessed included:•Adult Day Care•Assisted Care Living Facility•Critical Adult Care Home

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Strategic Plan 2018 Goals - 07/01/2018

~~1) Align service delivery systems and strengthen coordination to increase employment opportunities for Tennesseans with disabilities (#Data #Coordination #WIOA #Policy #Legislation #Workforce)2) Build shared community commitment to Employment First (#Self-Advocates #Families #Community #Communication)3) Increase the number of employers that hire people with disabilities (#Businesses)4) Make Tennessee state government a model employer of people with disabilities (#Government #Leadership)5) Prepare students for employment and post-secondary success (#Education #Transition) 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

TennCare Long Term Care Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“Job Development or Self-Employment Start Up.  For purposes of ECF CHOICES only and limited to members age 16 or older: (a) This is a time-limited service designed to implement a Job Development or Self Employment Plan as follows: 1.  Job Development is support to obtain an individualized competitive or customized job in an integrated employment setting in the general workforce, for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but ideally not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals without disabilities. The Job Development strategy should reflect best practices and be adjusted based on whether the individual is seeking competitive or customized employment. 2.  Self-Employment Start Up is support in implementing a self-employment business plan. The outcome of this service is expected to be the achievement of an individualized integrated employment or self-employment outcome consistent with the individual’s personal and career goals, as determined through Exploration, Discovery and/or the Situational Observation and Assessment, if authorized, and as identified in the Job Development or Self-Employment Plan that guides the delivery of this service.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

FY 2019 Provider Rate Increase FAQ's - 06/13/2018

~~During the past legislative session, Governor Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly dedicated approximately $50 million in state and federal dollars towards a rate increase for providers contracted with the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.  The legislation clearly states the funds are for the sole purpose of increasing the Direct Support Professional (DSP) staff salary component in the DIDD provider rate methodology, with a legislative intent to increase the hourly wages of DSPs at DIDD contracted provider agencies.

The legislation clearly states the funding is intended to increase the wages of direct support professionals.  Each provider agency will need to determine the best strategy to honor the legislative intent.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Expect Employment 2017: TN Employment First Task Force Report to the Governor - 08/01/2017

“Over the course of the fiscal year, several task force members completed major objectives in the strategic plan. Those include the implementation of the Employment and Community First CHOICES program and launch of the Transition Tennessee site. In addition, several agencies operationalized Memorandums of Understanding to further streamline services for people whose support needs may overlap two or more state agencies. The task force has also brought in new members and agencies, including the Department of Health. In an effort to bolster employer outreach, the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development joined the task force and embraced its mission wholeheartedly.

This year’s Expect Employment Report documents the task force’s successes goal by goal, objective by objective. It is clear reading through the report that collaboration has allowed for change to happen more quickly. In addition, throughout the report are the stories of real people who have been positively impacted by the programs and policies developed through the work of state agencies, task force members, and partner organizations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

TN Special Education Framework - 08/01/2017

“The purpose of the Special Education Framework is to support educators in writing instructionally appropriate IEPs. Several years ago, the department developed the first Special Education Framework and has continuously garnered feedback from educators on how to improve the framework in order to be most useful to teachers as they support students with disabilities.

The framework is now organized into two sections: (I) general information about special education and (II) writing IEPs. Other significant improvements include a component on the development of writing short-term objectives, additional clarification around service delivery, and links to resources for the IEP team. Looking ahead, the next revision of the framework will include a third section on the implementation of IEPs—with a clear delineation between best practices and legal requirements.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Tennessee HB 1276: Supporting Business Owners with Disabilities - 06/06/2017

“As enacted, adds "businesses owned by persons with disabilities" to the Tennessee Minority-Owned, Woman-Owned and Small Business Procurement and Contracting Act; requires that the annual report made by the chief procurement officer concerning the awarding of purchases to minority-owned business, woman-owned business, service-disabled veteran-owned business, or small business and the total value of awards made also include the total dollar amount of purchases awarded to all businesses in this state”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

"Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee HB 896/SB 429 (ABLE) - 02/05/2015

The purpose of this bill is to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence,  and quality of life; and (2) To provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of individuals with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the supplemental security income program under Title XVI of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C.§§ 1381 et seq.);the TennCare programs under Title XIX of the Social Security Act, (42 U.S.C. §§1396 et seq.); or any successor to the TennCare program administered pursuant to the federal Medicaid laws, the individual’s employment, and other sources  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee Title Code 67

A job tax credit of five thousand dollars ($5,000) for each net new full-time employee job, and two thousand dollars ($2,000) for each net new part-time employee job, for a person with disabilities who is receiving state services directly related to such disabilities, shall be allowed against a taxpayer's franchise and excise liability tax for that year; provided, that:            (A)  The employment of such individual creates a net increase in the number of persons with disabilities employed by the taxpayer within the ninety-day period immediately preceding the employment;            (B)  The taxpayer provides such employment for at least twelve (12) consecutive months and for no less than the minimal hours per week; and for employees enrolled in the minimal health care benefits described in subdivision (g)(1), for respective full-time employment jobs and part-time employment jobs;   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Governor’s Executive Order Order Establishing The Tennessee Employment First I - 06/19/2013

“NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Haslam, Governor of the State of Tennessee… do hereby order and direct the following:

1. State agencies coordinate efforts to increase opportunities for integrated and competitive employment for Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental illnesses, substance abuse disorders and other disabilities.2. The Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities convene an Employment First Taskforce (“Taskforce”).3 The Taskforce shall consist of representatives from the agencies administering disability services, family members of persons receiving employment services, vocational rehabilitation, workforce services and education, as well as consumer advocates and third party disability services providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Annual Report 2018 - 10/01/2018

~The  Department  of  Intellectual  and  Developmental  Disabilities  (DIDD)  is  the  state department  responsible  for  administration  and  oversight  of  community-based services  for  Tennesseans  with  intellectual  and  developmental  disabilities.  The department  operates  with  more  than  1,400  state  employees  and  400  community providers to serve approximately 7,800 people with intellectual disabilities through ts  Home  and  Community  Based  Waivers  and  4,500  people  through  the  Family Support  Program.    It  also  operates  38  Intermediate  Care  Facilities  for  Individuals with  Intellectual  Disabilities  (ICF/IID)  program  including  the  Harold  Jordan  Center, and three seating and positioning clinics across Tennessee.DIDD strives to support people with disabilities to live fulfilling and rewarding lives and become the nation’s most person-centered and cost-effective state support system for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Services (ages 14-24) - 09/12/2018

~~Title I of WIOA affirms the Department of Labor’s (DOL) commitment to providing high-quality services for youth (age 14-24), beginning with career exploration and guidance, continued support for educational attainment, opportunities for skills training, such as pre-apprenticeships or internships, for in-demand industries and occupations, and culminating with employment, enrollment in postsecondary education, or a Registered Apprenticeship.

To be eligible for Youth Services, an individual must meet specific requirements related to age and income and school statuses that result in an employment barrier. Program participation is assessed by distinct for in-school youth (ISY) or out-of-school youth (OSY)…..ISY must be:a. 14-21 years of ageb. Attending secondary or post-secondary schoolc. Low-income…

7.Individual with a disability

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Notice of Change in TennCare II Demonstration: Amendment 37 - 09/05/2018

~~Amendment 37 also includes a number of other adjustments to ECF CHOICES based  on  learnings  from  the  first  two  years  of  the  program’s  implementation. The otherchanges to the ECF CHOICES program proposed in Amendment 37 are:•Modifying   the   Expenditure   Caps   for   the   existing   ECF   CHOICES   Groups   5   and   6. These modifications will give  the  State  additional flexibility to target services  based  on  a  person’s identified   needs   and   will enhance access to Supported Employment and/or Individual Employment Support benefits.•Expanding the existing exception for persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES Group 6 from one of the State’s 1915(c) waiver programs and who are “at risk” of institutionalization to also apply to persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES from an Intermediate Care Facilityfor Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities.•Clarifying that a person who meets the nursing facility level of care criteria may be enrolled in ECF CHOICES Group 5 so long as the person’s needs can be safely met in Group 5.•Modifications and clarifications to certain ECF CHOICES service definitions. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DIDD Launches State Employment Mentorship Program - 08/02/2018

~~‘The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) launched a new mentorship program today, designed to leverage in-state employment expertise to increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities in Tennessee for years to come.

The focus of the Tennessee Employment First Leadership Initiative (TEFLI) is to provide consultation and mentoring to intellectual and developmental disability providers around the state as they transition people with disabilities from sheltered workshops to competitive integrated employment opportunities in the community. Persons who work at sheltered workshops typically make subminimum wage, as opposed to earning minimum wage or higher in community employment.’

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Employment First Strategic Plan 2018 Goals - 07/01/2018

~~1) Align service delivery systems and strengthen coordination to increase employment opportunities for Tennesseans with disabilities (#Data #Coordination #WIOA #Policy #Legislation #Workforce)2) Build shared community commitment to Employment First (#Self-Advocates #Families #Community #Communication)3) Increase the number of employers that hire people with disabilities (#Businesses)4) Make Tennessee state government a model employer of people with disabilities (#Government #Leadership)5) Prepare students for employment and post-secondary success (#Education #Transition) 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

TennCare Long Term Care Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“Job Development or Self-Employment Start Up.  For purposes of ECF CHOICES only and limited to members age 16 or older: (a) This is a time-limited service designed to implement a Job Development or Self Employment Plan as follows: 1.  Job Development is support to obtain an individualized competitive or customized job in an integrated employment setting in the general workforce, for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but ideally not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals without disabilities. The Job Development strategy should reflect best practices and be adjusted based on whether the individual is seeking competitive or customized employment. 2.  Self-Employment Start Up is support in implementing a self-employment business plan. The outcome of this service is expected to be the achievement of an individualized integrated employment or self-employment outcome consistent with the individual’s personal and career goals, as determined through Exploration, Discovery and/or the Situational Observation and Assessment, if authorized, and as identified in the Job Development or Self-Employment Plan that guides the delivery of this service.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

FY 2019 Provider Rate Increase FAQ's - 06/13/2018

~~During the past legislative session, Governor Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly dedicated approximately $50 million in state and federal dollars towards a rate increase for providers contracted with the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.  The legislation clearly states the funds are for the sole purpose of increasing the Direct Support Professional (DSP) staff salary component in the DIDD provider rate methodology, with a legislative intent to increase the hourly wages of DSPs at DIDD contracted provider agencies.

The legislation clearly states the funding is intended to increase the wages of direct support professionals.  Each provider agency will need to determine the best strategy to honor the legislative intent.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Expect Employment 2017: TN Employment First Task Force Report to the Governor - 08/01/2017

“Over the course of the fiscal year, several task force members completed major objectives in the strategic plan. Those include the implementation of the Employment and Community First CHOICES program and launch of the Transition Tennessee site. In addition, several agencies operationalized Memorandums of Understanding to further streamline services for people whose support needs may overlap two or more state agencies. The task force has also brought in new members and agencies, including the Department of Health. In an effort to bolster employer outreach, the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development joined the task force and embraced its mission wholeheartedly.

This year’s Expect Employment Report documents the task force’s successes goal by goal, objective by objective. It is clear reading through the report that collaboration has allowed for change to happen more quickly. In addition, throughout the report are the stories of real people who have been positively impacted by the programs and policies developed through the work of state agencies, task force members, and partner organizations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

TN Special Education Framework - 08/01/2017

“The purpose of the Special Education Framework is to support educators in writing instructionally appropriate IEPs. Several years ago, the department developed the first Special Education Framework and has continuously garnered feedback from educators on how to improve the framework in order to be most useful to teachers as they support students with disabilities.

The framework is now organized into two sections: (I) general information about special education and (II) writing IEPs. Other significant improvements include a component on the development of writing short-term objectives, additional clarification around service delivery, and links to resources for the IEP team. Looking ahead, the next revision of the framework will include a third section on the implementation of IEPs—with a clear delineation between best practices and legal requirements.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Workforce Services Policy – Co-Enrollment of American Job Center Customers - 05/12/2017

“The purpose of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) is to develop Tennessee’s workforce by encouraging access to education and skills training as they directly align with business needs. This policy introduces strategies to strengthen participant outcomes by increasing access to multiple services in order to benefit the long-term success of recipients. This simultaneous admission to programs is known as ‘co-enrollment’…

Individuals entering an American Job Center will be greeted with a “no wrong door” approach; the Tennessee Combined State Plan indicates that there is no incorrect entry point for an individual seeking services. During the first step a staff member will conduct a verbal assessment – mainly focused on the individual’s eligibility for WIOA Title I and III programs – that addresses barriers to employment, establishes priority of service, and identifies a disability that requires further resources. Using this assessment the staff member then offers guidance about the most appropriate next steps.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Memorandum of Understanding Between The Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and The State of Tennessee Bureau of TennCare, Division of Long Term Services and Supports - 03/20/2017

“This Memorandum is entered into and based upon the philosophy of Employment First which is based upon the premise that all citizens, including individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life. Because both VR and TennCare offer employment supports for people with disabilities, this Memorandum is intended to ensure that each agency provides those services to common customers in coordination with the other to ensure efficient use of resources and effective delivery of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee’s Independent Living & Developmental Disabilities Network: Joint Publication on Network Programs and Collaborations - 03/01/2017

“In September 2015, Tennessee agencies funded through the Developmental Disabilities Act and Tennessee’s Independent Living programs funded through the Rehabilitation Act met to begin strategic coordination among our organizations. Having been recently relocated to a new federal Administration on Disabilities, our programs had an opportunity to increase our impact in Tennessee by joining forces to address common goals. Together we established a shared priority: improving youth transition outcomes through postsecondary education and job training that leads to competitive and integrated employment. Since that time, our two networks continue to meet together to work on details of joint projects, including this publication!

We hope you find this publication informative and that you learn something new about the programs across Tennessee funded under the Independent Living Administration and the Developmental Disabilities Act. Please reach out to us to find ways that you can become involved in our work. We are always interested in hearing from Tennesseans with disabilities about your experiences in getting supports and services you need.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Memorandum of Understanding between DIDD and VR - 01/07/2016

On December 14, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Division of Rehabilitation Services, Vocational Rehabilitation Program and DIDD was finalized. In 2014, both agencies started discussing the option of creating an MOU through a Vision Quest workgroup (as part of the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program) spearheaded by two ODEP Subject Matter Experts: Dr. Stephen Hall and Sara Murphy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding for School-to-Work Transition - 08/05/2015

Five state agencies have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to improve services and better prepare youth with disabilities to transition from school into integrated employment in the community.  The MOU focuses on students age 14 years and over and aims to ensure all youth with disabilities leaving secondary education are prepared for either post-secondary training and/or integrated employment appropriate for their preferences, interests, skills and abilities.  “It’s vitally important that all state agencies work together to make sure youth with disabilities leave school and have the opportunity to contribute to the workforce,” Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) Commissioner Debra Payne said.  “It takes a team effort to make sure they have the training and support necessary to make that happen."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Interagency Agreement Regarding IDEA - 07/01/2012

“The purpose of this Agreement is to identify and define the financial responsibilities of the Parties to this Agreement and to facilitate the provision and coordination of services for all infants, toddlers, children, youth and adults who are IDEA eligible. This Agreement formalizes policies, procedures, and fiscal responsibilities of the parties relating to IDEA.” 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Employment Consortium - 06/01/2007

“The Tennessee Employment Consortium (TEC) is a statewide organization focused on increasing the number of Tennesseans in integrated employment. The consortium comprises volunteers from the state's Division of Mental Retardation Services (DMRS) and Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Tennessee Council on Developmental Disabilities, the ARC of Tennessee, the Center on Disability and Employment at the University of Tennessee, community rehabilitation providers (CRPs), family members, and other stakeholders. TEC's ability to organize collaborative activities across state agencies, advocacy organizations, and CRPs has played an important role in increasing integrated employment outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance - 05/01/2007

~~“The Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance was formed in May 2007 to increase awareness about the need for postsecondary opportunities in Tennessee, to gather information about postsecondary programs in other states, and to develop a pilot program on a Tennessee college campus. “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “Our partnership is focused on helping: Self-Advocates to aspire toward competitive work; Employers to recognize the contributions people with disabilities can make in the workplace; Educators to prepare young people with disabilities with strong skills and opportunities; Families to communicate high expectations from an early age; and State Systems and Disability Agencies to support real work for real pay.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

The ARC Tennessee

~~“ The Arc Tennessee is a grassroots, non-profit, statewide advocacy organization for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. Founded in 1952, The Arc Tennessee is affiliated with The Arc United States and works collaboratively with local chapters across the state.The Arc Tennessee values diversity and does not discriminate based on race, ethnicity, religion, age, geographic location, sexual orientation, gender, level of disability or Limited English Proficiency.Our MissionThe Arc Tennessee empowers people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families to actively participate in the community throughout their lifetime.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Tennessee Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) - 10/01/2011

“The TDEI project will replicate and improve upon the experience of the Disability Navigator Program (DPN) active in the nine (9) participating WIBs [Workforce Investment Boards]. The DPN Initiative provided a bridge between One-Stop Career Center staff, private and public partners, and the disability community. Each participating WIB will be responsible for tailoring a basic set of services to the needs of their local population with disabilities, as well as potential employers. Three (3) WIBs will offer services to customers with disabilities in primarily rural areas. The TDEI will rely on the states two Work Incentives Planning and Assistance service providers to assist it to work with Social Security disability beneficiaries.” The grant ended in 2014.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

TN Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“Through the EFSLMP Tennessee seeks to increase the number of adults and youth with significant disabilities in the state who are working in competitive, integrated employment. Leaders in the state are specifically looking to align departmental policies for coordination of integrated employment services. They are also intending to increase the use of customized employment strategies by service providers as well as to cultivate a better understanding of and use of work incentives available to individuals receiving Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability Income. Their proposal also includes strong involvement of the One-Stop Career Centers. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) will be the lead agency for this grant.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AIDD Partnerships in Employment

TennesseeWorks Partnership: Changing the Employment Landscape“The Vanderbilt Kennedy University Center for Excellence in DevelopmentalDisabilities and 28 agencies and organizations will develop a vibrant collaborativeacross the state to increase the number of young people accessing competitiveemployment prior to leaving high school; increase the capacity and commitmentamong families and practitioners to support competitive employment and careerdevelopment; raise expectations among youth, families, educators and providers;reallocate resources and funding streams toward competitive employment; andincrease the number of families and educators accessing professional development,resources, and supports addressing competitive employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Guide for Provider Transformation to an Employment First Service Model - 06/15/2016

~~Transition to an Employment First Service Model Guide is issuedOrganizations that are successful in their transformation to an Employment First provider agency share three elements, all of which should be addressed:1. Strategy:  What will you do?2. Structure:  Who does it?3. Systems:  How will your agency do it?

An understanding of these elements can give a framework for an agency to understandwhat parts of the organization need to be changed. In order to help agencies decide what to change, an Agency Assessment is provided in the Appendices.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Readiness program (ERP)

The focus of the Employment Readiness Program (ERP) is to prepare students in areas of employment and life skills. The ERP curriculum-based course spans 14 weeks and includes individualized and group format instruction and community based hands-on experience in a variety of work environments.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment and Individuals With Disabilities

This sheet contains tips and resources related to customized and supported employment in relation to Tennessee Disability Pathfinder and TennesseeWorks.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Employment First Trainings

MG&A articles & presentations on Customized Employment and Discovery from the TDI&DD website.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

Basic Rights: Training on IDEA Parent’s Introduction to Special Education Workshop

This workshop is designed for professionals and parents of children in special education or that might need special education. Come and gain a working knowledge of special education laws, including your role in the development of an appropriate education program (IEP) and how to be an effective partner with the school team in the process.  
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy, Education and Employment

“ Support for diversity and inclusion is a value at the core of the Center for Literacy, Education and Employment (CLEE). In addition, we determine the direction of our work by listening to and learning from practitioners, policymakers, business leaders and community leaders, as well as the academic community. As a result, the Center has a long history of involvement in advocacy efforts in the fields of literacy, education and employment, particularly those focused on supporting ALL individuals to flourish in an increasingly complex and interconnected world.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Customized Employment Partnership 2004

“The Tennessee Olmstead WorkFORCE Partnership (Working for Freedom Opportunity and Real Choice through Community Employment) is pleased to announce the availability of up to $75,000 per year per grantee for three years (a total award of $225,000 per grantee) to develop the capacity of at least one of their Career Centers to create “Tennessee Customized Employment Partnership” (TCEP) Hubs to provide customized employment services to people with significant disabilities. Funding is contingent upon continued appropriation from the federal government. Through an application process, up to three awards will be made. This project is supported by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability & Employment Policy (ODEP) through a grant to The Arc of Tennessee.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“Through the EFSLMP Tennessee seeks to increase the number of adults and youth with significant disabilities in the state who are working in competitive, integrated employment. Leaders in the state are specifically looking to align departmental policies for coordination of integrated employment services. They are also intending to increase the use of customized employment strategies by service providers as well as to cultivate a better understanding of and use of work incentives available to individuals receiving Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability Income. Their proposal also includes strong involvement of the One-Stop Career Centers. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) will be the lead agency for this grant.”

NOTE: Tennessee is using resources from the EFLSMP to provide training and capacity building to large workshops in the state. The capacity building includes customized employment and alternative sources of funding to providers, including becoming an Employment Network of the Ticket to Work Program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “This new website is an online resource for those in our state committed to these goals. [You can] [s]elect your role… to find comprehensive information, trainings, videos, success stories, and many other resources to equip, inform, and inspire your work.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Clover Bottom, Greene Valley, and Nat T. Winston Developmental Centers - Memorandum Approving Exit Plan (2015) - 01/29/2015

To effectively facilitate reform in mental health services, the Court cannot allow “perfect to become the enemy of good” nor allow the concepts of federalism and separation of powers to be ignored. The Court concludes that the Exit Plan presented by the Parties is “fair, reasonable, and adequate” and provides the next iteration of improvement to the lives of those with disabilities in Tennessee. It will test political will and legislative leadership to continue that progress and to determine how best to care for those often left in the shadows.    For the reasons detailed above, the Court will grant the unopposed joint motion seeking approval of an Exit Plan (Docket No. 1118-1) and entry of a proposed Agreed Order (Docket No. 1118-2). The Motion to Intervene brought by conservators of GVDC residents and Citizens for a Better Tennessee (Docket No. 1121) will be denied. .  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Tennessee Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan (11/2015) Amended Based on Public Comment (2/2016) - 07/31/2018

~~1915 (c) waiver settings assessed included:• Residential Habilitation• Employment and Day (Community and Facility Based Day, In-home Day, and Supported Employment)• Family Model Residential Support• Medical Residential Services• Supported Living

1115 CHOICES waiver settings assessed included:•Adult Day Care•Assisted Care Living Facility•Critical Adult Care Home

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment and Community First CHOICES (Employment Program) - 07/01/2016

~~The Employment and Community First CHOICES program is administered by TennCare through its contracted managed care organizations.  It offers services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  Services in the program will help people become employed and live as independently as possible in the community.  All new enrollment is in the Employment and Community First CHOICES program, as DIDD’s waivers are closed to new enrollment.

There is a limited amount of funding available to serve people each year.  That means not everyone who wants to apply can enroll or get services right away.." 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee State Plan Amendment (SPA) 16-0001 (approved 3-22-2016) - 03/22/2016

The State covers low-income families and children for Transitional Medical Assistance (TMA) under section 1925 of the Social Security Act (the Act). This coverage is provided for families who no longer qualify under section 1931 of the Act due to increased earned income, or working hours, from the caretaker relative’s employment, or due to the loss of a time-limited earned income disregard. (1902(a)(52), 1902(e)(1), and 1925 of the Act)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Tennessee Medicaid State Plan

Tennessee’s full state plan for TennCare, Tennessee’s Medicaid Program.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Tennessee 1915(c) Home and Community Based Service "Self Determination Waiver Program "

The Self-Determination Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive, integrated settings and engage in community life. Services are delivered in a manner which ensures each individual’s rights of privacy, dignity, respect and freedom from coercion and restraint; optimizes individual initiative, autonomy, and independence in making life choices; and are delivered in a manner that comports fully with standards applicable to HCBS settings delivered under Section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act…  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

TN The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02)

~~“The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02) serves children and adults with intellectual disabilities and children under age six with developmental delay who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the Self-Determination waiver, would require placement in a private ICF/IID.

The Self-Determination Waiver Program affords persons supported the opportunity to directly manage selected services, including the recruitment and management of service providers. Participants and families (as appropriate) electing self-direction are empowered and have the responsibility for managing, in accordance with waiver service definitions and limitations, a self-determination budget affording flexibility in service design and delivery. The Self-Determination Waiver Program serves persons who have an established non-institutional place of residence where they live with their family, a non-related caregiver or in their own home and whose needs can be met effectively by the combination of waiver services through this program and natural and other supports available to them. The Self-Determination Waiver does not include residential services such as supported living.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap Waiver (#0357.R03)

~~“The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap (CAC) Waiver (#0357.R03), formerly known as the Arlington Waiver, serves individuals with intellectual disabilities who are former members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Arlington Developmental Center), current members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Clover Bottom Developmental Center), and individuals transitioned from the Statewide Waiver (#0128) upon its renewal on January 1, 2015, because they were identified by the state as receiving services in excess of the individual cost neutrality cap established for the Statewide Waiver. These are individuals who have been institutionalized in a public institution, are part of a certified class because they were determined to be at risk of placement in a public institution, or have significant services/support needs consistent with that of the population served in a public ICF/IID and who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the CAC waiver, would require placement in an ICF/IID.

The CAC Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings and engage in community life.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee Statewide Waiver (0128.R05)

~~“The Statewide Waiver (0128.R05) serves adults with intellectual disabilities and children under age six with developmental delay who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the Statewide Waiver, would require placement in a private Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID).

The Statewide Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each person supported pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings and engage in community life “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

TN Money Follows the Person (MFP)

“Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a federally funded grant awarded to TennCare with the purpose of assisting the state to transition people from nursing homes and institutions to home and community based care, and to also assist the state to rebalance their long term care expenditures.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Tennessee is the Volunteer State, and its outstanding Employment First initiatives for individuals with disabilities show why this state exemplifies "America at its Best!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Tennessee’s VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
0.77%
Change from
2015 to 2016
6,651,194
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.46%
Change from
2015 to 2016
558,852
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.12%
Change from
2015 to 2016
174,370
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.69%
Change from
2015 to 2016
31.20%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.17%
Change from
2015 to 2016
76.09%

State Data

General

2014 2015 2016
Population. 6,549,352 6,600,299 6,651,194
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 563,863 550,696 558,852
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 168,683 167,179 174,370
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,557,629 2,632,997 2,640,999
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 29.92% 30.36% 31.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.41% 75.96% 76.09%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.70% 5.60% 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 26.10% 24.10% 22.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.90% 15.40% 14.60%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 483,056 489,181 486,269
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 529,442 519,602 529,763
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 815,721 821,098 829,448
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 161,345 150,942 149,092
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 19,799 23,298 21,457
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,255 4,147 4,255
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,347 7,211 8,863
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 568
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 19,929 19,638 18,165
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 4,332 5,212 4,641

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,508 4,813 4,932
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.60% 2.80% 2.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 252,231 251,021 249,055

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,075 10,107 12,330
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 21,113 23,774 27,376
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 43,402 47,093 54,059
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 18.60% 21.50% 22.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.30% 0.30%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.80% 0.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 0.30% 0.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 35.90% 30.60% 51.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,014 503 484
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,026 1,368 1,150
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 318 423 232
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 52,191 51,242 92,792

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,806 8,544 9,133
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 108 95 87
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 59 70 55
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 74.00% 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.91 1.06 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,369
3,648
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 202 282 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 244 272 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,039 794 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,445 1,160 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,250 992 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 189 148 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 28.10% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,455 7,463 7,728
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 371,708 370,137 366,628
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 473 409 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,372,000 $11,247,000 $11,124,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $24,128,000 $24,012,000 $23,338,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $64,877,000 $58,460,000 $52,890,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 19.00% 19.00% 18.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 6,464 6,667 6,257
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 N/A 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,745 3,742 3,408
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 20.40 20.50 19.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.07% 70.06% 70.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.27% 10.74% 11.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.76% 1.79% 1.78%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 73.68% 71.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 21.27% 22.10% 33.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 55.59% 58.22% 64.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.70% 69.26% 73.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.32% 36.12% 30.50%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 871,430
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,411
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 56,166
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 136,631
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 192,797
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 86
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 190
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 276
AbilityOne wages (products). $490,797
AbilityOne wages (services). $1,584,403

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 62 37 44
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 2 5
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 64 39 49
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,999 1,760 2,356
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 42 11 46
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,041 1,771 2,402

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

One-Stop Design and Delivery: The increased use of technology allows the Tennessee Workforce System to seamlessly integrate services, system and program changes in accordance with WIOA. The connection in Jobs4TN and VOS leverage the case management processes for all participants and programs that are involved in WIOA implementation across the state. The efficiencies realized with the common intake process and reporting will enable all programs and partners included in this Combined State Plan to mutually benefit from electronic referrals and reporting and coordinate services and tracking of co-enrolled participants, to name a few. Additionally, the centralized and coordinated efforts from all program partners eases the communication and engagement of job seekers, employers, local government support, community partners, and additional external clients. As it pertains to individuals with disabilities, Tennessee serves as an Employment First state, allowing seamless integration and support for this hard to serve population. (Page 41)    

Tennessee is an Employment First State, and there is an established Employment First Task Force. The Employment First Task force facilitated the completion of a Memorandum of Understanding for services to youth with disabilities between the following State agencies:

  • Vocational Rehabilitation
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Labor and Workforce Development
  • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
  • Council on Developmental Disabilities (Oversees the Implementation of the MOU) (Page 206)       
Customized Employment

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry.    (Page 203)                                                                                                                          

Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school and after-school opportunities and experiences outside of the traditional school settings. Examples of Work-Based Learning Experiences include On-the-Job Trainings, Apprenticeships, Internships, Summer Work Experiences, Work-Based Trainings, Job Search Assistance, Job Placement Assistance, On-the-Job Supports and Customized Employment. (Page 205)                                          

Continuing the practice of ensuring the availability of appropriate training activities and resources to meet the individualized needs of clients by seeking out and developing partnerships with other private and public entities to provide specialized education and training activities, to include those that can be provided through self-employment, on-the-job-training by employers, and customized employment. (Page 239)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/DRC

Providing cross training to the career center staff in regard to meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. Continue to provide consultation on career center accessibility and accommodation needs in regard to the accessibility needs in the building(s), and accommodations in terms of appropriate technology needed to serve individuals with the disabilities. Continue to partner with the American Job Centers (AJCs) in employment initiatives such as the summer youth employment project and the DEI grant. (Pages 240-241)

Competitive Integrated Employment

All SCSEP participants are required to develop an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) at the time of enrollment. The IEP serves as a personal road-map to success and is designed to specifically assist the participant in meeting both personal and program goals. Each participant receives specialized training that fits under his or her IEP and is assigned to a host agency to develop or improve skills. The plan also determines if the Host Agency has met the participant’s requirements. In addition, the Host Agency provides services to low-income older persons, to the economically disadvantaged and to organizations offering services which provide positive contributions to the welfare of the general community. Opportunities to serve other groups will also be provided through placement in schools, day-care programs, health and hospital programs, and agencies serving individuals with physical and developmental disabilities. (Page 385)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

In addition, although many of the SCSEP participants need or want to work they may be long-term consumers of government assistance programs for income or other supports. The finding is recipients of these government assistance programs such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Disability Insurance or Housing and Urban Development (HUD) never leaves, especially for employment, once on these programs. Even when there is an opportunity for the individual to move off government assistance into economic self-sufficiency, there is fear that if government assistance is needed again the process is so long and tedious it will not be available. SCSEP then becomes just a program to supplement the income of those participants receiving benefits from these programs. (Page 397)

Economic self-sufficiency through leveraging of all resources including tax incentives, financial education, social security work incentives, benefits planning, and other strategies to enhance profitable employment. The use of a universal design as a framework for the organization of employment policy and services in Tennessee. Customized and other flexible work options for individuals with disabilities. The assurance that the structural and technological accessibility of all AJC’s for persons with disabilities who are seeking employment services is further enhanced by participation in disability awareness/sensitivity training to assist AJC staff to understand how to provide quality employment services for this targeted population. The concept immediately increased the use of AJC by persons with disabilities. Outreach and education also increased throughout the centers. (Page 123)

  • Tennessee Disability Coalition Benefits to Work (Page 201)
Career Pathways

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

Tennessee will compete Section 225 according to the narrative set forth in (5)(B)(i). The grants awarded may be for up to 20% of the available federal dollars as set forth in section 222(a)(1).  The funds described in section 225(a) shall be used for the cost of educational programs for criminal offenders in correctional institutions and for other institutionalized individuals, including academic programs for:

  1. adult education and literacy activities;
  2. special education, as determined by the agency;
  3. secondary school credit;
  4. integrated education and training;
  5. career pathways;
  6. concurrent enrollment;
  7. peer tutoring; and
  8. transition to re-entry initiatives and other post release services with the goal of reducing recidivism. (Page 174) 

This will be done by having by eligible providers partnering with their local AJC for the referral of potential students; there, students will be assisted in building a resume and creating an account in Jobs4TN. Eligible providers will also refer students completing the program to the Tennessee Career Center for career information and job placement. Eligible providers will refer eligible students completing the program to the Local Workforce Board or Vocational Rehabilitation as set forth in this State Plan; this will include the development of career pathways to provide access to employment and training services for individuals in adult education and literacy activities. (Page 177)

Employer Engagement

The Division will continue to encourage CRPs to become Employment Networks as possible funding source for on-going support needs. The Division will continue to train CRPs and VR staff to increase usage of SSA PASS plan.

The Division will assure that funds are made available will only be used to provide Supported Employment services to individuals who are eligible to receive such services. (Page 249)

511

The department’s web-based Virtual One-Stop System (VOS) is the most advanced and comprehensive statewide workforce development information and reporting system available today. Using a set of core proprietary software components created by Geographic Solutions Inc., the department and its partners have modernized and integrated workforce services into a single computing platform referred to as Jobs4TN. Working from the WIOA statutes, we have moved forward with establishing needed data points in our systems, such as those spelled out in the draft PIRL, data specifications, and the Section 188 NPRM. (Page 96)  

 Our goal is to carry out all data-collection and reporting processes under this plan using a single virtual system, specifically, the Jobs4TN system which is being deployed by Geographic Solutions, Inc., TDLWD’s system of record for workforce data across all core programs. And to the extent possible, recognizing cost and infrastructure limitations, also to be deployed for certain mandatory and optional partners as WIOA takes shape in the future. (Page 96)

Information such as the FEIN, is founded in compliance with confidentiality provisions in 20 CFR Section 603, as well as in accordance with the emerging requirements of the SWIS (State Wage Interchange System) data sharing agreement. TEGL 7-16, Data Matching to Facilitate WIOA Performance Reporting, also is being used to guide the process and direction of partnership agreements, similar to MOUs, which define, if needed, authorized data share staff among program and IT staff of the TN agencies noted above. (Page 119)

Mental Health

REGION AND LOCAL LEVEL ACCOUNTABILITY

Tennessee’s workforce development system, both regional and local, requires that programs and providers co-locate, coordinate, and integrate activities and information, so that the system is cohesive and accessible for individuals and businesses alike. Accountability goals increase the long-term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment; to improve services to employers; and to demonstrate continuous improvement. The certification policy is the foundation to aligning programs, policies, and activities in the State’s Workforce System. This policy will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) and will undergird continuous improvement of one stop centers. It specifies minimum standards for the service menu and customer service to be met and branding requirements that demonstrate a statewide Workforce System. This certification process will demonstrate that the local workforce development boards can ensure that employment and training programs in their communities operate at the highest level of quality and consistency, while satisfying the expectations and needs of their customers. (Page 106)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Physical accessibility for people with disabilities was implemented and upgraded with the assistance of Tennessee Department Human Services (DHS) - Vocational Rehabilitation Program. Tennessee will be undergoing an accessibility study to ensure all AJC’s can be accessed. (Page 123)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Annual Report 2018 - 10/01/2018

~The  Department  of  Intellectual  and  Developmental  Disabilities  (DIDD)  is  the  state department  responsible  for  administration  and  oversight  of  community-based services  for  Tennesseans  with  intellectual  and  developmental  disabilities.  The department  operates  with  more  than  1,400  state  employees  and  400  community providers to serve approximately 7,800 people with intellectual disabilities through ts  Home  and  Community  Based  Waivers  and  4,500  people  through  the  Family Support  Program.    It  also  operates  38  Intermediate  Care  Facilities  for  Individuals with  Intellectual  Disabilities  (ICF/IID)  program  including  the  Harold  Jordan  Center, and three seating and positioning clinics across Tennessee.DIDD strives to support people with disabilities to live fulfilling and rewarding lives and become the nation’s most person-centered and cost-effective state support system for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Services (ages 14-24) - 09/12/2018

~~Title I of WIOA affirms the Department of Labor’s (DOL) commitment to providing high-quality services for youth (age 14-24), beginning with career exploration and guidance, continued support for educational attainment, opportunities for skills training, such as pre-apprenticeships or internships, for in-demand industries and occupations, and culminating with employment, enrollment in postsecondary education, or a Registered Apprenticeship.

To be eligible for Youth Services, an individual must meet specific requirements related to age and income and school statuses that result in an employment barrier. Program participation is assessed by distinct for in-school youth (ISY) or out-of-school youth (OSY)…..ISY must be:a. 14-21 years of ageb. Attending secondary or post-secondary schoolc. Low-income…

7.Individual with a disability

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Notice of Change in TennCare II Demonstration: Amendment 37 - 09/05/2018

~~Amendment 37 also includes a number of other adjustments to ECF CHOICES based  on  learnings  from  the  first  two  years  of  the  program’s  implementation. The otherchanges to the ECF CHOICES program proposed in Amendment 37 are:•Modifying   the   Expenditure   Caps   for   the   existing   ECF   CHOICES   Groups   5   and   6. These modifications will give  the  State  additional flexibility to target services  based  on  a  person’s identified   needs   and   will enhance access to Supported Employment and/or Individual Employment Support benefits.•Expanding the existing exception for persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES Group 6 from one of the State’s 1915(c) waiver programs and who are “at risk” of institutionalization to also apply to persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES from an Intermediate Care Facilityfor Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities.•Clarifying that a person who meets the nursing facility level of care criteria may be enrolled in ECF CHOICES Group 5 so long as the person’s needs can be safely met in Group 5.•Modifications and clarifications to certain ECF CHOICES service definitions. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DIDD Launches State Employment Mentorship Program - 08/02/2018

~~‘The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) launched a new mentorship program today, designed to leverage in-state employment expertise to increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities in Tennessee for years to come.

The focus of the Tennessee Employment First Leadership Initiative (TEFLI) is to provide consultation and mentoring to intellectual and developmental disability providers around the state as they transition people with disabilities from sheltered workshops to competitive integrated employment opportunities in the community. Persons who work at sheltered workshops typically make subminimum wage, as opposed to earning minimum wage or higher in community employment.’

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Tennessee Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan (11/2015) Amended Based on Public Comment (2/2016) - 07/31/2018

~~1915 (c) waiver settings assessed included:• Residential Habilitation• Employment and Day (Community and Facility Based Day, In-home Day, and Supported Employment)• Family Model Residential Support• Medical Residential Services• Supported Living

1115 CHOICES waiver settings assessed included:•Adult Day Care•Assisted Care Living Facility•Critical Adult Care Home

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Strategic Plan 2018 Goals - 07/01/2018

~~1) Align service delivery systems and strengthen coordination to increase employment opportunities for Tennesseans with disabilities (#Data #Coordination #WIOA #Policy #Legislation #Workforce)2) Build shared community commitment to Employment First (#Self-Advocates #Families #Community #Communication)3) Increase the number of employers that hire people with disabilities (#Businesses)4) Make Tennessee state government a model employer of people with disabilities (#Government #Leadership)5) Prepare students for employment and post-secondary success (#Education #Transition) 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

TennCare Long Term Care Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“Job Development or Self-Employment Start Up.  For purposes of ECF CHOICES only and limited to members age 16 or older: (a) This is a time-limited service designed to implement a Job Development or Self Employment Plan as follows: 1.  Job Development is support to obtain an individualized competitive or customized job in an integrated employment setting in the general workforce, for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but ideally not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals without disabilities. The Job Development strategy should reflect best practices and be adjusted based on whether the individual is seeking competitive or customized employment. 2.  Self-Employment Start Up is support in implementing a self-employment business plan. The outcome of this service is expected to be the achievement of an individualized integrated employment or self-employment outcome consistent with the individual’s personal and career goals, as determined through Exploration, Discovery and/or the Situational Observation and Assessment, if authorized, and as identified in the Job Development or Self-Employment Plan that guides the delivery of this service.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

FY 2019 Provider Rate Increase FAQ's - 06/13/2018

~~During the past legislative session, Governor Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly dedicated approximately $50 million in state and federal dollars towards a rate increase for providers contracted with the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.  The legislation clearly states the funds are for the sole purpose of increasing the Direct Support Professional (DSP) staff salary component in the DIDD provider rate methodology, with a legislative intent to increase the hourly wages of DSPs at DIDD contracted provider agencies.

The legislation clearly states the funding is intended to increase the wages of direct support professionals.  Each provider agency will need to determine the best strategy to honor the legislative intent.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Expect Employment 2017: TN Employment First Task Force Report to the Governor - 08/01/2017

“Over the course of the fiscal year, several task force members completed major objectives in the strategic plan. Those include the implementation of the Employment and Community First CHOICES program and launch of the Transition Tennessee site. In addition, several agencies operationalized Memorandums of Understanding to further streamline services for people whose support needs may overlap two or more state agencies. The task force has also brought in new members and agencies, including the Department of Health. In an effort to bolster employer outreach, the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development joined the task force and embraced its mission wholeheartedly.

This year’s Expect Employment Report documents the task force’s successes goal by goal, objective by objective. It is clear reading through the report that collaboration has allowed for change to happen more quickly. In addition, throughout the report are the stories of real people who have been positively impacted by the programs and policies developed through the work of state agencies, task force members, and partner organizations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

TN Special Education Framework - 08/01/2017

“The purpose of the Special Education Framework is to support educators in writing instructionally appropriate IEPs. Several years ago, the department developed the first Special Education Framework and has continuously garnered feedback from educators on how to improve the framework in order to be most useful to teachers as they support students with disabilities.

The framework is now organized into two sections: (I) general information about special education and (II) writing IEPs. Other significant improvements include a component on the development of writing short-term objectives, additional clarification around service delivery, and links to resources for the IEP team. Looking ahead, the next revision of the framework will include a third section on the implementation of IEPs—with a clear delineation between best practices and legal requirements.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Tennessee HB 1276: Supporting Business Owners with Disabilities - 06/06/2017

“As enacted, adds "businesses owned by persons with disabilities" to the Tennessee Minority-Owned, Woman-Owned and Small Business Procurement and Contracting Act; requires that the annual report made by the chief procurement officer concerning the awarding of purchases to minority-owned business, woman-owned business, service-disabled veteran-owned business, or small business and the total value of awards made also include the total dollar amount of purchases awarded to all businesses in this state”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

"Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee HB 896/SB 429 (ABLE) - 02/05/2015

The purpose of this bill is to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence,  and quality of life; and (2) To provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of individuals with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the supplemental security income program under Title XVI of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C.§§ 1381 et seq.);the TennCare programs under Title XIX of the Social Security Act, (42 U.S.C. §§1396 et seq.); or any successor to the TennCare program administered pursuant to the federal Medicaid laws, the individual’s employment, and other sources  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee Title Code 67

A job tax credit of five thousand dollars ($5,000) for each net new full-time employee job, and two thousand dollars ($2,000) for each net new part-time employee job, for a person with disabilities who is receiving state services directly related to such disabilities, shall be allowed against a taxpayer's franchise and excise liability tax for that year; provided, that:            (A)  The employment of such individual creates a net increase in the number of persons with disabilities employed by the taxpayer within the ninety-day period immediately preceding the employment;            (B)  The taxpayer provides such employment for at least twelve (12) consecutive months and for no less than the minimal hours per week; and for employees enrolled in the minimal health care benefits described in subdivision (g)(1), for respective full-time employment jobs and part-time employment jobs;   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Governor’s Executive Order Order Establishing The Tennessee Employment First I - 06/19/2013

“NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Haslam, Governor of the State of Tennessee… do hereby order and direct the following:

1. State agencies coordinate efforts to increase opportunities for integrated and competitive employment for Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental illnesses, substance abuse disorders and other disabilities.2. The Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities convene an Employment First Taskforce (“Taskforce”).3 The Taskforce shall consist of representatives from the agencies administering disability services, family members of persons receiving employment services, vocational rehabilitation, workforce services and education, as well as consumer advocates and third party disability services providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Annual Report 2018 - 10/01/2018

~The  Department  of  Intellectual  and  Developmental  Disabilities  (DIDD)  is  the  state department  responsible  for  administration  and  oversight  of  community-based services  for  Tennesseans  with  intellectual  and  developmental  disabilities.  The department  operates  with  more  than  1,400  state  employees  and  400  community providers to serve approximately 7,800 people with intellectual disabilities through ts  Home  and  Community  Based  Waivers  and  4,500  people  through  the  Family Support  Program.    It  also  operates  38  Intermediate  Care  Facilities  for  Individuals with  Intellectual  Disabilities  (ICF/IID)  program  including  the  Harold  Jordan  Center, and three seating and positioning clinics across Tennessee.DIDD strives to support people with disabilities to live fulfilling and rewarding lives and become the nation’s most person-centered and cost-effective state support system for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Services (ages 14-24) - 09/12/2018

~~Title I of WIOA affirms the Department of Labor’s (DOL) commitment to providing high-quality services for youth (age 14-24), beginning with career exploration and guidance, continued support for educational attainment, opportunities for skills training, such as pre-apprenticeships or internships, for in-demand industries and occupations, and culminating with employment, enrollment in postsecondary education, or a Registered Apprenticeship.

To be eligible for Youth Services, an individual must meet specific requirements related to age and income and school statuses that result in an employment barrier. Program participation is assessed by distinct for in-school youth (ISY) or out-of-school youth (OSY)…..ISY must be:a. 14-21 years of ageb. Attending secondary or post-secondary schoolc. Low-income…

7.Individual with a disability

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Notice of Change in TennCare II Demonstration: Amendment 37 - 09/05/2018

~~Amendment 37 also includes a number of other adjustments to ECF CHOICES based  on  learnings  from  the  first  two  years  of  the  program’s  implementation. The otherchanges to the ECF CHOICES program proposed in Amendment 37 are:•Modifying   the   Expenditure   Caps   for   the   existing   ECF   CHOICES   Groups   5   and   6. These modifications will give  the  State  additional flexibility to target services  based  on  a  person’s identified   needs   and   will enhance access to Supported Employment and/or Individual Employment Support benefits.•Expanding the existing exception for persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES Group 6 from one of the State’s 1915(c) waiver programs and who are “at risk” of institutionalization to also apply to persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES from an Intermediate Care Facilityfor Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities.•Clarifying that a person who meets the nursing facility level of care criteria may be enrolled in ECF CHOICES Group 5 so long as the person’s needs can be safely met in Group 5.•Modifications and clarifications to certain ECF CHOICES service definitions. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DIDD Launches State Employment Mentorship Program - 08/02/2018

~~‘The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) launched a new mentorship program today, designed to leverage in-state employment expertise to increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities in Tennessee for years to come.

The focus of the Tennessee Employment First Leadership Initiative (TEFLI) is to provide consultation and mentoring to intellectual and developmental disability providers around the state as they transition people with disabilities from sheltered workshops to competitive integrated employment opportunities in the community. Persons who work at sheltered workshops typically make subminimum wage, as opposed to earning minimum wage or higher in community employment.’

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Employment First Strategic Plan 2018 Goals - 07/01/2018

~~1) Align service delivery systems and strengthen coordination to increase employment opportunities for Tennesseans with disabilities (#Data #Coordination #WIOA #Policy #Legislation #Workforce)2) Build shared community commitment to Employment First (#Self-Advocates #Families #Community #Communication)3) Increase the number of employers that hire people with disabilities (#Businesses)4) Make Tennessee state government a model employer of people with disabilities (#Government #Leadership)5) Prepare students for employment and post-secondary success (#Education #Transition) 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

TennCare Long Term Care Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“Job Development or Self-Employment Start Up.  For purposes of ECF CHOICES only and limited to members age 16 or older: (a) This is a time-limited service designed to implement a Job Development or Self Employment Plan as follows: 1.  Job Development is support to obtain an individualized competitive or customized job in an integrated employment setting in the general workforce, for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but ideally not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals without disabilities. The Job Development strategy should reflect best practices and be adjusted based on whether the individual is seeking competitive or customized employment. 2.  Self-Employment Start Up is support in implementing a self-employment business plan. The outcome of this service is expected to be the achievement of an individualized integrated employment or self-employment outcome consistent with the individual’s personal and career goals, as determined through Exploration, Discovery and/or the Situational Observation and Assessment, if authorized, and as identified in the Job Development or Self-Employment Plan that guides the delivery of this service.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

FY 2019 Provider Rate Increase FAQ's - 06/13/2018

~~During the past legislative session, Governor Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly dedicated approximately $50 million in state and federal dollars towards a rate increase for providers contracted with the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.  The legislation clearly states the funds are for the sole purpose of increasing the Direct Support Professional (DSP) staff salary component in the DIDD provider rate methodology, with a legislative intent to increase the hourly wages of DSPs at DIDD contracted provider agencies.

The legislation clearly states the funding is intended to increase the wages of direct support professionals.  Each provider agency will need to determine the best strategy to honor the legislative intent.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Expect Employment 2017: TN Employment First Task Force Report to the Governor - 08/01/2017

“Over the course of the fiscal year, several task force members completed major objectives in the strategic plan. Those include the implementation of the Employment and Community First CHOICES program and launch of the Transition Tennessee site. In addition, several agencies operationalized Memorandums of Understanding to further streamline services for people whose support needs may overlap two or more state agencies. The task force has also brought in new members and agencies, including the Department of Health. In an effort to bolster employer outreach, the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development joined the task force and embraced its mission wholeheartedly.

This year’s Expect Employment Report documents the task force’s successes goal by goal, objective by objective. It is clear reading through the report that collaboration has allowed for change to happen more quickly. In addition, throughout the report are the stories of real people who have been positively impacted by the programs and policies developed through the work of state agencies, task force members, and partner organizations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

TN Special Education Framework - 08/01/2017

“The purpose of the Special Education Framework is to support educators in writing instructionally appropriate IEPs. Several years ago, the department developed the first Special Education Framework and has continuously garnered feedback from educators on how to improve the framework in order to be most useful to teachers as they support students with disabilities.

The framework is now organized into two sections: (I) general information about special education and (II) writing IEPs. Other significant improvements include a component on the development of writing short-term objectives, additional clarification around service delivery, and links to resources for the IEP team. Looking ahead, the next revision of the framework will include a third section on the implementation of IEPs—with a clear delineation between best practices and legal requirements.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Workforce Services Policy – Co-Enrollment of American Job Center Customers - 05/12/2017

“The purpose of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) is to develop Tennessee’s workforce by encouraging access to education and skills training as they directly align with business needs. This policy introduces strategies to strengthen participant outcomes by increasing access to multiple services in order to benefit the long-term success of recipients. This simultaneous admission to programs is known as ‘co-enrollment’…

Individuals entering an American Job Center will be greeted with a “no wrong door” approach; the Tennessee Combined State Plan indicates that there is no incorrect entry point for an individual seeking services. During the first step a staff member will conduct a verbal assessment – mainly focused on the individual’s eligibility for WIOA Title I and III programs – that addresses barriers to employment, establishes priority of service, and identifies a disability that requires further resources. Using this assessment the staff member then offers guidance about the most appropriate next steps.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Memorandum of Understanding Between The Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and The State of Tennessee Bureau of TennCare, Division of Long Term Services and Supports - 03/20/2017

“This Memorandum is entered into and based upon the philosophy of Employment First which is based upon the premise that all citizens, including individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life. Because both VR and TennCare offer employment supports for people with disabilities, this Memorandum is intended to ensure that each agency provides those services to common customers in coordination with the other to ensure efficient use of resources and effective delivery of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee’s Independent Living & Developmental Disabilities Network: Joint Publication on Network Programs and Collaborations - 03/01/2017

“In September 2015, Tennessee agencies funded through the Developmental Disabilities Act and Tennessee’s Independent Living programs funded through the Rehabilitation Act met to begin strategic coordination among our organizations. Having been recently relocated to a new federal Administration on Disabilities, our programs had an opportunity to increase our impact in Tennessee by joining forces to address common goals. Together we established a shared priority: improving youth transition outcomes through postsecondary education and job training that leads to competitive and integrated employment. Since that time, our two networks continue to meet together to work on details of joint projects, including this publication!

We hope you find this publication informative and that you learn something new about the programs across Tennessee funded under the Independent Living Administration and the Developmental Disabilities Act. Please reach out to us to find ways that you can become involved in our work. We are always interested in hearing from Tennesseans with disabilities about your experiences in getting supports and services you need.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Memorandum of Understanding between DIDD and VR - 01/07/2016

On December 14, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Division of Rehabilitation Services, Vocational Rehabilitation Program and DIDD was finalized. In 2014, both agencies started discussing the option of creating an MOU through a Vision Quest workgroup (as part of the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program) spearheaded by two ODEP Subject Matter Experts: Dr. Stephen Hall and Sara Murphy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding for School-to-Work Transition - 08/05/2015

Five state agencies have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to improve services and better prepare youth with disabilities to transition from school into integrated employment in the community.  The MOU focuses on students age 14 years and over and aims to ensure all youth with disabilities leaving secondary education are prepared for either post-secondary training and/or integrated employment appropriate for their preferences, interests, skills and abilities.  “It’s vitally important that all state agencies work together to make sure youth with disabilities leave school and have the opportunity to contribute to the workforce,” Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) Commissioner Debra Payne said.  “It takes a team effort to make sure they have the training and support necessary to make that happen."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Interagency Agreement Regarding IDEA - 07/01/2012

“The purpose of this Agreement is to identify and define the financial responsibilities of the Parties to this Agreement and to facilitate the provision and coordination of services for all infants, toddlers, children, youth and adults who are IDEA eligible. This Agreement formalizes policies, procedures, and fiscal responsibilities of the parties relating to IDEA.” 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Employment Consortium - 06/01/2007

“The Tennessee Employment Consortium (TEC) is a statewide organization focused on increasing the number of Tennesseans in integrated employment. The consortium comprises volunteers from the state's Division of Mental Retardation Services (DMRS) and Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Tennessee Council on Developmental Disabilities, the ARC of Tennessee, the Center on Disability and Employment at the University of Tennessee, community rehabilitation providers (CRPs), family members, and other stakeholders. TEC's ability to organize collaborative activities across state agencies, advocacy organizations, and CRPs has played an important role in increasing integrated employment outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance - 05/01/2007

~~“The Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance was formed in May 2007 to increase awareness about the need for postsecondary opportunities in Tennessee, to gather information about postsecondary programs in other states, and to develop a pilot program on a Tennessee college campus. “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “Our partnership is focused on helping: Self-Advocates to aspire toward competitive work; Employers to recognize the contributions people with disabilities can make in the workplace; Educators to prepare young people with disabilities with strong skills and opportunities; Families to communicate high expectations from an early age; and State Systems and Disability Agencies to support real work for real pay.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

The ARC Tennessee

~~“ The Arc Tennessee is a grassroots, non-profit, statewide advocacy organization for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. Founded in 1952, The Arc Tennessee is affiliated with The Arc United States and works collaboratively with local chapters across the state.The Arc Tennessee values diversity and does not discriminate based on race, ethnicity, religion, age, geographic location, sexual orientation, gender, level of disability or Limited English Proficiency.Our MissionThe Arc Tennessee empowers people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families to actively participate in the community throughout their lifetime.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Tennessee Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) - 10/01/2011

“The TDEI project will replicate and improve upon the experience of the Disability Navigator Program (DPN) active in the nine (9) participating WIBs [Workforce Investment Boards]. The DPN Initiative provided a bridge between One-Stop Career Center staff, private and public partners, and the disability community. Each participating WIB will be responsible for tailoring a basic set of services to the needs of their local population with disabilities, as well as potential employers. Three (3) WIBs will offer services to customers with disabilities in primarily rural areas. The TDEI will rely on the states two Work Incentives Planning and Assistance service providers to assist it to work with Social Security disability beneficiaries.” The grant ended in 2014.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

TN Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“Through the EFSLMP Tennessee seeks to increase the number of adults and youth with significant disabilities in the state who are working in competitive, integrated employment. Leaders in the state are specifically looking to align departmental policies for coordination of integrated employment services. They are also intending to increase the use of customized employment strategies by service providers as well as to cultivate a better understanding of and use of work incentives available to individuals receiving Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability Income. Their proposal also includes strong involvement of the One-Stop Career Centers. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) will be the lead agency for this grant.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AIDD Partnerships in Employment

TennesseeWorks Partnership: Changing the Employment Landscape“The Vanderbilt Kennedy University Center for Excellence in DevelopmentalDisabilities and 28 agencies and organizations will develop a vibrant collaborativeacross the state to increase the number of young people accessing competitiveemployment prior to leaving high school; increase the capacity and commitmentamong families and practitioners to support competitive employment and careerdevelopment; raise expectations among youth, families, educators and providers;reallocate resources and funding streams toward competitive employment; andincrease the number of families and educators accessing professional development,resources, and supports addressing competitive employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Guide for Provider Transformation to an Employment First Service Model - 06/15/2016

~~Transition to an Employment First Service Model Guide is issuedOrganizations that are successful in their transformation to an Employment First provider agency share three elements, all of which should be addressed:1. Strategy:  What will you do?2. Structure:  Who does it?3. Systems:  How will your agency do it?

An understanding of these elements can give a framework for an agency to understandwhat parts of the organization need to be changed. In order to help agencies decide what to change, an Agency Assessment is provided in the Appendices.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Readiness program (ERP)

The focus of the Employment Readiness Program (ERP) is to prepare students in areas of employment and life skills. The ERP curriculum-based course spans 14 weeks and includes individualized and group format instruction and community based hands-on experience in a variety of work environments.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment and Individuals With Disabilities

This sheet contains tips and resources related to customized and supported employment in relation to Tennessee Disability Pathfinder and TennesseeWorks.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Employment First Trainings

MG&A articles & presentations on Customized Employment and Discovery from the TDI&DD website.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

Basic Rights: Training on IDEA Parent’s Introduction to Special Education Workshop

This workshop is designed for professionals and parents of children in special education or that might need special education. Come and gain a working knowledge of special education laws, including your role in the development of an appropriate education program (IEP) and how to be an effective partner with the school team in the process.  
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy, Education and Employment

“ Support for diversity and inclusion is a value at the core of the Center for Literacy, Education and Employment (CLEE). In addition, we determine the direction of our work by listening to and learning from practitioners, policymakers, business leaders and community leaders, as well as the academic community. As a result, the Center has a long history of involvement in advocacy efforts in the fields of literacy, education and employment, particularly those focused on supporting ALL individuals to flourish in an increasingly complex and interconnected world.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Customized Employment Partnership 2004

“The Tennessee Olmstead WorkFORCE Partnership (Working for Freedom Opportunity and Real Choice through Community Employment) is pleased to announce the availability of up to $75,000 per year per grantee for three years (a total award of $225,000 per grantee) to develop the capacity of at least one of their Career Centers to create “Tennessee Customized Employment Partnership” (TCEP) Hubs to provide customized employment services to people with significant disabilities. Funding is contingent upon continued appropriation from the federal government. Through an application process, up to three awards will be made. This project is supported by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability & Employment Policy (ODEP) through a grant to The Arc of Tennessee.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“Through the EFSLMP Tennessee seeks to increase the number of adults and youth with significant disabilities in the state who are working in competitive, integrated employment. Leaders in the state are specifically looking to align departmental policies for coordination of integrated employment services. They are also intending to increase the use of customized employment strategies by service providers as well as to cultivate a better understanding of and use of work incentives available to individuals receiving Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability Income. Their proposal also includes strong involvement of the One-Stop Career Centers. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) will be the lead agency for this grant.”

NOTE: Tennessee is using resources from the EFLSMP to provide training and capacity building to large workshops in the state. The capacity building includes customized employment and alternative sources of funding to providers, including becoming an Employment Network of the Ticket to Work Program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “This new website is an online resource for those in our state committed to these goals. [You can] [s]elect your role… to find comprehensive information, trainings, videos, success stories, and many other resources to equip, inform, and inspire your work.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Clover Bottom, Greene Valley, and Nat T. Winston Developmental Centers - Memorandum Approving Exit Plan (2015) - 01/29/2015

To effectively facilitate reform in mental health services, the Court cannot allow “perfect to become the enemy of good” nor allow the concepts of federalism and separation of powers to be ignored. The Court concludes that the Exit Plan presented by the Parties is “fair, reasonable, and adequate” and provides the next iteration of improvement to the lives of those with disabilities in Tennessee. It will test political will and legislative leadership to continue that progress and to determine how best to care for those often left in the shadows.    For the reasons detailed above, the Court will grant the unopposed joint motion seeking approval of an Exit Plan (Docket No. 1118-1) and entry of a proposed Agreed Order (Docket No. 1118-2). The Motion to Intervene brought by conservators of GVDC residents and Citizens for a Better Tennessee (Docket No. 1121) will be denied. .  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Tennessee Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan (11/2015) Amended Based on Public Comment (2/2016) - 07/31/2018

~~1915 (c) waiver settings assessed included:• Residential Habilitation• Employment and Day (Community and Facility Based Day, In-home Day, and Supported Employment)• Family Model Residential Support• Medical Residential Services• Supported Living

1115 CHOICES waiver settings assessed included:•Adult Day Care•Assisted Care Living Facility•Critical Adult Care Home

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment and Community First CHOICES (Employment Program) - 07/01/2016

~~The Employment and Community First CHOICES program is administered by TennCare through its contracted managed care organizations.  It offers services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  Services in the program will help people become employed and live as independently as possible in the community.  All new enrollment is in the Employment and Community First CHOICES program, as DIDD’s waivers are closed to new enrollment.

There is a limited amount of funding available to serve people each year.  That means not everyone who wants to apply can enroll or get services right away.." 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee State Plan Amendment (SPA) 16-0001 (approved 3-22-2016) - 03/22/2016

The State covers low-income families and children for Transitional Medical Assistance (TMA) under section 1925 of the Social Security Act (the Act). This coverage is provided for families who no longer qualify under section 1931 of the Act due to increased earned income, or working hours, from the caretaker relative’s employment, or due to the loss of a time-limited earned income disregard. (1902(a)(52), 1902(e)(1), and 1925 of the Act)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Tennessee Medicaid State Plan

Tennessee’s full state plan for TennCare, Tennessee’s Medicaid Program.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Tennessee 1915(c) Home and Community Based Service "Self Determination Waiver Program "

The Self-Determination Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive, integrated settings and engage in community life. Services are delivered in a manner which ensures each individual’s rights of privacy, dignity, respect and freedom from coercion and restraint; optimizes individual initiative, autonomy, and independence in making life choices; and are delivered in a manner that comports fully with standards applicable to HCBS settings delivered under Section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act…  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

TN The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02)

~~“The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02) serves children and adults with intellectual disabilities and children under age six with developmental delay who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the Self-Determination waiver, would require placement in a private ICF/IID.

The Self-Determination Waiver Program affords persons supported the opportunity to directly manage selected services, including the recruitment and management of service providers. Participants and families (as appropriate) electing self-direction are empowered and have the responsibility for managing, in accordance with waiver service definitions and limitations, a self-determination budget affording flexibility in service design and delivery. The Self-Determination Waiver Program serves persons who have an established non-institutional place of residence where they live with their family, a non-related caregiver or in their own home and whose needs can be met effectively by the combination of waiver services through this program and natural and other supports available to them. The Self-Determination Waiver does not include residential services such as supported living.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap Waiver (#0357.R03)

~~“The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap (CAC) Waiver (#0357.R03), formerly known as the Arlington Waiver, serves individuals with intellectual disabilities who are former members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Arlington Developmental Center), current members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Clover Bottom Developmental Center), and individuals transitioned from the Statewide Waiver (#0128) upon its renewal on January 1, 2015, because they were identified by the state as receiving services in excess of the individual cost neutrality cap established for the Statewide Waiver. These are individuals who have been institutionalized in a public institution, are part of a certified class because they were determined to be at risk of placement in a public institution, or have significant services/support needs consistent with that of the population served in a public ICF/IID and who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the CAC waiver, would require placement in an ICF/IID.

The CAC Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings and engage in community life.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee Statewide Waiver (0128.R05)

~~“The Statewide Waiver (0128.R05) serves adults with intellectual disabilities and children under age six with developmental delay who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the Statewide Waiver, would require placement in a private Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID).

The Statewide Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each person supported pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings and engage in community life “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

TN Money Follows the Person (MFP)

“Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a federally funded grant awarded to TennCare with the purpose of assisting the state to transition people from nursing homes and institutions to home and community based care, and to also assist the state to rebalance their long term care expenditures.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Tennessee is the Volunteer State, and its outstanding Employment First initiatives for individuals with disabilities show why this state exemplifies "America at its Best!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Tennessee’s VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
0.77%
Change from
2015 to 2016
6,651,194
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.46%
Change from
2015 to 2016
558,852
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.12%
Change from
2015 to 2016
174,370
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.69%
Change from
2015 to 2016
31.20%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.17%
Change from
2015 to 2016
76.09%

State Data

General

2014 2015 2016
Population. 6,549,352 6,600,299 6,651,194
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 563,863 550,696 558,852
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 168,683 167,179 174,370
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,557,629 2,632,997 2,640,999
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 29.92% 30.36% 31.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.41% 75.96% 76.09%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.70% 5.60% 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 26.10% 24.10% 22.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.90% 15.40% 14.60%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 483,056 489,181 486,269
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 529,442 519,602 529,763
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 815,721 821,098 829,448
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 161,345 150,942 149,092
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 19,799 23,298 21,457
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,255 4,147 4,255
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,347 7,211 8,863
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 568
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 19,929 19,638 18,165
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 4,332 5,212 4,641

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,508 4,813 4,932
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.60% 2.80% 2.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 252,231 251,021 249,055

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,075 10,107 12,330
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 21,113 23,774 27,376
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 43,402 47,093 54,059
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 18.60% 21.50% 22.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.30% 0.30%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.80% 0.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 0.30% 0.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 35.90% 30.60% 51.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,014 503 484
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,026 1,368 1,150
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 318 423 232
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 52,191 51,242 92,792

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,806 8,544 9,133
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 108 95 87
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 59 70 55
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 74.00% 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.91 1.06 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,369
3,648
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 202 282 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 244 272 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,039 794 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,445 1,160 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,250 992 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 189 148 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 28.10% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,455 7,463 7,728
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 371,708 370,137 366,628
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 473 409 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,372,000 $11,247,000 $11,124,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $24,128,000 $24,012,000 $23,338,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $64,877,000 $58,460,000 $52,890,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 19.00% 19.00% 18.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 6,464 6,667 6,257
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 N/A 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,745 3,742 3,408
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 20.40 20.50 19.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.07% 70.06% 70.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.27% 10.74% 11.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.76% 1.79% 1.78%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00% 73.68% 71.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 21.27% 22.10% 33.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 55.59% 58.22% 64.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.70% 69.26% 73.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.32% 36.12% 30.50%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 871,430
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,411
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 56,166
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 136,631
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 192,797
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 86
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 190
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 276
AbilityOne wages (products). $490,797
AbilityOne wages (services). $1,584,403

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 62 37 44
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 2 5
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 64 39 49
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,999 1,760 2,356
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 42 11 46
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,041 1,771 2,402

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

One-Stop Design and Delivery: The increased use of technology allows the Tennessee Workforce System to seamlessly integrate services, system and program changes in accordance with WIOA. The connection in Jobs4TN and VOS leverage the case management processes for all participants and programs that are involved in WIOA implementation across the state. The efficiencies realized with the common intake process and reporting will enable all programs and partners included in this Combined State Plan to mutually benefit from electronic referrals and reporting and coordinate services and tracking of co-enrolled participants, to name a few. Additionally, the centralized and coordinated efforts from all program partners eases the communication and engagement of job seekers, employers, local government support, community partners, and additional external clients. As it pertains to individuals with disabilities, Tennessee serves as an Employment First state, allowing seamless integration and support for this hard to serve population. (Page 41)    

Tennessee is an Employment First State, and there is an established Employment First Task Force. The Employment First Task force facilitated the completion of a Memorandum of Understanding for services to youth with disabilities between the following State agencies:

  • Vocational Rehabilitation
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Labor and Workforce Development
  • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
  • Council on Developmental Disabilities (Oversees the Implementation of the MOU) (Page 206)       
Customized Employment

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry.    (Page 203)                                                                                                                          

Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school and after-school opportunities and experiences outside of the traditional school settings. Examples of Work-Based Learning Experiences include On-the-Job Trainings, Apprenticeships, Internships, Summer Work Experiences, Work-Based Trainings, Job Search Assistance, Job Placement Assistance, On-the-Job Supports and Customized Employment. (Page 205)                                          

Continuing the practice of ensuring the availability of appropriate training activities and resources to meet the individualized needs of clients by seeking out and developing partnerships with other private and public entities to provide specialized education and training activities, to include those that can be provided through self-employment, on-the-job-training by employers, and customized employment. (Page 239)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/DRC

Providing cross training to the career center staff in regard to meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. Continue to provide consultation on career center accessibility and accommodation needs in regard to the accessibility needs in the building(s), and accommodations in terms of appropriate technology needed to serve individuals with the disabilities. Continue to partner with the American Job Centers (AJCs) in employment initiatives such as the summer youth employment project and the DEI grant. (Pages 240-241)

Competitive Integrated Employment

All SCSEP participants are required to develop an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) at the time of enrollment. The IEP serves as a personal road-map to success and is designed to specifically assist the participant in meeting both personal and program goals. Each participant receives specialized training that fits under his or her IEP and is assigned to a host agency to develop or improve skills. The plan also determines if the Host Agency has met the participant’s requirements. In addition, the Host Agency provides services to low-income older persons, to the economically disadvantaged and to organizations offering services which provide positive contributions to the welfare of the general community. Opportunities to serve other groups will also be provided through placement in schools, day-care programs, health and hospital programs, and agencies serving individuals with physical and developmental disabilities. (Page 385)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

In addition, although many of the SCSEP participants need or want to work they may be long-term consumers of government assistance programs for income or other supports. The finding is recipients of these government assistance programs such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Disability Insurance or Housing and Urban Development (HUD) never leaves, especially for employment, once on these programs. Even when there is an opportunity for the individual to move off government assistance into economic self-sufficiency, there is fear that if government assistance is needed again the process is so long and tedious it will not be available. SCSEP then becomes just a program to supplement the income of those participants receiving benefits from these programs. (Page 397)

Economic self-sufficiency through leveraging of all resources including tax incentives, financial education, social security work incentives, benefits planning, and other strategies to enhance profitable employment. The use of a universal design as a framework for the organization of employment policy and services in Tennessee. Customized and other flexible work options for individuals with disabilities. The assurance that the structural and technological accessibility of all AJC’s for persons with disabilities who are seeking employment services is further enhanced by participation in disability awareness/sensitivity training to assist AJC staff to understand how to provide quality employment services for this targeted population. The concept immediately increased the use of AJC by persons with disabilities. Outreach and education also increased throughout the centers. (Page 123)

  • Tennessee Disability Coalition Benefits to Work (Page 201)
Career Pathways

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

Tennessee will compete Section 225 according to the narrative set forth in (5)(B)(i). The grants awarded may be for up to 20% of the available federal dollars as set forth in section 222(a)(1).  The funds described in section 225(a) shall be used for the cost of educational programs for criminal offenders in correctional institutions and for other institutionalized individuals, including academic programs for:

  1. adult education and literacy activities;
  2. special education, as determined by the agency;
  3. secondary school credit;
  4. integrated education and training;
  5. career pathways;
  6. concurrent enrollment;
  7. peer tutoring; and
  8. transition to re-entry initiatives and other post release services with the goal of reducing recidivism. (Page 174) 

This will be done by having by eligible providers partnering with their local AJC for the referral of potential students; there, students will be assisted in building a resume and creating an account in Jobs4TN. Eligible providers will also refer students completing the program to the Tennessee Career Center for career information and job placement. Eligible providers will refer eligible students completing the program to the Local Workforce Board or Vocational Rehabilitation as set forth in this State Plan; this will include the development of career pathways to provide access to employment and training services for individuals in adult education and literacy activities. (Page 177)

Employer Engagement

The Division will continue to encourage CRPs to become Employment Networks as possible funding source for on-going support needs. The Division will continue to train CRPs and VR staff to increase usage of SSA PASS plan.

The Division will assure that funds are made available will only be used to provide Supported Employment services to individuals who are eligible to receive such services. (Page 249)

511

The department’s web-based Virtual One-Stop System (VOS) is the most advanced and comprehensive statewide workforce development information and reporting system available today. Using a set of core proprietary software components created by Geographic Solutions Inc., the department and its partners have modernized and integrated workforce services into a single computing platform referred to as Jobs4TN. Working from the WIOA statutes, we have moved forward with establishing needed data points in our systems, such as those spelled out in the draft PIRL, data specifications, and the Section 188 NPRM. (Page 96)  

 Our goal is to carry out all data-collection and reporting processes under this plan using a single virtual system, specifically, the Jobs4TN system which is being deployed by Geographic Solutions, Inc., TDLWD’s system of record for workforce data across all core programs. And to the extent possible, recognizing cost and infrastructure limitations, also to be deployed for certain mandatory and optional partners as WIOA takes shape in the future. (Page 96)

Information such as the FEIN, is founded in compliance with confidentiality provisions in 20 CFR Section 603, as well as in accordance with the emerging requirements of the SWIS (State Wage Interchange System) data sharing agreement. TEGL 7-16, Data Matching to Facilitate WIOA Performance Reporting, also is being used to guide the process and direction of partnership agreements, similar to MOUs, which define, if needed, authorized data share staff among program and IT staff of the TN agencies noted above. (Page 119)

Mental Health

REGION AND LOCAL LEVEL ACCOUNTABILITY

Tennessee’s workforce development system, both regional and local, requires that programs and providers co-locate, coordinate, and integrate activities and information, so that the system is cohesive and accessible for individuals and businesses alike. Accountability goals increase the long-term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment; to improve services to employers; and to demonstrate continuous improvement. The certification policy is the foundation to aligning programs, policies, and activities in the State’s Workforce System. This policy will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) and will undergird continuous improvement of one stop centers. It specifies minimum standards for the service menu and customer service to be met and branding requirements that demonstrate a statewide Workforce System. This certification process will demonstrate that the local workforce development boards can ensure that employment and training programs in their communities operate at the highest level of quality and consistency, while satisfying the expectations and needs of their customers. (Page 106)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Physical accessibility for people with disabilities was implemented and upgraded with the assistance of Tennessee Department Human Services (DHS) - Vocational Rehabilitation Program. Tennessee will be undergoing an accessibility study to ensure all AJC’s can be accessed. (Page 123)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Annual Report 2018 - 10/01/2018

~The  Department  of  Intellectual  and  Developmental  Disabilities  (DIDD)  is  the  state department  responsible  for  administration  and  oversight  of  community-based services  for  Tennesseans  with  intellectual  and  developmental  disabilities.  The department  operates  with  more  than  1,400  state  employees  and  400  community providers to serve approximately 7,800 people with intellectual disabilities through ts  Home  and  Community  Based  Waivers  and  4,500  people  through  the  Family Support  Program.    It  also  operates  38  Intermediate  Care  Facilities  for  Individuals with  Intellectual  Disabilities  (ICF/IID)  program  including  the  Harold  Jordan  Center, and three seating and positioning clinics across Tennessee.DIDD strives to support people with disabilities to live fulfilling and rewarding lives and become the nation’s most person-centered and cost-effective state support system for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Services (ages 14-24) - 09/12/2018

~~Title I of WIOA affirms the Department of Labor’s (DOL) commitment to providing high-quality services for youth (age 14-24), beginning with career exploration and guidance, continued support for educational attainment, opportunities for skills training, such as pre-apprenticeships or internships, for in-demand industries and occupations, and culminating with employment, enrollment in postsecondary education, or a Registered Apprenticeship.

To be eligible for Youth Services, an individual must meet specific requirements related to age and income and school statuses that result in an employment barrier. Program participation is assessed by distinct for in-school youth (ISY) or out-of-school youth (OSY)…..ISY must be:a. 14-21 years of ageb. Attending secondary or post-secondary schoolc. Low-income…

7.Individual with a disability

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Notice of Change in TennCare II Demonstration: Amendment 37 - 09/05/2018

~~Amendment 37 also includes a number of other adjustments to ECF CHOICES based  on  learnings  from  the  first  two  years  of  the  program’s  implementation. The otherchanges to the ECF CHOICES program proposed in Amendment 37 are:•Modifying   the   Expenditure   Caps   for   the   existing   ECF   CHOICES   Groups   5   and   6. These modifications will give  the  State  additional flexibility to target services  based  on  a  person’s identified   needs   and   will enhance access to Supported Employment and/or Individual Employment Support benefits.•Expanding the existing exception for persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES Group 6 from one of the State’s 1915(c) waiver programs and who are “at risk” of institutionalization to also apply to persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES from an Intermediate Care Facilityfor Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities.•Clarifying that a person who meets the nursing facility level of care criteria may be enrolled in ECF CHOICES Group 5 so long as the person’s needs can be safely met in Group 5.•Modifications and clarifications to certain ECF CHOICES service definitions. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DIDD Launches State Employment Mentorship Program - 08/02/2018

~~‘The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) launched a new mentorship program today, designed to leverage in-state employment expertise to increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities in Tennessee for years to come.

The focus of the Tennessee Employment First Leadership Initiative (TEFLI) is to provide consultation and mentoring to intellectual and developmental disability providers around the state as they transition people with disabilities from sheltered workshops to competitive integrated employment opportunities in the community. Persons who work at sheltered workshops typically make subminimum wage, as opposed to earning minimum wage or higher in community employment.’

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Tennessee Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan (11/2015) Amended Based on Public Comment (2/2016) - 07/31/2018

~~1915 (c) waiver settings assessed included:• Residential Habilitation• Employment and Day (Community and Facility Based Day, In-home Day, and Supported Employment)• Family Model Residential Support• Medical Residential Services• Supported Living

1115 CHOICES waiver settings assessed included:•Adult Day Care•Assisted Care Living Facility•Critical Adult Care Home

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Strategic Plan 2018 Goals - 07/01/2018

~~1) Align service delivery systems and strengthen coordination to increase employment opportunities for Tennesseans with disabilities (#Data #Coordination #WIOA #Policy #Legislation #Workforce)2) Build shared community commitment to Employment First (#Self-Advocates #Families #Community #Communication)3) Increase the number of employers that hire people with disabilities (#Businesses)4) Make Tennessee state government a model employer of people with disabilities (#Government #Leadership)5) Prepare students for employment and post-secondary success (#Education #Transition) 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

TennCare Long Term Care Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“Job Development or Self-Employment Start Up.  For purposes of ECF CHOICES only and limited to members age 16 or older: (a) This is a time-limited service designed to implement a Job Development or Self Employment Plan as follows: 1.  Job Development is support to obtain an individualized competitive or customized job in an integrated employment setting in the general workforce, for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but ideally not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals without disabilities. The Job Development strategy should reflect best practices and be adjusted based on whether the individual is seeking competitive or customized employment. 2.  Self-Employment Start Up is support in implementing a self-employment business plan. The outcome of this service is expected to be the achievement of an individualized integrated employment or self-employment outcome consistent with the individual’s personal and career goals, as determined through Exploration, Discovery and/or the Situational Observation and Assessment, if authorized, and as identified in the Job Development or Self-Employment Plan that guides the delivery of this service.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

FY 2019 Provider Rate Increase FAQ's - 06/13/2018

~~During the past legislative session, Governor Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly dedicated approximately $50 million in state and federal dollars towards a rate increase for providers contracted with the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.  The legislation clearly states the funds are for the sole purpose of increasing the Direct Support Professional (DSP) staff salary component in the DIDD provider rate methodology, with a legislative intent to increase the hourly wages of DSPs at DIDD contracted provider agencies.

The legislation clearly states the funding is intended to increase the wages of direct support professionals.  Each provider agency will need to determine the best strategy to honor the legislative intent.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Expect Employment 2017: TN Employment First Task Force Report to the Governor - 08/01/2017

“Over the course of the fiscal year, several task force members completed major objectives in the strategic plan. Those include the implementation of the Employment and Community First CHOICES program and launch of the Transition Tennessee site. In addition, several agencies operationalized Memorandums of Understanding to further streamline services for people whose support needs may overlap two or more state agencies. The task force has also brought in new members and agencies, including the Department of Health. In an effort to bolster employer outreach, the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development joined the task force and embraced its mission wholeheartedly.

This year’s Expect Employment Report documents the task force’s successes goal by goal, objective by objective. It is clear reading through the report that collaboration has allowed for change to happen more quickly. In addition, throughout the report are the stories of real people who have been positively impacted by the programs and policies developed through the work of state agencies, task force members, and partner organizations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

TN Special Education Framework - 08/01/2017

“The purpose of the Special Education Framework is to support educators in writing instructionally appropriate IEPs. Several years ago, the department developed the first Special Education Framework and has continuously garnered feedback from educators on how to improve the framework in order to be most useful to teachers as they support students with disabilities.

The framework is now organized into two sections: (I) general information about special education and (II) writing IEPs. Other significant improvements include a component on the development of writing short-term objectives, additional clarification around service delivery, and links to resources for the IEP team. Looking ahead, the next revision of the framework will include a third section on the implementation of IEPs—with a clear delineation between best practices and legal requirements.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Tennessee HB 1276: Supporting Business Owners with Disabilities - 06/06/2017

“As enacted, adds "businesses owned by persons with disabilities" to the Tennessee Minority-Owned, Woman-Owned and Small Business Procurement and Contracting Act; requires that the annual report made by the chief procurement officer concerning the awarding of purchases to minority-owned business, woman-owned business, service-disabled veteran-owned business, or small business and the total value of awards made also include the total dollar amount of purchases awarded to all businesses in this state”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

"Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee HB 896/SB 429 (ABLE) - 02/05/2015

The purpose of this bill is to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence,  and quality of life; and (2) To provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of individuals with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the supplemental security income program under Title XVI of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C.§§ 1381 et seq.);the TennCare programs under Title XIX of the Social Security Act, (42 U.S.C. §§1396 et seq.); or any successor to the TennCare program administered pursuant to the federal Medicaid laws, the individual’s employment, and other sources  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee Title Code 67

A job tax credit of five thousand dollars ($5,000) for each net new full-time employee job, and two thousand dollars ($2,000) for each net new part-time employee job, for a person with disabilities who is receiving state services directly related to such disabilities, shall be allowed against a taxpayer's franchise and excise liability tax for that year; provided, that:            (A)  The employment of such individual creates a net increase in the number of persons with disabilities employed by the taxpayer within the ninety-day period immediately preceding the employment;            (B)  The taxpayer provides such employment for at least twelve (12) consecutive months and for no less than the minimal hours per week; and for employees enrolled in the minimal health care benefits described in subdivision (g)(1), for respective full-time employment jobs and part-time employment jobs;   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Governor’s Executive Order Order Establishing The Tennessee Employment First I - 06/19/2013

“NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Haslam, Governor of the State of Tennessee… do hereby order and direct the following:

1. State agencies coordinate efforts to increase opportunities for integrated and competitive employment for Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental illnesses, substance abuse disorders and other disabilities.2. The Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities convene an Employment First Taskforce (“Taskforce”).3 The Taskforce shall consist of representatives from the agencies administering disability services, family members of persons receiving employment services, vocational rehabilitation, workforce services and education, as well as consumer advocates and third party disability services providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Annual Report 2018 - 10/01/2018

~The  Department  of  Intellectual  and  Developmental  Disabilities  (DIDD)  is  the  state department  responsible  for  administration  and  oversight  of  community-based services  for  Tennesseans  with  intellectual  and  developmental  disabilities.  The department  operates  with  more  than  1,400  state  employees  and  400  community providers to serve approximately 7,800 people with intellectual disabilities through ts  Home  and  Community  Based  Waivers  and  4,500  people  through  the  Family Support  Program.    It  also  operates  38  Intermediate  Care  Facilities  for  Individuals with  Intellectual  Disabilities  (ICF/IID)  program  including  the  Harold  Jordan  Center, and three seating and positioning clinics across Tennessee.DIDD strives to support people with disabilities to live fulfilling and rewarding lives and become the nation’s most person-centered and cost-effective state support system for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Services (ages 14-24) - 09/12/2018

~~Title I of WIOA affirms the Department of Labor’s (DOL) commitment to providing high-quality services for youth (age 14-24), beginning with career exploration and guidance, continued support for educational attainment, opportunities for skills training, such as pre-apprenticeships or internships, for in-demand industries and occupations, and culminating with employment, enrollment in postsecondary education, or a Registered Apprenticeship.

To be eligible for Youth Services, an individual must meet specific requirements related to age and income and school statuses that result in an employment barrier. Program participation is assessed by distinct for in-school youth (ISY) or out-of-school youth (OSY)…..ISY must be:a. 14-21 years of ageb. Attending secondary or post-secondary schoolc. Low-income…

7.Individual with a disability

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Notice of Change in TennCare II Demonstration: Amendment 37 - 09/05/2018

~~Amendment 37 also includes a number of other adjustments to ECF CHOICES based  on  learnings  from  the  first  two  years  of  the  program’s  implementation. The otherchanges to the ECF CHOICES program proposed in Amendment 37 are:•Modifying   the   Expenditure   Caps   for   the   existing   ECF   CHOICES   Groups   5   and   6. These modifications will give  the  State  additional flexibility to target services  based  on  a  person’s identified   needs   and   will enhance access to Supported Employment and/or Individual Employment Support benefits.•Expanding the existing exception for persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES Group 6 from one of the State’s 1915(c) waiver programs and who are “at risk” of institutionalization to also apply to persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES from an Intermediate Care Facilityfor Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities.•Clarifying that a person who meets the nursing facility level of care criteria may be enrolled in ECF CHOICES Group 5 so long as the person’s needs can be safely met in Group 5.•Modifications and clarifications to certain ECF CHOICES service definitions. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DIDD Launches State Employment Mentorship Program - 08/02/2018

~~‘The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) launched a new mentorship program today, designed to leverage in-state employment expertise to increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities in Tennessee for years to come.

The focus of the Tennessee Employment First Leadership Initiative (TEFLI) is to provide consultation and mentoring to intellectual and developmental disability providers around the state as they transition people with disabilities from sheltered workshops to competitive integrated employment opportunities in the community. Persons who work at sheltered workshops typically make subminimum wage, as opposed to earning minimum wage or higher in community employment.’

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Employment First Strategic Plan 2018 Goals - 07/01/2018

~~1) Align service delivery systems and strengthen coordination to increase employment opportunities for Tennesseans with disabilities (#Data #Coordination #WIOA #Policy #Legislation #Workforce)2) Build shared community commitment to Employment First (#Self-Advocates #Families #Community #Communication)3) Increase the number of employers that hire people with disabilities (#Businesses)4) Make Tennessee state government a model employer of people with disabilities (#Government #Leadership)5) Prepare students for employment and post-secondary success (#Education #Transition) 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

TennCare Long Term Care Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“Job Development or Self-Employment Start Up.  For purposes of ECF CHOICES only and limited to members age 16 or older: (a) This is a time-limited service designed to implement a Job Development or Self Employment Plan as follows: 1.  Job Development is support to obtain an individualized competitive or customized job in an integrated employment setting in the general workforce, for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but ideally not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals without disabilities. The Job Development strategy should reflect best practices and be adjusted based on whether the individual is seeking competitive or customized employment. 2.  Self-Employment Start Up is support in implementing a self-employment business plan. The outcome of this service is expected to be the achievement of an individualized integrated employment or self-employment outcome consistent with the individual’s personal and career goals, as determined through Exploration, Discovery and/or the Situational Observation and Assessment, if authorized, and as identified in the Job Development or Self-Employment Plan that guides the delivery of this service.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

FY 2019 Provider Rate Increase FAQ's - 06/13/2018

~~During the past legislative session, Governor Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly dedicated approximately $50 million in state and federal dollars towards a rate increase for providers contracted with the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.  The legislation clearly states the funds are for the sole purpose of increasing the Direct Support Professional (DSP) staff salary component in the DIDD provider rate methodology, with a legislative intent to increase the hourly wages of DSPs at DIDD contracted provider agencies.

The legislation clearly states the funding is intended to increase the wages of direct support professionals.  Each provider agency will need to determine the best strategy to honor the legislative intent.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Expect Employment 2017: TN Employment First Task Force Report to the Governor - 08/01/2017

“Over the course of the fiscal year, several task force members completed major objectives in the strategic plan. Those include the implementation of the Employment and Community First CHOICES program and launch of the Transition Tennessee site. In addition, several agencies operationalized Memorandums of Understanding to further streamline services for people whose support needs may overlap two or more state agencies. The task force has also brought in new members and agencies, including the Department of Health. In an effort to bolster employer outreach, the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development joined the task force and embraced its mission wholeheartedly.

This year’s Expect Employment Report documents the task force’s successes goal by goal, objective by objective. It is clear reading through the report that collaboration has allowed for change to happen more quickly. In addition, throughout the report are the stories of real people who have been positively impacted by the programs and policies developed through the work of state agencies, task force members, and partner organizations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

TN Special Education Framework - 08/01/2017

“The purpose of the Special Education Framework is to support educators in writing instructionally appropriate IEPs. Several years ago, the department developed the first Special Education Framework and has continuously garnered feedback from educators on how to improve the framework in order to be most useful to teachers as they support students with disabilities.

The framework is now organized into two sections: (I) general information about special education and (II) writing IEPs. Other significant improvements include a component on the development of writing short-term objectives, additional clarification around service delivery, and links to resources for the IEP team. Looking ahead, the next revision of the framework will include a third section on the implementation of IEPs—with a clear delineation between best practices and legal requirements.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Workforce Services Policy – Co-Enrollment of American Job Center Customers - 05/12/2017

“The purpose of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) is to develop Tennessee’s workforce by encouraging access to education and skills training as they directly align with business needs. This policy introduces strategies to strengthen participant outcomes by increasing access to multiple services in order to benefit the long-term success of recipients. This simultaneous admission to programs is known as ‘co-enrollment’…

Individuals entering an American Job Center will be greeted with a “no wrong door” approach; the Tennessee Combined State Plan indicates that there is no incorrect entry point for an individual seeking services. During the first step a staff member will conduct a verbal assessment – mainly focused on the individual’s eligibility for WIOA Title I and III programs – that addresses barriers to employment, establishes priority of service, and identifies a disability that requires further resources. Using this assessment the staff member then offers guidance about the most appropriate next steps.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Memorandum of Understanding Between The Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and The State of Tennessee Bureau of TennCare, Division of Long Term Services and Supports - 03/20/2017

“This Memorandum is entered into and based upon the philosophy of Employment First which is based upon the premise that all citizens, including individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life. Because both VR and TennCare offer employment supports for people with disabilities, this Memorandum is intended to ensure that each agency provides those services to common customers in coordination with the other to ensure efficient use of resources and effective delivery of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee’s Independent Living & Developmental Disabilities Network: Joint Publication on Network Programs and Collaborations - 03/01/2017

“In September 2015, Tennessee agencies funded through the Developmental Disabilities Act and Tennessee’s Independent Living programs funded through the Rehabilitation Act met to begin strategic coordination among our organizations. Having been recently relocated to a new federal Administration on Disabilities, our programs had an opportunity to increase our impact in Tennessee by joining forces to address common goals. Together we established a shared priority: improving youth transition outcomes through postsecondary education and job training that leads to competitive and integrated employment. Since that time, our two networks continue to meet together to work on details of joint projects, including this publication!

We hope you find this publication informative and that you learn something new about the programs across Tennessee funded under the Independent Living Administration and the Developmental Disabilities Act. Please reach out to us to find ways that you can become involved in our work. We are always interested in hearing from Tennesseans with disabilities about your experiences in getting supports and services you need.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Memorandum of Understanding between DIDD and VR - 01/07/2016

On December 14, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Division of Rehabilitation Services, Vocational Rehabilitation Program and DIDD was finalized. In 2014, both agencies started discussing the option of creating an MOU through a Vision Quest workgroup (as part of the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program) spearheaded by two ODEP Subject Matter Experts: Dr. Stephen Hall and Sara Murphy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding for School-to-Work Transition - 08/05/2015

Five state agencies have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to improve services and better prepare youth with disabilities to transition from school into integrated employment in the community.  The MOU focuses on students age 14 years and over and aims to ensure all youth with disabilities leaving secondary education are prepared for either post-secondary training and/or integrated employment appropriate for their preferences, interests, skills and abilities.  “It’s vitally important that all state agencies work together to make sure youth with disabilities leave school and have the opportunity to contribute to the workforce,” Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) Commissioner Debra Payne said.  “It takes a team effort to make sure they have the training and support necessary to make that happen."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Interagency Agreement Regarding IDEA - 07/01/2012

“The purpose of this Agreement is to identify and define the financial responsibilities of the Parties to this Agreement and to facilitate the provision and coordination of services for all infants, toddlers, children, youth and adults who are IDEA eligible. This Agreement formalizes policies, procedures, and fiscal responsibilities of the parties relating to IDEA.” 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Employment Consortium - 06/01/2007

“The Tennessee Employment Consortium (TEC) is a statewide organization focused on increasing the number of Tennesseans in integrated employment. The consortium comprises volunteers from the state's Division of Mental Retardation Services (DMRS) and Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Tennessee Council on Developmental Disabilities, the ARC of Tennessee, the Center on Disability and Employment at the University of Tennessee, community rehabilitation providers (CRPs), family members, and other stakeholders. TEC's ability to organize collaborative activities across state agencies, advocacy organizations, and CRPs has played an important role in increasing integrated employment outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance - 05/01/2007

~~“The Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance was formed in May 2007 to increase awareness about the need for postsecondary opportunities in Tennessee, to gather information about postsecondary programs in other states, and to develop a pilot program on a Tennessee college campus. “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “Our partnership is focused on helping: Self-Advocates to aspire toward competitive work; Employers to recognize the contributions people with disabilities can make in the workplace; Educators to prepare young people with disabilities with strong skills and opportunities; Families to communicate high expectations from an early age; and State Systems and Disability Agencies to support real work for real pay.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

The ARC Tennessee

~~“ The Arc Tennessee is a grassroots, non-profit, statewide advocacy organization for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. Founded in 1952, The Arc Tennessee is affiliated with The Arc United States and works collaboratively with local chapters across the state.The Arc Tennessee values diversity and does not discriminate based on race, ethnicity, religion, age, geographic location, sexual orientation, gender, level of disability or Limited English Proficiency.Our MissionThe Arc Tennessee empowers people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families to actively participate in the community throughout their lifetime.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Tennessee Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) - 10/01/2011

“The TDEI project will replicate and improve upon the experience of the Disability Navigator Program (DPN) active in the nine (9) participating WIBs [Workforce Investment Boards]. The DPN Initiative provided a bridge between One-Stop Career Center staff, private and public partners, and the disability community. Each participating WIB will be responsible for tailoring a basic set of services to the needs of their local population with disabilities, as well as potential employers. Three (3) WIBs will offer services to customers with disabilities in primarily rural areas. The TDEI will rely on the states two Work Incentives Planning and Assistance service providers to assist it to work with Social Security disability beneficiaries.” The grant ended in 2014.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

TN Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“Through the EFSLMP Tennessee seeks to increase the number of adults and youth with significant disabilities in the state who are working in competitive, integrated employment. Leaders in the state are specifically looking to align departmental policies for coordination of integrated employment services. They are also intending to increase the use of customized employment strategies by service providers as well as to cultivate a better understanding of and use of work incentives available to individuals receiving Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability Income. Their proposal also includes strong involvement of the One-Stop Career Centers. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) will be the lead agency for this grant.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AIDD Partnerships in Employment

TennesseeWorks Partnership: Changing the Employment Landscape“The Vanderbilt Kennedy University Center for Excellence in DevelopmentalDisabilities and 28 agencies and organizations will develop a vibrant collaborativeacross the state to increase the number of young people accessing competitiveemployment prior to leaving high school; increase the capacity and commitmentamong families and practitioners to support competitive employment and careerdevelopment; raise expectations among youth, families, educators and providers;reallocate resources and funding streams toward competitive employment; andincrease the number of families and educators accessing professional development,resources, and supports addressing competitive employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Guide for Provider Transformation to an Employment First Service Model - 06/15/2016

~~Transition to an Employment First Service Model Guide is issuedOrganizations that are successful in their transformation to an Employment First provider agency share three elements, all of which should be addressed:1. Strategy:  What will you do?2. Structure:  Who does it?3. Systems:  How will your agency do it?

An understanding of these elements can give a framework for an agency to understandwhat parts of the organization need to be changed. In order to help agencies decide what to change, an Agency Assessment is provided in the Appendices.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Readiness program (ERP)

The focus of the Employment Readiness Program (ERP) is to prepare students in areas of employment and life skills. The ERP curriculum-based course spans 14 weeks and includes individualized and group format instruction and community based hands-on experience in a variety of work environments.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment and Individuals With Disabilities

This sheet contains tips and resources related to customized and supported employment in relation to Tennessee Disability Pathfinder and TennesseeWorks.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Employment First Trainings

MG&A articles & presentations on Customized Employment and Discovery from the TDI&DD website.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

Basic Rights: Training on IDEA Parent’s Introduction to Special Education Workshop

This workshop is designed for professionals and parents of children in special education or that might need special education. Come and gain a working knowledge of special education laws, including your role in the development of an appropriate education program (IEP) and how to be an effective partner with the school team in the process.  
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy, Education and Employment

“ Support for diversity and inclusion is a value at the core of the Center for Literacy, Education and Employment (CLEE). In addition, we determine the direction of our work by listening to and learning from practitioners, policymakers, business leaders and community leaders, as well as the academic community. As a result, the Center has a long history of involvement in advocacy efforts in the fields of literacy, education and employment, particularly those focused on supporting ALL individuals to flourish in an increasingly complex and interconnected world.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Customized Employment Partnership 2004

“The Tennessee Olmstead WorkFORCE Partnership (Working for Freedom Opportunity and Real Choice through Community Employment) is pleased to announce the availability of up to $75,000 per year per grantee for three years (a total award of $225,000 per grantee) to develop the capacity of at least one of their Career Centers to create “Tennessee Customized Employment Partnership” (TCEP) Hubs to provide customized employment services to people with significant disabilities. Funding is contingent upon continued appropriation from the federal government. Through an application process, up to three awards will be made. This project is supported by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability & Employment Policy (ODEP) through a grant to The Arc of Tennessee.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“Through the EFSLMP Tennessee seeks to increase the number of adults and youth with significant disabilities in the state who are working in competitive, integrated employment. Leaders in the state are specifically looking to align departmental policies for coordination of integrated employment services. They are also intending to increase the use of customized employment strategies by service providers as well as to cultivate a better understanding of and use of work incentives available to individuals receiving Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability Income. Their proposal also includes strong involvement of the One-Stop Career Centers. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) will be the lead agency for this grant.”

NOTE: Tennessee is using resources from the EFLSMP to provide training and capacity building to large workshops in the state. The capacity building includes customized employment and alternative sources of funding to providers, including becoming an Employment Network of the Ticket to Work Program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “This new website is an online resource for those in our state committed to these goals. [You can] [s]elect your role… to find comprehensive information, trainings, videos, success stories, and many other resources to equip, inform, and inspire your work.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Clover Bottom, Greene Valley, and Nat T. Winston Developmental Centers - Memorandum Approving Exit Plan (2015) - 01/29/2015

To effectively facilitate reform in mental health services, the Court cannot allow “perfect to become the enemy of good” nor allow the concepts of federalism and separation of powers to be ignored. The Court concludes that the Exit Plan presented by the Parties is “fair, reasonable, and adequate” and provides the next iteration of improvement to the lives of those with disabilities in Tennessee. It will test political will and legislative leadership to continue that progress and to determine how best to care for those often left in the shadows.    For the reasons detailed above, the Court will grant the unopposed joint motion seeking approval of an Exit Plan (Docket No. 1118-1) and entry of a proposed Agreed Order (Docket No. 1118-2). The Motion to Intervene brought by conservators of GVDC residents and Citizens for a Better Tennessee (Docket No. 1121) will be denied. .  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Tennessee Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan (11/2015) Amended Based on Public Comment (2/2016) - 07/31/2018

~~1915 (c) waiver settings assessed included:• Residential Habilitation• Employment and Day (Community and Facility Based Day, In-home Day, and Supported Employment)• Family Model Residential Support• Medical Residential Services• Supported Living

1115 CHOICES waiver settings assessed included:•Adult Day Care•Assisted Care Living Facility•Critical Adult Care Home

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment and Community First CHOICES (Employment Program) - 07/01/2016

~~The Employment and Community First CHOICES program is administered by TennCare through its contracted managed care organizations.  It offers services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  Services in the program will help people become employed and live as independently as possible in the community.  All new enrollment is in the Employment and Community First CHOICES program, as DIDD’s waivers are closed to new enrollment.

There is a limited amount of funding available to serve people each year.  That means not everyone who wants to apply can enroll or get services right away.." 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee State Plan Amendment (SPA) 16-0001 (approved 3-22-2016) - 03/22/2016

The State covers low-income families and children for Transitional Medical Assistance (TMA) under section 1925 of the Social Security Act (the Act). This coverage is provided for families who no longer qualify under section 1931 of the Act due to increased earned income, or working hours, from the caretaker relative’s employment, or due to the loss of a time-limited earned income disregard. (1902(a)(52), 1902(e)(1), and 1925 of the Act)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Tennessee Medicaid State Plan

Tennessee’s full state plan for TennCare, Tennessee’s Medicaid Program.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Tennessee 1915(c) Home and Community Based Service "Self Determination Waiver Program "

The Self-Determination Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive, integrated settings and engage in community life. Services are delivered in a manner which ensures each individual’s rights of privacy, dignity, respect and freedom from coercion and restraint; optimizes individual initiative, autonomy, and independence in making life choices; and are delivered in a manner that comports fully with standards applicable to HCBS settings delivered under Section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act…  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

TN The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02)

~~“The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02) serves children and adults with intellectual disabilities and children under age six with developmental delay who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the Self-Determination waiver, would require placement in a private ICF/IID.

The Self-Determination Waiver Program affords persons supported the opportunity to directly manage selected services, including the recruitment and management of service providers. Participants and families (as appropriate) electing self-direction are empowered and have the responsibility for managing, in accordance with waiver service definitions and limitations, a self-determination budget affording flexibility in service design and delivery. The Self-Determination Waiver Program serves persons who have an established non-institutional place of residence where they live with their family, a non-related caregiver or in their own home and whose needs can be met effectively by the combination of waiver services through this program and natural and other supports available to them. The Self-Determination Waiver does not include residential services such as supported living.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap Waiver (#0357.R03)

~~“The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap (CAC) Waiver (#0357.R03), formerly known as the Arlington Waiver, serves individuals with intellectual disabilities who are former members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Arlington Developmental Center), current members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Clover Bottom Developmental Center), and individuals transitioned from the Statewide Waiver (#0128) upon its renewal on January 1, 2015, because they were identified by the state as receiving services in excess of the individual cost neutrality cap established for the Statewide Waiver. These are individuals who have been institutionalized in a public institution, are part of a certified class because they were determined to be at risk of placement in a public institution, or have significant services/support needs consistent with that of the population served in a public ICF/IID and who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the CAC waiver, would require placement in an ICF/IID.

The CAC Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings and engage in community life.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee Statewide Waiver (0128.R05)

~~“The Statewide Waiver (0128.R05) serves adults with intellectual disabilities and children under age six with developmental delay who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the Statewide Waiver, would require placement in a private Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID).

The Statewide Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each person supported pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings and engage in community life “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

TN Money Follows the Person (MFP)

“Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a federally funded grant awarded to TennCare with the purpose of assisting the state to transition people from nursing homes and institutions to home and community based care, and to also assist the state to rebalance their long term care expenditures.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

Tennessee is the Volunteer State, and its outstanding Employment First initiatives for individuals with disabilities show why this state exemplifies "America at its Best!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Tennessee’s VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
0.77%
Change from
2015 to 2016
6,651,194
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.46%
Change from
2015 to 2016
558,852
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.12%
Change from
2015 to 2016
174,370
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.69%
Change from
2015 to 2016
31.20%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.17%
Change from
2015 to 2016
76.09%

State Data

General

2016
Population. 6,651,194
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 558,852
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 174,370
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,640,999
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 31.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.09%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.60%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 486,269
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 529,763
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 829,448
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 149,092
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,457
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,255
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,863
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 568
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 18,165
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 4,641

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,932
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 249,055

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 12,330
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 27,376
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 54,059
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.30%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 51.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 484
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,150
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 232
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 92,792

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 9,133
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 87
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 55
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,728
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 366,628
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,124,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $23,338,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $52,890,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 18.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 6,257
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,408
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 19.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 70.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.78%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 71.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 33.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 64.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.50%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 871,430
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,411
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 56,166
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 136,631
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 192,797
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 86
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 190
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 276
AbilityOne wages (products). $490,797
AbilityOne wages (services). $1,584,403

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 44
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 5
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 49
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,356
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 46
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,402

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

One-Stop Design and Delivery: The increased use of technology allows the Tennessee Workforce System to seamlessly integrate services, system and program changes in accordance with WIOA. The connection in Jobs4TN and VOS leverage the case management processes for all participants and programs that are involved in WIOA implementation across the state. The efficiencies realized with the common intake process and reporting will enable all programs and partners included in this Combined State Plan to mutually benefit from electronic referrals and reporting and coordinate services and tracking of co-enrolled participants, to name a few. Additionally, the centralized and coordinated efforts from all program partners eases the communication and engagement of job seekers, employers, local government support, community partners, and additional external clients. As it pertains to individuals with disabilities, Tennessee serves as an Employment First state, allowing seamless integration and support for this hard to serve population. (Page 41)    

Tennessee is an Employment First State, and there is an established Employment First Task Force. The Employment First Task force facilitated the completion of a Memorandum of Understanding for services to youth with disabilities between the following State agencies:

  • Vocational Rehabilitation
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Labor and Workforce Development
  • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
  • Council on Developmental Disabilities (Oversees the Implementation of the MOU) (Page 206)       
Customized Employment

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry.    (Page 203)                                                                                                                          

Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school and after-school opportunities and experiences outside of the traditional school settings. Examples of Work-Based Learning Experiences include On-the-Job Trainings, Apprenticeships, Internships, Summer Work Experiences, Work-Based Trainings, Job Search Assistance, Job Placement Assistance, On-the-Job Supports and Customized Employment. (Page 205)                                          

Continuing the practice of ensuring the availability of appropriate training activities and resources to meet the individualized needs of clients by seeking out and developing partnerships with other private and public entities to provide specialized education and training activities, to include those that can be provided through self-employment, on-the-job-training by employers, and customized employment. (Page 239)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/DRC

Providing cross training to the career center staff in regard to meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. Continue to provide consultation on career center accessibility and accommodation needs in regard to the accessibility needs in the building(s), and accommodations in terms of appropriate technology needed to serve individuals with the disabilities. Continue to partner with the American Job Centers (AJCs) in employment initiatives such as the summer youth employment project and the DEI grant. (Pages 240-241)

Competitive Integrated Employment

All SCSEP participants are required to develop an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) at the time of enrollment. The IEP serves as a personal road-map to success and is designed to specifically assist the participant in meeting both personal and program goals. Each participant receives specialized training that fits under his or her IEP and is assigned to a host agency to develop or improve skills. The plan also determines if the Host Agency has met the participant’s requirements. In addition, the Host Agency provides services to low-income older persons, to the economically disadvantaged and to organizations offering services which provide positive contributions to the welfare of the general community. Opportunities to serve other groups will also be provided through placement in schools, day-care programs, health and hospital programs, and agencies serving individuals with physical and developmental disabilities. (Page 385)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

In addition, although many of the SCSEP participants need or want to work they may be long-term consumers of government assistance programs for income or other supports. The finding is recipients of these government assistance programs such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Disability Insurance or Housing and Urban Development (HUD) never leaves, especially for employment, once on these programs. Even when there is an opportunity for the individual to move off government assistance into economic self-sufficiency, there is fear that if government assistance is needed again the process is so long and tedious it will not be available. SCSEP then becomes just a program to supplement the income of those participants receiving benefits from these programs. (Page 397)

Economic self-sufficiency through leveraging of all resources including tax incentives, financial education, social security work incentives, benefits planning, and other strategies to enhance profitable employment. The use of a universal design as a framework for the organization of employment policy and services in Tennessee. Customized and other flexible work options for individuals with disabilities. The assurance that the structural and technological accessibility of all AJC’s for persons with disabilities who are seeking employment services is further enhanced by participation in disability awareness/sensitivity training to assist AJC staff to understand how to provide quality employment services for this targeted population. The concept immediately increased the use of AJC by persons with disabilities. Outreach and education also increased throughout the centers. (Page 123)

  • Tennessee Disability Coalition Benefits to Work (Page 201)
Career Pathways

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

Tennessee will compete Section 225 according to the narrative set forth in (5)(B)(i). The grants awarded may be for up to 20% of the available federal dollars as set forth in section 222(a)(1).  The funds described in section 225(a) shall be used for the cost of educational programs for criminal offenders in correctional institutions and for other institutionalized individuals, including academic programs for:

  1. adult education and literacy activities;
  2. special education, as determined by the agency;
  3. secondary school credit;
  4. integrated education and training;
  5. career pathways;
  6. concurrent enrollment;
  7. peer tutoring; and
  8. transition to re-entry initiatives and other post release services with the goal of reducing recidivism. (Page 174) 

This will be done by having by eligible providers partnering with their local AJC for the referral of potential students; there, students will be assisted in building a resume and creating an account in Jobs4TN. Eligible providers will also refer students completing the program to the Tennessee Career Center for career information and job placement. Eligible providers will refer eligible students completing the program to the Local Workforce Board or Vocational Rehabilitation as set forth in this State Plan; this will include the development of career pathways to provide access to employment and training services for individuals in adult education and literacy activities. (Page 177)

Employer Engagement

The Division will continue to encourage CRPs to become Employment Networks as possible funding source for on-going support needs. The Division will continue to train CRPs and VR staff to increase usage of SSA PASS plan.

The Division will assure that funds are made available will only be used to provide Supported Employment services to individuals who are eligible to receive such services. (Page 249)

511

The department’s web-based Virtual One-Stop System (VOS) is the most advanced and comprehensive statewide workforce development information and reporting system available today. Using a set of core proprietary software components created by Geographic Solutions Inc., the department and its partners have modernized and integrated workforce services into a single computing platform referred to as Jobs4TN. Working from the WIOA statutes, we have moved forward with establishing needed data points in our systems, such as those spelled out in the draft PIRL, data specifications, and the Section 188 NPRM. (Page 96)  

 Our goal is to carry out all data-collection and reporting processes under this plan using a single virtual system, specifically, the Jobs4TN system which is being deployed by Geographic Solutions, Inc., TDLWD’s system of record for workforce data across all core programs. And to the extent possible, recognizing cost and infrastructure limitations, also to be deployed for certain mandatory and optional partners as WIOA takes shape in the future. (Page 96)

Information such as the FEIN, is founded in compliance with confidentiality provisions in 20 CFR Section 603, as well as in accordance with the emerging requirements of the SWIS (State Wage Interchange System) data sharing agreement. TEGL 7-16, Data Matching to Facilitate WIOA Performance Reporting, also is being used to guide the process and direction of partnership agreements, similar to MOUs, which define, if needed, authorized data share staff among program and IT staff of the TN agencies noted above. (Page 119)

Mental Health

REGION AND LOCAL LEVEL ACCOUNTABILITY

Tennessee’s workforce development system, both regional and local, requires that programs and providers co-locate, coordinate, and integrate activities and information, so that the system is cohesive and accessible for individuals and businesses alike. Accountability goals increase the long-term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment; to improve services to employers; and to demonstrate continuous improvement. The certification policy is the foundation to aligning programs, policies, and activities in the State’s Workforce System. This policy will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) and will undergird continuous improvement of one stop centers. It specifies minimum standards for the service menu and customer service to be met and branding requirements that demonstrate a statewide Workforce System. This certification process will demonstrate that the local workforce development boards can ensure that employment and training programs in their communities operate at the highest level of quality and consistency, while satisfying the expectations and needs of their customers. (Page 106)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Physical accessibility for people with disabilities was implemented and upgraded with the assistance of Tennessee Department Human Services (DHS) - Vocational Rehabilitation Program. Tennessee will be undergoing an accessibility study to ensure all AJC’s can be accessed. (Page 123)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Annual Report 2018 - 10/01/2018

~The  Department  of  Intellectual  and  Developmental  Disabilities  (DIDD)  is  the  state department  responsible  for  administration  and  oversight  of  community-based services  for  Tennesseans  with  intellectual  and  developmental  disabilities.  The department  operates  with  more  than  1,400  state  employees  and  400  community providers to serve approximately 7,800 people with intellectual disabilities through ts  Home  and  Community  Based  Waivers  and  4,500  people  through  the  Family Support  Program.    It  also  operates  38  Intermediate  Care  Facilities  for  Individuals with  Intellectual  Disabilities  (ICF/IID)  program  including  the  Harold  Jordan  Center, and three seating and positioning clinics across Tennessee.DIDD strives to support people with disabilities to live fulfilling and rewarding lives and become the nation’s most person-centered and cost-effective state support system for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Services (ages 14-24) - 09/12/2018

~~Title I of WIOA affirms the Department of Labor’s (DOL) commitment to providing high-quality services for youth (age 14-24), beginning with career exploration and guidance, continued support for educational attainment, opportunities for skills training, such as pre-apprenticeships or internships, for in-demand industries and occupations, and culminating with employment, enrollment in postsecondary education, or a Registered Apprenticeship.

To be eligible for Youth Services, an individual must meet specific requirements related to age and income and school statuses that result in an employment barrier. Program participation is assessed by distinct for in-school youth (ISY) or out-of-school youth (OSY)…..ISY must be:a. 14-21 years of ageb. Attending secondary or post-secondary schoolc. Low-income…

7.Individual with a disability

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Notice of Change in TennCare II Demonstration: Amendment 37 - 09/05/2018

~~Amendment 37 also includes a number of other adjustments to ECF CHOICES based  on  learnings  from  the  first  two  years  of  the  program’s  implementation. The otherchanges to the ECF CHOICES program proposed in Amendment 37 are:•Modifying   the   Expenditure   Caps   for   the   existing   ECF   CHOICES   Groups   5   and   6. These modifications will give  the  State  additional flexibility to target services  based  on  a  person’s identified   needs   and   will enhance access to Supported Employment and/or Individual Employment Support benefits.•Expanding the existing exception for persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES Group 6 from one of the State’s 1915(c) waiver programs and who are “at risk” of institutionalization to also apply to persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES from an Intermediate Care Facilityfor Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities.•Clarifying that a person who meets the nursing facility level of care criteria may be enrolled in ECF CHOICES Group 5 so long as the person’s needs can be safely met in Group 5.•Modifications and clarifications to certain ECF CHOICES service definitions. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DIDD Launches State Employment Mentorship Program - 08/02/2018

~~‘The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) launched a new mentorship program today, designed to leverage in-state employment expertise to increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities in Tennessee for years to come.

The focus of the Tennessee Employment First Leadership Initiative (TEFLI) is to provide consultation and mentoring to intellectual and developmental disability providers around the state as they transition people with disabilities from sheltered workshops to competitive integrated employment opportunities in the community. Persons who work at sheltered workshops typically make subminimum wage, as opposed to earning minimum wage or higher in community employment.’

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Tennessee Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan (11/2015) Amended Based on Public Comment (2/2016) - 07/31/2018

~~1915 (c) waiver settings assessed included:• Residential Habilitation• Employment and Day (Community and Facility Based Day, In-home Day, and Supported Employment)• Family Model Residential Support• Medical Residential Services• Supported Living

1115 CHOICES waiver settings assessed included:•Adult Day Care•Assisted Care Living Facility•Critical Adult Care Home

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Strategic Plan 2018 Goals - 07/01/2018

~~1) Align service delivery systems and strengthen coordination to increase employment opportunities for Tennesseans with disabilities (#Data #Coordination #WIOA #Policy #Legislation #Workforce)2) Build shared community commitment to Employment First (#Self-Advocates #Families #Community #Communication)3) Increase the number of employers that hire people with disabilities (#Businesses)4) Make Tennessee state government a model employer of people with disabilities (#Government #Leadership)5) Prepare students for employment and post-secondary success (#Education #Transition) 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

TennCare Long Term Care Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“Job Development or Self-Employment Start Up.  For purposes of ECF CHOICES only and limited to members age 16 or older: (a) This is a time-limited service designed to implement a Job Development or Self Employment Plan as follows: 1.  Job Development is support to obtain an individualized competitive or customized job in an integrated employment setting in the general workforce, for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but ideally not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals without disabilities. The Job Development strategy should reflect best practices and be adjusted based on whether the individual is seeking competitive or customized employment. 2.  Self-Employment Start Up is support in implementing a self-employment business plan. The outcome of this service is expected to be the achievement of an individualized integrated employment or self-employment outcome consistent with the individual’s personal and career goals, as determined through Exploration, Discovery and/or the Situational Observation and Assessment, if authorized, and as identified in the Job Development or Self-Employment Plan that guides the delivery of this service.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

FY 2019 Provider Rate Increase FAQ's - 06/13/2018

~~During the past legislative session, Governor Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly dedicated approximately $50 million in state and federal dollars towards a rate increase for providers contracted with the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.  The legislation clearly states the funds are for the sole purpose of increasing the Direct Support Professional (DSP) staff salary component in the DIDD provider rate methodology, with a legislative intent to increase the hourly wages of DSPs at DIDD contracted provider agencies.

The legislation clearly states the funding is intended to increase the wages of direct support professionals.  Each provider agency will need to determine the best strategy to honor the legislative intent.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Expect Employment 2017: TN Employment First Task Force Report to the Governor - 08/01/2017

“Over the course of the fiscal year, several task force members completed major objectives in the strategic plan. Those include the implementation of the Employment and Community First CHOICES program and launch of the Transition Tennessee site. In addition, several agencies operationalized Memorandums of Understanding to further streamline services for people whose support needs may overlap two or more state agencies. The task force has also brought in new members and agencies, including the Department of Health. In an effort to bolster employer outreach, the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development joined the task force and embraced its mission wholeheartedly.

This year’s Expect Employment Report documents the task force’s successes goal by goal, objective by objective. It is clear reading through the report that collaboration has allowed for change to happen more quickly. In addition, throughout the report are the stories of real people who have been positively impacted by the programs and policies developed through the work of state agencies, task force members, and partner organizations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

TN Special Education Framework - 08/01/2017

“The purpose of the Special Education Framework is to support educators in writing instructionally appropriate IEPs. Several years ago, the department developed the first Special Education Framework and has continuously garnered feedback from educators on how to improve the framework in order to be most useful to teachers as they support students with disabilities.

The framework is now organized into two sections: (I) general information about special education and (II) writing IEPs. Other significant improvements include a component on the development of writing short-term objectives, additional clarification around service delivery, and links to resources for the IEP team. Looking ahead, the next revision of the framework will include a third section on the implementation of IEPs—with a clear delineation between best practices and legal requirements.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Tennessee HB 1276: Supporting Business Owners with Disabilities - 06/06/2017

“As enacted, adds "businesses owned by persons with disabilities" to the Tennessee Minority-Owned, Woman-Owned and Small Business Procurement and Contracting Act; requires that the annual report made by the chief procurement officer concerning the awarding of purchases to minority-owned business, woman-owned business, service-disabled veteran-owned business, or small business and the total value of awards made also include the total dollar amount of purchases awarded to all businesses in this state”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

"Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee HB 896/SB 429 (ABLE) - 02/05/2015

The purpose of this bill is to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence,  and quality of life; and (2) To provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of individuals with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the supplemental security income program under Title XVI of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C.§§ 1381 et seq.);the TennCare programs under Title XIX of the Social Security Act, (42 U.S.C. §§1396 et seq.); or any successor to the TennCare program administered pursuant to the federal Medicaid laws, the individual’s employment, and other sources  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee Title Code 67

A job tax credit of five thousand dollars ($5,000) for each net new full-time employee job, and two thousand dollars ($2,000) for each net new part-time employee job, for a person with disabilities who is receiving state services directly related to such disabilities, shall be allowed against a taxpayer's franchise and excise liability tax for that year; provided, that:            (A)  The employment of such individual creates a net increase in the number of persons with disabilities employed by the taxpayer within the ninety-day period immediately preceding the employment;            (B)  The taxpayer provides such employment for at least twelve (12) consecutive months and for no less than the minimal hours per week; and for employees enrolled in the minimal health care benefits described in subdivision (g)(1), for respective full-time employment jobs and part-time employment jobs;   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Governor’s Executive Order Order Establishing The Tennessee Employment First I - 06/19/2013

“NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Haslam, Governor of the State of Tennessee… do hereby order and direct the following:

1. State agencies coordinate efforts to increase opportunities for integrated and competitive employment for Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental illnesses, substance abuse disorders and other disabilities.2. The Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities convene an Employment First Taskforce (“Taskforce”).3 The Taskforce shall consist of representatives from the agencies administering disability services, family members of persons receiving employment services, vocational rehabilitation, workforce services and education, as well as consumer advocates and third party disability services providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Annual Report 2018 - 10/01/2018

~The  Department  of  Intellectual  and  Developmental  Disabilities  (DIDD)  is  the  state department  responsible  for  administration  and  oversight  of  community-based services  for  Tennesseans  with  intellectual  and  developmental  disabilities.  The department  operates  with  more  than  1,400  state  employees  and  400  community providers to serve approximately 7,800 people with intellectual disabilities through ts  Home  and  Community  Based  Waivers  and  4,500  people  through  the  Family Support  Program.    It  also  operates  38  Intermediate  Care  Facilities  for  Individuals with  Intellectual  Disabilities  (ICF/IID)  program  including  the  Harold  Jordan  Center, and three seating and positioning clinics across Tennessee.DIDD strives to support people with disabilities to live fulfilling and rewarding lives and become the nation’s most person-centered and cost-effective state support system for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Services (ages 14-24) - 09/12/2018

~~Title I of WIOA affirms the Department of Labor’s (DOL) commitment to providing high-quality services for youth (age 14-24), beginning with career exploration and guidance, continued support for educational attainment, opportunities for skills training, such as pre-apprenticeships or internships, for in-demand industries and occupations, and culminating with employment, enrollment in postsecondary education, or a Registered Apprenticeship.

To be eligible for Youth Services, an individual must meet specific requirements related to age and income and school statuses that result in an employment barrier. Program participation is assessed by distinct for in-school youth (ISY) or out-of-school youth (OSY)…..ISY must be:a. 14-21 years of ageb. Attending secondary or post-secondary schoolc. Low-income…

7.Individual with a disability

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Notice of Change in TennCare II Demonstration: Amendment 37 - 09/05/2018

~~Amendment 37 also includes a number of other adjustments to ECF CHOICES based  on  learnings  from  the  first  two  years  of  the  program’s  implementation. The otherchanges to the ECF CHOICES program proposed in Amendment 37 are:•Modifying   the   Expenditure   Caps   for   the   existing   ECF   CHOICES   Groups   5   and   6. These modifications will give  the  State  additional flexibility to target services  based  on  a  person’s identified   needs   and   will enhance access to Supported Employment and/or Individual Employment Support benefits.•Expanding the existing exception for persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES Group 6 from one of the State’s 1915(c) waiver programs and who are “at risk” of institutionalization to also apply to persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES from an Intermediate Care Facilityfor Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities.•Clarifying that a person who meets the nursing facility level of care criteria may be enrolled in ECF CHOICES Group 5 so long as the person’s needs can be safely met in Group 5.•Modifications and clarifications to certain ECF CHOICES service definitions. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DIDD Launches State Employment Mentorship Program - 08/02/2018

~~‘The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) launched a new mentorship program today, designed to leverage in-state employment expertise to increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities in Tennessee for years to come.

The focus of the Tennessee Employment First Leadership Initiative (TEFLI) is to provide consultation and mentoring to intellectual and developmental disability providers around the state as they transition people with disabilities from sheltered workshops to competitive integrated employment opportunities in the community. Persons who work at sheltered workshops typically make subminimum wage, as opposed to earning minimum wage or higher in community employment.’

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Employment First Strategic Plan 2018 Goals - 07/01/2018

~~1) Align service delivery systems and strengthen coordination to increase employment opportunities for Tennesseans with disabilities (#Data #Coordination #WIOA #Policy #Legislation #Workforce)2) Build shared community commitment to Employment First (#Self-Advocates #Families #Community #Communication)3) Increase the number of employers that hire people with disabilities (#Businesses)4) Make Tennessee state government a model employer of people with disabilities (#Government #Leadership)5) Prepare students for employment and post-secondary success (#Education #Transition) 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

TennCare Long Term Care Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“Job Development or Self-Employment Start Up.  For purposes of ECF CHOICES only and limited to members age 16 or older: (a) This is a time-limited service designed to implement a Job Development or Self Employment Plan as follows: 1.  Job Development is support to obtain an individualized competitive or customized job in an integrated employment setting in the general workforce, for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but ideally not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals without disabilities. The Job Development strategy should reflect best practices and be adjusted based on whether the individual is seeking competitive or customized employment. 2.  Self-Employment Start Up is support in implementing a self-employment business plan. The outcome of this service is expected to be the achievement of an individualized integrated employment or self-employment outcome consistent with the individual’s personal and career goals, as determined through Exploration, Discovery and/or the Situational Observation and Assessment, if authorized, and as identified in the Job Development or Self-Employment Plan that guides the delivery of this service.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

FY 2019 Provider Rate Increase FAQ's - 06/13/2018

~~During the past legislative session, Governor Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly dedicated approximately $50 million in state and federal dollars towards a rate increase for providers contracted with the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.  The legislation clearly states the funds are for the sole purpose of increasing the Direct Support Professional (DSP) staff salary component in the DIDD provider rate methodology, with a legislative intent to increase the hourly wages of DSPs at DIDD contracted provider agencies.

The legislation clearly states the funding is intended to increase the wages of direct support professionals.  Each provider agency will need to determine the best strategy to honor the legislative intent.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Expect Employment 2017: TN Employment First Task Force Report to the Governor - 08/01/2017

“Over the course of the fiscal year, several task force members completed major objectives in the strategic plan. Those include the implementation of the Employment and Community First CHOICES program and launch of the Transition Tennessee site. In addition, several agencies operationalized Memorandums of Understanding to further streamline services for people whose support needs may overlap two or more state agencies. The task force has also brought in new members and agencies, including the Department of Health. In an effort to bolster employer outreach, the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development joined the task force and embraced its mission wholeheartedly.

This year’s Expect Employment Report documents the task force’s successes goal by goal, objective by objective. It is clear reading through the report that collaboration has allowed for change to happen more quickly. In addition, throughout the report are the stories of real people who have been positively impacted by the programs and policies developed through the work of state agencies, task force members, and partner organizations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

TN Special Education Framework - 08/01/2017

“The purpose of the Special Education Framework is to support educators in writing instructionally appropriate IEPs. Several years ago, the department developed the first Special Education Framework and has continuously garnered feedback from educators on how to improve the framework in order to be most useful to teachers as they support students with disabilities.

The framework is now organized into two sections: (I) general information about special education and (II) writing IEPs. Other significant improvements include a component on the development of writing short-term objectives, additional clarification around service delivery, and links to resources for the IEP team. Looking ahead, the next revision of the framework will include a third section on the implementation of IEPs—with a clear delineation between best practices and legal requirements.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Workforce Services Policy – Co-Enrollment of American Job Center Customers - 05/12/2017

“The purpose of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) is to develop Tennessee’s workforce by encouraging access to education and skills training as they directly align with business needs. This policy introduces strategies to strengthen participant outcomes by increasing access to multiple services in order to benefit the long-term success of recipients. This simultaneous admission to programs is known as ‘co-enrollment’…

Individuals entering an American Job Center will be greeted with a “no wrong door” approach; the Tennessee Combined State Plan indicates that there is no incorrect entry point for an individual seeking services. During the first step a staff member will conduct a verbal assessment – mainly focused on the individual’s eligibility for WIOA Title I and III programs – that addresses barriers to employment, establishes priority of service, and identifies a disability that requires further resources. Using this assessment the staff member then offers guidance about the most appropriate next steps.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Memorandum of Understanding Between The Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and The State of Tennessee Bureau of TennCare, Division of Long Term Services and Supports - 03/20/2017

“This Memorandum is entered into and based upon the philosophy of Employment First which is based upon the premise that all citizens, including individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life. Because both VR and TennCare offer employment supports for people with disabilities, this Memorandum is intended to ensure that each agency provides those services to common customers in coordination with the other to ensure efficient use of resources and effective delivery of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee’s Independent Living & Developmental Disabilities Network: Joint Publication on Network Programs and Collaborations - 03/01/2017

“In September 2015, Tennessee agencies funded through the Developmental Disabilities Act and Tennessee’s Independent Living programs funded through the Rehabilitation Act met to begin strategic coordination among our organizations. Having been recently relocated to a new federal Administration on Disabilities, our programs had an opportunity to increase our impact in Tennessee by joining forces to address common goals. Together we established a shared priority: improving youth transition outcomes through postsecondary education and job training that leads to competitive and integrated employment. Since that time, our two networks continue to meet together to work on details of joint projects, including this publication!

We hope you find this publication informative and that you learn something new about the programs across Tennessee funded under the Independent Living Administration and the Developmental Disabilities Act. Please reach out to us to find ways that you can become involved in our work. We are always interested in hearing from Tennesseans with disabilities about your experiences in getting supports and services you need.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Memorandum of Understanding between DIDD and VR - 01/07/2016

On December 14, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Division of Rehabilitation Services, Vocational Rehabilitation Program and DIDD was finalized. In 2014, both agencies started discussing the option of creating an MOU through a Vision Quest workgroup (as part of the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program) spearheaded by two ODEP Subject Matter Experts: Dr. Stephen Hall and Sara Murphy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding for School-to-Work Transition - 08/05/2015

Five state agencies have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to improve services and better prepare youth with disabilities to transition from school into integrated employment in the community.  The MOU focuses on students age 14 years and over and aims to ensure all youth with disabilities leaving secondary education are prepared for either post-secondary training and/or integrated employment appropriate for their preferences, interests, skills and abilities.  “It’s vitally important that all state agencies work together to make sure youth with disabilities leave school and have the opportunity to contribute to the workforce,” Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) Commissioner Debra Payne said.  “It takes a team effort to make sure they have the training and support necessary to make that happen."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Interagency Agreement Regarding IDEA - 07/01/2012

“The purpose of this Agreement is to identify and define the financial responsibilities of the Parties to this Agreement and to facilitate the provision and coordination of services for all infants, toddlers, children, youth and adults who are IDEA eligible. This Agreement formalizes policies, procedures, and fiscal responsibilities of the parties relating to IDEA.” 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Employment Consortium - 06/01/2007

“The Tennessee Employment Consortium (TEC) is a statewide organization focused on increasing the number of Tennesseans in integrated employment. The consortium comprises volunteers from the state's Division of Mental Retardation Services (DMRS) and Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Tennessee Council on Developmental Disabilities, the ARC of Tennessee, the Center on Disability and Employment at the University of Tennessee, community rehabilitation providers (CRPs), family members, and other stakeholders. TEC's ability to organize collaborative activities across state agencies, advocacy organizations, and CRPs has played an important role in increasing integrated employment outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance - 05/01/2007

~~“The Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance was formed in May 2007 to increase awareness about the need for postsecondary opportunities in Tennessee, to gather information about postsecondary programs in other states, and to develop a pilot program on a Tennessee college campus. “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “Our partnership is focused on helping: Self-Advocates to aspire toward competitive work; Employers to recognize the contributions people with disabilities can make in the workplace; Educators to prepare young people with disabilities with strong skills and opportunities; Families to communicate high expectations from an early age; and State Systems and Disability Agencies to support real work for real pay.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

The ARC Tennessee

~~“ The Arc Tennessee is a grassroots, non-profit, statewide advocacy organization for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. Founded in 1952, The Arc Tennessee is affiliated with The Arc United States and works collaboratively with local chapters across the state.The Arc Tennessee values diversity and does not discriminate based on race, ethnicity, religion, age, geographic location, sexual orientation, gender, level of disability or Limited English Proficiency.Our MissionThe Arc Tennessee empowers people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families to actively participate in the community throughout their lifetime.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Tennessee Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) - 10/01/2011

“The TDEI project will replicate and improve upon the experience of the Disability Navigator Program (DPN) active in the nine (9) participating WIBs [Workforce Investment Boards]. The DPN Initiative provided a bridge between One-Stop Career Center staff, private and public partners, and the disability community. Each participating WIB will be responsible for tailoring a basic set of services to the needs of their local population with disabilities, as well as potential employers. Three (3) WIBs will offer services to customers with disabilities in primarily rural areas. The TDEI will rely on the states two Work Incentives Planning and Assistance service providers to assist it to work with Social Security disability beneficiaries.” The grant ended in 2014.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

TN Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“Through the EFSLMP Tennessee seeks to increase the number of adults and youth with significant disabilities in the state who are working in competitive, integrated employment. Leaders in the state are specifically looking to align departmental policies for coordination of integrated employment services. They are also intending to increase the use of customized employment strategies by service providers as well as to cultivate a better understanding of and use of work incentives available to individuals receiving Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability Income. Their proposal also includes strong involvement of the One-Stop Career Centers. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) will be the lead agency for this grant.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AIDD Partnerships in Employment

TennesseeWorks Partnership: Changing the Employment Landscape“The Vanderbilt Kennedy University Center for Excellence in DevelopmentalDisabilities and 28 agencies and organizations will develop a vibrant collaborativeacross the state to increase the number of young people accessing competitiveemployment prior to leaving high school; increase the capacity and commitmentamong families and practitioners to support competitive employment and careerdevelopment; raise expectations among youth, families, educators and providers;reallocate resources and funding streams toward competitive employment; andincrease the number of families and educators accessing professional development,resources, and supports addressing competitive employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Guide for Provider Transformation to an Employment First Service Model - 06/15/2016

~~Transition to an Employment First Service Model Guide is issuedOrganizations that are successful in their transformation to an Employment First provider agency share three elements, all of which should be addressed:1. Strategy:  What will you do?2. Structure:  Who does it?3. Systems:  How will your agency do it?

An understanding of these elements can give a framework for an agency to understandwhat parts of the organization need to be changed. In order to help agencies decide what to change, an Agency Assessment is provided in the Appendices.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Readiness program (ERP)

The focus of the Employment Readiness Program (ERP) is to prepare students in areas of employment and life skills. The ERP curriculum-based course spans 14 weeks and includes individualized and group format instruction and community based hands-on experience in a variety of work environments.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment and Individuals With Disabilities

This sheet contains tips and resources related to customized and supported employment in relation to Tennessee Disability Pathfinder and TennesseeWorks.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Employment First Trainings

MG&A articles & presentations on Customized Employment and Discovery from the TDI&DD website.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

Basic Rights: Training on IDEA Parent’s Introduction to Special Education Workshop

This workshop is designed for professionals and parents of children in special education or that might need special education. Come and gain a working knowledge of special education laws, including your role in the development of an appropriate education program (IEP) and how to be an effective partner with the school team in the process.  
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy, Education and Employment

“ Support for diversity and inclusion is a value at the core of the Center for Literacy, Education and Employment (CLEE). In addition, we determine the direction of our work by listening to and learning from practitioners, policymakers, business leaders and community leaders, as well as the academic community. As a result, the Center has a long history of involvement in advocacy efforts in the fields of literacy, education and employment, particularly those focused on supporting ALL individuals to flourish in an increasingly complex and interconnected world.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Customized Employment Partnership 2004

“The Tennessee Olmstead WorkFORCE Partnership (Working for Freedom Opportunity and Real Choice through Community Employment) is pleased to announce the availability of up to $75,000 per year per grantee for three years (a total award of $225,000 per grantee) to develop the capacity of at least one of their Career Centers to create “Tennessee Customized Employment Partnership” (TCEP) Hubs to provide customized employment services to people with significant disabilities. Funding is contingent upon continued appropriation from the federal government. Through an application process, up to three awards will be made. This project is supported by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability & Employment Policy (ODEP) through a grant to The Arc of Tennessee.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“Through the EFSLMP Tennessee seeks to increase the number of adults and youth with significant disabilities in the state who are working in competitive, integrated employment. Leaders in the state are specifically looking to align departmental policies for coordination of integrated employment services. They are also intending to increase the use of customized employment strategies by service providers as well as to cultivate a better understanding of and use of work incentives available to individuals receiving Supplemental Security Income or Social Security Disability Income. Their proposal also includes strong involvement of the One-Stop Career Centers. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) will be the lead agency for this grant.”

NOTE: Tennessee is using resources from the EFLSMP to provide training and capacity building to large workshops in the state. The capacity building includes customized employment and alternative sources of funding to providers, including becoming an Employment Network of the Ticket to Work Program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “This new website is an online resource for those in our state committed to these goals. [You can] [s]elect your role… to find comprehensive information, trainings, videos, success stories, and many other resources to equip, inform, and inspire your work.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Clover Bottom, Greene Valley, and Nat T. Winston Developmental Centers - Memorandum Approving Exit Plan (2015) - 01/29/2015

To effectively facilitate reform in mental health services, the Court cannot allow “perfect to become the enemy of good” nor allow the concepts of federalism and separation of powers to be ignored. The Court concludes that the Exit Plan presented by the Parties is “fair, reasonable, and adequate” and provides the next iteration of improvement to the lives of those with disabilities in Tennessee. It will test political will and legislative leadership to continue that progress and to determine how best to care for those often left in the shadows.    For the reasons detailed above, the Court will grant the unopposed joint motion seeking approval of an Exit Plan (Docket No. 1118-1) and entry of a proposed Agreed Order (Docket No. 1118-2). The Motion to Intervene brought by conservators of GVDC residents and Citizens for a Better Tennessee (Docket No. 1121) will be denied. .  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Tennessee Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan (11/2015) Amended Based on Public Comment (2/2016) - 07/31/2018

~~1915 (c) waiver settings assessed included:• Residential Habilitation• Employment and Day (Community and Facility Based Day, In-home Day, and Supported Employment)• Family Model Residential Support• Medical Residential Services• Supported Living

1115 CHOICES waiver settings assessed included:•Adult Day Care•Assisted Care Living Facility•Critical Adult Care Home

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment and Community First CHOICES (Employment Program) - 07/01/2016

~~The Employment and Community First CHOICES program is administered by TennCare through its contracted managed care organizations.  It offers services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  Services in the program will help people become employed and live as independently as possible in the community.  All new enrollment is in the Employment and Community First CHOICES program, as DIDD’s waivers are closed to new enrollment.

There is a limited amount of funding available to serve people each year.  That means not everyone who wants to apply can enroll or get services right away.." 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee State Plan Amendment (SPA) 16-0001 (approved 3-22-2016) - 03/22/2016

The State covers low-income families and children for Transitional Medical Assistance (TMA) under section 1925 of the Social Security Act (the Act). This coverage is provided for families who no longer qualify under section 1931 of the Act due to increased earned income, or working hours, from the caretaker relative’s employment, or due to the loss of a time-limited earned income disregard. (1902(a)(52), 1902(e)(1), and 1925 of the Act)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Tennessee Medicaid State Plan

Tennessee’s full state plan for TennCare, Tennessee’s Medicaid Program.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Tennessee 1915(c) Home and Community Based Service "Self Determination Waiver Program "

The Self-Determination Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive, integrated settings and engage in community life. Services are delivered in a manner which ensures each individual’s rights of privacy, dignity, respect and freedom from coercion and restraint; optimizes individual initiative, autonomy, and independence in making life choices; and are delivered in a manner that comports fully with standards applicable to HCBS settings delivered under Section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act…  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

TN The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02)

~~“The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02) serves children and adults with intellectual disabilities and children under age six with developmental delay who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the Self-Determination waiver, would require placement in a private ICF/IID.

The Self-Determination Waiver Program affords persons supported the opportunity to directly manage selected services, including the recruitment and management of service providers. Participants and families (as appropriate) electing self-direction are empowered and have the responsibility for managing, in accordance with waiver service definitions and limitations, a self-determination budget affording flexibility in service design and delivery. The Self-Determination Waiver Program serves persons who have an established non-institutional place of residence where they live with their family, a non-related caregiver or in their own home and whose needs can be met effectively by the combination of waiver services through this program and natural and other supports available to them. The Self-Determination Waiver does not include residential services such as supported living.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap Waiver (#0357.R03)

~~“The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap (CAC) Waiver (#0357.R03), formerly known as the Arlington Waiver, serves individuals with intellectual disabilities who are former members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Arlington Developmental Center), current members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Clover Bottom Developmental Center), and individuals transitioned from the Statewide Waiver (#0128) upon its renewal on January 1, 2015, because they were identified by the state as receiving services in excess of the individual cost neutrality cap established for the Statewide Waiver. These are individuals who have been institutionalized in a public institution, are part of a certified class because they were determined to be at risk of placement in a public institution, or have significant services/support needs consistent with that of the population served in a public ICF/IID and who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the CAC waiver, would require placement in an ICF/IID.

The CAC Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings and engage in community life.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee Statewide Waiver (0128.R05)

~~“The Statewide Waiver (0128.R05) serves adults with intellectual disabilities and children under age six with developmental delay who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the Statewide Waiver, would require placement in a private Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID).

The Statewide Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each person supported pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings and engage in community life “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

TN Money Follows the Person (MFP)

“Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a federally funded grant awarded to TennCare with the purpose of assisting the state to transition people from nursing homes and institutions to home and community based care, and to also assist the state to rebalance their long term care expenditures.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

Tennessee is the Volunteer State, and its outstanding Employment First initiatives for individuals with disabilities show why this state exemplifies "America at its Best!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Tennessee’s VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
0.77%
Change from
2015 to 2016
6,651,194
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.46%
Change from
2015 to 2016
558,852
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.12%
Change from
2015 to 2016
174,370
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.69%
Change from
2015 to 2016
31.20%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.17%
Change from
2015 to 2016
76.09%

State Data

General

2016
Population. 6,651,194
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 558,852
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 174,370
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,640,999
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 31.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.09%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.30%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.60%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 486,269
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 529,763
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 829,448
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 149,092
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,457
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,255
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,863
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 568
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 18,165
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 4,641

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,932
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 249,055

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 12,330
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 27,376
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 54,059
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.30%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 51.70%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 484
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,150
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 232
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 92,792

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 9,133
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 87
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 55
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,728
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 366,628
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,124,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $23,338,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $52,890,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 18.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 6,257
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,408
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 19.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 70.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.78%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 71.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 33.93%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 64.43%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.50%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 871,430
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,411
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 56,166
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 136,631
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 192,797
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 86
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 190
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 276
AbilityOne wages (products). $490,797
AbilityOne wages (services). $1,584,403

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 44
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 5
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 49
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,356
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 46
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,402

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

One-Stop Design and Delivery: The increased use of technology allows the Tennessee Workforce System to seamlessly integrate services, system and program changes in accordance with WIOA. The connection in Jobs4TN and VOS leverage the case management processes for all participants and programs that are involved in WIOA implementation across the state. The efficiencies realized with the common intake process and reporting will enable all programs and partners included in this Combined State Plan to mutually benefit from electronic referrals and reporting and coordinate services and tracking of co-enrolled participants, to name a few. Additionally, the centralized and coordinated efforts from all program partners eases the communication and engagement of job seekers, employers, local government support, community partners, and additional external clients. As it pertains to individuals with disabilities, Tennessee serves as an Employment First state, allowing seamless integration and support for this hard to serve population. (Page 41)    

Tennessee is an Employment First State, and there is an established Employment First Task Force. The Employment First Task force facilitated the completion of a Memorandum of Understanding for services to youth with disabilities between the following State agencies:

  • Vocational Rehabilitation
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Labor and Workforce Development
  • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
  • Council on Developmental Disabilities (Oversees the Implementation of the MOU) (Page 206)       
Customized Employment

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry.    (Page 203)                                                                                                                          

Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school and after-school opportunities and experiences outside of the traditional school settings. Examples of Work-Based Learning Experiences include On-the-Job Trainings, Apprenticeships, Internships, Summer Work Experiences, Work-Based Trainings, Job Search Assistance, Job Placement Assistance, On-the-Job Supports and Customized Employment. (Page 205)                                          

Continuing the practice of ensuring the availability of appropriate training activities and resources to meet the individualized needs of clients by seeking out and developing partnerships with other private and public entities to provide specialized education and training activities, to include those that can be provided through self-employment, on-the-job-training by employers, and customized employment. (Page 239)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/DRC

Providing cross training to the career center staff in regard to meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. Continue to provide consultation on career center accessibility and accommodation needs in regard to the accessibility needs in the building(s), and accommodations in terms of appropriate technology needed to serve individuals with the disabilities. Continue to partner with the American Job Centers (AJCs) in employment initiatives such as the summer youth employment project and the DEI grant. (Pages 240-241)

Competitive Integrated Employment

All SCSEP participants are required to develop an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) at the time of enrollment. The IEP serves as a personal road-map to success and is designed to specifically assist the participant in meeting both personal and program goals. Each participant receives specialized training that fits under his or her IEP and is assigned to a host agency to develop or improve skills. The plan also determines if the Host Agency has met the participant’s requirements. In addition, the Host Agency provides services to low-income older persons, to the economically disadvantaged and to organizations offering services which provide positive contributions to the welfare of the general community. Opportunities to serve other groups will also be provided through placement in schools, day-care programs, health and hospital programs, and agencies serving individuals with physical and developmental disabilities. (Page 385)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

In addition, although many of the SCSEP participants need or want to work they may be long-term consumers of government assistance programs for income or other supports. The finding is recipients of these government assistance programs such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Disability Insurance or Housing and Urban Development (HUD) never leaves, especially for employment, once on these programs. Even when there is an opportunity for the individual to move off government assistance into economic self-sufficiency, there is fear that if government assistance is needed again the process is so long and tedious it will not be available. SCSEP then becomes just a program to supplement the income of those participants receiving benefits from these programs. (Page 397)

Economic self-sufficiency through leveraging of all resources including tax incentives, financial education, social security work incentives, benefits planning, and other strategies to enhance profitable employment. The use of a universal design as a framework for the organization of employment policy and services in Tennessee. Customized and other flexible work options for individuals with disabilities. The assurance that the structural and technological accessibility of all AJC’s for persons with disabilities who are seeking employment services is further enhanced by participation in disability awareness/sensitivity training to assist AJC staff to understand how to provide quality employment services for this targeted population. The concept immediately increased the use of AJC by persons with disabilities. Outreach and education also increased throughout the centers. (Page 123)

  • Tennessee Disability Coalition Benefits to Work (Page 201)
Career Pathways

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

Tennessee will compete Section 225 according to the narrative set forth in (5)(B)(i). The grants awarded may be for up to 20% of the available federal dollars as set forth in section 222(a)(1).  The funds described in section 225(a) shall be used for the cost of educational programs for criminal offenders in correctional institutions and for other institutionalized individuals, including academic programs for:

  1. adult education and literacy activities;
  2. special education, as determined by the agency;
  3. secondary school credit;
  4. integrated education and training;
  5. career pathways;
  6. concurrent enrollment;
  7. peer tutoring; and
  8. transition to re-entry initiatives and other post release services with the goal of reducing recidivism. (Page 174) 

This will be done by having by eligible providers partnering with their local AJC for the referral of potential students; there, students will be assisted in building a resume and creating an account in Jobs4TN. Eligible providers will also refer students completing the program to the Tennessee Career Center for career information and job placement. Eligible providers will refer eligible students completing the program to the Local Workforce Board or Vocational Rehabilitation as set forth in this State Plan; this will include the development of career pathways to provide access to employment and training services for individuals in adult education and literacy activities. (Page 177)

Employer Engagement

The Division will continue to encourage CRPs to become Employment Networks as possible funding source for on-going support needs. The Division will continue to train CRPs and VR staff to increase usage of SSA PASS plan.

The Division will assure that funds are made available will only be used to provide Supported Employment services to individuals who are eligible to receive such services. (Page 249)

511

The department’s web-based Virtual One-Stop System (VOS) is the most advanced and comprehensive statewide workforce development information and reporting system available today. Using a set of core proprietary software components created by Geographic Solutions Inc., the department and its partners have modernized and integrated workforce services into a single computing platform referred to as Jobs4TN. Working from the WIOA statutes, we have moved forward with establishing needed data points in our systems, such as those spelled out in the draft PIRL, data specifications, and the Section 188 NPRM. (Page 96)  

 Our goal is to carry out all data-collection and reporting processes under this plan using a single virtual system, specifically, the Jobs4TN system which is being deployed by Geographic Solutions, Inc., TDLWD’s system of record for workforce data across all core programs. And to the extent possible, recognizing cost and infrastructure limitations, also to be deployed for certain mandatory and optional partners as WIOA takes shape in the future. (Page 96)

Information such as the FEIN, is founded in compliance with confidentiality provisions in 20 CFR Section 603, as well as in accordance with the emerging requirements of the SWIS (State Wage Interchange System) data sharing agreement. TEGL 7-16, Data Matching to Facilitate WIOA Performance Reporting, also is being used to guide the process and direction of partnership agreements, similar to MOUs, which define, if needed, authorized data share staff among program and IT staff of the TN agencies noted above. (Page 119)

Mental Health

REGION AND LOCAL LEVEL ACCOUNTABILITY

Tennessee’s workforce development system, both regional and local, requires that programs and providers co-locate, coordinate, and integrate activities and information, so that the system is cohesive and accessible for individuals and businesses alike. Accountability goals increase the long-term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment; to improve services to employers; and to demonstrate continuous improvement. The certification policy is the foundation to aligning programs, policies, and activities in the State’s Workforce System. This policy will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) and will undergird continuous improvement of one stop centers. It specifies minimum standards for the service menu and customer service to be met and branding requirements that demonstrate a statewide Workforce System. This certification process will demonstrate that the local workforce development boards can ensure that employment and training programs in their communities operate at the highest level of quality and consistency, while satisfying the expectations and needs of their customers. (Page 106)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. Physical accessibility for people with disabilities was implemented and upgraded with the assistance of Tennessee Department Human Services (DHS) - Vocational Rehabilitation Program. Tennessee will be undergoing an accessibility study to ensure all AJC’s can be accessed. (Page 123)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Annual Report 2018 - 10/01/2018

~The  Department  of  Intellectual  and  Developmental  Disabilities  (DIDD)  is  the  state department  responsible  for  administration  and  oversight  of  community-based services  for  Tennesseans  with  intellectual  and  developmental  disabilities.  The department  operates  with  more  than  1,400  state  employees  and  400  community providers to serve approximately 7,800 people with intellectual disabilities through ts  Home  and  Community  Based  Waivers  and  4,500  people  through  the  Family Support  Program.    It  also  operates  38  Intermediate  Care  Facilities  for  Individuals with  Intellectual  Disabilities  (ICF/IID)  program  including  the  Harold  Jordan  Center, and three seating and positioning clinics across Tennessee.DIDD strives to support people with disabilities to live fulfilling and rewarding lives and become the nation’s most person-centered and cost-effective state support system for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Services (ages 14-24) - 09/12/2018

~~Title I of WIOA affirms the Department of Labor’s (DOL) commitment to providing high-quality services for youth (age 14-24), beginning with career exploration and guidance, continued support for educational attainment, opportunities for skills training, such as pre-apprenticeships or internships, for in-demand industries and occupations, and culminating with employment, enrollment in postsecondary education, or a Registered Apprenticeship.

To be eligible for Youth Services, an individual must meet specific requirements related to age and income and school statuses that result in an employment barrier. Program participation is assessed by distinct for in-school youth (ISY) or out-of-school youth (OSY)…..ISY must be:a. 14-21 years of ageb. Attending secondary or post-secondary schoolc. Low-income…

7.Individual with a disability

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Notice of Change in TennCare II Demonstration: Amendment 37 - 09/05/2018

~~Amendment 37 also includes a number of other adjustments to ECF CHOICES based  on  learnings  from  the  first  two  years  of  the  program’s  implementation. The otherchanges to the ECF CHOICES program proposed in Amendment 37 are:•Modifying   the   Expenditure   Caps   for   the   existing   ECF   CHOICES   Groups   5   and   6. These modifications will give  the  State  additional flexibility to target services  based  on  a  person’s identified   needs   and   will enhance access to Supported Employment and/or Individual Employment Support benefits.•Expanding the existing exception for persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES Group 6 from one of the State’s 1915(c) waiver programs and who are “at risk” of institutionalization to also apply to persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES from an Intermediate Care Facilityfor Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities.•Clarifying that a person who meets the nursing facility level of care criteria may be enrolled in ECF CHOICES Group 5 so long as the person’s needs can be safely met in Group 5.•Modifications and clarifications to certain ECF CHOICES service definitions. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DIDD Launches State Employment Mentorship Program - 08/02/2018

~~‘The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) launched a new mentorship program today, designed to leverage in-state employment expertise to increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities in Tennessee for years to come.

The focus of the Tennessee Employment First Leadership Initiative (TEFLI) is to provide consultation and mentoring to intellectual and developmental disability providers around the state as they transition people with disabilities from sheltered workshops to competitive integrated employment opportunities in the community. Persons who work at sheltered workshops typically make subminimum wage, as opposed to earning minimum wage or higher in community employment.’

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Tennessee Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan (11/2015) Amended Based on Public Comment (2/2016) - 07/31/2018

~~1915 (c) waiver settings assessed included:• Residential Habilitation• Employment and Day (Community and Facility Based Day, In-home Day, and Supported Employment)• Family Model Residential Support• Medical Residential Services• Supported Living

1115 CHOICES waiver settings assessed included:•Adult Day Care•Assisted Care Living Facility•Critical Adult Care Home

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment First Strategic Plan 2018 Goals - 07/01/2018

~~1) Align service delivery systems and strengthen coordination to increase employment opportunities for Tennesseans with disabilities (#Data #Coordination #WIOA #Policy #Legislation #Workforce)2) Build shared community commitment to Employment First (#Self-Advocates #Families #Community #Communication)3) Increase the number of employers that hire people with disabilities (#Businesses)4) Make Tennessee state government a model employer of people with disabilities (#Government #Leadership)5) Prepare students for employment and post-secondary success (#Education #Transition) 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

TennCare Long Term Care Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“Job Development or Self-Employment Start Up.  For purposes of ECF CHOICES only and limited to members age 16 or older: (a) This is a time-limited service designed to implement a Job Development or Self Employment Plan as follows: 1.  Job Development is support to obtain an individualized competitive or customized job in an integrated employment setting in the general workforce, for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but ideally not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals without disabilities. The Job Development strategy should reflect best practices and be adjusted based on whether the individual is seeking competitive or customized employment. 2.  Self-Employment Start Up is support in implementing a self-employment business plan. The outcome of this service is expected to be the achievement of an individualized integrated employment or self-employment outcome consistent with the individual’s personal and career goals, as determined through Exploration, Discovery and/or the Situational Observation and Assessment, if authorized, and as identified in the Job Development or Self-Employment Plan that guides the delivery of this service.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

FY 2019 Provider Rate Increase FAQ's - 06/13/2018

~~During the past legislative session, Governor Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly dedicated approximately $50 million in state and federal dollars towards a rate increase for providers contracted with the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.  The legislation clearly states the funds are for the sole purpose of increasing the Direct Support Professional (DSP) staff salary component in the DIDD provider rate methodology, with a legislative intent to increase the hourly wages of DSPs at DIDD contracted provider agencies.

The legislation clearly states the funding is intended to increase the wages of direct support professionals.  Each provider agency will need to determine the best strategy to honor the legislative intent.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Expect Employment 2017: TN Employment First Task Force Report to the Governor - 08/01/2017

“Over the course of the fiscal year, several task force members completed major objectives in the strategic plan. Those include the implementation of the Employment and Community First CHOICES program and launch of the Transition Tennessee site. In addition, several agencies operationalized Memorandums of Understanding to further streamline services for people whose support needs may overlap two or more state agencies. The task force has also brought in new members and agencies, including the Department of Health. In an effort to bolster employer outreach, the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development joined the task force and embraced its mission wholeheartedly.

This year’s Expect Employment Report documents the task force’s successes goal by goal, objective by objective. It is clear reading through the report that collaboration has allowed for change to happen more quickly. In addition, throughout the report are the stories of real people who have been positively impacted by the programs and policies developed through the work of state agencies, task force members, and partner organizations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

TN Special Education Framework - 08/01/2017

“The purpose of the Special Education Framework is to support educators in writing instructionally appropriate IEPs. Several years ago, the department developed the first Special Education Framework and has continuously garnered feedback from educators on how to improve the framework in order to be most useful to teachers as they support students with disabilities.

The framework is now organized into two sections: (I) general information about special education and (II) writing IEPs. Other significant improvements include a component on the development of writing short-term objectives, additional clarification around service delivery, and links to resources for the IEP team. Looking ahead, the next revision of the framework will include a third section on the implementation of IEPs—with a clear delineation between best practices and legal requirements.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Tennessee HB 1276: Supporting Business Owners with Disabilities - 06/06/2017

“As enacted, adds "businesses owned by persons with disabilities" to the Tennessee Minority-Owned, Woman-Owned and Small Business Procurement and Contracting Act; requires that the annual report made by the chief procurement officer concerning the awarding of purchases to minority-owned business, woman-owned business, service-disabled veteran-owned business, or small business and the total value of awards made also include the total dollar amount of purchases awarded to all businesses in this state”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

"Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee HB 896/SB 429 (ABLE) - 02/05/2015

The purpose of this bill is to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence,  and quality of life; and (2) To provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of individuals with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the supplemental security income program under Title XVI of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C.§§ 1381 et seq.);the TennCare programs under Title XIX of the Social Security Act, (42 U.S.C. §§1396 et seq.); or any successor to the TennCare program administered pursuant to the federal Medicaid laws, the individual’s employment, and other sources  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee Title Code 67

A job tax credit of five thousand dollars ($5,000) for each net new full-time employee job, and two thousand dollars ($2,000) for each net new part-time employee job, for a person with disabilities who is receiving state services directly related to such disabilities, shall be allowed against a taxpayer's franchise and excise liability tax for that year; provided, that:            (A)  The employment of such individual creates a net increase in the number of persons with disabilities employed by the taxpayer within the ninety-day period immediately preceding the employment;            (B)  The taxpayer provides such employment for at least twelve (12) consecutive months and for no less than the minimal hours per week; and for employees enrolled in the minimal health care benefits described in subdivision (g)(1), for respective full-time employment jobs and part-time employment jobs;   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Governor’s Executive Order Order Establishing The Tennessee Employment First I - 06/19/2013

“NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Haslam, Governor of the State of Tennessee… do hereby order and direct the following:

1. State agencies coordinate efforts to increase opportunities for integrated and competitive employment for Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental illnesses, substance abuse disorders and other disabilities.2. The Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities convene an Employment First Taskforce (“Taskforce”).3 The Taskforce shall consist of representatives from the agencies administering disability services, family members of persons receiving employment services, vocational rehabilitation, workforce services and education, as well as consumer advocates and third party disability services providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 22

Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Annual Report 2018 - 10/01/2018

~The  Department  of  Intellectual  and  Developmental  Disabilities  (DIDD)  is  the  state department  responsible  for  administration  and  oversight  of  community-based services  for  Tennesseans  with  intellectual  and  developmental  disabilities.  The department  operates  with  more  than  1,400  state  employees  and  400  community providers to serve approximately 7,800 people with intellectual disabilities through ts  Home  and  Community  Based  Waivers  and  4,500  people  through  the  Family Support  Program.    It  also  operates  38  Intermediate  Care  Facilities  for  Individuals with  Intellectual  Disabilities  (ICF/IID)  program  including  the  Harold  Jordan  Center, and three seating and positioning clinics across Tennessee.DIDD strives to support people with disabilities to live fulfilling and rewarding lives and become the nation’s most person-centered and cost-effective state support system for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Youth Services (ages 14-24) - 09/12/2018

~~Title I of WIOA affirms the Department of Labor’s (DOL) commitment to providing high-quality services for youth (age 14-24), beginning with career exploration and guidance, continued support for educational attainment, opportunities for skills training, such as pre-apprenticeships or internships, for in-demand industries and occupations, and culminating with employment, enrollment in postsecondary education, or a Registered Apprenticeship.

To be eligible for Youth Services, an individual must meet specific requirements related to age and income and school statuses that result in an employment barrier. Program participation is assessed by distinct for in-school youth (ISY) or out-of-school youth (OSY)…..ISY must be:a. 14-21 years of ageb. Attending secondary or post-secondary schoolc. Low-income…

7.Individual with a disability

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Notice of Change in TennCare II Demonstration: Amendment 37 - 09/05/2018

~~Amendment 37 also includes a number of other adjustments to ECF CHOICES based  on  learnings  from  the  first  two  years  of  the  program’s  implementation. The otherchanges to the ECF CHOICES program proposed in Amendment 37 are:•Modifying   the   Expenditure   Caps   for   the   existing   ECF   CHOICES   Groups   5   and   6. These modifications will give  the  State  additional flexibility to target services  based  on  a  person’s identified   needs   and   will enhance access to Supported Employment and/or Individual Employment Support benefits.•Expanding the existing exception for persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES Group 6 from one of the State’s 1915(c) waiver programs and who are “at risk” of institutionalization to also apply to persons who are transitioning into ECF CHOICES from an Intermediate Care Facilityfor Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities.•Clarifying that a person who meets the nursing facility level of care criteria may be enrolled in ECF CHOICES Group 5 so long as the person’s needs can be safely met in Group 5.•Modifications and clarifications to certain ECF CHOICES service definitions. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DIDD Launches State Employment Mentorship Program - 08/02/2018

~~‘The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) launched a new mentorship program today, designed to leverage in-state employment expertise to increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities in Tennessee for years to come.

The focus of the Tennessee Employment First Leadership Initiative (TEFLI) is to provide consultation and mentoring to intellectual and developmental disability providers around the state as they transition people with disabilities from sheltered workshops to competitive integrated employment opportunities in the community. Persons who work at sheltered workshops typically make subminimum wage, as opposed to earning minimum wage or higher in community employment.’

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Employment First Strategic Plan 2018 Goals - 07/01/2018

~~1) Align service delivery systems and strengthen coordination to increase employment opportunities for Tennesseans with disabilities (#Data #Coordination #WIOA #Policy #Legislation #Workforce)2) Build shared community commitment to Employment First (#Self-Advocates #Families #Community #Communication)3) Increase the number of employers that hire people with disabilities (#Businesses)4) Make Tennessee state government a model employer of people with disabilities (#Government #Leadership)5) Prepare students for employment and post-secondary success (#Education #Transition) 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

TennCare Long Term Care Programs - 07/01/2018

~~“Job Development or Self-Employment Start Up.  For purposes of ECF CHOICES only and limited to members age 16 or older: (a) This is a time-limited service designed to implement a Job Development or Self Employment Plan as follows: 1.  Job Development is support to obtain an individualized competitive or customized job in an integrated employment setting in the general workforce, for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but ideally not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals without disabilities. The Job Development strategy should reflect best practices and be adjusted based on whether the individual is seeking competitive or customized employment. 2.  Self-Employment Start Up is support in implementing a self-employment business plan. The outcome of this service is expected to be the achievement of an individualized integrated employment or self-employment outcome consistent with the individual’s personal and career goals, as determined through Exploration, Discovery and/or the Situational Observation and Assessment, if authorized, and as identified in the Job Development or Self-Employment Plan that guides the delivery of this service.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

FY 2019 Provider Rate Increase FAQ's - 06/13/2018

~~During the past legislative session, Governor Haslam and the Tennessee General Assembly dedicated approximately $50 million in state and federal dollars towards a rate increase for providers contracted with the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.  The legislation clearly states the funds are for the sole purpose of increasing the Direct Support Professional (DSP) staff salary component in the DIDD provider rate methodology, with a legislative intent to increase the hourly wages of DSPs at DIDD contracted provider agencies.

The legislation clearly states the funding is intended to increase the wages of direct support professionals.  Each provider agency will need to determine the best strategy to honor the legislative intent.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Expect Employment 2017: TN Employment First Task Force Report to the Governor - 08/01/2017

“Over the course of the fiscal year, several task force members completed major objectives in the strategic plan. Those include the implementation of the Employment and Community First CHOICES program and launch of the Transition Tennessee site. In addition, several agencies operationalized Memorandums of Understanding to further streamline services for people whose support needs may overlap two or more state agencies. The task force has also brought in new members and agencies, including the Department of Health. In an effort to bolster employer outreach, the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development joined the task force and embraced its mission wholeheartedly.

This year’s Expect Employment Report documents the task force’s successes goal by goal, objective by objective. It is clear reading through the report that collaboration has allowed for change to happen more quickly. In addition, throughout the report are the stories of real people who have been positively impacted by the programs and policies developed through the work of state agencies, task force members, and partner organizations.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

TN Special Education Framework - 08/01/2017

“The purpose of the Special Education Framework is to support educators in writing instructionally appropriate IEPs. Several years ago, the department developed the first Special Education Framework and has continuously garnered feedback from educators on how to improve the framework in order to be most useful to teachers as they support students with disabilities.

The framework is now organized into two sections: (I) general information about special education and (II) writing IEPs. Other significant improvements include a component on the development of writing short-term objectives, additional clarification around service delivery, and links to resources for the IEP team. Looking ahead, the next revision of the framework will include a third section on the implementation of IEPs—with a clear delineation between best practices and legal requirements.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Workforce Services Policy – Co-Enrollment of American Job Center Customers - 05/12/2017

“The purpose of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) is to develop Tennessee’s workforce by encouraging access to education and skills training as they directly align with business needs. This policy introduces strategies to strengthen participant outcomes by increasing access to multiple services in order to benefit the long-term success of recipients. This simultaneous admission to programs is known as ‘co-enrollment’…

Individuals entering an American Job Center will be greeted with a “no wrong door” approach; the Tennessee Combined State Plan indicates that there is no incorrect entry point for an individual seeking services. During the first step a staff member will conduct a verbal assessment – mainly focused on the individual’s eligibility for WIOA Title I and III programs – that addresses barriers to employment, establishes priority of service, and identifies a disability that requires further resources. Using this assessment the staff member then offers guidance about the most appropriate next steps.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Memorandum of Understanding Between The Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and The State of Tennessee Bureau of TennCare, Division of Long Term Services and Supports - 03/20/2017

“This Memorandum is entered into and based upon the philosophy of Employment First which is based upon the premise that all citizens, including individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life. Because both VR and TennCare offer employment supports for people with disabilities, this Memorandum is intended to ensure that each agency provides those services to common customers in coordination with the other to ensure efficient use of resources and effective delivery of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee’s Independent Living & Developmental Disabilities Network: Joint Publication on Network Programs and Collaborations - 03/01/2017

“In September 2015, Tennessee agencies funded through the Developmental Disabilities Act and Tennessee’s Independent Living programs funded through the Rehabilitation Act met to begin strategic coordination among our organizations. Having been recently relocated to a new federal Administration on Disabilities, our programs had an opportunity to increase our impact in Tennessee by joining forces to address common goals. Together we established a shared priority: improving youth transition outcomes through postsecondary education and job training that leads to competitive and integrated employment. Since that time, our two networks continue to meet together to work on details of joint projects, including this publication!

We hope you find this publication informative and that you learn something new about the programs across Tennessee funded under the Independent Living Administration and the Developmental Disabilities Act. Please reach out to us to find ways that you can become involved in our work. We are always interested in hearing from Tennesseans with disabilities about your experiences in getting supports and services you need.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Memorandum of Understanding between DIDD and VR - 01/07/2016

On December 14, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Division of Rehabilitation Services, Vocational Rehabilitation Program and DIDD was finalized. In 2014, both agencies started discussing the option of creating an MOU through a Vision Quest workgroup (as part of the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program) spearheaded by two ODEP Subject Matter Experts: Dr. Stephen Hall and Sara Murphy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding for School-to-Work Transition - 08/05/2015

Five state agencies have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to improve services and better prepare youth with disabilities to transition from school into integrated employment in the community.  The MOU focuses on students age 14 years and over and aims to ensure all youth with disabilities leaving secondary education are prepared for either post-secondary training and/or integrated employment appropriate for their preferences, interests, skills and abilities.  “It’s vitally important that all state agencies work together to make sure youth with disabilities leave school and have the opportunity to contribute to the workforce,” Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) Commissioner Debra Payne said.  “It takes a team effort to make sure they have the training and support necessary to make that happen."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships