Tennessee

States - Big Screen

Tennessee is the Volunteer State, and its outstanding Employment First initiatives for individuals with disabilities show why this state exemplifies "America at its Best!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Tennessee’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.8%
Change from
2017 to 2018
6,770,010
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.69%
Change from
2017 to 2018
552,942
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.14%
Change from
2017 to 2018
184,851
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.45%
Change from
2017 to 2018
33.43%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.44%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.18%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 6,651,194 6,715,984 6,770,010
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 558,852 538,061 552,942
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 174,370 179,049 184,851
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,640,999 2,734,895 2,725,255
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 31.20% 33.28% 33.43%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.09% 77.52% 77.18%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.80% 3.70% 3.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.30% 23.20% 22.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.60% 13.50% 14.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 486,269 486,795 494,694
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 529,763 532,484 534,166
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 829,448 831,407 835,143
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 149,092 151,192 156,250
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,457 19,117 24,494
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,255 4,664 3,909
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,863 7,877 8,862
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 568 N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 18,165 19,117 18,506
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 4,641 4,331 5,921

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,932 5,085 5,044
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.90% 3.00% 3.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 249,055 245,370 241,307

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 12,330 10,800 10,730
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 27,376 23,450 24,420
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 54,059 43,641 44,279
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.80% 24.70% 24.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.30% 0.50% 0.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 0.70% 0.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 0.20% 0.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 51.70% 53.50% 36.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 484 806 837
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,150 1,057 867
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 232 250 109
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 92,792 85,677 64,870

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,806 8,544 9,133
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 108 95 87
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 59 70 55
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 74.00% 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.91 1.06 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,648
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 282 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 272 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 794 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,160 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 992 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 148 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.30% 29.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,463 7,728 7,233
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 370,137 366,628 362,916
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 209 203 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 409 252 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,124,000 $10,939,000 $11,303,439
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $23,338,000 $20,949,000 $14,507,332
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $52,890,000 $53,775,000 $59,349,017
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 18.00% 16.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 6,257 6,283 6,427
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,408 3,223 2,734
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 19.20 17.00 17.74

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 70.46% 70.16% 69.69%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.11% 11.48% 11.49%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.78% 1.79% 1.81%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 71.84% 72.52% 74.03%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 33.93% 21.17% 26.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 64.43% 54.60% 61.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.32% 64.62% 71.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.50% 33.43% 34.97%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 871,430
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,411
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 56,166
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 136,631
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 192,797
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 86
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 190
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 276
AbilityOne wages (products). $490,797
AbilityOne wages (services). $1,584,403

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 44 31 13
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 5 2 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 49 33 14
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,356 1,617 339
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 46 27 11
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,402 1,644 350

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~• Youth Program: While the most significant program changes under WIOA impacted the services to youth, this shift-aligned with several modifications Tennessee was already making. The existing work of Pathways Tennessee (career pathways) and the Work Based Learning Champions initiative (Career and Technical Education) both led by the Tennessee Department of Education strongly support the increased need for funding services for in-school youth as well as increasing opportunities for work experiences. Regarding out-of-school youth, the Governor’s Drive to 55 Alliance provides excellent support and resources to get 55 percent of Tennesseans equipped with a college degree or certificate by the year 2025. The Alliance’s three initiatives - Tennessee Promise, Tennessee Reconnect and Tennessee LEAP (Labor Education Alignment Program), all serve as conduits to identify and close skills gaps to better prepare our workforce and our state for the future, most of which involves better serves to youth.

Some areas for growth and improvement have been identified in asset mapping of local and state level resources, common strategy development, and meeting the growing employer demand for skilled and qualified employees. Efforts to improve these challenges have been made through hosting regional meetings with local partners to identify services provided and opportunities for increased alignment. In addition, coordinated data sharing and communication will remain areas of focus for improvement and innovation. The use of data along with integration, agility, and ability to serve those with significant barriers has always been a focus in the Workforce System; this common thread has helped shape the focus and continuation of workforce development activities statewide. (Page 52) Title I

Tennessee is an Employment First State, and there is an established Employment First Task Force. The Employment First Task force facilitated the completion of a Memorandum of Understanding for services to youth with disabilities between the following State agencies: • Vocational Rehabilitation • Department of Education • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities • Department of Labor and Workforce Development • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services • Council on Developmental Disabilities (Oversees the Implementation of the MOU)
In Tennessee the agency that administers the State Medicaid plan is the Bureau of TennCare. The VR Program is developing a Memorandum of Understanding with the Bureau of TennCare. The VR Program has developed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. (Page 223) Title I

 An interagency agreement was developed to fulfill the requirements of IDEIA. The most recent version of this agreement was signed July 1, 2012. The purpose of this agreement is to identify and define the financial responsibility of each state agency for providing services under IDEIA and to facilitate the provision and coordination of services for all children with disabilities. The following state agencies are participating in this agreement: Tennessee Department of Education; Tennessee Department of Children’s Services; Tennessee Department of Finance and Administration; Bureau of TennCare; Department of Developmental Services; Tennessee Department of Health; Tennessee Department of Human Services; Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities; and Tennessee Department of Correction.

In 2013, Governor Bill Haslam signed an Employment First Executive Order. This Executive Order established the Employment First Taskforce. In 2014, the Employment First Taskforce sign and executed a Youth Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The agencies involved in the MOU are: • Department of Education • Vocational Rehabilitation • Department of Labor and Workforce Development • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services • Council on Developmental Disabilities (this agency oversees the implementation of the MOU.

The purpose of this MOU, is to state how these agencies will work together to provide transition school to work services to students and youth with disabilities. (Page 233) Title I

The Division has established service codes and defined the extended services that will be provided for up to 4 years for youth with disabilities. The Community Rehabilitation Providers have been notified of these services that can be provided for youth.

In 2013, Governor Bill Haslam signed an Employment First Executive Order. This Executive Order established the Employment First Taskforce. In 2014, the Employment First Taskforce sign and executed a Youth Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The agencies involved in the MOU are:
• Department of Education
• Vocational Rehabilitation
• Department of Labor and Workforce Development
• Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
• Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
• Council on Developmental Disabilities (this agency oversees the implementation of the MOU. (Page 253) Title I

19. Continue implementation of the electronic case management system (TRIMS) utilizing input from agency staff and vendors to enhance the Division’s technological infrastructure and client service capabilities.

20. Continue partnerships with the three federal grants that target employment of persons with disabilities. Those grants are Tennessee Works, Employment First, and DEI. Tennessee is one of three states in the country that are receiving all three grants.

 21. Revise the self-employment process to streamline the experience for clients seeking the self-employment option. Research other state VR self-employment policies for efficient, consumer oriented strategies; and include successful business owners in the process to produce a successful program that will help individuals with disabilities become successful entrepreneurs. (Page 257) Title I

There is a small pilot supported employment program for individuals with intellectual and development disabilities that have a behavioral health diagnosis. This pilot program is utilizing IPS in providing SE services. IPS is a promising employment service model for non-behavioral health individuals. The Division along with the DIDD, DMHSAS, and the CRP are testing the applicability of the IPS model in serving individuals with said diagnoses.

For FFY 2018, the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) has selected Tennessee as a Core and Vision Quest state to receive technical assistance under the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). As a Core state, TN will be assisted in Employer Engagement and Provider Transformation. TN’s goal to increase the number of providers undergoing transformation and increasing the people engaged in competitive integrated employment. As a Vision Quest state, TN will receive guidance about funding and expansion of IPS services in partnership with VR, DMHSAS, and TennCare. (Page 264) Title I

Tennessee is an Employment First State, and there is an established Employment First Task Force. The Employment First Task force facilitated the completion of a Memorandum of Understanding for services to youth with disabilities between the following State agencies:
• Vocational Rehabilitation
• Department of Education
• Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
• Department of Labor and Workforce Development
• Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
• Council on Developmental Disabilities (Oversees the Implementation of the MOU

In Tennessee the agency that administers the State Medicaid plan is the Bureau of TennCare. The VR Program is developing a Memorandum of Understanding with the Bureau of TennCare. The VR Program has developed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. (Page 505) Title I

For FFY 2018, the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) has selected Tennessee as a Core and Vision Quest state to receive technical assistance under the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). As a Core state, TN will be assisted in Employer Engagement and Provider Transformation. TN’s goal to increase the number of providers undergoing transformation and increasing the people engaged in competitive integrated employment. As a Vision Quest state, TN will receive guidance about funding and expansion of IPS services in partnership with VR, DMHSAS, and TennCare.

The Division coordinates with other state agencies and the community rehabilitation providers to transition clients receiving supported employment services to extended services. An individual is moved to extended services when the client has reached a point where he/she has achieved maximum performance on the job; has achieved minimum necessary supports on the job; the job is not in jeopardy of ending; and individual is maintaining work performance which is acceptable to employer and client. The Division is working with the University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy, Education and Employment to develop training for CRPs on how to develop natural supports to address extended services where funding is not available from another Agency. (Page 545) Title I

   

Customized Employment

~~The Divisions Facility Programs, Service Contracts and Letters of Agreements are used to provide needed services such as but not limited to: • Vocational evaluation • Personal and vocational adjustment training • Transportation and daily meals • Vocational training • Job readiness training • Job development and job placement • Supported employment • Rehabilitation technology • Orientation and mobility • Activities of daily living • Trial work experiences • Follow-up • Pre-Employment Transition Services

The VR Program is finalizing the implementation of Customized Employment Services and extended services to youth with most significant disabilities who require supported employment. (Page 220) Title I

Literacy Education and Employment to provide staff training and development and consultation services for community supported employment service providers; and 5. Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders. Utilizing an evidence based Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment; Tennessee Division of Health Care Finance and Administration, Division of TennCare for provision of employment services for individuals enrolled in Employment and Community First CHOICES. The Department of Education for the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services.

The Division has encouraged the establishment and development of Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) to improve and expand services through Letters of Agreement. The Letter of Agreement (LOA) is an agreement between the Division and the CRP. The LOA describes the functions and responsibilities of the Division and the CRP as well as the scope of services and payment methodology agreed upon by both the Division and CRP in a joint effort of improving and expanding supported employment and extended services for individuals with disabilities. The Division currently has 92 LOAs for supported employment services. The Division continues its’ efforts to increase S.E. providers and anticipates the numbers of providers will increase. VR is actively pursuing a number of other providers for underserved areas across the state. (Page 221) Title I

In addition, as the Division continues to serve Priority Category 1 and 2 cases, more individuals with significant disabilities are able to access vocational rehabilitation services. The Division continues to monitor the budget and the staff capacity in order to determine the ability to serve Priority 3 and 4 cases. It is anticipated this activity will lead to improvement in the number of individuals with disabilities reaching successful rehabilitation outcome statuses by:

1. Continuing the practice of ensuring the availability of appropriate training activities and resources to meet the individualized needs of clients by seeking out and developing partnerships with other private and public entities to provide specialized education and training activities, to include those that can be provided through self-employment, on-the-job- training by employers, and customized employment.

2. Continuing the development and expansion of statewide employer relationships that focus on inclusion of employees with disabilities in the workforce and the value of hiring people with disabilities. The Division will continue its expansion of our activities with Employment Groups across the state and in the local areas with new programs, such as Walgreens REDI and Project Search. (Page 254) Title I

The VR Program is finalizing the implementation of Customized Employment Services and extended services to youth with most significant disabilities who require supported employment.

F. ARRANGEMENTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS FOR THE PROVISION OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(4)). Describe the designated State agency’s efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other State agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide supported employment services and extended employment services, as applicable, to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 501) Title IV

5. Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders. Utilizing an evidence based Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment; Tennessee Division of Health Care Finance and Administration, Division of TennCare for provision of employment services for individuals enrolled in Employment and Community First CHOICES. The Department of Education for the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services. (Page 502) Title IV

In addition, as the Division continues to serve Priority Category 1 and 2 cases, more individuals with significant disabilities are able to access vocational rehabilitation services. The Division continues to monitor the budget and the staff capacity in order to determine the ability to serve Priority 3 and 4 cases. It is anticipated this activity will lead to improvement in the number of individuals with disabilities reaching successful rehabilitation outcome statuses by:

1. Continuing the practice of ensuring the availability of appropriate training activities and resources to meet the individualized needs of clients by seeking out and developing partnerships with other private and public entities to provide specialized education and training activities, to include those that can be provided through self-employment, on-the-job- training by employers, and customized employment.

2. Continuing the development and expansion of statewide employer relationships that focus on inclusion of employees with disabilities in the workforce and the value of hiring people with disabilities. The Division will continue its expansion of our activities with Employment Groups across the state and in the local areas with new programs, such as Walgreens REDI and Project Search. (Page 536) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

In achieving the Governor’s Drive to 55 goal, all training activities and education practices are working to prioritize efficiency in creating connections across a wide spectrum. From Read to be Ready, to Tennessee Promise, Tennessee LEAP, and Tennessee ReConnect, the core programs and partners are actively identifying numerous ways of leveraging their assets and building capacity in a more integrated manner. The work being done by the local boards to navigate and connect the numerous citizens accessing our systems each day further provides thousands of opportunities to engage at numerous levels. Tennessee Workforce System is collaborating with Tennessee Higher Education Commission to provide ambassadors throughout the state that advocate for participants reconnecting to post-secondary educational programs. The assistance they provide guides Participants needing direction with FASFA, student loan information, and more to ease the process of returning to school. (Page 49-50) Title I

 o Partnering regionally with economic development entities and other critical stakeholders, including Pathways Tennessee, to better align education and workforce development activities and policies with regional labor markets, economic growth strategies, and employer demand
 
 o Partnering with the business community, including business associations, and educational institutions (including secondary and post-secondary institutions such as community colleges) to design and implement programs and career pathways that lead to credentials and employment
 
 o Partnering with and leveraging resources from other Federally-funded programs, such as Adult Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Small Business Development Centers, etc.
 
 o Partnering with community-based organizations, since they are key providers of basic skills training, technical skills training, supportive services, and workforce development services in communities across Tennessee
 
 o Sustaining summer employment and work experience opportunities - State and local workforce development boards should consider using additional sources of funding to leverage summer employment program activities. In addition to regular WIOA Youth formula funds, local areas can use other resources, such as Job Corps, and fund matching from private industry. (Page 91) Title I

.

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~11. Continuing to support the Workforce Investment System by continuing to co-locate vocational rehabilitation counselors in each of the major Workforce Investment Act Service delivery area career centers and ensuring that all career center satellites also have vocational rehabilitation counselors assigned to visit their centers on a regular basis to work with individuals with disabilities that visit each center.

12. Providing cross training to the career center staff in regard to meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. Continue to provide consultation on career center accessibility and accommodation needs in regard to the accessibility needs in the building(s), and accommodations in terms of appropriate technology needed to serve individuals with the disabilities. Continue to partner with the American Job Centers (AJCs) in employment initiatives such as the summer youth employment project and the DEI grant. (Page 256) Title I

19. Continue implementation of the electronic case management system (TRIMS) utilizing input from agency staff and vendors to enhance the Division’s technological infrastructure and client service capabilities.

20. Continue partnerships with the three federal grants that target employment of persons with disabilities. Those grants are Tennessee Works, Employment First, and DEI. Tennessee is one of three states in the country that are receiving all three grants.

21. Revise the self-employment process to streamline the experience for clients seeking the self-employment option. Research other state VR self-employment policies for efficient, consumer oriented strategies; and include successful business owners in the process to produce a successful program that will help individuals with disabilities become successful entrepreneurs. (Page 257) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Supportive services, such, assistive technologies, transportation, personal assistance services, and services to family members may also be provided if necessary for the individual to utilize the services identified above. Post-employment services may be provided to previously rehabilitated individuals when needed to maintain or regain suitable employment. Pre-employment transition services provided to students with disabilities include job exploration and counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs at institutions of higher education, workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and instruction in self-advocacy. Technical assistance, training, outreach and other supportive services are provided to public and private employers of all sizes, including Federal and Federal contracting employers for the purpose of increasing employment opportunities for job seekers with disabilities. (Page 87) Title I

Participants are required to observe a program orientation that explains the work requirements, components offered, component requirements, and assistance provided for each component. We hope to implement an Online Orientation during Fiscal Year 2018. After the Orientation has been completed, program participants are assessed during a one-on-one meeting to develop an Individual Employment Plan (IEP). The assessment will review the individual’s background, education, work history, hobbies, and any barriers to employment. The plan can include education and/or training activities, but the overall goal is obtaining employment with a gainful wage that significantly reduces or eliminates the need for governmental assistance. After the IEP is developed, participants will immediately begin their participation in their most suitable component. (Page 93) Title I

The Division requests a waiver of state wideness in order to maintain thirty Third Party Agreements with thirty-five (LEAs). These Third Party Agreements are designed to provide enhanced and concentrated services to Transition School to Work students/clients covered by the agreements. The Division has a contract with each entity that is consistent with Federal regulations (34 CFR § 361.26) and includes the following provisions:
1. The vocational rehabilitation services to be provided are identified in Section A. Scope of Services in each contract (Each contract has been submitted separately to RSA to provide the written assurances requested for this attachment);
2. The LEA assures that non-Federal funds are made available to the Division by committing to their maintenance of effort in Section E.13 of the contract;
3. The LEA assures that the Division’s approval is required before services are provided with the Division’s counselor determining eligibility for each client served;
4. The LEA assures, through the Division’s vocational rehabilitation counselors, that all other state plan requirements, including the Order of Selection policy, are applied to persons receiving services through the agreement; and
5. The LEA assures that reasonable accommodations will be provided. A list of the LEA contracts is provided below: • Anderson County Schools • Bledsoe County Schools • Blount County Schools • Carter County Schools • Johnson County Schools • Clarksville/Montgomery County Schools • Cocke County Schools • Dyserburg City Schools • Elizabethton City Schools • Greene County/ Greenville City Schools • Hamblen County Schools • Henderson County Schools • Humboldt City, Trenton Special School District, Milan Special District • Jackson/Madison County Schools • Kingsport City Schools • Knox County Schools • Lauderdale County Schools • Loudon County Schools • McMinn County Schools • McNairy County Schools • Metro Nashville Public Schools • Polk County Schools • Putnam County Schools • Sequatchie County Schools • Shelby County Schools • TN School for the Blind • TN School for the Deaf • Tullahoma City Schools • Unicoi County Schools • Warren County Schools • Washington County Schools (Pages 208-209) Title I

The Division has interagency cooperation, collaboration, and coordination with other state and local entities that are not components of the Statewide Workforce Investment System. The Division works in cooperation with the following federal, state, and local agencies and programs to provide services for individuals with significant disabilities: 1. The Department of Children’s Services for youth-The Program is currently meeting with DCS state office staff to determine how to blend DCS Independent Living Services with VR program services. DCS state office staff has toured the TRC at Smyrna to learn more about the services provided at the TRC. The DCS Independent Living Coordinators statewide have an annual meeting. The VR Program has offered to host the 2016 spring meeting of the DCS Independent Living Coordinators. During that meeting, all Independent Living Coordinators will tour the facility in order to assist in a plan for coordination of services. 2. The Department of Health in providing services to individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI); 3. Post-secondary school systems and their governing bodies; 4. The Department of Education and Local Education Agencies for individuals who are transitioning from school to work. 5. The Department of Corrections for individuals released from state correctional facilities; 6. The Tennessee Board of Probation and Parole for individuals released from state correctional facilities and monitored by the Board. 7. Local city police, county sheriffs and judge’s programs for individuals being released from jails or on probation or trial diversion; 8. The Department of Human Services Family Assistance and Child Support Division for individuals participating in services under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program; 9. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders; 10. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities; (Pages 209-210) Title I

The DSU entered into an exclusive Interagency Agreement with the Department of Education in October, 2017. The Agreement lays out the Purpose of the Agreement, VR responsibilities, DOE responsibilities, and mutual responsibilities. We were aided by WINTAC, an RSA technical assistance contractor. Training has begun across the state at the Special Education Study Councils and is currently being provided at the Partners in Education Conference, February 6-8, 2018.
When a student who is eligible based on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) standards reaches the age of fourteen (14), the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team , as defined by 34 CFR § 300.344, formulates a statement of transition service needs as a component of the IEP. The Division’s staff is invited and to the extent possible participates in these IEP meetings.
The Division has been under an Order of Selection since 2001. Under the current Order, the Division is able to provide direct services to those eligible individuals in Priority Category 1 and Priority Category 2. The Division was able to open Priority Category 2 effective September 30, 2012. There was a release of clients from the waiting list in Priority Category 3 on October 1, 2013. From January 2015-March 2015 all PCs were closed for the provision of new services. This was a brief closing and Priority Categories 1 and 2 were re-opened in March 2015. The opening and release of clients from the waiting list allows for the provision of direct services to significantly more students with disabilities. The Division provides information and referral services to help all applicants find services through other agencies and entities. The inclusion of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) will allow for the provision of the five stated Pre-ETS services for those students with a disability who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services. (Pages 211-212) Title I

The IEP team, which should include the Division’s staff when invited and when available, parent and student, determines that the student should be referred for VR services. The Division’s staff should inform the student and parents, preferable at the IEP meeting, the purpose of the vocational rehabilitation program. VR Staff make every effort to attend IEP meetings, however due to staff resources this is not always possible. However information regarding VR Services is made available during IEP meetings. 

The Transition School to Work Unit within the VR program is working with the Department of Education on how to incorporate VR services information into the IEP meeting. The Director of the Unit has been trained on Easy IEPs. In the provision of the Pre-Employment Transition Services, students with disabilities and their families will start receiving information on VR services as early as age fourteen. Information will be made available to Middle school staff in order to assist with the beginning the transition. (Page 212) Title I

Beginning in October 2015, these IEP meetings will include information on Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) services that are available at age 14. Pre-ETS services are available to students with disabilities ages 14-22. Pre-ETS services can be provided without an application for VR services. For those individuals that are interested in applying for services, the information should include the application procedures, the eligibility requirements including the Order of Selection, and the potential scope of services that may be available. As soon as possible after referral, the Division takes an application from the student and determines eligibility as well as whether the student is in an open priority category. If the student is in an open priority category, the Division’s staff assists in the formulation of the student’s IEP and the student’s vocational rehabilitation Individualized Plan for Employment as soon as it is determined that the student can benefit from services provided by the Division in preparation for exiting the school system and transitioning into training and/or employment. Services provided by the Division may include attending job fairs, community vocational adjustment training and pre-employment, vocational skills training, college prep, and job readiness training.

The DSU has chosen to provide Pre-Employment Transition Services through Transition School to Work Contracts, Pre-ETS contracts, LOAs and direct staff contact. (Page 212-213) Title I

The DSU has hired 9 Pre-Employment Transition Specialists and 3 Pre-employment Transition Supervisors to coordinate services provided in their areas, identify Local Education Agencies (LEAs) who have a need for Pre-Employment Transition Services, and recruit Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs). They will match interested schools and willing CRPs and/or provide services where there are students with disabilities who need the service.
The Pre-Employment Transition Specialists will work with the schools to identify students who are of working age who want to become VR clients and make referrals to the VR Counselor assigned to the school. (Page 213) Title I

In 2014 VR transitioned from VR counselors to TSW grants to work in the school systems. There are currently 38 TSW grants serving 42 LEAs.
It is the Division’s policy that the development and approval of the IPE for each student determined eligible for VR services occurs as soon as it is determined that the student can benefit from services provided by the Division. An IPE must be developed before the student leaves the school setting.
The interagency agreement identifies the financial responsibility of the Department of Education (DOE) to ensure that individuals who are IDEIA eligible receive a free appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment. A free appropriate public education means regular and special education and related services which:
1. Are provided at public expense, under public supervision and direction, and without charge to the parent;
2. Meet the standards established by state law, including the requirements of IDEIA Part B and the Rules, Regulations and Minimum Standards for the Governance of Tennessee Public Schools, issued by DOE;
3. Include preschool, elementary school, and secondary school (including appropriate vocational, career or work experience education); and
4. Are provided in conformity with an IEP. (Page 214) Title I

The interagency agreement relates the financial responsibility of the Division to ensure that individuals who are IDEIA eligible and meet the Division’s eligibility requirements will receive VR Services. VR Services means any services necessary to determine eligibility and those services described in an IPE necessary to assist an individual with a disability in preparing for, securing, retaining, or regaining an employment outcome that is consistent with the strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice of the individual.
The LEA is responsible for the educational costs related to the provision of special education and related services for the individual attending school. The agreement states that if another public agency is obligated under federal or state law or assigned responsibility under state policy to provide or pay for any services that are considered special education or related services and are necessary for ensuring FAPE to students who are IDEIA eligible, the public agency shall fulfill that obligation or responsibility, directly, through contract or by another arrangement. However, failure of that public agency to pay for that service does not relieve the LEA of its obligation to provide that service to an individual with a disability in a timely manner. (Page 214) Title I

The Division is responsible for all costs necessary for eligibility determination and provision of services under an IPE. The Division must take into account comparable services and benefits [34 CFR § 361.53 (c) (1))], available under any other program that does not interrupt or delay the progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the IPE.
The Division’s staff maintains a working relationship with special education supervisors, vocational education supervisors, directors, secondary school guidance counselors, and LEA administrators for the purpose of providing outreach for students with disabilities and technical assistance to school personnel to assist LEAs in preparing students with disabilities for career opportunities. The Division participates in in-service training programs for LEAs, as well as in statewide special education conferences for the purpose of providing information regarding VR services. The Division also participates in and organizes local community job fairs, job clubs, attends civic club/organization meetings to inform students and parents of the purpose of the VR program, the application procedures, the eligibility requirements, and the potential scope of services that may be available. (Page 215) Title I

The Division currently contracts with forty-four LEAs as part of its transition initiative. The contracts provide for a menu of needed and additional services chosen by the LEA to assist in the transitioning of students from school to work. All services provided under these contracts/agreements have a VR employment focus. All services provided under these contracts/agreements are in keeping with all state plan requirements to include our state’s Order of Selection requirements. Services provided under these contracts/agreements are only available to applicants for, or recipients of, services of the Division. The Division will strive to increase the number of contracts with LEAs as allowed by the Division’s and LEAs’ funding availability. (Page 215) Title I

The 5 Pre-Employment Transition Services are: 1. Job Exploration Counseling can be provided in classroom or a work setting of in-demand occupations. Counseling can include completing interest inventories to determine a student’s interests, job shadowing, exploration of Career Pathways, and researching local labor market information that apply to the student’s interests. 2. Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school or after-school opportunities, or experiences outside of the traditional school settings (including internships). It is provided in an integrated environment in the community to the maximum extent possible; 3. Counseling on Post-Secondary Opportunities, which may include exploration and preparation for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary education programs at institutions of higher education; 4. Workplace Readiness Training for the development of social skills and independent living skills necessary for successful employment. This may include skill acquisition as well as opportunities to apply newly acquired knowledge. 5. Instruction in self-Advocacy, which may include Self-Determination, Life Skills Training and peer mentoring from individuals with disabilities working in competitive integrated employment. Recipients learn about their rights, responsibilities, and how to request accommodations for post-secondary education placement as well as employment. (Page 223) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation Stakeholders Overall, respondents (38%) are sometimes satisfied with the services VR clients receive from TN Rehabilitation Services. Twenty-four percent are satisfied and 21% are dissatisfied. Two respondents listed not applicable, two were very dissatisfied, and one person stated that they were very satisfied with the services VR clients receive. One stakeholder praised VR’s improvements made in “Working on developing relationships with future clients before they leave high school; actively participating in meaningful IEP transition meetings.” (Page 236) Title I

 Specifically, the assessment identified the following primary needs for the program: • Outreach materials to increase awareness and knowledge about the VR program and services to communities and local businesses. VR’s outreach activities are woven throughout the state plan. See sections a, d, e, j, l, o, p, and q. • Training to VR employees and Community Resource Partners covering policy changes and Letters of Agreement (LOA). The state plan includes numerous training initiatives and strategies for both VR staff and CRPs in sections a, c, d, f, i, j, l, n, o, p, and q. • Training to VR employees covering medical impairments and how they impact limitations with work. As noted above, the state plan includes numerous training initiatives and strategies in sections a, c, d, f, i, j, l, n, o, p, and q. • Transportation for clients. Meeting the transportation needs of clients continues to be an identified need in Tennessee. Transportation was a need identified in 2010, 2013, and 2016. Transportation is a major support service provided by VR either directly to an individual or through area transportation providers. The needs assessments identified needs in rural areas that do not have the transportation opportunities available in urban areas. To the extent possible, VR works with each individual to address transportation needs through rural transportation agencies or family members until an individual can afford his or her own transportation following employment. DHS continues to work with rural transportation providers and Human Resource Agencies to address rural transportation needs for individuals participating in work programs. • Improved communication with Community Resource Partners (CRP). The state plan includes information on communication with CRPs through contracts, letters of agreement, training, and monitoring as outlined in sections a, c, d, e, f, l, m, o, p, and q. • Increase in Pre-Employment Transition Services. The state plan includes several updates to the pre-employment transition service activities occurring throughout the state in sections a, d, e, f, g, l, and m. • Increase in Local Education Association (LEA). The state plan includes several updates to its work with local education agencies in sections a, d, g, l, o, and p. Most notably, the number of LEAs served by the Transition School to Work program has increased. (Pages 241-242) Title I

As of Sept 30, 2017, 8,010 individuals in the state are eligible for services under an IPE. Of this number and in compliance with our Order of Selection, 7,255 are receiving services provided with Title I, Part B funds and 755 are receiving services provided with Title VI, Part B funds and with Title I, Part B funds.
For Fiscal Year 2018, it is projected that there will be 5,499 new applicants and that 12,754 individuals in the state will be eligible for services under an IPE. Of this number, 12,013 will receive services under an IPE provided with Title I, Part B funds and 741 will receive services under an IPE provided with Title VI, Part B funds and with Title I, Part B funds. It is estimated that the number of individuals to be served under Title I, Part B and Title VI, Part B under an IPE during Fiscal Year 2018 under each priority category within our Order of Selection will be:
• Priority Category 1 - 8,928 (Includes Title VI, Part B) • Priority Category 2 - 3,826
Total 12,754
Note: Estimates for eligible individuals and those who will be provided services under our Order of Selection in Fiscal Year 2018 is based on current trends and adjustments to utilization of Title VI, Part B funds. (Page 243) Title I

On August 1, 2001, the Division implemented an Order of Selection due to funding limitations that would not allow the Division to provide services under an IPE to all eligible individuals. Only Priority Category 1 cases (eligible individuals who have the most significant disabilities) were served until 2009.
From 2009 until October 2012 there were numerous releases of Priority Category 2 and 3 cases. Beginning October 1, 2012, the Division opened Priority Category 2 for services. The Division is now serving all Priority Category 1 and 2 cases. Those Priority Category 3 cases that were on the waiting list were released for services on October 1, 2013.
The Division’s funds and resources remain inadequate to serve individuals in all four priority categories. The Division expects to have approximately $21,000,000 from the federal grant and state appropriations to spend for assessments for an estimated 5,797 new cases and planned services for approximately 13,000 existing and new cases. Approximately half of this amount must be allocated for pre-employment transition services. (Page 249) Title I

6. Continuing to support expansion of Transition School-to-Work services by continuing to work with Local Education Agencies (LEA’s) in the maintenance of existing partnerships and the creation of additional partnerships to provide vocational rehabilitation services targeted specifically to that LEA’s school system. Continuing to work with and educate school personnel on the mission and scope of the Division in order to maximize services from both entities to better serve our mutual clientele to include appropriate qualified interpreters/accommodations for students that are in LEA/School to Work programs. The newly hired Transition School to Work Director will manage this process. (Page 255) Title I

The Division will develop strategies for increasing referrals of transition school to work clients through local education agencies. Special focus will include the identification of any underserved population at the regional level.
ACHIEVEMENT: In Federal Fiscal Year the Program had 2358 successful employment outcomes. This is a 9% increase over FY2014’s successful employment outcomes of 2159. The VR Program continued focused collaborative efforts with numerous state agencies, in addition to collaboration with Universities across the state. In FFY 2015 Transition School to Work contracts were increased. (Page 259) Title I

Program Reviews:
The Grants and Program Manager will monitor programs on an annual basis. TDLWD SNAP Program staff are interviewed at the local office to determine their general understanding of the program. At each location, case files are reviewed. The Individual Employability Plan (IEP) is evaluated for detailed direction, and incremental steps to achieve program goals. The EDP documents each step as the client progresses through the program. (Page 302) Title I

Any participant of SCSEP is required to develop an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) at the time of enrollment. The IEP serves as a personal road-map to success and is designed to specifically assist the participant in meeting both personal and program goals. Each participant receives specialized training that fits under his or her IEP and is assigned to a host agency to develop or improve skills. The plan also determines if the Host Agency has met the participant’s requirements. In addition, the Host Agency provides services to low-income older persons, to the economically disadvantaged, and to organizations offering services which provide positive contributions to the welfare of the general community. Opportunities to serve other groups will also be provided through placement in schools, day-care programs, health and hospital programs, and agencies serving individuals with physical and developmental disabilities. (Page 370) Title IV

IEPs are referred to often throughout participation to ensure goals are being met. In addition, any IEP identifies the need for vocational, high school equivalency (HSE), or computer training. All of these require attendance in a “classroom” environment where the participant may have workbooks, exercises, and reading assignments. Tennessee believes that it is vital to strengthen initial assessments of participant skills, knowledge, interests, aptitudes, and qualities to assist participants with defining career objectives that are relevant and which meet employer needs. . (Page 371) Title IV

Tennessee prides itself on being engaged in actionable partnerships to leverage resources across agencies and enhance customer performance outcomes. Governor’s Jobs and Economic Development Goal: Objective II, to establish cost-effective co-investment models, across government funding streams and other funding streams. These partnerships include:
o Coordinating with American Job Centers, Vocational Rehabilitation Services and other members of the local disability community regarding activities, resources, and services for seniors with disabilities
o Participating in meetings, as appropriate, with senior service providers, both public and private
o Coordinating with local service providers and community stakeholders to assess needs and develop solutions for local transportation services
o Using 2-1-1 and other directories of service and supporting organizations to identify entities and programs in the community that provides referrals and support services to seniors. These directories are especially helpful for transition services when a participant’s durational limit is approaching and project staff is working with him/her to develop a Transition Assessment & IEP.
o Networking with area faith-based organizations to conduct outreach to SCSEP-eligible individuals
Outreach and education of AJC and partner staff will be increased with training on basic competencies when servicing those with disabilities. If assistance is needed for training and employment services with the deaf and hard of hearing, interpreters and other communication-access services will be scheduled. Other partnerships include organizations providing assistance with subsidized housing, healthcare and medical services, transportation, the law, food, personal and financial counseling, interviewing, clothes, etc. (Page 373) Title IV

Special population students have equal access to all CTE courses and use the same curriculum and assessment as other students. One of the successes observed through the use of competency profiles as a measurement approach for occupational attainment has been the value they have for CTE and special education teachers working together to develop students’ IEPs. After the review of the required competencies, support is given special education students through educational assistants for success in the classroom. Modification of curriculum, equipment, and teaching methodologies are offered, when needed, for success in the course. Several regional offices offer in-service training for teachers to use competency profiles in the development of IEPs. (Page 418) Title IV

In addition to the strategies already identified above for all special population students, strategies to enable identified students to prepare for further learning and for high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand careers may include the following:
o exploration of career areas that focus on expanding career options, educational planning, and CTE training that is free of gender bias;
o comprehensive career counseling and guidance including labor market information on a broad range of occupations, career testing, placement services for part-time and summer employment, internships, and cooperative programs;
o access to options for specialization in a variety of areas with access to work-based learning opportunities;
o career development activities which lead to mastery of workplace readiness skills;
o high quality, paid work-based learning experiences to provide career exploration, enhancement of personal and interpersonal skills, and development of occupational skills;
o access to programs which encourage learning all aspects of the industry including planning, management, finances, technical production, and principles of technology; and
o provide information on non-traditional jobs that are in high-demand, require high-skill or offer high-wages with opportunities for advancement and benefits.
Special populations have access to all CTE courses and use the same curriculum and assessment as other students. One of the successes observed through the use of competency profiles as a measurement approach for occupational attainment has been the value they have for CTE teachers and special education teachers working together to develop students’ IEPs. After the review of the required competencies, support is given to special education students through educational assistants for success in the classroom. Modification of curriculum, equipment, and teaching methodologies are offered, when needed, for success in the course. Several regional offices provided in-service training for teachers in the use of competency profiles in the development of IEPs. (Page 423-424) Title IV

The Division requests a waiver of state wideness in order to maintain thirty Third Party Agreements with thirty-five (LEAs). These Third Party Agreements are designed to provide enhanced and concentrated services to Transition School to Work students/clients covered by the agreements. The Division has a contract with each entity that is consistent with Federal regulations (34 CFR § 361.26) and includes the following provisions:
1. The vocational rehabilitation services to be provided are identified in Section A. Scope of Services in each contract (Each contract has been submitted separately to RSA to provide the written assurances requested for this attachment);
2. The LEA assures that non-Federal funds are made available to the Division by committing to their maintenance of effort in Section E.13 of the contract;
3. The LEA assures that the Division’s approval is required before services are provided with the Division’s counselor determining eligibility for each client served; (Page 486) Title IV

When a student who is eligible based on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) standards reaches the age of fourteen (14), the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team , as defined by 34 CFR § 300.344, formulates a statement of transition service needs as a component of the IEP. The Division’s staff is invited and to the extent possible participates in these IEP meetings. (Page 491) Title IV

The IEP team, which should include the Division’s staff when invited and when available, parent and student, determines that the student should be referred for VR services. The Division’s staff should inform the student and parents, preferable at the IEP meeting, the purpose of the vocational rehabilitation program. VR Staff make every effort to attend IEP meetings, however due to staff resources this is not always possible. However information regarding VR Services is made available during IEP meetings.
The Transition School to Work Unit within the VR program is working with the Department of Education on how to incorporate VR services information into the IEP meeting. The Director of the Unit has been trained on Easy IEPs. In the provision of the Pre-Employment Transition Services, students with disabilities and their families will start receiving information on VR services as early as age fourteen. Information will be made available to Middle school staff in order to assist with the beginning the transition. (Page 492) Title IV

The DSU has hired 9 Pre-Employment Transition Specialists and 3 Pre-employment Transition Supervisors to coordinate services provided in their areas, identify Local Education Agencies (LEAs) who have a need for Pre-Employment Transition Services, and recruit Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs). They will match interested schools and willing CRPs and/or provide services where there are students with disabilities who need the service.
The Pre-Employment Transition Specialists will work with the schools to identify students who are of working age who want to become VR clients and make referrals to the VR Counselor assigned to the school. (Pages 492-493) Title IV

There are 28 Pre-Employment Transition Community Rehabilitation Providers providing services.
The LEA’s involved in the interagency agreement with the Division should cooperate in developing and coordinating services for students and youth with disabilities within each respective agency’s legal authority. The ultimate goal of each agency participating in the agreement is to provide, or cause to be provided, a continuum of appropriate services leading to transition from school into employment. The agreement provides for:
1. Consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;
2. Consultation and technical assistance on providing reasonable accommodations;
3. Transition planning by personnel of the Division of Rehabilitation Services and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) of 2004 (P.L. 108-446); (Page 493) Title IV 

The interagency agreement identifies the financial responsibility of the Department of Education (DOE) to ensure that individuals who are IDEIA eligible receive a free appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment. A free appropriate public education means regular and special education and related services which:
1. Are provided at public expense, under public supervision and direction, and without charge to the parent;
2. Meet the standards established by state law, including the requirements of IDEIA Part B and the Rules, Regulations and Minimum Standards for the Governance of Tennessee Public Schools, issued by DOE;
3. Include preschool, elementary school, and secondary school (including appropriate vocational, career or work experience education); and
4. Are provided in conformity with an IEP. (Page 494) Title I

The Division currently contracts with forty-four LEAs as part of its transition initiative. The contracts provide for a menu of needed and additional services chosen by the LEA to assist in the transitioning of students from school to work. All services provided under these contracts/agreements have a VR employment focus. All services provided under these contracts/agreements are in keeping with all state plan requirements to include our state’s Order of Selection requirements. Services provided under these contracts/agreements are only available to applicants for, or recipients of, services of the Division. The Division will strive to increase the number of contracts with LEAs as allowed by the Division’s and LEAs’ funding availability.
Although the Division utilizes contracts with LEAs as part of its transition initiative, all decisions affecting eligibility for VR services, the nature and scope of available services, and the provision of these services remain the sole responsibility of the VR counselor employed by the Division. VR staff is responsible for determinations to close cases and for all allocations of expenditures for services. (Page 495) Title IV

The purpose of this MOU, is to state how these agencies will work together to provide transition school to work services to students and youth with disabilities.
The Division continues to recognize the value of the involvement of its State Rehabilitation Council in personnel development activities. It is the policy of the Division to give the Council ongoing review and input on the development of issues associated with the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development.
The Council continues to be involved with CSPD issues associated with the recruitment and retention of staff, such as; counselor salaries and pay incentives for the successful attainment of counselors with a Master's degree in Rehabilitation and also training for existing staff to obtain a Master's Degree in Rehabilitation. (Page 516) Title IV

Overall, respondents (38%) are sometimes satisfied with the services VR clients receive from TN Rehabilitation Services. Twenty-four percent are satisfied and 21% are dissatisfied. Two respondents listed not applicable, two were very dissatisfied, and one person stated that they were very satisfied with the services VR clients receive. One stakeholder praised VR’s improvements made in “Working on developing relationships with future clients before they leave high school; actively participating in meaningful IEP transition meetings.”
According to survey results, 48% of stakeholders straddled the fence in their belief that VR Counselors fully understand how and why a client’s disability affects their chances of employment. Twenty-four percent agree and 17% percent disagree that VR Counselors understand the impact a disability has on employment. Eleven of the Stakeholders felt that employment opportunities were an unmet need of individuals with disabilities. One respondent shared that “There seems to be a lack of creativity to find positions that are compatible with their disabilities.” (Page 518) Title IV

• Increase in Pre-Employment Transition Services. The state plan includes several updates to the pre-employment transition service activities occurring throughout the state in sections a, d, e, f, g, l, and m.
• Increase in Local Education Association (LEA). The state plan includes several updates to its work with local education agencies in sections a, d, g, l, o, and p. Most notably, the number of LEAs served by the Transition School to Work program has increased. (Page 525) Title IV

The Division also elects not to serve eligible individuals, regardless of any established order of selection, who require specific services or equipment to maintain employment. The Division expects to serve 12,754 existing and new Priority Category 1 and 2 in 2018. Of this number, the Division expects to provide services for 8,928 Priority Category 1 cases and 3,826 Priority Category 2 cases.
The Division will monitor staffing needs to determine if there is sufficient manpower to schedule releases of Priority Category 3 and 4 cases for services or open all Priority Category 3 cases for services. Therefore, continuation of the Order of Selection mandated by the Rehabilitation Act of
1973, as amended, to determine which eligible individuals will be served under an IPE is still warranted due to staffing deficiencies.
The Division monitors services and expenditures on a continuous basis, allowing the Division to manage available funds and staff to assure sustainability of services for cases placed in an open priority category and receiving services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). Additionally, adequate funds will continue to be conserved and staffing deficiencies monitored to provide assessment services for all applicants expected to apply throughout the year to determine eligibility and to provide services for those eligible individuals in an open priority category within the Order of Selection. (Page 532) Title IV

6. Continuing to support expansion of Transition School-to-Work services by continuing to work with Local Education Agencies (LEA’s) in the maintenance of existing partnerships and the creation of additional partnerships to provide vocational rehabilitation services targeted specifically to that LEA’s school system. Continuing to work with and educate school personnel on the mission and scope of the Division in order to maximize services from both entities to better serve our mutual clientele to include appropriate qualified interpreters/accommodations for students that are in LEA/School to Work programs. The newly hired Transition School to Work Director will manage this process. (Page 537) Title IV

The Division will develop strategies for increasing referrals of transition school to work clients through local education agencies. Special focus will include the identification of any underserved population at the regional level.
ACHIEVEMENT: In Federal Fiscal Year the Program had 2358 successful employment outcomes. This is a 9% increase over FY2014’s successful employment outcomes of 2159. The VR Program continued focused collaborative efforts with numerous state agencies, in addition to collaboration with Universities across the state. In FFY 2015 Transition School to Work contracts were increased. (Page 541) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Tennessee’s plan to utilize wage record data, which includes SSNs, wages, and employer information such as the FEIN, is founded in compliance with confidentiality provisions in 20 CFR Section 603, as well as in accordance with the emerging requirements of the SWIS (State Wage Interchange System) data sharing agreement. TEGL 7-16, Data Matching to Facilitate WIOA Performance Reporting, also is being used to guide the process and direction of partnership agreements, similar to MOUs, which define, if needed, authorized data share staff among program and IT staff of the TN agencies noted above. One of the options under TEGL 7-16 is a centralized process carried out by TDLWD which consolidates earnings and post-secondary attainment into the full PIRL reporting file; but it will be December 2016 before this decision is fully approved, through full engagement with partners. TDLWD also will engage internal staff, already authorized to view and handle education data under FERPA, to extend the reach of the department’s sharing agreements with the University of Tennessee. This will authorize the transfer to TDLWD of TN’s longitudinal data, named P20, which is currently being used to track student and thus WIOA participant progress through career pathways carried out in the partnership with OCTAE, AE, and all core programs under WIOA. (Page 144) Title I

Fifteen percent (15%) of the Basic VR grant must be set aside for the provision of Pre-ETS services. TN VR provides the 5 Pre-ETS services through contracts with qualified Community Rehabilitation Partners (CRPs), Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and/or VR staff.

The 5 Pre-Employment Transition Services are:

  1. Job Exploration Counseling can be provided in classroom or a work setting of in-demand occupations. Counseling can include completing interest inventories to determine a student’s interests, job shadowing, exploration of Career Pathways, and researching local labor market information that apply to the student’s interests.
  2. Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school or after-school opportunities, or experiences outside of the traditional school settings (including internships). It is provided in an integrated environment in the community to the maximum extent possible;
  3. Counseling on Post-Secondary Opportunities, which may include exploration and preparation for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary education programs at institutions of higher education;
  4. Workplace Readiness Training for the development of social skills and independent living skills necessary for successful employment. This may include skill acquisition as well as opportunities to apply newly acquired knowledge.
  5. Instruction in self-Advocacy, which may include Self-Determination, Life Skills Training and peer mentoring from individuals with disabilities working in competitive integrated employment. Recipients learn about their rights, responsibilities, and how to request accommodations for post-secondary education placement as well as employment. (Page 223) Title I

The 5 Pre-Employment Transition Services are:
1. Job Exploration Counseling can be provided in classroom or a work setting of in-demand occupations. Counseling can include completing interest inventories to determine a student’s interests, job shadowing, exploration of Career Pathways, and researching local labor market information that apply to the student’s interests.
2. Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school or after-school opportunities, or experiences outside of the traditional school settings (including internships). It is provided in an integrated environment in the community to the maximum extent possible;
3. Counseling on Post-Secondary Opportunities, which may include exploration and preparation for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary education programs at institutions of higher education;
4. Workplace Readiness Training for the development of social skills and independent living skills necessary for successful employment. This may include skill acquisition as well as opportunities to apply newly acquired knowledge.
5. Instruction in self-Advocacy, which may include Self-Determination, Life Skills Training and peer mentoring from individuals with disabilities working in competitive integrated employment. Recipients learn about their rights, responsibilities, and how to request accommodations for post-secondary education placement as well as employment.  (Page 504) Title IV
 

Apprenticeship

These local teams will coordinate activities geared to connecting employees, affected by the layoffs/closings, to other employment opportunities to minimize the time needed for unemployment insurance assistance. In addition to connecting dislocated workers to employment, Rapid Response teams will also work to connect participants to training opportunities through WIOA and partner programs, including the higher education system. In addition to connecting participants to formal training opportunities, Rapid Response teams will also work with the AJCs to connect participants to apprenticeships, to OJTs, and other dislocated worker re-employment activities. Rapid Response funds will be used to assist with the expenses associated with technical features such as Jobs4TN, the mobile units, materials, and staff time associated with Rapid Response activities. (Page 158) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~5. Program Administration for the Supported Employment Title VI Supplement:
a. The designated State unit assures that it will include in the VR services portion of the Unified or Combined State Plan all information required by section 606 of the Rehabilitation Act.
b. The designated State agency assures that it will submit reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the Commissioner may require and collects the information required by section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under title I and individuals receiving supported employment services under title VI of the Rehabilitation Act.
c. The designated state unit will coordinate activities with any other State agency that is functioning as an employment network under the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency program under Section 1148 of the Social Security Act.

6. Financial Administration of the Supported Employment Program:
a. The designated State agency assures that it will expend no more than 2.5 percent of the State’s allotment under title VI for administrative costs of carrying out this program; and, the designated State agency or agencies will provide, directly or indirectly through public or private entities, non-Federal contributions in an amount that is not less than 10 percent of the costs of carrying out supported employment services provided to youth with the most significant disabilities with the funds reserved for such purpose under section 603(d) of the Rehabilitation Act, in accordance with section 606(b)(7)(G) and (H) of the Rehabilitation Act. (Pages 272-273) Title I

 Continuing to support expansion of supported employment services by actively seeking out, training, and monitoring community rehabilitation providers; especially in the more rural areas, that are willing to provide supported employment services to vocational rehabilitation clients with the most significant disabilities; and by fostering partnerships with DIDD and chapters of The ARC in Tennessee to implement employment network projects with community rehabilitation providers. The Division is striving to have shared vendors with DIDD in order to access services for shared clients. The Division is expanding participation in the Individual Placement Model of Supported Employment (IPS) statewide. (Page 537) Title IV

13. Continuing to support the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program and use of other Social Security work incentives that benefit clients by continuing contract with the Benefits to Work Company. This company provides Social Security benefits counseling to clients before and after the Individualized Plan for Employment process. Currently the Division contracts with Benefits to Work to provide outreach to communities on how working affects Social Security Benefits, work incentives, and benefits planning. The agency will also continue to promote the most effective use of Ticket to Work Employment Network programs for the Division and our partners. (Page 538) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~There is a small pilot supported employment program for individuals with intellectual and development disabilities that have a behavioral health diagnosis. This pilot program is utilizing IPS in providing SE services. IPS is a promising employment service model for non-behavioral health individuals. The Division along with the DIDD, DMHSAS, and the CRP are testing the applicability of the IPS model in serving individuals with said diagnoses.

For FFY 2018, the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) has selected Tennessee as a Core and Vision Quest state to receive technical assistance under the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). As a Core state, TN will be assisted in Employer Engagement and Provider Transformation. TN’s goal to increase the number of providers undergoing transformation and increasing the people engaged in competitive integrated employment. As a Vision Quest state, TN will receive guidance about funding and expansion of IPS services in partnership with VR, DMHSAS, and TennCare. (Page 264) Title I

Data Collection

Of the 92 who responded, 48 stated that few clients have jobs when they leave the VR program. Forty-two (42%) stated that most clients have jobs and only 2 stated none of their clients have jobs when they leave the program. Most clients, 60-79%, currently receive checks from the government such as SSI or SSDI, according to 30% of the VR Staff respondents. Another 28% stated that 80-90% of their clients receive SSI or SSDI. Half of the staff who responded has Master’s degrees. Another fourth have a bachelor’s degree. Twenty-six people skipped this question. Most respondents are between the age of 45-64 years of age. (Page 522) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~2018 UPDATE: The Division continues to monitor timeliness of eligibility determinations and development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). Monthly rates have met or exceeded the established performance metrics of 92% and 90% respectively. Additionally, the Division continues to monitor the success rate of case closures. To date, the Division has not achieved its goal of meeting or exceeding the federal rate of 55.8%. The success rate for FFY 2017 was 50.8%.

OBJECTIVE 2.2: Meet or exceed the Federal ratio of the average hourly wage of individuals who achieved competitive employment to the average hourly wage of all employed individuals in the State of 0.520. Fifty-two percent of closures should be working at wages of $10-$11 per hour.

ACHIEVEMENT: The VR Program did not meet this goal. The ratio has consistently been 0.49, meaning Forty-nine percent of the successful closures were work at wages of $10-$11 per hour.

2018 UPDATE: The Average reported hourly wage of clients closed successfully in FFY 2017 was $10.01. The Division continues to strive for meeting or exceeding the federal ratio for wages. To date, the Division has not achieved this goal. (Page 261) Title I

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Branding and outreach materials will be a statewide theme including the national DOL brand information. o Common definitions will be established to support all funding streams’ understanding and requirements. o A performance management dashboard inclusive of State Board measures and locally selected measures will be required to help drive positive behaviors in regard to employers. o The rapid response will be included in the regional and local business service team responsibilities. Rapid Response activities have been functionally aligned and provided through local workforce areas to establish a more integrated seamless approach to helping job seekers and business customers. Title I has the primary responsibility to provide Rapid Response activities. o AJC certification requirements will include business service parameters that each local business service team must meet or exceed. o Business service teams are expected to collaborate with job seeker services to fill positions and focus training on needed skills and knowledge. (Page 104) Title I

A critical factor in meeting the skills needs of employers is an understanding of exactly what those needs are. TDLWD will work with its education and economic development partners to clearly identify and forecast employer needs to be aligned with the industry clusters and sectors identified in the Governor’s vision. Concerning the cornerstone of the Governor’s Jobs and Economic Development Goal and Objectives, TDLWD considers employers to be primary customers. The Workforce System focuses on “people for jobs” and “jobs for people”; that can be achieved through a collaborative relationship among partners. Outreach and promotion as well as providing time sensitive and effective customized screening and recruiting services have developed strong ongoing relationships with employers. The Department will: 122. Enhance relationships with employers currently served through local AJCs via Labor Exchange, Veterans Programs, the Trade Act, Re-employment Services, Unemployment Insurance, and Local Workforce Area Business Service efforts. This includes working with TNECD to identify, connect and serve companies with workforce needs. 123. Establish protocol and policy to deliver employer services through a functionally aligned approach with seamless service delivery. 124. Establish an AJC certification process that has standards required for business services statewide 125. Continue to provide and track training to Workforce System partners to build the capacity to serve employers and to better understand labor market information data and analyses (Page 105) Title I

Tennessee’s workforce development system, both regional and local, requires that programs and providers co-locate, coordinate, and integrate activities and information so that the system is cohesive and accessible for individuals and businesses alike. Accountability goals increase the long-term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment; to improve services to employers; and to demonstrate continuous improvement. The certification policy is the foundation for aligning programs, policies, and activities in the State’s Workforce System. This policy will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) and will undergird continuous improvement of one-stop centers. It specifies minimum standards for the service menu and customer service to be met and branding requirements that demonstrate a statewide Workforce System. This certification process will demonstrate that the local workforce development boards can ensure that employment and training programs in their communities operate at the highest level of quality and consistency while satisfying the expectations and needs of their customers. (Pages 125-126) Title I

Veterans

Integration of the DVOP and LVER into the WIOA Service Delivery system is accomplished by utilizing in-place procedures for servicing Veterans with SBEs and combining them with the new policies and processes that will support the law. Per US Dept. of Veterans Affairs, there are 501,907 Veterans in Tennessee. Those between ages 18-64 are 450,313kii. INCREASING VETERANS TRANSITION SERVICES Tennessee has developed a partnership with the Tennessee College of Applied Technology (TCAT) and the Army Career and Alumni Program (ACAP) at Fort Campbell Army base. This partnership is to provide production line training (Mechatronics) and certification to transitioning service members, allowing veteran participants to obtain the necessary skills required by manufacturing. (Page 98) Title I

One Stop partners are included in the intake process for JVSG DVOP services. Upon entering the AJC, Veterans are met by a front desk staff member, who asks several questions to help identify veterans and their needs. After identifying the veteran’s purpose for visiting the AJC, a staff member will conduct an intake assessment using the Veterans Service Form (VSF) to identify any significant barriers preventing employment. Upon identifying SBEs, partner staff members refer the veteran to the DVOP. Those veterans who do not have SBEs, however still require employment services and are provided services by our AJC staff, but not from a DVOP. Furthermore, when necessary, JVSG staff is often consulted with by AJC staff regarding military, DD-214, and other language translation in addition to other employment/ service related questions, as needed. JVSG, DVOP/ LVER, integration into the One Stop extends beyond co-location. Veterans seeking services at affiliate centers, that do not have DVOP within that facility, still receive priority of service. After the staff identifies a veteran, an initial needs assessment will be conducted, and a determination of services will be made at that time. In addition, the VSF form is completed to help identify SBEs and additional barriers that may require intensive services from a DVOP. Upon identifying that the veteran has SBEs, the DVOP assigned to that county will be notified. Within 24 hours, the DVOP makes contact and schedules an appointment to meet with the veteran and proceeds with the subsequent intensive services. (Page 99) Title I

Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes: a. How the State intends to provide employment, training and job placement services to veterans and eligible persons under the JVSG Employment Outlook for Veterans 1. The Overall Employment Outlook for Veterans The employment outlook for Veterans in Tennessee is expected to be above that for their civilian counterparts. Continued technological advances in military equipment and the requisite training to operate and maintain this gear make Veterans highly competitive in a broad spectrum of markets. A lack of required (I.E. Healthcare, CDL, etc.) certification because of “State Mandated” formal educational training remains a challenge for some Veterans in certain career fields. However, programs like the Post 9/11 GI Bill and the Transition Assistance Program along with proposed state legislative action to allow for the use of military schooling to be used in lieu of in-state instruction, are dealing with these difficulties and provide opportunities along with information and training to enhance the accreditation process for recently separated Veterans in a variety of career fields. The “Soft skills” Veterans possess also make them desirable to potential employers and include; leadership, a strong work ethic, teamwork, loyalty and a desire to succeed, just to name a few. 2. Opportunities for Veterans Areas of growth specifically being promoted by the current administration are jobs in the automotive and healthcare sectors. Hankook manufacturing from Korea has agreed to build a new tire plant in Clarksville Tennessee (Montgomery County) that will employ 1500+ people. One of the deciding factors for them locating in Clarksville was the close proximity of Ft. Campbell and the large pool of available transitioning and residential Veterans. Additionally, the current automotive industry in Tennessee is expanding, with Nissan committed to increasing production of the Nissan Leaf in Smyrna. GM will also continue to produce the Chevy Volt at the Spring Hill plant and Volkswagen is expanding with plans to grow their production facility in Chattanooga. In addition to the specific auto manufacturers, the companies that support those facilities continue to grow as well. As an example, Automotive Energy Supply Corporation (AESC), the company that produces the battery for the Leaf is expanding to meet the higher level of demand through increased production. (Page 310) Title IV

The advantage of hiring Veterans is a topic that needs to be presented to an employer on a consistent basis. Tennessee’s American Job Centers (AJCs), through the Business Services Team (BST), will provide an effective conduit to promote Veterans to businesses as a sound and wise investment. Federal contractors and subcontractors are also targeted as companies that not only can benefit from the hiring of Veterans, but they are also informed about their responsibilities under the Office of Federal Contract and Compliance Programs (OFCCP) and Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act (VEVRAA) guidelines as well. This is done through our BST, which includes the Local Veterans’ Employment Representative (LVER), the Local Office Site Leads, Wagner-Peyser (W/P) staff, Local Workforce Development Area (LWDA) staff as well as the Tennessee’s Department of Labors’ Workforce Development (TDLWD) Marketing Services Team within the Service Delivery System. All provide valuable information about promoting Veterans within a variety of venues including job fair participation, Chamber of Commerce meetings, Society of Human Resource Managers (SHRM) meetings, employer visits, public radio and television service spots and departmental brochures. Besides the benefits of hiring Veterans, employers are also informed about the assistance available to them at the AJC, such as the ability to conduct individual hiring fairs and notification of job opportunities to potential candidates. (Page 311) Title IV

TDLWD has determined that the appropriate placement of DVOP/LVER personnel is paramount to the success of the program. For DVOPs, careful study of state demographics and associated evidence indicates that targeted veteran subgroups are predominately located in Tennessee’s metropolitan areas. However, many counties outside of the MSAs have sufficient Veteran population to warrant the presence of a DVOP. Most DVOP Specialists will be assigned to a comprehensive Career Center where other supportive services are readily available. In the areas where there are additional organizations such as VA VR&E offices, Homeless Shelters and other Community Partners, a DVOP from the local AJC has a partnership with them to provide Intensive Services to those who require additional assistance to become job ready. Services will be provided to Veterans who have identified themselves as having an SBE. LVER staff will be placed throughout the state to reach out to employers and promote the benefits of hiring veterans. One way this promotion process can be accomplished is by introducing employers to the immediate tangible benefits such as the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC, when funded) that is available to them when they hire Veterans. In addition to the tangible incentives they can get are the short and long-range benefits gained from the intangible “soft skills” Veterans bring to the hiring table, teamwork, trainability, leadership, diversity in the workplace, and a host of others that are inherent to the military experience. By “showcasing” our Veterans, the LVER staff increases job opportunities for them. Every effort is made to keep vacancies of staff positions down below the 60-day time frame as directed. The Veterans Program Coordinator (VPC) will ensure that Tennessee’s Department of Human Resources is aware of the unique funding stream of the JVSG and will keep all vacancies filled within the 60-day mandate. TDLWD will ensure that all new hires for DVOP and LVER will attend NVTI for mandatory training within the required 18 month time period. (Pages 313-314) Title IV

1. Primary Duties: The LVER will actively advocate for employment and training opportunities with business, industry, and community-based organizations on behalf of Veterans consistent with VPL 03-14, VPL 03-14 Ch1, VPL 03-14 Ch2, VPL 04-14. LVERs will be assigned duties that promote to employers, employer associations, and business groups the advantages of hiring veterans and will be part of the “Business Services Team” within the AJC that conduct outreach activities to these entities. The following activities will be part of this program: 2. In conjunction with employers, conduct job searches and workshops and establish job search groups to facilitate the use of the TDLWD labor exchange system to enhance their employee search activities. 3. Form effective relationships with the business community and trade unions to enhance the availability of employment and training opportunities for Veterans. o Encourage businesses to hire Veterans and to provide OJT and Apprenticeship programs geared to the Veteran community. o Maintain current labor market information on trends and adjust strategies accordingly. 4. Work with training providers and credentialing bodies to promote opportunities for Veterans. o Encourage employers in professions requiring licensure or certification to develop OJT and/or apprenticeship programs for Veterans. o Promote the participation of Veterans in programs leading to certification or licensure. o Advocate with training providers and credentialing agencies for recognition of equivalent military training. 5. Plan and participate in job fairs to provide employment opportunities for Veterans. The LVER will facilitate this by: o Initiating contact and developing relationships with employers, community leaders, labor unions, veterans’ organizations, and training program representatives to develop their commitment to providing employment and training opportunities for Veterans. o Maintaining current information regarding a full range of employment and training options available to Veterans. (Pages 316-317) Title IV

7. Employer Relations: The LVER will establish and maintain regular contact with employers in order to maximize the development of employment and training opportunities for the Veteran community. 8. Develop an employer contact plan designed to encourage the employment of Veterans by the use of business and community organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce, Human Resource Groups, and others as determined to be beneficial in the facilitation of hiring Veterans. This can be accomplished by: o Personal Visits o Phone Calls o E-mail Contact o Internet Connections or other means deemed effective (Page 318) Title IV

1. DVOP and LVER Integration DVOPs and LVERs are fully integrated into the TDLWD Labor Exchange System to form a comprehensive delivery team that provides services to Veterans that address their employment and training needs. All AJCs (with the exception of two located in extremely rural locations) have assigned Veteran staff, with LVERs and DVOPs assigned according to the population of their target groups and the needs of the community. DVOPs are assigned to areas with the highest concentration of Veterans, including disabled, homeless, and other Veterans with SBE. LVER assignments are based on the employer population and the probabilities of economic growth in their areas. Urban areas will normally have both LVER and DVOP staff assigned to ensure effective service to all Veterans. AJC Staff will work together in a comprehensive manner, respective of their roles and responsibilities, to provide assistance to Veterans in need which will foster job developments created with the employers in these highly industrialized and diverse environments. Suburban and rural (agricultural) areas will normally be assigned a LVER or DVOP as indicated by the factors previously mentioned. (Page 319) Title IV

4.In-Demand Careers In coordination with the DVOP, and after receiving names of Veterans who have been deemed “job ready”, the LVER will work with local industry leaders as well as Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (ECD) to identify the requisite skill sets needed for in-demand careers for their area and develop opportunities for training through programs such as OJT through WIOA. Additionally, the LVER will coordinate with state educational facilities such as the Tennessee Technology Centers (TTC) to foster attendance in training programs for those in-demand jobs. 5. Public Outreach to Veterans concerning Employment and Training Opportunities In addition to the efforts of the DVOP and LVER staff, TDLWD Marketing Services Staff (part of the BST) will promote the available services, including employment and job training opportunities, to veterans in a variety of forums in which they are involved. These can include job fairs, Chamber of Commerce meetings, Society of Human Resources Managers (SHRM) meetings, employer visits, public radio, television spots, and departmental brochures. (Page 320) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.
The Division maintains an ongoing interagency agreement with the Tennessee Department of Education, Tennessee Department of Children’s Services, Tennessee Department of Finance and Administration, Bureau of TennCare, Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Tennessee Department of Health, Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services and Tennessee Department of Corrections. The agreement, along with the Division’s policy manual and Standard Procedures Directives, outlines the plans, policies and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the participation of the Division staff in transition planning and the referral of students with disabilities to the Division for a determination of eligibility for VR services.  (Page 211) Title I

II. Service Contracts:

A. The Division plans to continue service contracts with the following community rehabilitation providers to ensure quality services statewide provided funding is available:

  • Clovernook
  • Department of Education
  • National Federation for the Blind
  • Southeast TN Human Resource Agency
  • Technology Centers: East Tennessee Technology Access in Knoxville; Signal Centers; Technology Access Center of Middle Tennessee in Nashville; West Tennessee Special Technology Access Resource (STAR) Center in Jackson; and Mid-South ACT in Memphis
  • Tennessee Disability Coalition Benefits to Work
  • University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy Education and Employment
  • Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
  • Statewide Independent Living Council
  • STAR Center
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Labor and Workforce Development
  • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. (Page 219) Title I

The Division has interagency arrangements and coordination with the following entities for the provision of supported employment services and extended services:

1. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities;

2. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders;

3. The Tennessee Employment Consortium, an independent association of community rehabilitation providers and state agencies developed jointly by the Division, the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and the Tennessee Council on Developmental Disabilities to provide a forum for all stakeholders to review and discuss state policies and share best practices; (Page 220) Title I

5. Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders. Utilizing an evidence based Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment; Tennessee Division of Health Care Finance and Administration, Division of TennCare for provision of employment services for individuals enrolled in Employment and Community First CHOICES. The Department of Education for the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services. (Page 502) Title IV

It is the continued goal of the Division to provide quality supported employment services which are delivered in an effective, efficient and timely manner. Supported employment services are provided through Letters of Agreement with community rehabilitation providers, and in cooperation with the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. The community rehabilitation providers must assure that on-going support (extended) services will be provided prior to the implementation of supported employment services or will be developed as natural supports during training. The Division has an excellent supported employment program along with training and support activities to ensure the continued provision of quality supported employment services. These programs are ongoing and are not subject to a specific timeline. Prime examples of these ongoing activities are:

1. Through contract with the University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy, Education and Employment (CLEE), the Division funds three supported employment consultants who are charged with the responsibility of working with our many supported employment community rehabilitation providers in providing training and technical assistance to the staff who provide services to our clients. These same consultants also work with the Division staff on an as needed basis to provide technical assistance. (Page 534) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Community and Social Service occupations are also expected to increase by 2.4 percent annually and expected to have more than 6600 openings each year. However, median wages are in the middle range, at $39,580, but still above the state median of $33,860. Fast-growing occupations include marriage and family therapists (4.4 percent annually), community health workers (3.8 percent), and substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors (3.6 percent). Reducing the opioid crisis will likely cause growth in these areas to continue. Some of the largest occupations include clergy, directors of religious activities; and child, family, and school social workers (660 openings expected annually) (Page 29) Title I

Continue the Eligibility Review Interview (ERI) program in which claimants will be more accurately assigned Claimant Characteristic Codes based upon a review of work and layoff history from the same employer. This program will flag claimants who have reached their return to work date and verify the continuing eligibility of all claimants. Examine SBR opportunities as well as penalty and interest collections for fraud detection and prevention solutions. Continue to use the Treasury Offset Program (TOP) to recover improper payments. Continues use of standalone Recovery unit poised to addresses the recovery of overpaid benefits. Unit will utilize multiple strategies such as liens, garnishments, correspondence, and out bound telephone calls to those that have an outstanding debt to the agency. There are also utilizing a change to write off law that allows us more time to collect the debt. Recovery unit will also partner with Lexis Nexis to implement Business Data Enrichment Solution. This process will help with recovery of benefits by searching for alternative addresses and contact information. It will also look at assets to determine the claimant ability to pay back benefits. This process will give us another tool to go after those claimants that have not updated contact information as well it will determine their ability to pay back the benefits based on assets. (Page 361) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 74

Job Placement for Veterans - 07/09/2020

“Finding a meaningful career after military service can feel overwhelming but our American Job Centers across the state offer variety of services that include resource centers, job fairs, workshops, employment strategies, WIOA Scholarships, career counseling, job search assistance, access to job training and certifications, and labor market information. Our American Job Centers have dedicated Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Specialist (DVOP) staff who themselves have served in the military and are ready to assist veterans in finding long term suitable employment and gain access to training and education opportunities.“

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

An Order Transferring the Tennessee Early Intervention System from the Department of Education to the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/02/2019

“WHEREAS, the Tennessee Early Intervention System (hereinafter "TEIS") is a voluntary educational program for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families that is designed to support, facilitate, and encourage the child's development and participation in family and community activities, as well as assist families in encouraging and participating in the child's development…

Effective July 1,2020, the management and operation of TEIS shall be transferred from the Department of Education to the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, which shall serve as the State lead agency under Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act under 20 U.S.C. 1a35(a)(10). Notwithstanding this transfer, nine TEIS positions shall be maintained by the Department of Education to ensure implementation of IDEA's child find responsibilities and appropriate transitions for children and families into pre-K and K-12 educational settings…

As of July 1 ,2020, the Commissioner of the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities shall control, manage, and oversee all aspects of TEIS, including statutory and regulatory functions.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

State Rehabilitation Council 2019 Annual Report - 12/01/2019

“On behalf of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) of Tennessee, I am privileged to present the 2019 SRC Annual Report to provide an update on the Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and to highlight the work of the SRC during the past year. We address the key accomplishments of the VR program during 2019 and look to the future to improve services provided to individuals with disabilities in Tennessee.  The report also reviews the responsibilities of the SRC and its achievements during the past year as we serve as the voice of the consumer to review, analyze and advise the VR program.

 

A highlight of the annual report is the inclusion of customer success stories to convey a picture of the VR program in a way which pure data cannot.  These stories reflect individuals at different stages in life and with a variety of backgrounds, experiences, abilities and interests who all share a desire to obtain competitive integrated employment and who required the support of the VR program in order to achieve that goal.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA
  • Data Sharing

1915(c) Waiver Changes to Employment and Day Services - 11/25/2019

“Training Outline:

1. Why and how waiver changes were developed (slides 4-7)

2. Overview of waiver changes

• New services (slides 8-45)

➢Summary and detailed requirements

➢ Justifications (IOGs)

• Other notable changes (slides 46-51)

3. Overview of service request process (

slides 52-64)

4. Documentation guidance (slides 65-69)

5. FAQs (slides 70-72)

6. Recommended resources (slides 73 -74)”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/22/2019

“WHEREAS, Tennesseans with disabilities, including mental illnesses and substance abuse disorders, experience disproportionately high levels of unemployment and underemployment; and

WHEREAS, people with disabilities in Tennessee share with the state's other six million residents the desire to achieve personal success and economic self-sufficiency through meaningful work in their communities and deserve the same opportunity for employment as all Tennesseans…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Lee, Governor of the State of Tennessee, do hereby proclaim the month of October 2019 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in Tennessee and encourage all citizens to join me in this worthy observance.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Family & Children’s Service was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—vulnerable and underserved, uninsured and under-insured; LEP; disabled; hourly wage workers (restaurant and retail workers); and those transitioning between employment and employer-sponsored insurance. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with State Farm & Farm Bureau Insurance Agents and Brokers, Music Health Alliance, Nashville Mayor’s Office, Restaurant and Bar Associations, TN Department of Labor, TN Workforce Development, Department Employment Agencies, Local social service, community action agencies, and healthcare providers, and Local libraries.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mary MoorePhone: (615) 320-0591Email: Mary.Hunt@fcsnashville.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Data Collection Frequently Asked Questions - 05/11/2019

~~“The TN SPDC Tool serves as an easy way for providers to deliver data to their program director.

Data is collected for all individuals receiving DIDD residential, day, and/or employment services regardless of their employment status. However if a person only receives Behavior or Personal Assistance services, they are not included in this data collection.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Department of Human Services Teams Up with CVS Health to Provide Workforce Training to Individuals with Disabilities - 05/08/2019

~~“The Tennessee Department of Human Services (TDHS) has joined with CVS Health to unveil an innovative program to help individuals with disabilities find jobs in Tennessee’s growing health care industry.

The partnership recently constructed a mock CVS Pharmacy inside the Vocational Rehabilitation program’s Tennessee Rehabilitation Center (TRC) in Smyrna where students are now receiving job training in two areas that lead to consideration for a career with CVS Health, the nation’s premier healthcare innovation company with more than 4,700 colleagues in the state."

More information can be found by accessing the web link.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Beneficiary Support System - 05/03/2019

~~“As part of TennCare’s Beneficiary Support System (BSS), Disability Rights TN contracts with TennCare to help people with long term services and supports (LTSS) or who may qualify for LTSS by• explaining member rights and responsibilities• answering questions about TennCare programs• resolving concerns or complaints• filing appeals or finding the status of an appeal” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee Self-Determination Waiver Program TN.0427.R03.01 - 04/01/2019

~~“The primary purpose of this amendment is to revise the Service Specification for “Employment and Day Services” to separate the service category into distinct employment and day service types with separate service specifications, provider qualifications and reimbursement/rate structures in order to provide increased choice and flexibility for waiver participants, align incentives toward competitive integrated employment and community participation, and increase transparency with respect to the types of day services provided as well as payment for those services, as part of Tennessee’s approved Statewide Transition Plan for compliance with the HCBS Settings Rule.  Proposed changes include:

Establishing Supported Employment-Individual Employment Support, Supported Employment-Small Group Employment Support, Community Participation Supports, Facility-Based Day Supports and Intermittent Employment and Community Integration Wraparound Supports as separate services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Tennessee HB 1276: Supporting Business Owners with Disabilities - 06/06/2017

“As enacted, adds "businesses owned by persons with disabilities" to the Tennessee Minority-Owned, Woman-Owned and Small Business Procurement and Contracting Act; requires that the annual report made by the chief procurement officer concerning the awarding of purchases to minority-owned business, woman-owned business, service-disabled veteran-owned business, or small business and the total value of awards made also include the total dollar amount of purchases awarded to all businesses in this state”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

"Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee HB 896/SB 429 (ABLE) - 02/05/2015

The purpose of this bill is to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence,  and quality of life; and (2) To provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of individuals with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the supplemental security income program under Title XVI of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C.§§ 1381 et seq.);the TennCare programs under Title XIX of the Social Security Act, (42 U.S.C. §§1396 et seq.); or any successor to the TennCare program administered pursuant to the federal Medicaid laws, the individual’s employment, and other sources  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee Title Code 67

A job tax credit of five thousand dollars ($5,000) for each net new full-time employee job, and two thousand dollars ($2,000) for each net new part-time employee job, for a person with disabilities who is receiving state services directly related to such disabilities, shall be allowed against a taxpayer's franchise and excise liability tax for that year; provided, that:            (A)  The employment of such individual creates a net increase in the number of persons with disabilities employed by the taxpayer within the ninety-day period immediately preceding the employment;            (B)  The taxpayer provides such employment for at least twelve (12) consecutive months and for no less than the minimal hours per week; and for employees enrolled in the minimal health care benefits described in subdivision (g)(1), for respective full-time employment jobs and part-time employment jobs;   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

An Order Transferring the Tennessee Early Intervention System from the Department of Education to the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/02/2019

“WHEREAS, the Tennessee Early Intervention System (hereinafter "TEIS") is a voluntary educational program for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families that is designed to support, facilitate, and encourage the child's development and participation in family and community activities, as well as assist families in encouraging and participating in the child's development…

Effective July 1,2020, the management and operation of TEIS shall be transferred from the Department of Education to the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, which shall serve as the State lead agency under Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act under 20 U.S.C. 1a35(a)(10). Notwithstanding this transfer, nine TEIS positions shall be maintained by the Department of Education to ensure implementation of IDEA's child find responsibilities and appropriate transitions for children and families into pre-K and K-12 educational settings…

As of July 1 ,2020, the Commissioner of the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities shall control, manage, and oversee all aspects of TEIS, including statutory and regulatory functions.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/22/2019

“WHEREAS, Tennesseans with disabilities, including mental illnesses and substance abuse disorders, experience disproportionately high levels of unemployment and underemployment; and

WHEREAS, people with disabilities in Tennessee share with the state's other six million residents the desire to achieve personal success and economic self-sufficiency through meaningful work in their communities and deserve the same opportunity for employment as all Tennesseans…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Lee, Governor of the State of Tennessee, do hereby proclaim the month of October 2019 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in Tennessee and encourage all citizens to join me in this worthy observance.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Governor’s Executive Order Order Establishing The Tennessee Employment First I - 06/19/2013

“NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Haslam, Governor of the State of Tennessee… do hereby order and direct the following:

1. State agencies coordinate efforts to increase opportunities for integrated and competitive employment for Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental illnesses, substance abuse disorders and other disabilities.2. The Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities convene an Employment First Taskforce (“Taskforce”).3 The Taskforce shall consist of representatives from the agencies administering disability services, family members of persons receiving employment services, vocational rehabilitation, workforce services and education, as well as consumer advocates and third party disability services providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 33

Job Placement for Veterans - 07/09/2020

“Finding a meaningful career after military service can feel overwhelming but our American Job Centers across the state offer variety of services that include resource centers, job fairs, workshops, employment strategies, WIOA Scholarships, career counseling, job search assistance, access to job training and certifications, and labor market information. Our American Job Centers have dedicated Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Specialist (DVOP) staff who themselves have served in the military and are ready to assist veterans in finding long term suitable employment and gain access to training and education opportunities.“

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

State Rehabilitation Council 2019 Annual Report - 12/01/2019

“On behalf of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) of Tennessee, I am privileged to present the 2019 SRC Annual Report to provide an update on the Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and to highlight the work of the SRC during the past year. We address the key accomplishments of the VR program during 2019 and look to the future to improve services provided to individuals with disabilities in Tennessee.  The report also reviews the responsibilities of the SRC and its achievements during the past year as we serve as the voice of the consumer to review, analyze and advise the VR program.

 

A highlight of the annual report is the inclusion of customer success stories to convey a picture of the VR program in a way which pure data cannot.  These stories reflect individuals at different stages in life and with a variety of backgrounds, experiences, abilities and interests who all share a desire to obtain competitive integrated employment and who required the support of the VR program in order to achieve that goal.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA
  • Data Sharing

1915(c) Waiver Changes to Employment and Day Services - 11/25/2019

“Training Outline:

1. Why and how waiver changes were developed (slides 4-7)

2. Overview of waiver changes

• New services (slides 8-45)

➢Summary and detailed requirements

➢ Justifications (IOGs)

• Other notable changes (slides 46-51)

3. Overview of service request process (

slides 52-64)

4. Documentation guidance (slides 65-69)

5. FAQs (slides 70-72)

6. Recommended resources (slides 73 -74)”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Employment Data Collection Frequently Asked Questions - 05/11/2019

~~“The TN SPDC Tool serves as an easy way for providers to deliver data to their program director.

Data is collected for all individuals receiving DIDD residential, day, and/or employment services regardless of their employment status. However if a person only receives Behavior or Personal Assistance services, they are not included in this data collection.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Tennessee DIDD Annual Report 2018 - 04/01/2019

~~“The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) is the state department responsible for administration and oversight of community-based services for Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The department operates with more than 1,400 state employees and 400 community providers to serve approximately 7,800 people with intellectual disabilities through its Home and Community Based Waivers and 4,500 people through the Family Support Program. It also operates 38 Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) program including the Harold Jordan Center, and three seating and positioning clinics across Tennessee”. More information can be found by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Data Sharing

About the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 01/26/2019

~~“The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) is the state agency responsible for administering services and support to Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This is done in several ways, including Medicaid waiver Home and Community Based Services (HCBS), state-operated ICF/IIDs, and the Family Support Program. DIDD administers services directly or through contracts with community providers. DIDD strives to partner with the people it supports and their family members and friends.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

2018 Homelessness Action Plan for the Chattanooga Community - 12/04/2018

~~“As part of the Housing First model, the Chattanooga community embraces permanent supportive housing interventions for the chronically homeless. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) defines chronic homelessness as a person with a disabling condition who experiences continual homelessness for at least one year or four periods of homelessness within three years. Permanent supportive housing program recipients usually have a diagnosed disability, including serious mental illness or disabling drug addiction. Deploying a Housing First model and investing in permanent supportive housing can help people experiencing chronic homelessness who suffer from serious mental illness and substance use disorders access and maintain housing over time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Apprenticeship Engagement Strategy - 12/01/2018

~~“Vision and GoalsProvide every Tennessean with education and high quality job opportunitieso For Tennessee to offer apprenticeships to increase education, learning, and employment opportunities for customers with disabilities and provide quality candidates for businesso Provide adults with a direct pathway from training to apprenticeship/workforceo Create a process for developing local talent for the technology and healthcare industry” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transportation Distribution and Logistics: Apprenticeship Acceleration in West Tennessee - 12/01/2018

~~“For veterans, benefits  of apprenticeship  programs  can include  a structured transition  process, ability to use GI Bill benefits in combination with apprenticeship incentives, and facilitation of skillset translation from a military to civilian environment. For women, apprenticeship programs can lead to economic self-sufficiency and access to high wage occupations they otherwise may not consider.    For persons  with  disabilities  who  may  not  perform  well  on  standardized  testing, apprenticeships can provide an alternative means of training that is better aligned to their strengths. However, the challenge may be in qualifying for apprenticeship programs as these individuals may not meet entrance criteria.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Services Offered by the Nashville Regional Office - 11/25/2018

~~“VA’s Nashville Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Tennessee and at the Fort Campbell Military Base in Kentucky. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and elderly, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Department of Human Services Teams Up with CVS Health to Provide Workforce Training to Individuals with Disabilities - 05/08/2019

~~“The Tennessee Department of Human Services (TDHS) has joined with CVS Health to unveil an innovative program to help individuals with disabilities find jobs in Tennessee’s growing health care industry.

The partnership recently constructed a mock CVS Pharmacy inside the Vocational Rehabilitation program’s Tennessee Rehabilitation Center (TRC) in Smyrna where students are now receiving job training in two areas that lead to consideration for a career with CVS Health, the nation’s premier healthcare innovation company with more than 4,700 colleagues in the state."

More information can be found by accessing the web link.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding Between The Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and The State of Tennessee Bureau of TennCare, Division of Long Term Services and Supports - 03/20/2017

“This Memorandum is entered into and based upon the philosophy of Employment First which is based upon the premise that all citizens, including individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life. Because both VR and TennCare offer employment supports for people with disabilities, this Memorandum is intended to ensure that each agency provides those services to common customers in coordination with the other to ensure efficient use of resources and effective delivery of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee’s Independent Living & Developmental Disabilities Network: Joint Publication on Network Programs and Collaborations - 03/01/2017

“In September 2015, Tennessee agencies funded through the Developmental Disabilities Act and Tennessee’s Independent Living programs funded through the Rehabilitation Act met to begin strategic coordination among our organizations. Having been recently relocated to a new federal Administration on Disabilities, our programs had an opportunity to increase our impact in Tennessee by joining forces to address common goals. Together we established a shared priority: improving youth transition outcomes through postsecondary education and job training that leads to competitive and integrated employment. Since that time, our two networks continue to meet together to work on details of joint projects, including this publication!

We hope you find this publication informative and that you learn something new about the programs across Tennessee funded under the Independent Living Administration and the Developmental Disabilities Act. Please reach out to us to find ways that you can become involved in our work. We are always interested in hearing from Tennesseans with disabilities about your experiences in getting supports and services you need.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Memorandum of Understanding between DIDD and VR - 01/07/2016

On December 14, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Division of Rehabilitation Services, Vocational Rehabilitation Program and DIDD was finalized. In 2014, both agencies started discussing the option of creating an MOU through a Vision Quest workgroup (as part of the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program) spearheaded by two ODEP Subject Matter Experts: Dr. Stephen Hall and Sara Murphy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding for School-to-Work Transition - 08/05/2015

Five state agencies have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to improve services and better prepare youth with disabilities to transition from school into integrated employment in the community.  The MOU focuses on students age 14 years and over and aims to ensure all youth with disabilities leaving secondary education are prepared for either post-secondary training and/or integrated employment appropriate for their preferences, interests, skills and abilities.  “It’s vitally important that all state agencies work together to make sure youth with disabilities leave school and have the opportunity to contribute to the workforce,” Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) Commissioner Debra Payne said.  “It takes a team effort to make sure they have the training and support necessary to make that happen."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Interagency Agreement Regarding IDEA - 07/01/2012

“The purpose of this Agreement is to identify and define the financial responsibilities of the Parties to this Agreement and to facilitate the provision and coordination of services for all infants, toddlers, children, youth and adults who are IDEA eligible. This Agreement formalizes policies, procedures, and fiscal responsibilities of the parties relating to IDEA.” 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Employment Consortium - 06/01/2007

“The Tennessee Employment Consortium (TEC) is a statewide organization focused on increasing the number of Tennesseans in integrated employment. The consortium comprises volunteers from the state's Division of Mental Retardation Services (DMRS) and Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Tennessee Council on Developmental Disabilities, the ARC of Tennessee, the Center on Disability and Employment at the University of Tennessee, community rehabilitation providers (CRPs), family members, and other stakeholders. TEC's ability to organize collaborative activities across state agencies, advocacy organizations, and CRPs has played an important role in increasing integrated employment outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance - 05/01/2007

~~“The Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance was formed in May 2007 to increase awareness about the need for postsecondary opportunities in Tennessee, to gather information about postsecondary programs in other states, and to develop a pilot program on a Tennessee college campus. “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “Our partnership is focused on helping: Self-Advocates to aspire toward competitive work; Employers to recognize the contributions people with disabilities can make in the workplace; Educators to prepare young people with disabilities with strong skills and opportunities; Families to communicate high expectations from an early age; and State Systems and Disability Agencies to support real work for real pay.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

The ARC Tennessee

~~“ The Arc Tennessee is a grassroots, non-profit, statewide advocacy organization for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. Founded in 1952, The Arc Tennessee is affiliated with The Arc United States and works collaboratively with local chapters across the state.The Arc Tennessee values diversity and does not discriminate based on race, ethnicity, religion, age, geographic location, sexual orientation, gender, level of disability or Limited English Proficiency.Our MissionThe Arc Tennessee empowers people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families to actively participate in the community throughout their lifetime.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Tennessee Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) - 10/01/2011

“The TDEI project will replicate and improve upon the experience of the Disability Navigator Program (DPN) active in the nine (9) participating WIBs [Workforce Investment Boards]. The DPN Initiative provided a bridge between One-Stop Career Center staff, private and public partners, and the disability community. Each participating WIB will be responsible for tailoring a basic set of services to the needs of their local population with disabilities, as well as potential employers. Three (3) WIBs will offer services to customers with disabilities in primarily rural areas. The TDEI will rely on the states two Work Incentives Planning and Assistance service providers to assist it to work with Social Security disability beneficiaries.” The grant ended in 2014.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AIDD Partnerships in Employment

TennesseeWorks Partnership: Changing the Employment Landscape“The Vanderbilt Kennedy University Center for Excellence in DevelopmentalDisabilities and 28 agencies and organizations will develop a vibrant collaborativeacross the state to increase the number of young people accessing competitiveemployment prior to leaving high school; increase the capacity and commitmentamong families and practitioners to support competitive employment and careerdevelopment; raise expectations among youth, families, educators and providers;reallocate resources and funding streams toward competitive employment; andincrease the number of families and educators accessing professional development,resources, and supports addressing competitive employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Family & Children’s Service was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—vulnerable and underserved, uninsured and under-insured; LEP; disabled; hourly wage workers (restaurant and retail workers); and those transitioning between employment and employer-sponsored insurance. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with State Farm & Farm Bureau Insurance Agents and Brokers, Music Health Alliance, Nashville Mayor’s Office, Restaurant and Bar Associations, TN Department of Labor, TN Workforce Development, Department Employment Agencies, Local social service, community action agencies, and healthcare providers, and Local libraries.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mary MoorePhone: (615) 320-0591Email: Mary.Hunt@fcsnashville.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Tennessee - 01/31/2019

~~“Supporting Strong Transitions for Youth with Disabilities

Welcome to Tennessee’s online home for training and resources on preparing students with disabilities for life after high school. Consider this the “blueprint” to building a comprehensive transition program for your students. Learn about the best practices and practical strategies for special educators, families, and other transition team members as you fill your toolbox with key tools for success.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Guide for Provider Transformation to an Employment First Service Model - 06/15/2016

~~Transition to an Employment First Service Model Guide is issuedOrganizations that are successful in their transformation to an Employment First provider agency share three elements, all of which should be addressed:1. Strategy:  What will you do?2. Structure:  Who does it?3. Systems:  How will your agency do it?

An understanding of these elements can give a framework for an agency to understandwhat parts of the organization need to be changed. In order to help agencies decide what to change, an Agency Assessment is provided in the Appendices.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Readiness program (ERP)

"The focus of this program is to prepare students in the areas of employment and life skills. In depth instruction is provided in three critical domains of adult living: daily living skills, self-determination/interpersonal skills, and employment skills. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate their readiness for employment. Positive work behaviors and market ready skills will enable students to be more independent, motivated, and successful."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment and Individuals With Disabilities

This sheet contains tips and resources related to customized and supported employment in relation to Tennessee Disability Pathfinder and TennesseeWorks.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Employment First Trainings

MG&A articles & presentations on Customized Employment and Discovery from the TDI&DD website.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy, Education and Employment

“ Support for diversity and inclusion is a value at the core of the Center for Literacy, Education and Employment (CLEE). In addition, we determine the direction of our work by listening to and learning from practitioners, policymakers, business leaders and community leaders, as well as the academic community. As a result, the Center has a long history of involvement in advocacy efforts in the fields of literacy, education and employment, particularly those focused on supporting ALL individuals to flourish in an increasingly complex and interconnected world.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “This new website is an online resource for those in our state committed to these goals. [You can] [s]elect your role… to find comprehensive information, trainings, videos, success stories, and many other resources to equip, inform, and inspire your work.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Clover Bottom, Greene Valley, and Nat T. Winston Developmental Centers - Memorandum Approving Exit Plan (2015) - 01/29/2015

To effectively facilitate reform in mental health services, the Court cannot allow “perfect to become the enemy of good” nor allow the concepts of federalism and separation of powers to be ignored. The Court concludes that the Exit Plan presented by the Parties is “fair, reasonable, and adequate” and provides the next iteration of improvement to the lives of those with disabilities in Tennessee. It will test political will and legislative leadership to continue that progress and to determine how best to care for those often left in the shadows.    For the reasons detailed above, the Court will grant the unopposed joint motion seeking approval of an Exit Plan (Docket No. 1118-1) and entry of a proposed Agreed Order (Docket No. 1118-2). The Motion to Intervene brought by conservators of GVDC residents and Citizens for a Better Tennessee (Docket No. 1121) will be denied. .  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Beneficiary Support System - 05/03/2019

~~“As part of TennCare’s Beneficiary Support System (BSS), Disability Rights TN contracts with TennCare to help people with long term services and supports (LTSS) or who may qualify for LTSS by• explaining member rights and responsibilities• answering questions about TennCare programs• resolving concerns or complaints• filing appeals or finding the status of an appeal” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee Self-Determination Waiver Program TN.0427.R03.01 - 04/01/2019

~~“The primary purpose of this amendment is to revise the Service Specification for “Employment and Day Services” to separate the service category into distinct employment and day service types with separate service specifications, provider qualifications and reimbursement/rate structures in order to provide increased choice and flexibility for waiver participants, align incentives toward competitive integrated employment and community participation, and increase transparency with respect to the types of day services provided as well as payment for those services, as part of Tennessee’s approved Statewide Transition Plan for compliance with the HCBS Settings Rule.  Proposed changes include:

Establishing Supported Employment-Individual Employment Support, Supported Employment-Small Group Employment Support, Community Participation Supports, Facility-Based Day Supports and Intermittent Employment and Community Integration Wraparound Supports as separate services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Comprehensive Aggregate Cap Home and Community Based Services (or "CAC") Waiver - 04/01/2019

~~“An individual’s Individual Support Plan may include more than one non-residential habilitation service (SE-IES; Supported Employment-Small Group Employment Supports; Community Participation Supports; Intermittent Employment and Community Integration Wrap-Around Supports; Facility-Based Day Supports); however, they may not be billed for during the same period of time (e.g., the same 15 minute or hour unit of time). A provider of SE-IES services may also receive Social Security’s Ticket to Work Outcome and Milestone payments. These payments do not conflict with CMS regulatory requirements and do not constitute an overpayment of Federal dollars for services provided.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan (11/2015) Amended Based on Public Comment (2/2016) - 07/31/2018

~~1915 (c) waiver settings assessed included:• Residential Habilitation• Employment and Day (Community and Facility Based Day, In-home Day, and Supported Employment)• Family Model Residential Support• Medical Residential Services• Supported Living

1115 CHOICES waiver settings assessed included:•Adult Day Care•Assisted Care Living Facility•Critical Adult Care Home

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment and Community First CHOICES (Employment Program) - 07/01/2016

~~The Employment and Community First CHOICES program is administered by TennCare through its contracted managed care organizations.  It offers services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  Services in the program will help people become employed and live as independently as possible in the community.  All new enrollment is in the Employment and Community First CHOICES program, as DIDD’s waivers are closed to new enrollment.

There is a limited amount of funding available to serve people each year.  That means not everyone who wants to apply can enroll or get services right away.." 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee State Plan Amendment (SPA) 16-0001 (approved 3-22-2016) - 03/22/2016

The State covers low-income families and children for Transitional Medical Assistance (TMA) under section 1925 of the Social Security Act (the Act). This coverage is provided for families who no longer qualify under section 1931 of the Act due to increased earned income, or working hours, from the caretaker relative’s employment, or due to the loss of a time-limited earned income disregard. (1902(a)(52), 1902(e)(1), and 1925 of the Act)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Tennessee Medicaid State Plan

Tennessee’s full state plan for TennCare, Tennessee’s Medicaid Program.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Tennessee 1915(c) Home and Community Based Service "Self Determination Waiver Program "

The Self-Determination Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive, integrated settings and engage in community life. Services are delivered in a manner which ensures each individual’s rights of privacy, dignity, respect and freedom from coercion and restraint; optimizes individual initiative, autonomy, and independence in making life choices; and are delivered in a manner that comports fully with standards applicable to HCBS settings delivered under Section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act…  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

TN The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02)

~~“The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02) serves children and adults with intellectual disabilities and children under age six with developmental delay who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the Self-Determination waiver, would require placement in a private ICF/IID.

The Self-Determination Waiver Program affords persons supported the opportunity to directly manage selected services, including the recruitment and management of service providers. Participants and families (as appropriate) electing self-direction are empowered and have the responsibility for managing, in accordance with waiver service definitions and limitations, a self-determination budget affording flexibility in service design and delivery. The Self-Determination Waiver Program serves persons who have an established non-institutional place of residence where they live with their family, a non-related caregiver or in their own home and whose needs can be met effectively by the combination of waiver services through this program and natural and other supports available to them. The Self-Determination Waiver does not include residential services such as supported living.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap Waiver (#0357.R03)

~~“The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap (CAC) Waiver (#0357.R03), formerly known as the Arlington Waiver, serves individuals with intellectual disabilities who are former members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Arlington Developmental Center), current members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Clover Bottom Developmental Center), and individuals transitioned from the Statewide Waiver (#0128) upon its renewal on January 1, 2015, because they were identified by the state as receiving services in excess of the individual cost neutrality cap established for the Statewide Waiver. These are individuals who have been institutionalized in a public institution, are part of a certified class because they were determined to be at risk of placement in a public institution, or have significant services/support needs consistent with that of the population served in a public ICF/IID and who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the CAC waiver, would require placement in an ICF/IID.

The CAC Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings and engage in community life.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Tennessee is the Volunteer State, and its outstanding Employment First initiatives for individuals with disabilities show why this state exemplifies "America at its Best!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Tennessee’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.8%
Change from
2017 to 2018
6,770,010
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.69%
Change from
2017 to 2018
552,942
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.14%
Change from
2017 to 2018
184,851
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.45%
Change from
2017 to 2018
33.43%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.44%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.18%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 6,651,194 6,715,984 6,770,010
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 558,852 538,061 552,942
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 174,370 179,049 184,851
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,640,999 2,734,895 2,725,255
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 31.20% 33.28% 33.43%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.09% 77.52% 77.18%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.80% 3.70% 3.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.30% 23.20% 22.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.60% 13.50% 14.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 486,269 486,795 494,694
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 529,763 532,484 534,166
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 829,448 831,407 835,143
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 149,092 151,192 156,250
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,457 19,117 24,494
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,255 4,664 3,909
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,863 7,877 8,862
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 568 N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 18,165 19,117 18,506
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 4,641 4,331 5,921

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,932 5,085 5,044
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.90% 3.00% 3.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 249,055 245,370 241,307

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 12,330 10,800 10,730
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 27,376 23,450 24,420
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 54,059 43,641 44,279
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.80% 24.70% 24.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.30% 0.50% 0.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 0.70% 0.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 0.20% 0.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 51.70% 53.50% 36.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 484 806 837
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,150 1,057 867
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 232 250 109
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 92,792 85,677 64,870

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,806 8,544 9,133
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 108 95 87
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 59 70 55
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 74.00% 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.91 1.06 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,648
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 282 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 272 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 794 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,160 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 992 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 148 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.30% 29.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,463 7,728 7,233
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 370,137 366,628 362,916
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 209 203 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 409 252 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,124,000 $10,939,000 $11,303,439
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $23,338,000 $20,949,000 $14,507,332
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $52,890,000 $53,775,000 $59,349,017
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 18.00% 16.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 6,257 6,283 6,427
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,408 3,223 2,734
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 19.20 17.00 17.74

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 70.46% 70.16% 69.69%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.11% 11.48% 11.49%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.78% 1.79% 1.81%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 71.84% 72.52% 74.03%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 33.93% 21.17% 26.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 64.43% 54.60% 61.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.32% 64.62% 71.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.50% 33.43% 34.97%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 871,430
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,411
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 56,166
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 136,631
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 192,797
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 86
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 190
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 276
AbilityOne wages (products). $490,797
AbilityOne wages (services). $1,584,403

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 44 31 13
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 5 2 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 49 33 14
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,356 1,617 339
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 46 27 11
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,402 1,644 350

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~• Youth Program: While the most significant program changes under WIOA impacted the services to youth, this shift-aligned with several modifications Tennessee was already making. The existing work of Pathways Tennessee (career pathways) and the Work Based Learning Champions initiative (Career and Technical Education) both led by the Tennessee Department of Education strongly support the increased need for funding services for in-school youth as well as increasing opportunities for work experiences. Regarding out-of-school youth, the Governor’s Drive to 55 Alliance provides excellent support and resources to get 55 percent of Tennesseans equipped with a college degree or certificate by the year 2025. The Alliance’s three initiatives - Tennessee Promise, Tennessee Reconnect and Tennessee LEAP (Labor Education Alignment Program), all serve as conduits to identify and close skills gaps to better prepare our workforce and our state for the future, most of which involves better serves to youth.

Some areas for growth and improvement have been identified in asset mapping of local and state level resources, common strategy development, and meeting the growing employer demand for skilled and qualified employees. Efforts to improve these challenges have been made through hosting regional meetings with local partners to identify services provided and opportunities for increased alignment. In addition, coordinated data sharing and communication will remain areas of focus for improvement and innovation. The use of data along with integration, agility, and ability to serve those with significant barriers has always been a focus in the Workforce System; this common thread has helped shape the focus and continuation of workforce development activities statewide. (Page 52) Title I

Tennessee is an Employment First State, and there is an established Employment First Task Force. The Employment First Task force facilitated the completion of a Memorandum of Understanding for services to youth with disabilities between the following State agencies: • Vocational Rehabilitation • Department of Education • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities • Department of Labor and Workforce Development • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services • Council on Developmental Disabilities (Oversees the Implementation of the MOU)
In Tennessee the agency that administers the State Medicaid plan is the Bureau of TennCare. The VR Program is developing a Memorandum of Understanding with the Bureau of TennCare. The VR Program has developed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. (Page 223) Title I

 An interagency agreement was developed to fulfill the requirements of IDEIA. The most recent version of this agreement was signed July 1, 2012. The purpose of this agreement is to identify and define the financial responsibility of each state agency for providing services under IDEIA and to facilitate the provision and coordination of services for all children with disabilities. The following state agencies are participating in this agreement: Tennessee Department of Education; Tennessee Department of Children’s Services; Tennessee Department of Finance and Administration; Bureau of TennCare; Department of Developmental Services; Tennessee Department of Health; Tennessee Department of Human Services; Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities; and Tennessee Department of Correction.

In 2013, Governor Bill Haslam signed an Employment First Executive Order. This Executive Order established the Employment First Taskforce. In 2014, the Employment First Taskforce sign and executed a Youth Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The agencies involved in the MOU are: • Department of Education • Vocational Rehabilitation • Department of Labor and Workforce Development • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services • Council on Developmental Disabilities (this agency oversees the implementation of the MOU.

The purpose of this MOU, is to state how these agencies will work together to provide transition school to work services to students and youth with disabilities. (Page 233) Title I

The Division has established service codes and defined the extended services that will be provided for up to 4 years for youth with disabilities. The Community Rehabilitation Providers have been notified of these services that can be provided for youth.

In 2013, Governor Bill Haslam signed an Employment First Executive Order. This Executive Order established the Employment First Taskforce. In 2014, the Employment First Taskforce sign and executed a Youth Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The agencies involved in the MOU are:
• Department of Education
• Vocational Rehabilitation
• Department of Labor and Workforce Development
• Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
• Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
• Council on Developmental Disabilities (this agency oversees the implementation of the MOU. (Page 253) Title I

19. Continue implementation of the electronic case management system (TRIMS) utilizing input from agency staff and vendors to enhance the Division’s technological infrastructure and client service capabilities.

20. Continue partnerships with the three federal grants that target employment of persons with disabilities. Those grants are Tennessee Works, Employment First, and DEI. Tennessee is one of three states in the country that are receiving all three grants.

 21. Revise the self-employment process to streamline the experience for clients seeking the self-employment option. Research other state VR self-employment policies for efficient, consumer oriented strategies; and include successful business owners in the process to produce a successful program that will help individuals with disabilities become successful entrepreneurs. (Page 257) Title I

There is a small pilot supported employment program for individuals with intellectual and development disabilities that have a behavioral health diagnosis. This pilot program is utilizing IPS in providing SE services. IPS is a promising employment service model for non-behavioral health individuals. The Division along with the DIDD, DMHSAS, and the CRP are testing the applicability of the IPS model in serving individuals with said diagnoses.

For FFY 2018, the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) has selected Tennessee as a Core and Vision Quest state to receive technical assistance under the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). As a Core state, TN will be assisted in Employer Engagement and Provider Transformation. TN’s goal to increase the number of providers undergoing transformation and increasing the people engaged in competitive integrated employment. As a Vision Quest state, TN will receive guidance about funding and expansion of IPS services in partnership with VR, DMHSAS, and TennCare. (Page 264) Title I

Tennessee is an Employment First State, and there is an established Employment First Task Force. The Employment First Task force facilitated the completion of a Memorandum of Understanding for services to youth with disabilities between the following State agencies:
• Vocational Rehabilitation
• Department of Education
• Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
• Department of Labor and Workforce Development
• Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
• Council on Developmental Disabilities (Oversees the Implementation of the MOU

In Tennessee the agency that administers the State Medicaid plan is the Bureau of TennCare. The VR Program is developing a Memorandum of Understanding with the Bureau of TennCare. The VR Program has developed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. (Page 505) Title I

For FFY 2018, the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) has selected Tennessee as a Core and Vision Quest state to receive technical assistance under the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). As a Core state, TN will be assisted in Employer Engagement and Provider Transformation. TN’s goal to increase the number of providers undergoing transformation and increasing the people engaged in competitive integrated employment. As a Vision Quest state, TN will receive guidance about funding and expansion of IPS services in partnership with VR, DMHSAS, and TennCare.

The Division coordinates with other state agencies and the community rehabilitation providers to transition clients receiving supported employment services to extended services. An individual is moved to extended services when the client has reached a point where he/she has achieved maximum performance on the job; has achieved minimum necessary supports on the job; the job is not in jeopardy of ending; and individual is maintaining work performance which is acceptable to employer and client. The Division is working with the University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy, Education and Employment to develop training for CRPs on how to develop natural supports to address extended services where funding is not available from another Agency. (Page 545) Title I

   

Customized Employment

~~The Divisions Facility Programs, Service Contracts and Letters of Agreements are used to provide needed services such as but not limited to: • Vocational evaluation • Personal and vocational adjustment training • Transportation and daily meals • Vocational training • Job readiness training • Job development and job placement • Supported employment • Rehabilitation technology • Orientation and mobility • Activities of daily living • Trial work experiences • Follow-up • Pre-Employment Transition Services

The VR Program is finalizing the implementation of Customized Employment Services and extended services to youth with most significant disabilities who require supported employment. (Page 220) Title I

Literacy Education and Employment to provide staff training and development and consultation services for community supported employment service providers; and 5. Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders. Utilizing an evidence based Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment; Tennessee Division of Health Care Finance and Administration, Division of TennCare for provision of employment services for individuals enrolled in Employment and Community First CHOICES. The Department of Education for the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services.

The Division has encouraged the establishment and development of Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) to improve and expand services through Letters of Agreement. The Letter of Agreement (LOA) is an agreement between the Division and the CRP. The LOA describes the functions and responsibilities of the Division and the CRP as well as the scope of services and payment methodology agreed upon by both the Division and CRP in a joint effort of improving and expanding supported employment and extended services for individuals with disabilities. The Division currently has 92 LOAs for supported employment services. The Division continues its’ efforts to increase S.E. providers and anticipates the numbers of providers will increase. VR is actively pursuing a number of other providers for underserved areas across the state. (Page 221) Title I

In addition, as the Division continues to serve Priority Category 1 and 2 cases, more individuals with significant disabilities are able to access vocational rehabilitation services. The Division continues to monitor the budget and the staff capacity in order to determine the ability to serve Priority 3 and 4 cases. It is anticipated this activity will lead to improvement in the number of individuals with disabilities reaching successful rehabilitation outcome statuses by:

1. Continuing the practice of ensuring the availability of appropriate training activities and resources to meet the individualized needs of clients by seeking out and developing partnerships with other private and public entities to provide specialized education and training activities, to include those that can be provided through self-employment, on-the-job- training by employers, and customized employment.

2. Continuing the development and expansion of statewide employer relationships that focus on inclusion of employees with disabilities in the workforce and the value of hiring people with disabilities. The Division will continue its expansion of our activities with Employment Groups across the state and in the local areas with new programs, such as Walgreens REDI and Project Search. (Page 254) Title I

The VR Program is finalizing the implementation of Customized Employment Services and extended services to youth with most significant disabilities who require supported employment.

F. ARRANGEMENTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS FOR THE PROVISION OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(4)). Describe the designated State agency’s efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other State agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide supported employment services and extended employment services, as applicable, to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 501) Title IV

5. Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders. Utilizing an evidence based Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment; Tennessee Division of Health Care Finance and Administration, Division of TennCare for provision of employment services for individuals enrolled in Employment and Community First CHOICES. The Department of Education for the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services. (Page 502) Title IV

In addition, as the Division continues to serve Priority Category 1 and 2 cases, more individuals with significant disabilities are able to access vocational rehabilitation services. The Division continues to monitor the budget and the staff capacity in order to determine the ability to serve Priority 3 and 4 cases. It is anticipated this activity will lead to improvement in the number of individuals with disabilities reaching successful rehabilitation outcome statuses by:

1. Continuing the practice of ensuring the availability of appropriate training activities and resources to meet the individualized needs of clients by seeking out and developing partnerships with other private and public entities to provide specialized education and training activities, to include those that can be provided through self-employment, on-the-job- training by employers, and customized employment.

2. Continuing the development and expansion of statewide employer relationships that focus on inclusion of employees with disabilities in the workforce and the value of hiring people with disabilities. The Division will continue its expansion of our activities with Employment Groups across the state and in the local areas with new programs, such as Walgreens REDI and Project Search. (Page 536) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

In achieving the Governor’s Drive to 55 goal, all training activities and education practices are working to prioritize efficiency in creating connections across a wide spectrum. From Read to be Ready, to Tennessee Promise, Tennessee LEAP, and Tennessee ReConnect, the core programs and partners are actively identifying numerous ways of leveraging their assets and building capacity in a more integrated manner. The work being done by the local boards to navigate and connect the numerous citizens accessing our systems each day further provides thousands of opportunities to engage at numerous levels. Tennessee Workforce System is collaborating with Tennessee Higher Education Commission to provide ambassadors throughout the state that advocate for participants reconnecting to post-secondary educational programs. The assistance they provide guides Participants needing direction with FASFA, student loan information, and more to ease the process of returning to school. (Page 49-50) Title I

 o Partnering regionally with economic development entities and other critical stakeholders, including Pathways Tennessee, to better align education and workforce development activities and policies with regional labor markets, economic growth strategies, and employer demand
 
 o Partnering with the business community, including business associations, and educational institutions (including secondary and post-secondary institutions such as community colleges) to design and implement programs and career pathways that lead to credentials and employment
 
 o Partnering with and leveraging resources from other Federally-funded programs, such as Adult Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Small Business Development Centers, etc.
 
 o Partnering with community-based organizations, since they are key providers of basic skills training, technical skills training, supportive services, and workforce development services in communities across Tennessee
 
 o Sustaining summer employment and work experience opportunities - State and local workforce development boards should consider using additional sources of funding to leverage summer employment program activities. In addition to regular WIOA Youth formula funds, local areas can use other resources, such as Job Corps, and fund matching from private industry. (Page 91) Title I

.

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~11. Continuing to support the Workforce Investment System by continuing to co-locate vocational rehabilitation counselors in each of the major Workforce Investment Act Service delivery area career centers and ensuring that all career center satellites also have vocational rehabilitation counselors assigned to visit their centers on a regular basis to work with individuals with disabilities that visit each center.

12. Providing cross training to the career center staff in regard to meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. Continue to provide consultation on career center accessibility and accommodation needs in regard to the accessibility needs in the building(s), and accommodations in terms of appropriate technology needed to serve individuals with the disabilities. Continue to partner with the American Job Centers (AJCs) in employment initiatives such as the summer youth employment project and the DEI grant. (Page 256) Title I

19. Continue implementation of the electronic case management system (TRIMS) utilizing input from agency staff and vendors to enhance the Division’s technological infrastructure and client service capabilities.

20. Continue partnerships with the three federal grants that target employment of persons with disabilities. Those grants are Tennessee Works, Employment First, and DEI. Tennessee is one of three states in the country that are receiving all three grants.

21. Revise the self-employment process to streamline the experience for clients seeking the self-employment option. Research other state VR self-employment policies for efficient, consumer oriented strategies; and include successful business owners in the process to produce a successful program that will help individuals with disabilities become successful entrepreneurs. (Page 257) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Supportive services, such, assistive technologies, transportation, personal assistance services, and services to family members may also be provided if necessary for the individual to utilize the services identified above. Post-employment services may be provided to previously rehabilitated individuals when needed to maintain or regain suitable employment. Pre-employment transition services provided to students with disabilities include job exploration and counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs at institutions of higher education, workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and instruction in self-advocacy. Technical assistance, training, outreach and other supportive services are provided to public and private employers of all sizes, including Federal and Federal contracting employers for the purpose of increasing employment opportunities for job seekers with disabilities. (Page 87) Title I

Participants are required to observe a program orientation that explains the work requirements, components offered, component requirements, and assistance provided for each component. We hope to implement an Online Orientation during Fiscal Year 2018. After the Orientation has been completed, program participants are assessed during a one-on-one meeting to develop an Individual Employment Plan (IEP). The assessment will review the individual’s background, education, work history, hobbies, and any barriers to employment. The plan can include education and/or training activities, but the overall goal is obtaining employment with a gainful wage that significantly reduces or eliminates the need for governmental assistance. After the IEP is developed, participants will immediately begin their participation in their most suitable component. (Page 93) Title I

The Division requests a waiver of state wideness in order to maintain thirty Third Party Agreements with thirty-five (LEAs). These Third Party Agreements are designed to provide enhanced and concentrated services to Transition School to Work students/clients covered by the agreements. The Division has a contract with each entity that is consistent with Federal regulations (34 CFR § 361.26) and includes the following provisions:
1. The vocational rehabilitation services to be provided are identified in Section A. Scope of Services in each contract (Each contract has been submitted separately to RSA to provide the written assurances requested for this attachment);
2. The LEA assures that non-Federal funds are made available to the Division by committing to their maintenance of effort in Section E.13 of the contract;
3. The LEA assures that the Division’s approval is required before services are provided with the Division’s counselor determining eligibility for each client served;
4. The LEA assures, through the Division’s vocational rehabilitation counselors, that all other state plan requirements, including the Order of Selection policy, are applied to persons receiving services through the agreement; and
5. The LEA assures that reasonable accommodations will be provided. A list of the LEA contracts is provided below: • Anderson County Schools • Bledsoe County Schools • Blount County Schools • Carter County Schools • Johnson County Schools • Clarksville/Montgomery County Schools • Cocke County Schools • Dyserburg City Schools • Elizabethton City Schools • Greene County/ Greenville City Schools • Hamblen County Schools • Henderson County Schools • Humboldt City, Trenton Special School District, Milan Special District • Jackson/Madison County Schools • Kingsport City Schools • Knox County Schools • Lauderdale County Schools • Loudon County Schools • McMinn County Schools • McNairy County Schools • Metro Nashville Public Schools • Polk County Schools • Putnam County Schools • Sequatchie County Schools • Shelby County Schools • TN School for the Blind • TN School for the Deaf • Tullahoma City Schools • Unicoi County Schools • Warren County Schools • Washington County Schools (Pages 208-209) Title I

The Division has interagency cooperation, collaboration, and coordination with other state and local entities that are not components of the Statewide Workforce Investment System. The Division works in cooperation with the following federal, state, and local agencies and programs to provide services for individuals with significant disabilities: 1. The Department of Children’s Services for youth-The Program is currently meeting with DCS state office staff to determine how to blend DCS Independent Living Services with VR program services. DCS state office staff has toured the TRC at Smyrna to learn more about the services provided at the TRC. The DCS Independent Living Coordinators statewide have an annual meeting. The VR Program has offered to host the 2016 spring meeting of the DCS Independent Living Coordinators. During that meeting, all Independent Living Coordinators will tour the facility in order to assist in a plan for coordination of services. 2. The Department of Health in providing services to individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI); 3. Post-secondary school systems and their governing bodies; 4. The Department of Education and Local Education Agencies for individuals who are transitioning from school to work. 5. The Department of Corrections for individuals released from state correctional facilities; 6. The Tennessee Board of Probation and Parole for individuals released from state correctional facilities and monitored by the Board. 7. Local city police, county sheriffs and judge’s programs for individuals being released from jails or on probation or trial diversion; 8. The Department of Human Services Family Assistance and Child Support Division for individuals participating in services under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program; 9. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders; 10. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities; (Pages 209-210) Title I

The DSU entered into an exclusive Interagency Agreement with the Department of Education in October, 2017. The Agreement lays out the Purpose of the Agreement, VR responsibilities, DOE responsibilities, and mutual responsibilities. We were aided by WINTAC, an RSA technical assistance contractor. Training has begun across the state at the Special Education Study Councils and is currently being provided at the Partners in Education Conference, February 6-8, 2018.
When a student who is eligible based on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) standards reaches the age of fourteen (14), the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team , as defined by 34 CFR § 300.344, formulates a statement of transition service needs as a component of the IEP. The Division’s staff is invited and to the extent possible participates in these IEP meetings.
The Division has been under an Order of Selection since 2001. Under the current Order, the Division is able to provide direct services to those eligible individuals in Priority Category 1 and Priority Category 2. The Division was able to open Priority Category 2 effective September 30, 2012. There was a release of clients from the waiting list in Priority Category 3 on October 1, 2013. From January 2015-March 2015 all PCs were closed for the provision of new services. This was a brief closing and Priority Categories 1 and 2 were re-opened in March 2015. The opening and release of clients from the waiting list allows for the provision of direct services to significantly more students with disabilities. The Division provides information and referral services to help all applicants find services through other agencies and entities. The inclusion of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) will allow for the provision of the five stated Pre-ETS services for those students with a disability who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services. (Pages 211-212) Title I

The IEP team, which should include the Division’s staff when invited and when available, parent and student, determines that the student should be referred for VR services. The Division’s staff should inform the student and parents, preferable at the IEP meeting, the purpose of the vocational rehabilitation program. VR Staff make every effort to attend IEP meetings, however due to staff resources this is not always possible. However information regarding VR Services is made available during IEP meetings. 

The Transition School to Work Unit within the VR program is working with the Department of Education on how to incorporate VR services information into the IEP meeting. The Director of the Unit has been trained on Easy IEPs. In the provision of the Pre-Employment Transition Services, students with disabilities and their families will start receiving information on VR services as early as age fourteen. Information will be made available to Middle school staff in order to assist with the beginning the transition. (Page 212) Title I

Beginning in October 2015, these IEP meetings will include information on Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) services that are available at age 14. Pre-ETS services are available to students with disabilities ages 14-22. Pre-ETS services can be provided without an application for VR services. For those individuals that are interested in applying for services, the information should include the application procedures, the eligibility requirements including the Order of Selection, and the potential scope of services that may be available. As soon as possible after referral, the Division takes an application from the student and determines eligibility as well as whether the student is in an open priority category. If the student is in an open priority category, the Division’s staff assists in the formulation of the student’s IEP and the student’s vocational rehabilitation Individualized Plan for Employment as soon as it is determined that the student can benefit from services provided by the Division in preparation for exiting the school system and transitioning into training and/or employment. Services provided by the Division may include attending job fairs, community vocational adjustment training and pre-employment, vocational skills training, college prep, and job readiness training.

The DSU has chosen to provide Pre-Employment Transition Services through Transition School to Work Contracts, Pre-ETS contracts, LOAs and direct staff contact. (Page 212-213) Title I

The DSU has hired 9 Pre-Employment Transition Specialists and 3 Pre-employment Transition Supervisors to coordinate services provided in their areas, identify Local Education Agencies (LEAs) who have a need for Pre-Employment Transition Services, and recruit Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs). They will match interested schools and willing CRPs and/or provide services where there are students with disabilities who need the service.
The Pre-Employment Transition Specialists will work with the schools to identify students who are of working age who want to become VR clients and make referrals to the VR Counselor assigned to the school. (Page 213) Title I

In 2014 VR transitioned from VR counselors to TSW grants to work in the school systems. There are currently 38 TSW grants serving 42 LEAs.
It is the Division’s policy that the development and approval of the IPE for each student determined eligible for VR services occurs as soon as it is determined that the student can benefit from services provided by the Division. An IPE must be developed before the student leaves the school setting.
The interagency agreement identifies the financial responsibility of the Department of Education (DOE) to ensure that individuals who are IDEIA eligible receive a free appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment. A free appropriate public education means regular and special education and related services which:
1. Are provided at public expense, under public supervision and direction, and without charge to the parent;
2. Meet the standards established by state law, including the requirements of IDEIA Part B and the Rules, Regulations and Minimum Standards for the Governance of Tennessee Public Schools, issued by DOE;
3. Include preschool, elementary school, and secondary school (including appropriate vocational, career or work experience education); and
4. Are provided in conformity with an IEP. (Page 214) Title I

The interagency agreement relates the financial responsibility of the Division to ensure that individuals who are IDEIA eligible and meet the Division’s eligibility requirements will receive VR Services. VR Services means any services necessary to determine eligibility and those services described in an IPE necessary to assist an individual with a disability in preparing for, securing, retaining, or regaining an employment outcome that is consistent with the strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice of the individual.
The LEA is responsible for the educational costs related to the provision of special education and related services for the individual attending school. The agreement states that if another public agency is obligated under federal or state law or assigned responsibility under state policy to provide or pay for any services that are considered special education or related services and are necessary for ensuring FAPE to students who are IDEIA eligible, the public agency shall fulfill that obligation or responsibility, directly, through contract or by another arrangement. However, failure of that public agency to pay for that service does not relieve the LEA of its obligation to provide that service to an individual with a disability in a timely manner. (Page 214) Title I

The Division is responsible for all costs necessary for eligibility determination and provision of services under an IPE. The Division must take into account comparable services and benefits [34 CFR § 361.53 (c) (1))], available under any other program that does not interrupt or delay the progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the IPE.
The Division’s staff maintains a working relationship with special education supervisors, vocational education supervisors, directors, secondary school guidance counselors, and LEA administrators for the purpose of providing outreach for students with disabilities and technical assistance to school personnel to assist LEAs in preparing students with disabilities for career opportunities. The Division participates in in-service training programs for LEAs, as well as in statewide special education conferences for the purpose of providing information regarding VR services. The Division also participates in and organizes local community job fairs, job clubs, attends civic club/organization meetings to inform students and parents of the purpose of the VR program, the application procedures, the eligibility requirements, and the potential scope of services that may be available. (Page 215) Title I

The Division currently contracts with forty-four LEAs as part of its transition initiative. The contracts provide for a menu of needed and additional services chosen by the LEA to assist in the transitioning of students from school to work. All services provided under these contracts/agreements have a VR employment focus. All services provided under these contracts/agreements are in keeping with all state plan requirements to include our state’s Order of Selection requirements. Services provided under these contracts/agreements are only available to applicants for, or recipients of, services of the Division. The Division will strive to increase the number of contracts with LEAs as allowed by the Division’s and LEAs’ funding availability. (Page 215) Title I

The 5 Pre-Employment Transition Services are: 1. Job Exploration Counseling can be provided in classroom or a work setting of in-demand occupations. Counseling can include completing interest inventories to determine a student’s interests, job shadowing, exploration of Career Pathways, and researching local labor market information that apply to the student’s interests. 2. Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school or after-school opportunities, or experiences outside of the traditional school settings (including internships). It is provided in an integrated environment in the community to the maximum extent possible; 3. Counseling on Post-Secondary Opportunities, which may include exploration and preparation for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary education programs at institutions of higher education; 4. Workplace Readiness Training for the development of social skills and independent living skills necessary for successful employment. This may include skill acquisition as well as opportunities to apply newly acquired knowledge. 5. Instruction in self-Advocacy, which may include Self-Determination, Life Skills Training and peer mentoring from individuals with disabilities working in competitive integrated employment. Recipients learn about their rights, responsibilities, and how to request accommodations for post-secondary education placement as well as employment. (Page 223) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation Stakeholders Overall, respondents (38%) are sometimes satisfied with the services VR clients receive from TN Rehabilitation Services. Twenty-four percent are satisfied and 21% are dissatisfied. Two respondents listed not applicable, two were very dissatisfied, and one person stated that they were very satisfied with the services VR clients receive. One stakeholder praised VR’s improvements made in “Working on developing relationships with future clients before they leave high school; actively participating in meaningful IEP transition meetings.” (Page 236) Title I

 Specifically, the assessment identified the following primary needs for the program: • Outreach materials to increase awareness and knowledge about the VR program and services to communities and local businesses. VR’s outreach activities are woven throughout the state plan. See sections a, d, e, j, l, o, p, and q. • Training to VR employees and Community Resource Partners covering policy changes and Letters of Agreement (LOA). The state plan includes numerous training initiatives and strategies for both VR staff and CRPs in sections a, c, d, f, i, j, l, n, o, p, and q. • Training to VR employees covering medical impairments and how they impact limitations with work. As noted above, the state plan includes numerous training initiatives and strategies in sections a, c, d, f, i, j, l, n, o, p, and q. • Transportation for clients. Meeting the transportation needs of clients continues to be an identified need in Tennessee. Transportation was a need identified in 2010, 2013, and 2016. Transportation is a major support service provided by VR either directly to an individual or through area transportation providers. The needs assessments identified needs in rural areas that do not have the transportation opportunities available in urban areas. To the extent possible, VR works with each individual to address transportation needs through rural transportation agencies or family members until an individual can afford his or her own transportation following employment. DHS continues to work with rural transportation providers and Human Resource Agencies to address rural transportation needs for individuals participating in work programs. • Improved communication with Community Resource Partners (CRP). The state plan includes information on communication with CRPs through contracts, letters of agreement, training, and monitoring as outlined in sections a, c, d, e, f, l, m, o, p, and q. • Increase in Pre-Employment Transition Services. The state plan includes several updates to the pre-employment transition service activities occurring throughout the state in sections a, d, e, f, g, l, and m. • Increase in Local Education Association (LEA). The state plan includes several updates to its work with local education agencies in sections a, d, g, l, o, and p. Most notably, the number of LEAs served by the Transition School to Work program has increased. (Pages 241-242) Title I

As of Sept 30, 2017, 8,010 individuals in the state are eligible for services under an IPE. Of this number and in compliance with our Order of Selection, 7,255 are receiving services provided with Title I, Part B funds and 755 are receiving services provided with Title VI, Part B funds and with Title I, Part B funds.
For Fiscal Year 2018, it is projected that there will be 5,499 new applicants and that 12,754 individuals in the state will be eligible for services under an IPE. Of this number, 12,013 will receive services under an IPE provided with Title I, Part B funds and 741 will receive services under an IPE provided with Title VI, Part B funds and with Title I, Part B funds. It is estimated that the number of individuals to be served under Title I, Part B and Title VI, Part B under an IPE during Fiscal Year 2018 under each priority category within our Order of Selection will be:
• Priority Category 1 - 8,928 (Includes Title VI, Part B) • Priority Category 2 - 3,826
Total 12,754
Note: Estimates for eligible individuals and those who will be provided services under our Order of Selection in Fiscal Year 2018 is based on current trends and adjustments to utilization of Title VI, Part B funds. (Page 243) Title I

On August 1, 2001, the Division implemented an Order of Selection due to funding limitations that would not allow the Division to provide services under an IPE to all eligible individuals. Only Priority Category 1 cases (eligible individuals who have the most significant disabilities) were served until 2009.
From 2009 until October 2012 there were numerous releases of Priority Category 2 and 3 cases. Beginning October 1, 2012, the Division opened Priority Category 2 for services. The Division is now serving all Priority Category 1 and 2 cases. Those Priority Category 3 cases that were on the waiting list were released for services on October 1, 2013.
The Division’s funds and resources remain inadequate to serve individuals in all four priority categories. The Division expects to have approximately $21,000,000 from the federal grant and state appropriations to spend for assessments for an estimated 5,797 new cases and planned services for approximately 13,000 existing and new cases. Approximately half of this amount must be allocated for pre-employment transition services. (Page 249) Title I

6. Continuing to support expansion of Transition School-to-Work services by continuing to work with Local Education Agencies (LEA’s) in the maintenance of existing partnerships and the creation of additional partnerships to provide vocational rehabilitation services targeted specifically to that LEA’s school system. Continuing to work with and educate school personnel on the mission and scope of the Division in order to maximize services from both entities to better serve our mutual clientele to include appropriate qualified interpreters/accommodations for students that are in LEA/School to Work programs. The newly hired Transition School to Work Director will manage this process. (Page 255) Title I

The Division will develop strategies for increasing referrals of transition school to work clients through local education agencies. Special focus will include the identification of any underserved population at the regional level.
ACHIEVEMENT: In Federal Fiscal Year the Program had 2358 successful employment outcomes. This is a 9% increase over FY2014’s successful employment outcomes of 2159. The VR Program continued focused collaborative efforts with numerous state agencies, in addition to collaboration with Universities across the state. In FFY 2015 Transition School to Work contracts were increased. (Page 259) Title I

Program Reviews:
The Grants and Program Manager will monitor programs on an annual basis. TDLWD SNAP Program staff are interviewed at the local office to determine their general understanding of the program. At each location, case files are reviewed. The Individual Employability Plan (IEP) is evaluated for detailed direction, and incremental steps to achieve program goals. The EDP documents each step as the client progresses through the program. (Page 302) Title I

Any participant of SCSEP is required to develop an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) at the time of enrollment. The IEP serves as a personal road-map to success and is designed to specifically assist the participant in meeting both personal and program goals. Each participant receives specialized training that fits under his or her IEP and is assigned to a host agency to develop or improve skills. The plan also determines if the Host Agency has met the participant’s requirements. In addition, the Host Agency provides services to low-income older persons, to the economically disadvantaged, and to organizations offering services which provide positive contributions to the welfare of the general community. Opportunities to serve other groups will also be provided through placement in schools, day-care programs, health and hospital programs, and agencies serving individuals with physical and developmental disabilities. (Page 370) Title IV

IEPs are referred to often throughout participation to ensure goals are being met. In addition, any IEP identifies the need for vocational, high school equivalency (HSE), or computer training. All of these require attendance in a “classroom” environment where the participant may have workbooks, exercises, and reading assignments. Tennessee believes that it is vital to strengthen initial assessments of participant skills, knowledge, interests, aptitudes, and qualities to assist participants with defining career objectives that are relevant and which meet employer needs. . (Page 371) Title IV

Tennessee prides itself on being engaged in actionable partnerships to leverage resources across agencies and enhance customer performance outcomes. Governor’s Jobs and Economic Development Goal: Objective II, to establish cost-effective co-investment models, across government funding streams and other funding streams. These partnerships include:
o Coordinating with American Job Centers, Vocational Rehabilitation Services and other members of the local disability community regarding activities, resources, and services for seniors with disabilities
o Participating in meetings, as appropriate, with senior service providers, both public and private
o Coordinating with local service providers and community stakeholders to assess needs and develop solutions for local transportation services
o Using 2-1-1 and other directories of service and supporting organizations to identify entities and programs in the community that provides referrals and support services to seniors. These directories are especially helpful for transition services when a participant’s durational limit is approaching and project staff is working with him/her to develop a Transition Assessment & IEP.
o Networking with area faith-based organizations to conduct outreach to SCSEP-eligible individuals
Outreach and education of AJC and partner staff will be increased with training on basic competencies when servicing those with disabilities. If assistance is needed for training and employment services with the deaf and hard of hearing, interpreters and other communication-access services will be scheduled. Other partnerships include organizations providing assistance with subsidized housing, healthcare and medical services, transportation, the law, food, personal and financial counseling, interviewing, clothes, etc. (Page 373) Title IV

Special population students have equal access to all CTE courses and use the same curriculum and assessment as other students. One of the successes observed through the use of competency profiles as a measurement approach for occupational attainment has been the value they have for CTE and special education teachers working together to develop students’ IEPs. After the review of the required competencies, support is given special education students through educational assistants for success in the classroom. Modification of curriculum, equipment, and teaching methodologies are offered, when needed, for success in the course. Several regional offices offer in-service training for teachers to use competency profiles in the development of IEPs. (Page 418) Title IV

In addition to the strategies already identified above for all special population students, strategies to enable identified students to prepare for further learning and for high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand careers may include the following:
o exploration of career areas that focus on expanding career options, educational planning, and CTE training that is free of gender bias;
o comprehensive career counseling and guidance including labor market information on a broad range of occupations, career testing, placement services for part-time and summer employment, internships, and cooperative programs;
o access to options for specialization in a variety of areas with access to work-based learning opportunities;
o career development activities which lead to mastery of workplace readiness skills;
o high quality, paid work-based learning experiences to provide career exploration, enhancement of personal and interpersonal skills, and development of occupational skills;
o access to programs which encourage learning all aspects of the industry including planning, management, finances, technical production, and principles of technology; and
o provide information on non-traditional jobs that are in high-demand, require high-skill or offer high-wages with opportunities for advancement and benefits.
Special populations have access to all CTE courses and use the same curriculum and assessment as other students. One of the successes observed through the use of competency profiles as a measurement approach for occupational attainment has been the value they have for CTE teachers and special education teachers working together to develop students’ IEPs. After the review of the required competencies, support is given to special education students through educational assistants for success in the classroom. Modification of curriculum, equipment, and teaching methodologies are offered, when needed, for success in the course. Several regional offices provided in-service training for teachers in the use of competency profiles in the development of IEPs. (Page 423-424) Title IV

The Division requests a waiver of state wideness in order to maintain thirty Third Party Agreements with thirty-five (LEAs). These Third Party Agreements are designed to provide enhanced and concentrated services to Transition School to Work students/clients covered by the agreements. The Division has a contract with each entity that is consistent with Federal regulations (34 CFR § 361.26) and includes the following provisions:
1. The vocational rehabilitation services to be provided are identified in Section A. Scope of Services in each contract (Each contract has been submitted separately to RSA to provide the written assurances requested for this attachment);
2. The LEA assures that non-Federal funds are made available to the Division by committing to their maintenance of effort in Section E.13 of the contract;
3. The LEA assures that the Division’s approval is required before services are provided with the Division’s counselor determining eligibility for each client served; (Page 486) Title IV

When a student who is eligible based on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) standards reaches the age of fourteen (14), the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team , as defined by 34 CFR § 300.344, formulates a statement of transition service needs as a component of the IEP. The Division’s staff is invited and to the extent possible participates in these IEP meetings. (Page 491) Title IV

The IEP team, which should include the Division’s staff when invited and when available, parent and student, determines that the student should be referred for VR services. The Division’s staff should inform the student and parents, preferable at the IEP meeting, the purpose of the vocational rehabilitation program. VR Staff make every effort to attend IEP meetings, however due to staff resources this is not always possible. However information regarding VR Services is made available during IEP meetings.
The Transition School to Work Unit within the VR program is working with the Department of Education on how to incorporate VR services information into the IEP meeting. The Director of the Unit has been trained on Easy IEPs. In the provision of the Pre-Employment Transition Services, students with disabilities and their families will start receiving information on VR services as early as age fourteen. Information will be made available to Middle school staff in order to assist with the beginning the transition. (Page 492) Title IV

The DSU has hired 9 Pre-Employment Transition Specialists and 3 Pre-employment Transition Supervisors to coordinate services provided in their areas, identify Local Education Agencies (LEAs) who have a need for Pre-Employment Transition Services, and recruit Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs). They will match interested schools and willing CRPs and/or provide services where there are students with disabilities who need the service.
The Pre-Employment Transition Specialists will work with the schools to identify students who are of working age who want to become VR clients and make referrals to the VR Counselor assigned to the school. (Pages 492-493) Title IV

There are 28 Pre-Employment Transition Community Rehabilitation Providers providing services.
The LEA’s involved in the interagency agreement with the Division should cooperate in developing and coordinating services for students and youth with disabilities within each respective agency’s legal authority. The ultimate goal of each agency participating in the agreement is to provide, or cause to be provided, a continuum of appropriate services leading to transition from school into employment. The agreement provides for:
1. Consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;
2. Consultation and technical assistance on providing reasonable accommodations;
3. Transition planning by personnel of the Division of Rehabilitation Services and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) of 2004 (P.L. 108-446); (Page 493) Title IV 

The interagency agreement identifies the financial responsibility of the Department of Education (DOE) to ensure that individuals who are IDEIA eligible receive a free appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment. A free appropriate public education means regular and special education and related services which:
1. Are provided at public expense, under public supervision and direction, and without charge to the parent;
2. Meet the standards established by state law, including the requirements of IDEIA Part B and the Rules, Regulations and Minimum Standards for the Governance of Tennessee Public Schools, issued by DOE;
3. Include preschool, elementary school, and secondary school (including appropriate vocational, career or work experience education); and
4. Are provided in conformity with an IEP. (Page 494) Title I

The Division currently contracts with forty-four LEAs as part of its transition initiative. The contracts provide for a menu of needed and additional services chosen by the LEA to assist in the transitioning of students from school to work. All services provided under these contracts/agreements have a VR employment focus. All services provided under these contracts/agreements are in keeping with all state plan requirements to include our state’s Order of Selection requirements. Services provided under these contracts/agreements are only available to applicants for, or recipients of, services of the Division. The Division will strive to increase the number of contracts with LEAs as allowed by the Division’s and LEAs’ funding availability.
Although the Division utilizes contracts with LEAs as part of its transition initiative, all decisions affecting eligibility for VR services, the nature and scope of available services, and the provision of these services remain the sole responsibility of the VR counselor employed by the Division. VR staff is responsible for determinations to close cases and for all allocations of expenditures for services. (Page 495) Title IV

The purpose of this MOU, is to state how these agencies will work together to provide transition school to work services to students and youth with disabilities.
The Division continues to recognize the value of the involvement of its State Rehabilitation Council in personnel development activities. It is the policy of the Division to give the Council ongoing review and input on the development of issues associated with the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development.
The Council continues to be involved with CSPD issues associated with the recruitment and retention of staff, such as; counselor salaries and pay incentives for the successful attainment of counselors with a Master's degree in Rehabilitation and also training for existing staff to obtain a Master's Degree in Rehabilitation. (Page 516) Title IV

Overall, respondents (38%) are sometimes satisfied with the services VR clients receive from TN Rehabilitation Services. Twenty-four percent are satisfied and 21% are dissatisfied. Two respondents listed not applicable, two were very dissatisfied, and one person stated that they were very satisfied with the services VR clients receive. One stakeholder praised VR’s improvements made in “Working on developing relationships with future clients before they leave high school; actively participating in meaningful IEP transition meetings.”
According to survey results, 48% of stakeholders straddled the fence in their belief that VR Counselors fully understand how and why a client’s disability affects their chances of employment. Twenty-four percent agree and 17% percent disagree that VR Counselors understand the impact a disability has on employment. Eleven of the Stakeholders felt that employment opportunities were an unmet need of individuals with disabilities. One respondent shared that “There seems to be a lack of creativity to find positions that are compatible with their disabilities.” (Page 518) Title IV

• Increase in Pre-Employment Transition Services. The state plan includes several updates to the pre-employment transition service activities occurring throughout the state in sections a, d, e, f, g, l, and m.
• Increase in Local Education Association (LEA). The state plan includes several updates to its work with local education agencies in sections a, d, g, l, o, and p. Most notably, the number of LEAs served by the Transition School to Work program has increased. (Page 525) Title IV

The Division also elects not to serve eligible individuals, regardless of any established order of selection, who require specific services or equipment to maintain employment. The Division expects to serve 12,754 existing and new Priority Category 1 and 2 in 2018. Of this number, the Division expects to provide services for 8,928 Priority Category 1 cases and 3,826 Priority Category 2 cases.
The Division will monitor staffing needs to determine if there is sufficient manpower to schedule releases of Priority Category 3 and 4 cases for services or open all Priority Category 3 cases for services. Therefore, continuation of the Order of Selection mandated by the Rehabilitation Act of
1973, as amended, to determine which eligible individuals will be served under an IPE is still warranted due to staffing deficiencies.
The Division monitors services and expenditures on a continuous basis, allowing the Division to manage available funds and staff to assure sustainability of services for cases placed in an open priority category and receiving services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). Additionally, adequate funds will continue to be conserved and staffing deficiencies monitored to provide assessment services for all applicants expected to apply throughout the year to determine eligibility and to provide services for those eligible individuals in an open priority category within the Order of Selection. (Page 532) Title IV

6. Continuing to support expansion of Transition School-to-Work services by continuing to work with Local Education Agencies (LEA’s) in the maintenance of existing partnerships and the creation of additional partnerships to provide vocational rehabilitation services targeted specifically to that LEA’s school system. Continuing to work with and educate school personnel on the mission and scope of the Division in order to maximize services from both entities to better serve our mutual clientele to include appropriate qualified interpreters/accommodations for students that are in LEA/School to Work programs. The newly hired Transition School to Work Director will manage this process. (Page 537) Title IV

The Division will develop strategies for increasing referrals of transition school to work clients through local education agencies. Special focus will include the identification of any underserved population at the regional level.
ACHIEVEMENT: In Federal Fiscal Year the Program had 2358 successful employment outcomes. This is a 9% increase over FY2014’s successful employment outcomes of 2159. The VR Program continued focused collaborative efforts with numerous state agencies, in addition to collaboration with Universities across the state. In FFY 2015 Transition School to Work contracts were increased. (Page 541) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Tennessee’s plan to utilize wage record data, which includes SSNs, wages, and employer information such as the FEIN, is founded in compliance with confidentiality provisions in 20 CFR Section 603, as well as in accordance with the emerging requirements of the SWIS (State Wage Interchange System) data sharing agreement. TEGL 7-16, Data Matching to Facilitate WIOA Performance Reporting, also is being used to guide the process and direction of partnership agreements, similar to MOUs, which define, if needed, authorized data share staff among program and IT staff of the TN agencies noted above. One of the options under TEGL 7-16 is a centralized process carried out by TDLWD which consolidates earnings and post-secondary attainment into the full PIRL reporting file; but it will be December 2016 before this decision is fully approved, through full engagement with partners. TDLWD also will engage internal staff, already authorized to view and handle education data under FERPA, to extend the reach of the department’s sharing agreements with the University of Tennessee. This will authorize the transfer to TDLWD of TN’s longitudinal data, named P20, which is currently being used to track student and thus WIOA participant progress through career pathways carried out in the partnership with OCTAE, AE, and all core programs under WIOA. (Page 144) Title I

Fifteen percent (15%) of the Basic VR grant must be set aside for the provision of Pre-ETS services. TN VR provides the 5 Pre-ETS services through contracts with qualified Community Rehabilitation Partners (CRPs), Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and/or VR staff.

The 5 Pre-Employment Transition Services are:

  1. Job Exploration Counseling can be provided in classroom or a work setting of in-demand occupations. Counseling can include completing interest inventories to determine a student’s interests, job shadowing, exploration of Career Pathways, and researching local labor market information that apply to the student’s interests.
  2. Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school or after-school opportunities, or experiences outside of the traditional school settings (including internships). It is provided in an integrated environment in the community to the maximum extent possible;
  3. Counseling on Post-Secondary Opportunities, which may include exploration and preparation for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary education programs at institutions of higher education;
  4. Workplace Readiness Training for the development of social skills and independent living skills necessary for successful employment. This may include skill acquisition as well as opportunities to apply newly acquired knowledge.
  5. Instruction in self-Advocacy, which may include Self-Determination, Life Skills Training and peer mentoring from individuals with disabilities working in competitive integrated employment. Recipients learn about their rights, responsibilities, and how to request accommodations for post-secondary education placement as well as employment. (Page 223) Title I

The 5 Pre-Employment Transition Services are:
1. Job Exploration Counseling can be provided in classroom or a work setting of in-demand occupations. Counseling can include completing interest inventories to determine a student’s interests, job shadowing, exploration of Career Pathways, and researching local labor market information that apply to the student’s interests.
2. Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school or after-school opportunities, or experiences outside of the traditional school settings (including internships). It is provided in an integrated environment in the community to the maximum extent possible;
3. Counseling on Post-Secondary Opportunities, which may include exploration and preparation for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary education programs at institutions of higher education;
4. Workplace Readiness Training for the development of social skills and independent living skills necessary for successful employment. This may include skill acquisition as well as opportunities to apply newly acquired knowledge.
5. Instruction in self-Advocacy, which may include Self-Determination, Life Skills Training and peer mentoring from individuals with disabilities working in competitive integrated employment. Recipients learn about their rights, responsibilities, and how to request accommodations for post-secondary education placement as well as employment.  (Page 504) Title IV
 

Apprenticeship

These local teams will coordinate activities geared to connecting employees, affected by the layoffs/closings, to other employment opportunities to minimize the time needed for unemployment insurance assistance. In addition to connecting dislocated workers to employment, Rapid Response teams will also work to connect participants to training opportunities through WIOA and partner programs, including the higher education system. In addition to connecting participants to formal training opportunities, Rapid Response teams will also work with the AJCs to connect participants to apprenticeships, to OJTs, and other dislocated worker re-employment activities. Rapid Response funds will be used to assist with the expenses associated with technical features such as Jobs4TN, the mobile units, materials, and staff time associated with Rapid Response activities. (Page 158) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~5. Program Administration for the Supported Employment Title VI Supplement:
a. The designated State unit assures that it will include in the VR services portion of the Unified or Combined State Plan all information required by section 606 of the Rehabilitation Act.
b. The designated State agency assures that it will submit reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the Commissioner may require and collects the information required by section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under title I and individuals receiving supported employment services under title VI of the Rehabilitation Act.
c. The designated state unit will coordinate activities with any other State agency that is functioning as an employment network under the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency program under Section 1148 of the Social Security Act.

6. Financial Administration of the Supported Employment Program:
a. The designated State agency assures that it will expend no more than 2.5 percent of the State’s allotment under title VI for administrative costs of carrying out this program; and, the designated State agency or agencies will provide, directly or indirectly through public or private entities, non-Federal contributions in an amount that is not less than 10 percent of the costs of carrying out supported employment services provided to youth with the most significant disabilities with the funds reserved for such purpose under section 603(d) of the Rehabilitation Act, in accordance with section 606(b)(7)(G) and (H) of the Rehabilitation Act. (Pages 272-273) Title I

 Continuing to support expansion of supported employment services by actively seeking out, training, and monitoring community rehabilitation providers; especially in the more rural areas, that are willing to provide supported employment services to vocational rehabilitation clients with the most significant disabilities; and by fostering partnerships with DIDD and chapters of The ARC in Tennessee to implement employment network projects with community rehabilitation providers. The Division is striving to have shared vendors with DIDD in order to access services for shared clients. The Division is expanding participation in the Individual Placement Model of Supported Employment (IPS) statewide. (Page 537) Title IV

13. Continuing to support the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program and use of other Social Security work incentives that benefit clients by continuing contract with the Benefits to Work Company. This company provides Social Security benefits counseling to clients before and after the Individualized Plan for Employment process. Currently the Division contracts with Benefits to Work to provide outreach to communities on how working affects Social Security Benefits, work incentives, and benefits planning. The agency will also continue to promote the most effective use of Ticket to Work Employment Network programs for the Division and our partners. (Page 538) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~There is a small pilot supported employment program for individuals with intellectual and development disabilities that have a behavioral health diagnosis. This pilot program is utilizing IPS in providing SE services. IPS is a promising employment service model for non-behavioral health individuals. The Division along with the DIDD, DMHSAS, and the CRP are testing the applicability of the IPS model in serving individuals with said diagnoses.

For FFY 2018, the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) has selected Tennessee as a Core and Vision Quest state to receive technical assistance under the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). As a Core state, TN will be assisted in Employer Engagement and Provider Transformation. TN’s goal to increase the number of providers undergoing transformation and increasing the people engaged in competitive integrated employment. As a Vision Quest state, TN will receive guidance about funding and expansion of IPS services in partnership with VR, DMHSAS, and TennCare. (Page 264) Title I

Data Collection

Of the 92 who responded, 48 stated that few clients have jobs when they leave the VR program. Forty-two (42%) stated that most clients have jobs and only 2 stated none of their clients have jobs when they leave the program. Most clients, 60-79%, currently receive checks from the government such as SSI or SSDI, according to 30% of the VR Staff respondents. Another 28% stated that 80-90% of their clients receive SSI or SSDI. Half of the staff who responded has Master’s degrees. Another fourth have a bachelor’s degree. Twenty-six people skipped this question. Most respondents are between the age of 45-64 years of age. (Page 522) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~2018 UPDATE: The Division continues to monitor timeliness of eligibility determinations and development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). Monthly rates have met or exceeded the established performance metrics of 92% and 90% respectively. Additionally, the Division continues to monitor the success rate of case closures. To date, the Division has not achieved its goal of meeting or exceeding the federal rate of 55.8%. The success rate for FFY 2017 was 50.8%.

OBJECTIVE 2.2: Meet or exceed the Federal ratio of the average hourly wage of individuals who achieved competitive employment to the average hourly wage of all employed individuals in the State of 0.520. Fifty-two percent of closures should be working at wages of $10-$11 per hour.

ACHIEVEMENT: The VR Program did not meet this goal. The ratio has consistently been 0.49, meaning Forty-nine percent of the successful closures were work at wages of $10-$11 per hour.

2018 UPDATE: The Average reported hourly wage of clients closed successfully in FFY 2017 was $10.01. The Division continues to strive for meeting or exceeding the federal ratio for wages. To date, the Division has not achieved this goal. (Page 261) Title I

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Branding and outreach materials will be a statewide theme including the national DOL brand information. o Common definitions will be established to support all funding streams’ understanding and requirements. o A performance management dashboard inclusive of State Board measures and locally selected measures will be required to help drive positive behaviors in regard to employers. o The rapid response will be included in the regional and local business service team responsibilities. Rapid Response activities have been functionally aligned and provided through local workforce areas to establish a more integrated seamless approach to helping job seekers and business customers. Title I has the primary responsibility to provide Rapid Response activities. o AJC certification requirements will include business service parameters that each local business service team must meet or exceed. o Business service teams are expected to collaborate with job seeker services to fill positions and focus training on needed skills and knowledge. (Page 104) Title I

A critical factor in meeting the skills needs of employers is an understanding of exactly what those needs are. TDLWD will work with its education and economic development partners to clearly identify and forecast employer needs to be aligned with the industry clusters and sectors identified in the Governor’s vision. Concerning the cornerstone of the Governor’s Jobs and Economic Development Goal and Objectives, TDLWD considers employers to be primary customers. The Workforce System focuses on “people for jobs” and “jobs for people”; that can be achieved through a collaborative relationship among partners. Outreach and promotion as well as providing time sensitive and effective customized screening and recruiting services have developed strong ongoing relationships with employers. The Department will: 122. Enhance relationships with employers currently served through local AJCs via Labor Exchange, Veterans Programs, the Trade Act, Re-employment Services, Unemployment Insurance, and Local Workforce Area Business Service efforts. This includes working with TNECD to identify, connect and serve companies with workforce needs. 123. Establish protocol and policy to deliver employer services through a functionally aligned approach with seamless service delivery. 124. Establish an AJC certification process that has standards required for business services statewide 125. Continue to provide and track training to Workforce System partners to build the capacity to serve employers and to better understand labor market information data and analyses (Page 105) Title I

Tennessee’s workforce development system, both regional and local, requires that programs and providers co-locate, coordinate, and integrate activities and information so that the system is cohesive and accessible for individuals and businesses alike. Accountability goals increase the long-term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment; to improve services to employers; and to demonstrate continuous improvement. The certification policy is the foundation for aligning programs, policies, and activities in the State’s Workforce System. This policy will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) and will undergird continuous improvement of one-stop centers. It specifies minimum standards for the service menu and customer service to be met and branding requirements that demonstrate a statewide Workforce System. This certification process will demonstrate that the local workforce development boards can ensure that employment and training programs in their communities operate at the highest level of quality and consistency while satisfying the expectations and needs of their customers. (Pages 125-126) Title I

Veterans

Integration of the DVOP and LVER into the WIOA Service Delivery system is accomplished by utilizing in-place procedures for servicing Veterans with SBEs and combining them with the new policies and processes that will support the law. Per US Dept. of Veterans Affairs, there are 501,907 Veterans in Tennessee. Those between ages 18-64 are 450,313kii. INCREASING VETERANS TRANSITION SERVICES Tennessee has developed a partnership with the Tennessee College of Applied Technology (TCAT) and the Army Career and Alumni Program (ACAP) at Fort Campbell Army base. This partnership is to provide production line training (Mechatronics) and certification to transitioning service members, allowing veteran participants to obtain the necessary skills required by manufacturing. (Page 98) Title I

One Stop partners are included in the intake process for JVSG DVOP services. Upon entering the AJC, Veterans are met by a front desk staff member, who asks several questions to help identify veterans and their needs. After identifying the veteran’s purpose for visiting the AJC, a staff member will conduct an intake assessment using the Veterans Service Form (VSF) to identify any significant barriers preventing employment. Upon identifying SBEs, partner staff members refer the veteran to the DVOP. Those veterans who do not have SBEs, however still require employment services and are provided services by our AJC staff, but not from a DVOP. Furthermore, when necessary, JVSG staff is often consulted with by AJC staff regarding military, DD-214, and other language translation in addition to other employment/ service related questions, as needed. JVSG, DVOP/ LVER, integration into the One Stop extends beyond co-location. Veterans seeking services at affiliate centers, that do not have DVOP within that facility, still receive priority of service. After the staff identifies a veteran, an initial needs assessment will be conducted, and a determination of services will be made at that time. In addition, the VSF form is completed to help identify SBEs and additional barriers that may require intensive services from a DVOP. Upon identifying that the veteran has SBEs, the DVOP assigned to that county will be notified. Within 24 hours, the DVOP makes contact and schedules an appointment to meet with the veteran and proceeds with the subsequent intensive services. (Page 99) Title I

Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes: a. How the State intends to provide employment, training and job placement services to veterans and eligible persons under the JVSG Employment Outlook for Veterans 1. The Overall Employment Outlook for Veterans The employment outlook for Veterans in Tennessee is expected to be above that for their civilian counterparts. Continued technological advances in military equipment and the requisite training to operate and maintain this gear make Veterans highly competitive in a broad spectrum of markets. A lack of required (I.E. Healthcare, CDL, etc.) certification because of “State Mandated” formal educational training remains a challenge for some Veterans in certain career fields. However, programs like the Post 9/11 GI Bill and the Transition Assistance Program along with proposed state legislative action to allow for the use of military schooling to be used in lieu of in-state instruction, are dealing with these difficulties and provide opportunities along with information and training to enhance the accreditation process for recently separated Veterans in a variety of career fields. The “Soft skills” Veterans possess also make them desirable to potential employers and include; leadership, a strong work ethic, teamwork, loyalty and a desire to succeed, just to name a few. 2. Opportunities for Veterans Areas of growth specifically being promoted by the current administration are jobs in the automotive and healthcare sectors. Hankook manufacturing from Korea has agreed to build a new tire plant in Clarksville Tennessee (Montgomery County) that will employ 1500+ people. One of the deciding factors for them locating in Clarksville was the close proximity of Ft. Campbell and the large pool of available transitioning and residential Veterans. Additionally, the current automotive industry in Tennessee is expanding, with Nissan committed to increasing production of the Nissan Leaf in Smyrna. GM will also continue to produce the Chevy Volt at the Spring Hill plant and Volkswagen is expanding with plans to grow their production facility in Chattanooga. In addition to the specific auto manufacturers, the companies that support those facilities continue to grow as well. As an example, Automotive Energy Supply Corporation (AESC), the company that produces the battery for the Leaf is expanding to meet the higher level of demand through increased production. (Page 310) Title IV

The advantage of hiring Veterans is a topic that needs to be presented to an employer on a consistent basis. Tennessee’s American Job Centers (AJCs), through the Business Services Team (BST), will provide an effective conduit to promote Veterans to businesses as a sound and wise investment. Federal contractors and subcontractors are also targeted as companies that not only can benefit from the hiring of Veterans, but they are also informed about their responsibilities under the Office of Federal Contract and Compliance Programs (OFCCP) and Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act (VEVRAA) guidelines as well. This is done through our BST, which includes the Local Veterans’ Employment Representative (LVER), the Local Office Site Leads, Wagner-Peyser (W/P) staff, Local Workforce Development Area (LWDA) staff as well as the Tennessee’s Department of Labors’ Workforce Development (TDLWD) Marketing Services Team within the Service Delivery System. All provide valuable information about promoting Veterans within a variety of venues including job fair participation, Chamber of Commerce meetings, Society of Human Resource Managers (SHRM) meetings, employer visits, public radio and television service spots and departmental brochures. Besides the benefits of hiring Veterans, employers are also informed about the assistance available to them at the AJC, such as the ability to conduct individual hiring fairs and notification of job opportunities to potential candidates. (Page 311) Title IV

TDLWD has determined that the appropriate placement of DVOP/LVER personnel is paramount to the success of the program. For DVOPs, careful study of state demographics and associated evidence indicates that targeted veteran subgroups are predominately located in Tennessee’s metropolitan areas. However, many counties outside of the MSAs have sufficient Veteran population to warrant the presence of a DVOP. Most DVOP Specialists will be assigned to a comprehensive Career Center where other supportive services are readily available. In the areas where there are additional organizations such as VA VR&E offices, Homeless Shelters and other Community Partners, a DVOP from the local AJC has a partnership with them to provide Intensive Services to those who require additional assistance to become job ready. Services will be provided to Veterans who have identified themselves as having an SBE. LVER staff will be placed throughout the state to reach out to employers and promote the benefits of hiring veterans. One way this promotion process can be accomplished is by introducing employers to the immediate tangible benefits such as the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC, when funded) that is available to them when they hire Veterans. In addition to the tangible incentives they can get are the short and long-range benefits gained from the intangible “soft skills” Veterans bring to the hiring table, teamwork, trainability, leadership, diversity in the workplace, and a host of others that are inherent to the military experience. By “showcasing” our Veterans, the LVER staff increases job opportunities for them. Every effort is made to keep vacancies of staff positions down below the 60-day time frame as directed. The Veterans Program Coordinator (VPC) will ensure that Tennessee’s Department of Human Resources is aware of the unique funding stream of the JVSG and will keep all vacancies filled within the 60-day mandate. TDLWD will ensure that all new hires for DVOP and LVER will attend NVTI for mandatory training within the required 18 month time period. (Pages 313-314) Title IV

1. Primary Duties: The LVER will actively advocate for employment and training opportunities with business, industry, and community-based organizations on behalf of Veterans consistent with VPL 03-14, VPL 03-14 Ch1, VPL 03-14 Ch2, VPL 04-14. LVERs will be assigned duties that promote to employers, employer associations, and business groups the advantages of hiring veterans and will be part of the “Business Services Team” within the AJC that conduct outreach activities to these entities. The following activities will be part of this program: 2. In conjunction with employers, conduct job searches and workshops and establish job search groups to facilitate the use of the TDLWD labor exchange system to enhance their employee search activities. 3. Form effective relationships with the business community and trade unions to enhance the availability of employment and training opportunities for Veterans. o Encourage businesses to hire Veterans and to provide OJT and Apprenticeship programs geared to the Veteran community. o Maintain current labor market information on trends and adjust strategies accordingly. 4. Work with training providers and credentialing bodies to promote opportunities for Veterans. o Encourage employers in professions requiring licensure or certification to develop OJT and/or apprenticeship programs for Veterans. o Promote the participation of Veterans in programs leading to certification or licensure. o Advocate with training providers and credentialing agencies for recognition of equivalent military training. 5. Plan and participate in job fairs to provide employment opportunities for Veterans. The LVER will facilitate this by: o Initiating contact and developing relationships with employers, community leaders, labor unions, veterans’ organizations, and training program representatives to develop their commitment to providing employment and training opportunities for Veterans. o Maintaining current information regarding a full range of employment and training options available to Veterans. (Pages 316-317) Title IV

7. Employer Relations: The LVER will establish and maintain regular contact with employers in order to maximize the development of employment and training opportunities for the Veteran community. 8. Develop an employer contact plan designed to encourage the employment of Veterans by the use of business and community organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce, Human Resource Groups, and others as determined to be beneficial in the facilitation of hiring Veterans. This can be accomplished by: o Personal Visits o Phone Calls o E-mail Contact o Internet Connections or other means deemed effective (Page 318) Title IV

1. DVOP and LVER Integration DVOPs and LVERs are fully integrated into the TDLWD Labor Exchange System to form a comprehensive delivery team that provides services to Veterans that address their employment and training needs. All AJCs (with the exception of two located in extremely rural locations) have assigned Veteran staff, with LVERs and DVOPs assigned according to the population of their target groups and the needs of the community. DVOPs are assigned to areas with the highest concentration of Veterans, including disabled, homeless, and other Veterans with SBE. LVER assignments are based on the employer population and the probabilities of economic growth in their areas. Urban areas will normally have both LVER and DVOP staff assigned to ensure effective service to all Veterans. AJC Staff will work together in a comprehensive manner, respective of their roles and responsibilities, to provide assistance to Veterans in need which will foster job developments created with the employers in these highly industrialized and diverse environments. Suburban and rural (agricultural) areas will normally be assigned a LVER or DVOP as indicated by the factors previously mentioned. (Page 319) Title IV

4.In-Demand Careers In coordination with the DVOP, and after receiving names of Veterans who have been deemed “job ready”, the LVER will work with local industry leaders as well as Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (ECD) to identify the requisite skill sets needed for in-demand careers for their area and develop opportunities for training through programs such as OJT through WIOA. Additionally, the LVER will coordinate with state educational facilities such as the Tennessee Technology Centers (TTC) to foster attendance in training programs for those in-demand jobs. 5. Public Outreach to Veterans concerning Employment and Training Opportunities In addition to the efforts of the DVOP and LVER staff, TDLWD Marketing Services Staff (part of the BST) will promote the available services, including employment and job training opportunities, to veterans in a variety of forums in which they are involved. These can include job fairs, Chamber of Commerce meetings, Society of Human Resources Managers (SHRM) meetings, employer visits, public radio, television spots, and departmental brochures. (Page 320) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.
The Division maintains an ongoing interagency agreement with the Tennessee Department of Education, Tennessee Department of Children’s Services, Tennessee Department of Finance and Administration, Bureau of TennCare, Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Tennessee Department of Health, Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services and Tennessee Department of Corrections. The agreement, along with the Division’s policy manual and Standard Procedures Directives, outlines the plans, policies and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the participation of the Division staff in transition planning and the referral of students with disabilities to the Division for a determination of eligibility for VR services.  (Page 211) Title I

II. Service Contracts:

A. The Division plans to continue service contracts with the following community rehabilitation providers to ensure quality services statewide provided funding is available:

  • Clovernook
  • Department of Education
  • National Federation for the Blind
  • Southeast TN Human Resource Agency
  • Technology Centers: East Tennessee Technology Access in Knoxville; Signal Centers; Technology Access Center of Middle Tennessee in Nashville; West Tennessee Special Technology Access Resource (STAR) Center in Jackson; and Mid-South ACT in Memphis
  • Tennessee Disability Coalition Benefits to Work
  • University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy Education and Employment
  • Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
  • Statewide Independent Living Council
  • STAR Center
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Labor and Workforce Development
  • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. (Page 219) Title I

The Division has interagency arrangements and coordination with the following entities for the provision of supported employment services and extended services:

1. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities;

2. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders;

3. The Tennessee Employment Consortium, an independent association of community rehabilitation providers and state agencies developed jointly by the Division, the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and the Tennessee Council on Developmental Disabilities to provide a forum for all stakeholders to review and discuss state policies and share best practices; (Page 220) Title I

5. Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders. Utilizing an evidence based Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment; Tennessee Division of Health Care Finance and Administration, Division of TennCare for provision of employment services for individuals enrolled in Employment and Community First CHOICES. The Department of Education for the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services. (Page 502) Title IV

It is the continued goal of the Division to provide quality supported employment services which are delivered in an effective, efficient and timely manner. Supported employment services are provided through Letters of Agreement with community rehabilitation providers, and in cooperation with the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. The community rehabilitation providers must assure that on-going support (extended) services will be provided prior to the implementation of supported employment services or will be developed as natural supports during training. The Division has an excellent supported employment program along with training and support activities to ensure the continued provision of quality supported employment services. These programs are ongoing and are not subject to a specific timeline. Prime examples of these ongoing activities are:

1. Through contract with the University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy, Education and Employment (CLEE), the Division funds three supported employment consultants who are charged with the responsibility of working with our many supported employment community rehabilitation providers in providing training and technical assistance to the staff who provide services to our clients. These same consultants also work with the Division staff on an as needed basis to provide technical assistance. (Page 534) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Community and Social Service occupations are also expected to increase by 2.4 percent annually and expected to have more than 6600 openings each year. However, median wages are in the middle range, at $39,580, but still above the state median of $33,860. Fast-growing occupations include marriage and family therapists (4.4 percent annually), community health workers (3.8 percent), and substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors (3.6 percent). Reducing the opioid crisis will likely cause growth in these areas to continue. Some of the largest occupations include clergy, directors of religious activities; and child, family, and school social workers (660 openings expected annually) (Page 29) Title I

Continue the Eligibility Review Interview (ERI) program in which claimants will be more accurately assigned Claimant Characteristic Codes based upon a review of work and layoff history from the same employer. This program will flag claimants who have reached their return to work date and verify the continuing eligibility of all claimants. Examine SBR opportunities as well as penalty and interest collections for fraud detection and prevention solutions. Continue to use the Treasury Offset Program (TOP) to recover improper payments. Continues use of standalone Recovery unit poised to addresses the recovery of overpaid benefits. Unit will utilize multiple strategies such as liens, garnishments, correspondence, and out bound telephone calls to those that have an outstanding debt to the agency. There are also utilizing a change to write off law that allows us more time to collect the debt. Recovery unit will also partner with Lexis Nexis to implement Business Data Enrichment Solution. This process will help with recovery of benefits by searching for alternative addresses and contact information. It will also look at assets to determine the claimant ability to pay back benefits. This process will give us another tool to go after those claimants that have not updated contact information as well it will determine their ability to pay back the benefits based on assets. (Page 361) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 74

Job Placement for Veterans - 07/09/2020

“Finding a meaningful career after military service can feel overwhelming but our American Job Centers across the state offer variety of services that include resource centers, job fairs, workshops, employment strategies, WIOA Scholarships, career counseling, job search assistance, access to job training and certifications, and labor market information. Our American Job Centers have dedicated Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Specialist (DVOP) staff who themselves have served in the military and are ready to assist veterans in finding long term suitable employment and gain access to training and education opportunities.“

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

An Order Transferring the Tennessee Early Intervention System from the Department of Education to the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/02/2019

“WHEREAS, the Tennessee Early Intervention System (hereinafter "TEIS") is a voluntary educational program for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families that is designed to support, facilitate, and encourage the child's development and participation in family and community activities, as well as assist families in encouraging and participating in the child's development…

Effective July 1,2020, the management and operation of TEIS shall be transferred from the Department of Education to the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, which shall serve as the State lead agency under Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act under 20 U.S.C. 1a35(a)(10). Notwithstanding this transfer, nine TEIS positions shall be maintained by the Department of Education to ensure implementation of IDEA's child find responsibilities and appropriate transitions for children and families into pre-K and K-12 educational settings…

As of July 1 ,2020, the Commissioner of the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities shall control, manage, and oversee all aspects of TEIS, including statutory and regulatory functions.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

State Rehabilitation Council 2019 Annual Report - 12/01/2019

“On behalf of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) of Tennessee, I am privileged to present the 2019 SRC Annual Report to provide an update on the Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and to highlight the work of the SRC during the past year. We address the key accomplishments of the VR program during 2019 and look to the future to improve services provided to individuals with disabilities in Tennessee.  The report also reviews the responsibilities of the SRC and its achievements during the past year as we serve as the voice of the consumer to review, analyze and advise the VR program.

 

A highlight of the annual report is the inclusion of customer success stories to convey a picture of the VR program in a way which pure data cannot.  These stories reflect individuals at different stages in life and with a variety of backgrounds, experiences, abilities and interests who all share a desire to obtain competitive integrated employment and who required the support of the VR program in order to achieve that goal.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA
  • Data Sharing

1915(c) Waiver Changes to Employment and Day Services - 11/25/2019

“Training Outline:

1. Why and how waiver changes were developed (slides 4-7)

2. Overview of waiver changes

• New services (slides 8-45)

➢Summary and detailed requirements

➢ Justifications (IOGs)

• Other notable changes (slides 46-51)

3. Overview of service request process (

slides 52-64)

4. Documentation guidance (slides 65-69)

5. FAQs (slides 70-72)

6. Recommended resources (slides 73 -74)”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/22/2019

“WHEREAS, Tennesseans with disabilities, including mental illnesses and substance abuse disorders, experience disproportionately high levels of unemployment and underemployment; and

WHEREAS, people with disabilities in Tennessee share with the state's other six million residents the desire to achieve personal success and economic self-sufficiency through meaningful work in their communities and deserve the same opportunity for employment as all Tennesseans…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Lee, Governor of the State of Tennessee, do hereby proclaim the month of October 2019 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in Tennessee and encourage all citizens to join me in this worthy observance.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Family & Children’s Service was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—vulnerable and underserved, uninsured and under-insured; LEP; disabled; hourly wage workers (restaurant and retail workers); and those transitioning between employment and employer-sponsored insurance. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with State Farm & Farm Bureau Insurance Agents and Brokers, Music Health Alliance, Nashville Mayor’s Office, Restaurant and Bar Associations, TN Department of Labor, TN Workforce Development, Department Employment Agencies, Local social service, community action agencies, and healthcare providers, and Local libraries.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mary MoorePhone: (615) 320-0591Email: Mary.Hunt@fcsnashville.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Data Collection Frequently Asked Questions - 05/11/2019

~~“The TN SPDC Tool serves as an easy way for providers to deliver data to their program director.

Data is collected for all individuals receiving DIDD residential, day, and/or employment services regardless of their employment status. However if a person only receives Behavior or Personal Assistance services, they are not included in this data collection.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Department of Human Services Teams Up with CVS Health to Provide Workforce Training to Individuals with Disabilities - 05/08/2019

~~“The Tennessee Department of Human Services (TDHS) has joined with CVS Health to unveil an innovative program to help individuals with disabilities find jobs in Tennessee’s growing health care industry.

The partnership recently constructed a mock CVS Pharmacy inside the Vocational Rehabilitation program’s Tennessee Rehabilitation Center (TRC) in Smyrna where students are now receiving job training in two areas that lead to consideration for a career with CVS Health, the nation’s premier healthcare innovation company with more than 4,700 colleagues in the state."

More information can be found by accessing the web link.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Beneficiary Support System - 05/03/2019

~~“As part of TennCare’s Beneficiary Support System (BSS), Disability Rights TN contracts with TennCare to help people with long term services and supports (LTSS) or who may qualify for LTSS by• explaining member rights and responsibilities• answering questions about TennCare programs• resolving concerns or complaints• filing appeals or finding the status of an appeal” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee Self-Determination Waiver Program TN.0427.R03.01 - 04/01/2019

~~“The primary purpose of this amendment is to revise the Service Specification for “Employment and Day Services” to separate the service category into distinct employment and day service types with separate service specifications, provider qualifications and reimbursement/rate structures in order to provide increased choice and flexibility for waiver participants, align incentives toward competitive integrated employment and community participation, and increase transparency with respect to the types of day services provided as well as payment for those services, as part of Tennessee’s approved Statewide Transition Plan for compliance with the HCBS Settings Rule.  Proposed changes include:

Establishing Supported Employment-Individual Employment Support, Supported Employment-Small Group Employment Support, Community Participation Supports, Facility-Based Day Supports and Intermittent Employment and Community Integration Wraparound Supports as separate services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Tennessee HB 1276: Supporting Business Owners with Disabilities - 06/06/2017

“As enacted, adds "businesses owned by persons with disabilities" to the Tennessee Minority-Owned, Woman-Owned and Small Business Procurement and Contracting Act; requires that the annual report made by the chief procurement officer concerning the awarding of purchases to minority-owned business, woman-owned business, service-disabled veteran-owned business, or small business and the total value of awards made also include the total dollar amount of purchases awarded to all businesses in this state”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

"Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee HB 896/SB 429 (ABLE) - 02/05/2015

The purpose of this bill is to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence,  and quality of life; and (2) To provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of individuals with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the supplemental security income program under Title XVI of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C.§§ 1381 et seq.);the TennCare programs under Title XIX of the Social Security Act, (42 U.S.C. §§1396 et seq.); or any successor to the TennCare program administered pursuant to the federal Medicaid laws, the individual’s employment, and other sources  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee Title Code 67

A job tax credit of five thousand dollars ($5,000) for each net new full-time employee job, and two thousand dollars ($2,000) for each net new part-time employee job, for a person with disabilities who is receiving state services directly related to such disabilities, shall be allowed against a taxpayer's franchise and excise liability tax for that year; provided, that:            (A)  The employment of such individual creates a net increase in the number of persons with disabilities employed by the taxpayer within the ninety-day period immediately preceding the employment;            (B)  The taxpayer provides such employment for at least twelve (12) consecutive months and for no less than the minimal hours per week; and for employees enrolled in the minimal health care benefits described in subdivision (g)(1), for respective full-time employment jobs and part-time employment jobs;   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

An Order Transferring the Tennessee Early Intervention System from the Department of Education to the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/02/2019

“WHEREAS, the Tennessee Early Intervention System (hereinafter "TEIS") is a voluntary educational program for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families that is designed to support, facilitate, and encourage the child's development and participation in family and community activities, as well as assist families in encouraging and participating in the child's development…

Effective July 1,2020, the management and operation of TEIS shall be transferred from the Department of Education to the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, which shall serve as the State lead agency under Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act under 20 U.S.C. 1a35(a)(10). Notwithstanding this transfer, nine TEIS positions shall be maintained by the Department of Education to ensure implementation of IDEA's child find responsibilities and appropriate transitions for children and families into pre-K and K-12 educational settings…

As of July 1 ,2020, the Commissioner of the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities shall control, manage, and oversee all aspects of TEIS, including statutory and regulatory functions.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/22/2019

“WHEREAS, Tennesseans with disabilities, including mental illnesses and substance abuse disorders, experience disproportionately high levels of unemployment and underemployment; and

WHEREAS, people with disabilities in Tennessee share with the state's other six million residents the desire to achieve personal success and economic self-sufficiency through meaningful work in their communities and deserve the same opportunity for employment as all Tennesseans…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Lee, Governor of the State of Tennessee, do hereby proclaim the month of October 2019 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in Tennessee and encourage all citizens to join me in this worthy observance.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Governor’s Executive Order Order Establishing The Tennessee Employment First I - 06/19/2013

“NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Haslam, Governor of the State of Tennessee… do hereby order and direct the following:

1. State agencies coordinate efforts to increase opportunities for integrated and competitive employment for Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental illnesses, substance abuse disorders and other disabilities.2. The Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities convene an Employment First Taskforce (“Taskforce”).3 The Taskforce shall consist of representatives from the agencies administering disability services, family members of persons receiving employment services, vocational rehabilitation, workforce services and education, as well as consumer advocates and third party disability services providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 33

Job Placement for Veterans - 07/09/2020

“Finding a meaningful career after military service can feel overwhelming but our American Job Centers across the state offer variety of services that include resource centers, job fairs, workshops, employment strategies, WIOA Scholarships, career counseling, job search assistance, access to job training and certifications, and labor market information. Our American Job Centers have dedicated Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Specialist (DVOP) staff who themselves have served in the military and are ready to assist veterans in finding long term suitable employment and gain access to training and education opportunities.“

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

State Rehabilitation Council 2019 Annual Report - 12/01/2019

“On behalf of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) of Tennessee, I am privileged to present the 2019 SRC Annual Report to provide an update on the Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and to highlight the work of the SRC during the past year. We address the key accomplishments of the VR program during 2019 and look to the future to improve services provided to individuals with disabilities in Tennessee.  The report also reviews the responsibilities of the SRC and its achievements during the past year as we serve as the voice of the consumer to review, analyze and advise the VR program.

 

A highlight of the annual report is the inclusion of customer success stories to convey a picture of the VR program in a way which pure data cannot.  These stories reflect individuals at different stages in life and with a variety of backgrounds, experiences, abilities and interests who all share a desire to obtain competitive integrated employment and who required the support of the VR program in order to achieve that goal.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA
  • Data Sharing

1915(c) Waiver Changes to Employment and Day Services - 11/25/2019

“Training Outline:

1. Why and how waiver changes were developed (slides 4-7)

2. Overview of waiver changes

• New services (slides 8-45)

➢Summary and detailed requirements

➢ Justifications (IOGs)

• Other notable changes (slides 46-51)

3. Overview of service request process (

slides 52-64)

4. Documentation guidance (slides 65-69)

5. FAQs (slides 70-72)

6. Recommended resources (slides 73 -74)”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Employment Data Collection Frequently Asked Questions - 05/11/2019

~~“The TN SPDC Tool serves as an easy way for providers to deliver data to their program director.

Data is collected for all individuals receiving DIDD residential, day, and/or employment services regardless of their employment status. However if a person only receives Behavior or Personal Assistance services, they are not included in this data collection.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Tennessee DIDD Annual Report 2018 - 04/01/2019

~~“The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) is the state department responsible for administration and oversight of community-based services for Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The department operates with more than 1,400 state employees and 400 community providers to serve approximately 7,800 people with intellectual disabilities through its Home and Community Based Waivers and 4,500 people through the Family Support Program. It also operates 38 Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) program including the Harold Jordan Center, and three seating and positioning clinics across Tennessee”. More information can be found by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Data Sharing

About the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 01/26/2019

~~“The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) is the state agency responsible for administering services and support to Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This is done in several ways, including Medicaid waiver Home and Community Based Services (HCBS), state-operated ICF/IIDs, and the Family Support Program. DIDD administers services directly or through contracts with community providers. DIDD strives to partner with the people it supports and their family members and friends.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

2018 Homelessness Action Plan for the Chattanooga Community - 12/04/2018

~~“As part of the Housing First model, the Chattanooga community embraces permanent supportive housing interventions for the chronically homeless. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) defines chronic homelessness as a person with a disabling condition who experiences continual homelessness for at least one year or four periods of homelessness within three years. Permanent supportive housing program recipients usually have a diagnosed disability, including serious mental illness or disabling drug addiction. Deploying a Housing First model and investing in permanent supportive housing can help people experiencing chronic homelessness who suffer from serious mental illness and substance use disorders access and maintain housing over time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Apprenticeship Engagement Strategy - 12/01/2018

~~“Vision and GoalsProvide every Tennessean with education and high quality job opportunitieso For Tennessee to offer apprenticeships to increase education, learning, and employment opportunities for customers with disabilities and provide quality candidates for businesso Provide adults with a direct pathway from training to apprenticeship/workforceo Create a process for developing local talent for the technology and healthcare industry” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transportation Distribution and Logistics: Apprenticeship Acceleration in West Tennessee - 12/01/2018

~~“For veterans, benefits  of apprenticeship  programs  can include  a structured transition  process, ability to use GI Bill benefits in combination with apprenticeship incentives, and facilitation of skillset translation from a military to civilian environment. For women, apprenticeship programs can lead to economic self-sufficiency and access to high wage occupations they otherwise may not consider.    For persons  with  disabilities  who  may  not  perform  well  on  standardized  testing, apprenticeships can provide an alternative means of training that is better aligned to their strengths. However, the challenge may be in qualifying for apprenticeship programs as these individuals may not meet entrance criteria.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Services Offered by the Nashville Regional Office - 11/25/2018

~~“VA’s Nashville Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Tennessee and at the Fort Campbell Military Base in Kentucky. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and elderly, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Department of Human Services Teams Up with CVS Health to Provide Workforce Training to Individuals with Disabilities - 05/08/2019

~~“The Tennessee Department of Human Services (TDHS) has joined with CVS Health to unveil an innovative program to help individuals with disabilities find jobs in Tennessee’s growing health care industry.

The partnership recently constructed a mock CVS Pharmacy inside the Vocational Rehabilitation program’s Tennessee Rehabilitation Center (TRC) in Smyrna where students are now receiving job training in two areas that lead to consideration for a career with CVS Health, the nation’s premier healthcare innovation company with more than 4,700 colleagues in the state."

More information can be found by accessing the web link.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding Between The Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and The State of Tennessee Bureau of TennCare, Division of Long Term Services and Supports - 03/20/2017

“This Memorandum is entered into and based upon the philosophy of Employment First which is based upon the premise that all citizens, including individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life. Because both VR and TennCare offer employment supports for people with disabilities, this Memorandum is intended to ensure that each agency provides those services to common customers in coordination with the other to ensure efficient use of resources and effective delivery of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee’s Independent Living & Developmental Disabilities Network: Joint Publication on Network Programs and Collaborations - 03/01/2017

“In September 2015, Tennessee agencies funded through the Developmental Disabilities Act and Tennessee’s Independent Living programs funded through the Rehabilitation Act met to begin strategic coordination among our organizations. Having been recently relocated to a new federal Administration on Disabilities, our programs had an opportunity to increase our impact in Tennessee by joining forces to address common goals. Together we established a shared priority: improving youth transition outcomes through postsecondary education and job training that leads to competitive and integrated employment. Since that time, our two networks continue to meet together to work on details of joint projects, including this publication!

We hope you find this publication informative and that you learn something new about the programs across Tennessee funded under the Independent Living Administration and the Developmental Disabilities Act. Please reach out to us to find ways that you can become involved in our work. We are always interested in hearing from Tennesseans with disabilities about your experiences in getting supports and services you need.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Memorandum of Understanding between DIDD and VR - 01/07/2016

On December 14, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Division of Rehabilitation Services, Vocational Rehabilitation Program and DIDD was finalized. In 2014, both agencies started discussing the option of creating an MOU through a Vision Quest workgroup (as part of the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program) spearheaded by two ODEP Subject Matter Experts: Dr. Stephen Hall and Sara Murphy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding for School-to-Work Transition - 08/05/2015

Five state agencies have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to improve services and better prepare youth with disabilities to transition from school into integrated employment in the community.  The MOU focuses on students age 14 years and over and aims to ensure all youth with disabilities leaving secondary education are prepared for either post-secondary training and/or integrated employment appropriate for their preferences, interests, skills and abilities.  “It’s vitally important that all state agencies work together to make sure youth with disabilities leave school and have the opportunity to contribute to the workforce,” Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) Commissioner Debra Payne said.  “It takes a team effort to make sure they have the training and support necessary to make that happen."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Interagency Agreement Regarding IDEA - 07/01/2012

“The purpose of this Agreement is to identify and define the financial responsibilities of the Parties to this Agreement and to facilitate the provision and coordination of services for all infants, toddlers, children, youth and adults who are IDEA eligible. This Agreement formalizes policies, procedures, and fiscal responsibilities of the parties relating to IDEA.” 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Employment Consortium - 06/01/2007

“The Tennessee Employment Consortium (TEC) is a statewide organization focused on increasing the number of Tennesseans in integrated employment. The consortium comprises volunteers from the state's Division of Mental Retardation Services (DMRS) and Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Tennessee Council on Developmental Disabilities, the ARC of Tennessee, the Center on Disability and Employment at the University of Tennessee, community rehabilitation providers (CRPs), family members, and other stakeholders. TEC's ability to organize collaborative activities across state agencies, advocacy organizations, and CRPs has played an important role in increasing integrated employment outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance - 05/01/2007

~~“The Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance was formed in May 2007 to increase awareness about the need for postsecondary opportunities in Tennessee, to gather information about postsecondary programs in other states, and to develop a pilot program on a Tennessee college campus. “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “Our partnership is focused on helping: Self-Advocates to aspire toward competitive work; Employers to recognize the contributions people with disabilities can make in the workplace; Educators to prepare young people with disabilities with strong skills and opportunities; Families to communicate high expectations from an early age; and State Systems and Disability Agencies to support real work for real pay.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

The ARC Tennessee

~~“ The Arc Tennessee is a grassroots, non-profit, statewide advocacy organization for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. Founded in 1952, The Arc Tennessee is affiliated with The Arc United States and works collaboratively with local chapters across the state.The Arc Tennessee values diversity and does not discriminate based on race, ethnicity, religion, age, geographic location, sexual orientation, gender, level of disability or Limited English Proficiency.Our MissionThe Arc Tennessee empowers people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families to actively participate in the community throughout their lifetime.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Tennessee Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) - 10/01/2011

“The TDEI project will replicate and improve upon the experience of the Disability Navigator Program (DPN) active in the nine (9) participating WIBs [Workforce Investment Boards]. The DPN Initiative provided a bridge between One-Stop Career Center staff, private and public partners, and the disability community. Each participating WIB will be responsible for tailoring a basic set of services to the needs of their local population with disabilities, as well as potential employers. Three (3) WIBs will offer services to customers with disabilities in primarily rural areas. The TDEI will rely on the states two Work Incentives Planning and Assistance service providers to assist it to work with Social Security disability beneficiaries.” The grant ended in 2014.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AIDD Partnerships in Employment

TennesseeWorks Partnership: Changing the Employment Landscape“The Vanderbilt Kennedy University Center for Excellence in DevelopmentalDisabilities and 28 agencies and organizations will develop a vibrant collaborativeacross the state to increase the number of young people accessing competitiveemployment prior to leaving high school; increase the capacity and commitmentamong families and practitioners to support competitive employment and careerdevelopment; raise expectations among youth, families, educators and providers;reallocate resources and funding streams toward competitive employment; andincrease the number of families and educators accessing professional development,resources, and supports addressing competitive employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Family & Children’s Service was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—vulnerable and underserved, uninsured and under-insured; LEP; disabled; hourly wage workers (restaurant and retail workers); and those transitioning between employment and employer-sponsored insurance. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with State Farm & Farm Bureau Insurance Agents and Brokers, Music Health Alliance, Nashville Mayor’s Office, Restaurant and Bar Associations, TN Department of Labor, TN Workforce Development, Department Employment Agencies, Local social service, community action agencies, and healthcare providers, and Local libraries.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mary MoorePhone: (615) 320-0591Email: Mary.Hunt@fcsnashville.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Tennessee - 01/31/2019

~~“Supporting Strong Transitions for Youth with Disabilities

Welcome to Tennessee’s online home for training and resources on preparing students with disabilities for life after high school. Consider this the “blueprint” to building a comprehensive transition program for your students. Learn about the best practices and practical strategies for special educators, families, and other transition team members as you fill your toolbox with key tools for success.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Guide for Provider Transformation to an Employment First Service Model - 06/15/2016

~~Transition to an Employment First Service Model Guide is issuedOrganizations that are successful in their transformation to an Employment First provider agency share three elements, all of which should be addressed:1. Strategy:  What will you do?2. Structure:  Who does it?3. Systems:  How will your agency do it?

An understanding of these elements can give a framework for an agency to understandwhat parts of the organization need to be changed. In order to help agencies decide what to change, an Agency Assessment is provided in the Appendices.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Readiness program (ERP)

"The focus of this program is to prepare students in the areas of employment and life skills. In depth instruction is provided in three critical domains of adult living: daily living skills, self-determination/interpersonal skills, and employment skills. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate their readiness for employment. Positive work behaviors and market ready skills will enable students to be more independent, motivated, and successful."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment and Individuals With Disabilities

This sheet contains tips and resources related to customized and supported employment in relation to Tennessee Disability Pathfinder and TennesseeWorks.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Employment First Trainings

MG&A articles & presentations on Customized Employment and Discovery from the TDI&DD website.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy, Education and Employment

“ Support for diversity and inclusion is a value at the core of the Center for Literacy, Education and Employment (CLEE). In addition, we determine the direction of our work by listening to and learning from practitioners, policymakers, business leaders and community leaders, as well as the academic community. As a result, the Center has a long history of involvement in advocacy efforts in the fields of literacy, education and employment, particularly those focused on supporting ALL individuals to flourish in an increasingly complex and interconnected world.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “This new website is an online resource for those in our state committed to these goals. [You can] [s]elect your role… to find comprehensive information, trainings, videos, success stories, and many other resources to equip, inform, and inspire your work.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Clover Bottom, Greene Valley, and Nat T. Winston Developmental Centers - Memorandum Approving Exit Plan (2015) - 01/29/2015

To effectively facilitate reform in mental health services, the Court cannot allow “perfect to become the enemy of good” nor allow the concepts of federalism and separation of powers to be ignored. The Court concludes that the Exit Plan presented by the Parties is “fair, reasonable, and adequate” and provides the next iteration of improvement to the lives of those with disabilities in Tennessee. It will test political will and legislative leadership to continue that progress and to determine how best to care for those often left in the shadows.    For the reasons detailed above, the Court will grant the unopposed joint motion seeking approval of an Exit Plan (Docket No. 1118-1) and entry of a proposed Agreed Order (Docket No. 1118-2). The Motion to Intervene brought by conservators of GVDC residents and Citizens for a Better Tennessee (Docket No. 1121) will be denied. .  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Beneficiary Support System - 05/03/2019

~~“As part of TennCare’s Beneficiary Support System (BSS), Disability Rights TN contracts with TennCare to help people with long term services and supports (LTSS) or who may qualify for LTSS by• explaining member rights and responsibilities• answering questions about TennCare programs• resolving concerns or complaints• filing appeals or finding the status of an appeal” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee Self-Determination Waiver Program TN.0427.R03.01 - 04/01/2019

~~“The primary purpose of this amendment is to revise the Service Specification for “Employment and Day Services” to separate the service category into distinct employment and day service types with separate service specifications, provider qualifications and reimbursement/rate structures in order to provide increased choice and flexibility for waiver participants, align incentives toward competitive integrated employment and community participation, and increase transparency with respect to the types of day services provided as well as payment for those services, as part of Tennessee’s approved Statewide Transition Plan for compliance with the HCBS Settings Rule.  Proposed changes include:

Establishing Supported Employment-Individual Employment Support, Supported Employment-Small Group Employment Support, Community Participation Supports, Facility-Based Day Supports and Intermittent Employment and Community Integration Wraparound Supports as separate services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Comprehensive Aggregate Cap Home and Community Based Services (or "CAC") Waiver - 04/01/2019

~~“An individual’s Individual Support Plan may include more than one non-residential habilitation service (SE-IES; Supported Employment-Small Group Employment Supports; Community Participation Supports; Intermittent Employment and Community Integration Wrap-Around Supports; Facility-Based Day Supports); however, they may not be billed for during the same period of time (e.g., the same 15 minute or hour unit of time). A provider of SE-IES services may also receive Social Security’s Ticket to Work Outcome and Milestone payments. These payments do not conflict with CMS regulatory requirements and do not constitute an overpayment of Federal dollars for services provided.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan (11/2015) Amended Based on Public Comment (2/2016) - 07/31/2018

~~1915 (c) waiver settings assessed included:• Residential Habilitation• Employment and Day (Community and Facility Based Day, In-home Day, and Supported Employment)• Family Model Residential Support• Medical Residential Services• Supported Living

1115 CHOICES waiver settings assessed included:•Adult Day Care•Assisted Care Living Facility•Critical Adult Care Home

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment and Community First CHOICES (Employment Program) - 07/01/2016

~~The Employment and Community First CHOICES program is administered by TennCare through its contracted managed care organizations.  It offers services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  Services in the program will help people become employed and live as independently as possible in the community.  All new enrollment is in the Employment and Community First CHOICES program, as DIDD’s waivers are closed to new enrollment.

There is a limited amount of funding available to serve people each year.  That means not everyone who wants to apply can enroll or get services right away.." 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee State Plan Amendment (SPA) 16-0001 (approved 3-22-2016) - 03/22/2016

The State covers low-income families and children for Transitional Medical Assistance (TMA) under section 1925 of the Social Security Act (the Act). This coverage is provided for families who no longer qualify under section 1931 of the Act due to increased earned income, or working hours, from the caretaker relative’s employment, or due to the loss of a time-limited earned income disregard. (1902(a)(52), 1902(e)(1), and 1925 of the Act)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Tennessee Medicaid State Plan

Tennessee’s full state plan for TennCare, Tennessee’s Medicaid Program.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Tennessee 1915(c) Home and Community Based Service "Self Determination Waiver Program "

The Self-Determination Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive, integrated settings and engage in community life. Services are delivered in a manner which ensures each individual’s rights of privacy, dignity, respect and freedom from coercion and restraint; optimizes individual initiative, autonomy, and independence in making life choices; and are delivered in a manner that comports fully with standards applicable to HCBS settings delivered under Section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act…  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

TN The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02)

~~“The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02) serves children and adults with intellectual disabilities and children under age six with developmental delay who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the Self-Determination waiver, would require placement in a private ICF/IID.

The Self-Determination Waiver Program affords persons supported the opportunity to directly manage selected services, including the recruitment and management of service providers. Participants and families (as appropriate) electing self-direction are empowered and have the responsibility for managing, in accordance with waiver service definitions and limitations, a self-determination budget affording flexibility in service design and delivery. The Self-Determination Waiver Program serves persons who have an established non-institutional place of residence where they live with their family, a non-related caregiver or in their own home and whose needs can be met effectively by the combination of waiver services through this program and natural and other supports available to them. The Self-Determination Waiver does not include residential services such as supported living.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap Waiver (#0357.R03)

~~“The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap (CAC) Waiver (#0357.R03), formerly known as the Arlington Waiver, serves individuals with intellectual disabilities who are former members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Arlington Developmental Center), current members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Clover Bottom Developmental Center), and individuals transitioned from the Statewide Waiver (#0128) upon its renewal on January 1, 2015, because they were identified by the state as receiving services in excess of the individual cost neutrality cap established for the Statewide Waiver. These are individuals who have been institutionalized in a public institution, are part of a certified class because they were determined to be at risk of placement in a public institution, or have significant services/support needs consistent with that of the population served in a public ICF/IID and who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the CAC waiver, would require placement in an ICF/IID.

The CAC Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings and engage in community life.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Tennessee is the Volunteer State, and its outstanding Employment First initiatives for individuals with disabilities show why this state exemplifies "America at its Best!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Tennessee’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.8%
Change from
2017 to 2018
6,770,010
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.69%
Change from
2017 to 2018
552,942
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.14%
Change from
2017 to 2018
184,851
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.45%
Change from
2017 to 2018
33.43%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.44%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.18%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 6,651,194 6,715,984 6,770,010
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 558,852 538,061 552,942
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 174,370 179,049 184,851
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,640,999 2,734,895 2,725,255
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 31.20% 33.28% 33.43%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.09% 77.52% 77.18%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.80% 3.70% 3.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.30% 23.20% 22.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.60% 13.50% 14.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 486,269 486,795 494,694
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 529,763 532,484 534,166
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 829,448 831,407 835,143
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 149,092 151,192 156,250
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 21,457 19,117 24,494
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,255 4,664 3,909
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,863 7,877 8,862
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 568 N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 18,165 19,117 18,506
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 4,641 4,331 5,921

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,932 5,085 5,044
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.90% 3.00% 3.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 249,055 245,370 241,307

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 12,330 10,800 10,730
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 27,376 23,450 24,420
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 54,059 43,641 44,279
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.80% 24.70% 24.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.30% 0.50% 0.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 0.70% 0.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 0.20% 0.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 51.70% 53.50% 36.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 484 806 837
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 1,150 1,057 867
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 232 250 109
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 92,792 85,677 64,870

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,806 8,544 9,133
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 108 95 87
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 59 70 55
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 74.00% 63.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.91 1.06 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,648
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 282 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 272 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 794 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,160 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 992 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 148 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.30% 29.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,463 7,728 7,233
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 370,137 366,628 362,916
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 209 203 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 409 252 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,124,000 $10,939,000 $11,303,439
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $23,338,000 $20,949,000 $14,507,332
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $52,890,000 $53,775,000 $59,349,017
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 18.00% 16.00% 17.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 6,257 6,283 6,427
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,408 3,223 2,734
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 19.20 17.00 17.74

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 70.46% 70.16% 69.69%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.11% 11.48% 11.49%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.78% 1.79% 1.81%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 71.84% 72.52% 74.03%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 33.93% 21.17% 26.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 64.43% 54.60% 61.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.32% 64.62% 71.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.50% 33.43% 34.97%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 871,430
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,411
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 56,166
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 136,631
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 192,797
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 86
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 190
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 276
AbilityOne wages (products). $490,797
AbilityOne wages (services). $1,584,403

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 44 31 13
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 5 2 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 49 33 14
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,356 1,617 339
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 46 27 11
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,402 1,644 350

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~• Youth Program: While the most significant program changes under WIOA impacted the services to youth, this shift-aligned with several modifications Tennessee was already making. The existing work of Pathways Tennessee (career pathways) and the Work Based Learning Champions initiative (Career and Technical Education) both led by the Tennessee Department of Education strongly support the increased need for funding services for in-school youth as well as increasing opportunities for work experiences. Regarding out-of-school youth, the Governor’s Drive to 55 Alliance provides excellent support and resources to get 55 percent of Tennesseans equipped with a college degree or certificate by the year 2025. The Alliance’s three initiatives - Tennessee Promise, Tennessee Reconnect and Tennessee LEAP (Labor Education Alignment Program), all serve as conduits to identify and close skills gaps to better prepare our workforce and our state for the future, most of which involves better serves to youth.

Some areas for growth and improvement have been identified in asset mapping of local and state level resources, common strategy development, and meeting the growing employer demand for skilled and qualified employees. Efforts to improve these challenges have been made through hosting regional meetings with local partners to identify services provided and opportunities for increased alignment. In addition, coordinated data sharing and communication will remain areas of focus for improvement and innovation. The use of data along with integration, agility, and ability to serve those with significant barriers has always been a focus in the Workforce System; this common thread has helped shape the focus and continuation of workforce development activities statewide. (Page 52) Title I

Tennessee is an Employment First State, and there is an established Employment First Task Force. The Employment First Task force facilitated the completion of a Memorandum of Understanding for services to youth with disabilities between the following State agencies: • Vocational Rehabilitation • Department of Education • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities • Department of Labor and Workforce Development • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services • Council on Developmental Disabilities (Oversees the Implementation of the MOU)
In Tennessee the agency that administers the State Medicaid plan is the Bureau of TennCare. The VR Program is developing a Memorandum of Understanding with the Bureau of TennCare. The VR Program has developed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. (Page 223) Title I

 An interagency agreement was developed to fulfill the requirements of IDEIA. The most recent version of this agreement was signed July 1, 2012. The purpose of this agreement is to identify and define the financial responsibility of each state agency for providing services under IDEIA and to facilitate the provision and coordination of services for all children with disabilities. The following state agencies are participating in this agreement: Tennessee Department of Education; Tennessee Department of Children’s Services; Tennessee Department of Finance and Administration; Bureau of TennCare; Department of Developmental Services; Tennessee Department of Health; Tennessee Department of Human Services; Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities; and Tennessee Department of Correction.

In 2013, Governor Bill Haslam signed an Employment First Executive Order. This Executive Order established the Employment First Taskforce. In 2014, the Employment First Taskforce sign and executed a Youth Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The agencies involved in the MOU are: • Department of Education • Vocational Rehabilitation • Department of Labor and Workforce Development • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services • Council on Developmental Disabilities (this agency oversees the implementation of the MOU.

The purpose of this MOU, is to state how these agencies will work together to provide transition school to work services to students and youth with disabilities. (Page 233) Title I

The Division has established service codes and defined the extended services that will be provided for up to 4 years for youth with disabilities. The Community Rehabilitation Providers have been notified of these services that can be provided for youth.

In 2013, Governor Bill Haslam signed an Employment First Executive Order. This Executive Order established the Employment First Taskforce. In 2014, the Employment First Taskforce sign and executed a Youth Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). The agencies involved in the MOU are:
• Department of Education
• Vocational Rehabilitation
• Department of Labor and Workforce Development
• Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
• Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
• Council on Developmental Disabilities (this agency oversees the implementation of the MOU. (Page 253) Title I

19. Continue implementation of the electronic case management system (TRIMS) utilizing input from agency staff and vendors to enhance the Division’s technological infrastructure and client service capabilities.

20. Continue partnerships with the three federal grants that target employment of persons with disabilities. Those grants are Tennessee Works, Employment First, and DEI. Tennessee is one of three states in the country that are receiving all three grants.

 21. Revise the self-employment process to streamline the experience for clients seeking the self-employment option. Research other state VR self-employment policies for efficient, consumer oriented strategies; and include successful business owners in the process to produce a successful program that will help individuals with disabilities become successful entrepreneurs. (Page 257) Title I

There is a small pilot supported employment program for individuals with intellectual and development disabilities that have a behavioral health diagnosis. This pilot program is utilizing IPS in providing SE services. IPS is a promising employment service model for non-behavioral health individuals. The Division along with the DIDD, DMHSAS, and the CRP are testing the applicability of the IPS model in serving individuals with said diagnoses.

For FFY 2018, the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) has selected Tennessee as a Core and Vision Quest state to receive technical assistance under the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). As a Core state, TN will be assisted in Employer Engagement and Provider Transformation. TN’s goal to increase the number of providers undergoing transformation and increasing the people engaged in competitive integrated employment. As a Vision Quest state, TN will receive guidance about funding and expansion of IPS services in partnership with VR, DMHSAS, and TennCare. (Page 264) Title I

Tennessee is an Employment First State, and there is an established Employment First Task Force. The Employment First Task force facilitated the completion of a Memorandum of Understanding for services to youth with disabilities between the following State agencies:
• Vocational Rehabilitation
• Department of Education
• Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
• Department of Labor and Workforce Development
• Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
• Council on Developmental Disabilities (Oversees the Implementation of the MOU

In Tennessee the agency that administers the State Medicaid plan is the Bureau of TennCare. The VR Program is developing a Memorandum of Understanding with the Bureau of TennCare. The VR Program has developed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. (Page 505) Title I

For FFY 2018, the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) has selected Tennessee as a Core and Vision Quest state to receive technical assistance under the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). As a Core state, TN will be assisted in Employer Engagement and Provider Transformation. TN’s goal to increase the number of providers undergoing transformation and increasing the people engaged in competitive integrated employment. As a Vision Quest state, TN will receive guidance about funding and expansion of IPS services in partnership with VR, DMHSAS, and TennCare.

The Division coordinates with other state agencies and the community rehabilitation providers to transition clients receiving supported employment services to extended services. An individual is moved to extended services when the client has reached a point where he/she has achieved maximum performance on the job; has achieved minimum necessary supports on the job; the job is not in jeopardy of ending; and individual is maintaining work performance which is acceptable to employer and client. The Division is working with the University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy, Education and Employment to develop training for CRPs on how to develop natural supports to address extended services where funding is not available from another Agency. (Page 545) Title I

   

Customized Employment

~~The Divisions Facility Programs, Service Contracts and Letters of Agreements are used to provide needed services such as but not limited to: • Vocational evaluation • Personal and vocational adjustment training • Transportation and daily meals • Vocational training • Job readiness training • Job development and job placement • Supported employment • Rehabilitation technology • Orientation and mobility • Activities of daily living • Trial work experiences • Follow-up • Pre-Employment Transition Services

The VR Program is finalizing the implementation of Customized Employment Services and extended services to youth with most significant disabilities who require supported employment. (Page 220) Title I

Literacy Education and Employment to provide staff training and development and consultation services for community supported employment service providers; and 5. Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders. Utilizing an evidence based Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment; Tennessee Division of Health Care Finance and Administration, Division of TennCare for provision of employment services for individuals enrolled in Employment and Community First CHOICES. The Department of Education for the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services.

The Division has encouraged the establishment and development of Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) to improve and expand services through Letters of Agreement. The Letter of Agreement (LOA) is an agreement between the Division and the CRP. The LOA describes the functions and responsibilities of the Division and the CRP as well as the scope of services and payment methodology agreed upon by both the Division and CRP in a joint effort of improving and expanding supported employment and extended services for individuals with disabilities. The Division currently has 92 LOAs for supported employment services. The Division continues its’ efforts to increase S.E. providers and anticipates the numbers of providers will increase. VR is actively pursuing a number of other providers for underserved areas across the state. (Page 221) Title I

In addition, as the Division continues to serve Priority Category 1 and 2 cases, more individuals with significant disabilities are able to access vocational rehabilitation services. The Division continues to monitor the budget and the staff capacity in order to determine the ability to serve Priority 3 and 4 cases. It is anticipated this activity will lead to improvement in the number of individuals with disabilities reaching successful rehabilitation outcome statuses by:

1. Continuing the practice of ensuring the availability of appropriate training activities and resources to meet the individualized needs of clients by seeking out and developing partnerships with other private and public entities to provide specialized education and training activities, to include those that can be provided through self-employment, on-the-job- training by employers, and customized employment.

2. Continuing the development and expansion of statewide employer relationships that focus on inclusion of employees with disabilities in the workforce and the value of hiring people with disabilities. The Division will continue its expansion of our activities with Employment Groups across the state and in the local areas with new programs, such as Walgreens REDI and Project Search. (Page 254) Title I

The VR Program is finalizing the implementation of Customized Employment Services and extended services to youth with most significant disabilities who require supported employment.

F. ARRANGEMENTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS FOR THE PROVISION OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(4)). Describe the designated State agency’s efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other State agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide supported employment services and extended employment services, as applicable, to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 501) Title IV

5. Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders. Utilizing an evidence based Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment; Tennessee Division of Health Care Finance and Administration, Division of TennCare for provision of employment services for individuals enrolled in Employment and Community First CHOICES. The Department of Education for the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services. (Page 502) Title IV

In addition, as the Division continues to serve Priority Category 1 and 2 cases, more individuals with significant disabilities are able to access vocational rehabilitation services. The Division continues to monitor the budget and the staff capacity in order to determine the ability to serve Priority 3 and 4 cases. It is anticipated this activity will lead to improvement in the number of individuals with disabilities reaching successful rehabilitation outcome statuses by:

1. Continuing the practice of ensuring the availability of appropriate training activities and resources to meet the individualized needs of clients by seeking out and developing partnerships with other private and public entities to provide specialized education and training activities, to include those that can be provided through self-employment, on-the-job- training by employers, and customized employment.

2. Continuing the development and expansion of statewide employer relationships that focus on inclusion of employees with disabilities in the workforce and the value of hiring people with disabilities. The Division will continue its expansion of our activities with Employment Groups across the state and in the local areas with new programs, such as Walgreens REDI and Project Search. (Page 536) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild.

In achieving the Governor’s Drive to 55 goal, all training activities and education practices are working to prioritize efficiency in creating connections across a wide spectrum. From Read to be Ready, to Tennessee Promise, Tennessee LEAP, and Tennessee ReConnect, the core programs and partners are actively identifying numerous ways of leveraging their assets and building capacity in a more integrated manner. The work being done by the local boards to navigate and connect the numerous citizens accessing our systems each day further provides thousands of opportunities to engage at numerous levels. Tennessee Workforce System is collaborating with Tennessee Higher Education Commission to provide ambassadors throughout the state that advocate for participants reconnecting to post-secondary educational programs. The assistance they provide guides Participants needing direction with FASFA, student loan information, and more to ease the process of returning to school. (Page 49-50) Title I

 o Partnering regionally with economic development entities and other critical stakeholders, including Pathways Tennessee, to better align education and workforce development activities and policies with regional labor markets, economic growth strategies, and employer demand
 
 o Partnering with the business community, including business associations, and educational institutions (including secondary and post-secondary institutions such as community colleges) to design and implement programs and career pathways that lead to credentials and employment
 
 o Partnering with and leveraging resources from other Federally-funded programs, such as Adult Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Small Business Development Centers, etc.
 
 o Partnering with community-based organizations, since they are key providers of basic skills training, technical skills training, supportive services, and workforce development services in communities across Tennessee
 
 o Sustaining summer employment and work experience opportunities - State and local workforce development boards should consider using additional sources of funding to leverage summer employment program activities. In addition to regular WIOA Youth formula funds, local areas can use other resources, such as Job Corps, and fund matching from private industry. (Page 91) Title I

.

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~11. Continuing to support the Workforce Investment System by continuing to co-locate vocational rehabilitation counselors in each of the major Workforce Investment Act Service delivery area career centers and ensuring that all career center satellites also have vocational rehabilitation counselors assigned to visit their centers on a regular basis to work with individuals with disabilities that visit each center.

12. Providing cross training to the career center staff in regard to meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities. Continue to provide consultation on career center accessibility and accommodation needs in regard to the accessibility needs in the building(s), and accommodations in terms of appropriate technology needed to serve individuals with the disabilities. Continue to partner with the American Job Centers (AJCs) in employment initiatives such as the summer youth employment project and the DEI grant. (Page 256) Title I

19. Continue implementation of the electronic case management system (TRIMS) utilizing input from agency staff and vendors to enhance the Division’s technological infrastructure and client service capabilities.

20. Continue partnerships with the three federal grants that target employment of persons with disabilities. Those grants are Tennessee Works, Employment First, and DEI. Tennessee is one of three states in the country that are receiving all three grants.

21. Revise the self-employment process to streamline the experience for clients seeking the self-employment option. Research other state VR self-employment policies for efficient, consumer oriented strategies; and include successful business owners in the process to produce a successful program that will help individuals with disabilities become successful entrepreneurs. (Page 257) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Supportive services, such, assistive technologies, transportation, personal assistance services, and services to family members may also be provided if necessary for the individual to utilize the services identified above. Post-employment services may be provided to previously rehabilitated individuals when needed to maintain or regain suitable employment. Pre-employment transition services provided to students with disabilities include job exploration and counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs at institutions of higher education, workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and instruction in self-advocacy. Technical assistance, training, outreach and other supportive services are provided to public and private employers of all sizes, including Federal and Federal contracting employers for the purpose of increasing employment opportunities for job seekers with disabilities. (Page 87) Title I

Participants are required to observe a program orientation that explains the work requirements, components offered, component requirements, and assistance provided for each component. We hope to implement an Online Orientation during Fiscal Year 2018. After the Orientation has been completed, program participants are assessed during a one-on-one meeting to develop an Individual Employment Plan (IEP). The assessment will review the individual’s background, education, work history, hobbies, and any barriers to employment. The plan can include education and/or training activities, but the overall goal is obtaining employment with a gainful wage that significantly reduces or eliminates the need for governmental assistance. After the IEP is developed, participants will immediately begin their participation in their most suitable component. (Page 93) Title I

The Division requests a waiver of state wideness in order to maintain thirty Third Party Agreements with thirty-five (LEAs). These Third Party Agreements are designed to provide enhanced and concentrated services to Transition School to Work students/clients covered by the agreements. The Division has a contract with each entity that is consistent with Federal regulations (34 CFR § 361.26) and includes the following provisions:
1. The vocational rehabilitation services to be provided are identified in Section A. Scope of Services in each contract (Each contract has been submitted separately to RSA to provide the written assurances requested for this attachment);
2. The LEA assures that non-Federal funds are made available to the Division by committing to their maintenance of effort in Section E.13 of the contract;
3. The LEA assures that the Division’s approval is required before services are provided with the Division’s counselor determining eligibility for each client served;
4. The LEA assures, through the Division’s vocational rehabilitation counselors, that all other state plan requirements, including the Order of Selection policy, are applied to persons receiving services through the agreement; and
5. The LEA assures that reasonable accommodations will be provided. A list of the LEA contracts is provided below: • Anderson County Schools • Bledsoe County Schools • Blount County Schools • Carter County Schools • Johnson County Schools • Clarksville/Montgomery County Schools • Cocke County Schools • Dyserburg City Schools • Elizabethton City Schools • Greene County/ Greenville City Schools • Hamblen County Schools • Henderson County Schools • Humboldt City, Trenton Special School District, Milan Special District • Jackson/Madison County Schools • Kingsport City Schools • Knox County Schools • Lauderdale County Schools • Loudon County Schools • McMinn County Schools • McNairy County Schools • Metro Nashville Public Schools • Polk County Schools • Putnam County Schools • Sequatchie County Schools • Shelby County Schools • TN School for the Blind • TN School for the Deaf • Tullahoma City Schools • Unicoi County Schools • Warren County Schools • Washington County Schools (Pages 208-209) Title I

The Division has interagency cooperation, collaboration, and coordination with other state and local entities that are not components of the Statewide Workforce Investment System. The Division works in cooperation with the following federal, state, and local agencies and programs to provide services for individuals with significant disabilities: 1. The Department of Children’s Services for youth-The Program is currently meeting with DCS state office staff to determine how to blend DCS Independent Living Services with VR program services. DCS state office staff has toured the TRC at Smyrna to learn more about the services provided at the TRC. The DCS Independent Living Coordinators statewide have an annual meeting. The VR Program has offered to host the 2016 spring meeting of the DCS Independent Living Coordinators. During that meeting, all Independent Living Coordinators will tour the facility in order to assist in a plan for coordination of services. 2. The Department of Health in providing services to individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI); 3. Post-secondary school systems and their governing bodies; 4. The Department of Education and Local Education Agencies for individuals who are transitioning from school to work. 5. The Department of Corrections for individuals released from state correctional facilities; 6. The Tennessee Board of Probation and Parole for individuals released from state correctional facilities and monitored by the Board. 7. Local city police, county sheriffs and judge’s programs for individuals being released from jails or on probation or trial diversion; 8. The Department of Human Services Family Assistance and Child Support Division for individuals participating in services under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program; 9. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders; 10. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities; (Pages 209-210) Title I

The DSU entered into an exclusive Interagency Agreement with the Department of Education in October, 2017. The Agreement lays out the Purpose of the Agreement, VR responsibilities, DOE responsibilities, and mutual responsibilities. We were aided by WINTAC, an RSA technical assistance contractor. Training has begun across the state at the Special Education Study Councils and is currently being provided at the Partners in Education Conference, February 6-8, 2018.
When a student who is eligible based on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) standards reaches the age of fourteen (14), the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team , as defined by 34 CFR § 300.344, formulates a statement of transition service needs as a component of the IEP. The Division’s staff is invited and to the extent possible participates in these IEP meetings.
The Division has been under an Order of Selection since 2001. Under the current Order, the Division is able to provide direct services to those eligible individuals in Priority Category 1 and Priority Category 2. The Division was able to open Priority Category 2 effective September 30, 2012. There was a release of clients from the waiting list in Priority Category 3 on October 1, 2013. From January 2015-March 2015 all PCs were closed for the provision of new services. This was a brief closing and Priority Categories 1 and 2 were re-opened in March 2015. The opening and release of clients from the waiting list allows for the provision of direct services to significantly more students with disabilities. The Division provides information and referral services to help all applicants find services through other agencies and entities. The inclusion of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) will allow for the provision of the five stated Pre-ETS services for those students with a disability who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services. (Pages 211-212) Title I

The IEP team, which should include the Division’s staff when invited and when available, parent and student, determines that the student should be referred for VR services. The Division’s staff should inform the student and parents, preferable at the IEP meeting, the purpose of the vocational rehabilitation program. VR Staff make every effort to attend IEP meetings, however due to staff resources this is not always possible. However information regarding VR Services is made available during IEP meetings. 

The Transition School to Work Unit within the VR program is working with the Department of Education on how to incorporate VR services information into the IEP meeting. The Director of the Unit has been trained on Easy IEPs. In the provision of the Pre-Employment Transition Services, students with disabilities and their families will start receiving information on VR services as early as age fourteen. Information will be made available to Middle school staff in order to assist with the beginning the transition. (Page 212) Title I

Beginning in October 2015, these IEP meetings will include information on Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) services that are available at age 14. Pre-ETS services are available to students with disabilities ages 14-22. Pre-ETS services can be provided without an application for VR services. For those individuals that are interested in applying for services, the information should include the application procedures, the eligibility requirements including the Order of Selection, and the potential scope of services that may be available. As soon as possible after referral, the Division takes an application from the student and determines eligibility as well as whether the student is in an open priority category. If the student is in an open priority category, the Division’s staff assists in the formulation of the student’s IEP and the student’s vocational rehabilitation Individualized Plan for Employment as soon as it is determined that the student can benefit from services provided by the Division in preparation for exiting the school system and transitioning into training and/or employment. Services provided by the Division may include attending job fairs, community vocational adjustment training and pre-employment, vocational skills training, college prep, and job readiness training.

The DSU has chosen to provide Pre-Employment Transition Services through Transition School to Work Contracts, Pre-ETS contracts, LOAs and direct staff contact. (Page 212-213) Title I

The DSU has hired 9 Pre-Employment Transition Specialists and 3 Pre-employment Transition Supervisors to coordinate services provided in their areas, identify Local Education Agencies (LEAs) who have a need for Pre-Employment Transition Services, and recruit Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs). They will match interested schools and willing CRPs and/or provide services where there are students with disabilities who need the service.
The Pre-Employment Transition Specialists will work with the schools to identify students who are of working age who want to become VR clients and make referrals to the VR Counselor assigned to the school. (Page 213) Title I

In 2014 VR transitioned from VR counselors to TSW grants to work in the school systems. There are currently 38 TSW grants serving 42 LEAs.
It is the Division’s policy that the development and approval of the IPE for each student determined eligible for VR services occurs as soon as it is determined that the student can benefit from services provided by the Division. An IPE must be developed before the student leaves the school setting.
The interagency agreement identifies the financial responsibility of the Department of Education (DOE) to ensure that individuals who are IDEIA eligible receive a free appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment. A free appropriate public education means regular and special education and related services which:
1. Are provided at public expense, under public supervision and direction, and without charge to the parent;
2. Meet the standards established by state law, including the requirements of IDEIA Part B and the Rules, Regulations and Minimum Standards for the Governance of Tennessee Public Schools, issued by DOE;
3. Include preschool, elementary school, and secondary school (including appropriate vocational, career or work experience education); and
4. Are provided in conformity with an IEP. (Page 214) Title I

The interagency agreement relates the financial responsibility of the Division to ensure that individuals who are IDEIA eligible and meet the Division’s eligibility requirements will receive VR Services. VR Services means any services necessary to determine eligibility and those services described in an IPE necessary to assist an individual with a disability in preparing for, securing, retaining, or regaining an employment outcome that is consistent with the strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice of the individual.
The LEA is responsible for the educational costs related to the provision of special education and related services for the individual attending school. The agreement states that if another public agency is obligated under federal or state law or assigned responsibility under state policy to provide or pay for any services that are considered special education or related services and are necessary for ensuring FAPE to students who are IDEIA eligible, the public agency shall fulfill that obligation or responsibility, directly, through contract or by another arrangement. However, failure of that public agency to pay for that service does not relieve the LEA of its obligation to provide that service to an individual with a disability in a timely manner. (Page 214) Title I

The Division is responsible for all costs necessary for eligibility determination and provision of services under an IPE. The Division must take into account comparable services and benefits [34 CFR § 361.53 (c) (1))], available under any other program that does not interrupt or delay the progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the IPE.
The Division’s staff maintains a working relationship with special education supervisors, vocational education supervisors, directors, secondary school guidance counselors, and LEA administrators for the purpose of providing outreach for students with disabilities and technical assistance to school personnel to assist LEAs in preparing students with disabilities for career opportunities. The Division participates in in-service training programs for LEAs, as well as in statewide special education conferences for the purpose of providing information regarding VR services. The Division also participates in and organizes local community job fairs, job clubs, attends civic club/organization meetings to inform students and parents of the purpose of the VR program, the application procedures, the eligibility requirements, and the potential scope of services that may be available. (Page 215) Title I

The Division currently contracts with forty-four LEAs as part of its transition initiative. The contracts provide for a menu of needed and additional services chosen by the LEA to assist in the transitioning of students from school to work. All services provided under these contracts/agreements have a VR employment focus. All services provided under these contracts/agreements are in keeping with all state plan requirements to include our state’s Order of Selection requirements. Services provided under these contracts/agreements are only available to applicants for, or recipients of, services of the Division. The Division will strive to increase the number of contracts with LEAs as allowed by the Division’s and LEAs’ funding availability. (Page 215) Title I

The 5 Pre-Employment Transition Services are: 1. Job Exploration Counseling can be provided in classroom or a work setting of in-demand occupations. Counseling can include completing interest inventories to determine a student’s interests, job shadowing, exploration of Career Pathways, and researching local labor market information that apply to the student’s interests. 2. Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school or after-school opportunities, or experiences outside of the traditional school settings (including internships). It is provided in an integrated environment in the community to the maximum extent possible; 3. Counseling on Post-Secondary Opportunities, which may include exploration and preparation for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary education programs at institutions of higher education; 4. Workplace Readiness Training for the development of social skills and independent living skills necessary for successful employment. This may include skill acquisition as well as opportunities to apply newly acquired knowledge. 5. Instruction in self-Advocacy, which may include Self-Determination, Life Skills Training and peer mentoring from individuals with disabilities working in competitive integrated employment. Recipients learn about their rights, responsibilities, and how to request accommodations for post-secondary education placement as well as employment. (Page 223) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation Stakeholders Overall, respondents (38%) are sometimes satisfied with the services VR clients receive from TN Rehabilitation Services. Twenty-four percent are satisfied and 21% are dissatisfied. Two respondents listed not applicable, two were very dissatisfied, and one person stated that they were very satisfied with the services VR clients receive. One stakeholder praised VR’s improvements made in “Working on developing relationships with future clients before they leave high school; actively participating in meaningful IEP transition meetings.” (Page 236) Title I

 Specifically, the assessment identified the following primary needs for the program: • Outreach materials to increase awareness and knowledge about the VR program and services to communities and local businesses. VR’s outreach activities are woven throughout the state plan. See sections a, d, e, j, l, o, p, and q. • Training to VR employees and Community Resource Partners covering policy changes and Letters of Agreement (LOA). The state plan includes numerous training initiatives and strategies for both VR staff and CRPs in sections a, c, d, f, i, j, l, n, o, p, and q. • Training to VR employees covering medical impairments and how they impact limitations with work. As noted above, the state plan includes numerous training initiatives and strategies in sections a, c, d, f, i, j, l, n, o, p, and q. • Transportation for clients. Meeting the transportation needs of clients continues to be an identified need in Tennessee. Transportation was a need identified in 2010, 2013, and 2016. Transportation is a major support service provided by VR either directly to an individual or through area transportation providers. The needs assessments identified needs in rural areas that do not have the transportation opportunities available in urban areas. To the extent possible, VR works with each individual to address transportation needs through rural transportation agencies or family members until an individual can afford his or her own transportation following employment. DHS continues to work with rural transportation providers and Human Resource Agencies to address rural transportation needs for individuals participating in work programs. • Improved communication with Community Resource Partners (CRP). The state plan includes information on communication with CRPs through contracts, letters of agreement, training, and monitoring as outlined in sections a, c, d, e, f, l, m, o, p, and q. • Increase in Pre-Employment Transition Services. The state plan includes several updates to the pre-employment transition service activities occurring throughout the state in sections a, d, e, f, g, l, and m. • Increase in Local Education Association (LEA). The state plan includes several updates to its work with local education agencies in sections a, d, g, l, o, and p. Most notably, the number of LEAs served by the Transition School to Work program has increased. (Pages 241-242) Title I

As of Sept 30, 2017, 8,010 individuals in the state are eligible for services under an IPE. Of this number and in compliance with our Order of Selection, 7,255 are receiving services provided with Title I, Part B funds and 755 are receiving services provided with Title VI, Part B funds and with Title I, Part B funds.
For Fiscal Year 2018, it is projected that there will be 5,499 new applicants and that 12,754 individuals in the state will be eligible for services under an IPE. Of this number, 12,013 will receive services under an IPE provided with Title I, Part B funds and 741 will receive services under an IPE provided with Title VI, Part B funds and with Title I, Part B funds. It is estimated that the number of individuals to be served under Title I, Part B and Title VI, Part B under an IPE during Fiscal Year 2018 under each priority category within our Order of Selection will be:
• Priority Category 1 - 8,928 (Includes Title VI, Part B) • Priority Category 2 - 3,826
Total 12,754
Note: Estimates for eligible individuals and those who will be provided services under our Order of Selection in Fiscal Year 2018 is based on current trends and adjustments to utilization of Title VI, Part B funds. (Page 243) Title I

On August 1, 2001, the Division implemented an Order of Selection due to funding limitations that would not allow the Division to provide services under an IPE to all eligible individuals. Only Priority Category 1 cases (eligible individuals who have the most significant disabilities) were served until 2009.
From 2009 until October 2012 there were numerous releases of Priority Category 2 and 3 cases. Beginning October 1, 2012, the Division opened Priority Category 2 for services. The Division is now serving all Priority Category 1 and 2 cases. Those Priority Category 3 cases that were on the waiting list were released for services on October 1, 2013.
The Division’s funds and resources remain inadequate to serve individuals in all four priority categories. The Division expects to have approximately $21,000,000 from the federal grant and state appropriations to spend for assessments for an estimated 5,797 new cases and planned services for approximately 13,000 existing and new cases. Approximately half of this amount must be allocated for pre-employment transition services. (Page 249) Title I

6. Continuing to support expansion of Transition School-to-Work services by continuing to work with Local Education Agencies (LEA’s) in the maintenance of existing partnerships and the creation of additional partnerships to provide vocational rehabilitation services targeted specifically to that LEA’s school system. Continuing to work with and educate school personnel on the mission and scope of the Division in order to maximize services from both entities to better serve our mutual clientele to include appropriate qualified interpreters/accommodations for students that are in LEA/School to Work programs. The newly hired Transition School to Work Director will manage this process. (Page 255) Title I

The Division will develop strategies for increasing referrals of transition school to work clients through local education agencies. Special focus will include the identification of any underserved population at the regional level.
ACHIEVEMENT: In Federal Fiscal Year the Program had 2358 successful employment outcomes. This is a 9% increase over FY2014’s successful employment outcomes of 2159. The VR Program continued focused collaborative efforts with numerous state agencies, in addition to collaboration with Universities across the state. In FFY 2015 Transition School to Work contracts were increased. (Page 259) Title I

Program Reviews:
The Grants and Program Manager will monitor programs on an annual basis. TDLWD SNAP Program staff are interviewed at the local office to determine their general understanding of the program. At each location, case files are reviewed. The Individual Employability Plan (IEP) is evaluated for detailed direction, and incremental steps to achieve program goals. The EDP documents each step as the client progresses through the program. (Page 302) Title I

Any participant of SCSEP is required to develop an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) at the time of enrollment. The IEP serves as a personal road-map to success and is designed to specifically assist the participant in meeting both personal and program goals. Each participant receives specialized training that fits under his or her IEP and is assigned to a host agency to develop or improve skills. The plan also determines if the Host Agency has met the participant’s requirements. In addition, the Host Agency provides services to low-income older persons, to the economically disadvantaged, and to organizations offering services which provide positive contributions to the welfare of the general community. Opportunities to serve other groups will also be provided through placement in schools, day-care programs, health and hospital programs, and agencies serving individuals with physical and developmental disabilities. (Page 370) Title IV

IEPs are referred to often throughout participation to ensure goals are being met. In addition, any IEP identifies the need for vocational, high school equivalency (HSE), or computer training. All of these require attendance in a “classroom” environment where the participant may have workbooks, exercises, and reading assignments. Tennessee believes that it is vital to strengthen initial assessments of participant skills, knowledge, interests, aptitudes, and qualities to assist participants with defining career objectives that are relevant and which meet employer needs. . (Page 371) Title IV

Tennessee prides itself on being engaged in actionable partnerships to leverage resources across agencies and enhance customer performance outcomes. Governor’s Jobs and Economic Development Goal: Objective II, to establish cost-effective co-investment models, across government funding streams and other funding streams. These partnerships include:
o Coordinating with American Job Centers, Vocational Rehabilitation Services and other members of the local disability community regarding activities, resources, and services for seniors with disabilities
o Participating in meetings, as appropriate, with senior service providers, both public and private
o Coordinating with local service providers and community stakeholders to assess needs and develop solutions for local transportation services
o Using 2-1-1 and other directories of service and supporting organizations to identify entities and programs in the community that provides referrals and support services to seniors. These directories are especially helpful for transition services when a participant’s durational limit is approaching and project staff is working with him/her to develop a Transition Assessment & IEP.
o Networking with area faith-based organizations to conduct outreach to SCSEP-eligible individuals
Outreach and education of AJC and partner staff will be increased with training on basic competencies when servicing those with disabilities. If assistance is needed for training and employment services with the deaf and hard of hearing, interpreters and other communication-access services will be scheduled. Other partnerships include organizations providing assistance with subsidized housing, healthcare and medical services, transportation, the law, food, personal and financial counseling, interviewing, clothes, etc. (Page 373) Title IV

Special population students have equal access to all CTE courses and use the same curriculum and assessment as other students. One of the successes observed through the use of competency profiles as a measurement approach for occupational attainment has been the value they have for CTE and special education teachers working together to develop students’ IEPs. After the review of the required competencies, support is given special education students through educational assistants for success in the classroom. Modification of curriculum, equipment, and teaching methodologies are offered, when needed, for success in the course. Several regional offices offer in-service training for teachers to use competency profiles in the development of IEPs. (Page 418) Title IV

In addition to the strategies already identified above for all special population students, strategies to enable identified students to prepare for further learning and for high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand careers may include the following:
o exploration of career areas that focus on expanding career options, educational planning, and CTE training that is free of gender bias;
o comprehensive career counseling and guidance including labor market information on a broad range of occupations, career testing, placement services for part-time and summer employment, internships, and cooperative programs;
o access to options for specialization in a variety of areas with access to work-based learning opportunities;
o career development activities which lead to mastery of workplace readiness skills;
o high quality, paid work-based learning experiences to provide career exploration, enhancement of personal and interpersonal skills, and development of occupational skills;
o access to programs which encourage learning all aspects of the industry including planning, management, finances, technical production, and principles of technology; and
o provide information on non-traditional jobs that are in high-demand, require high-skill or offer high-wages with opportunities for advancement and benefits.
Special populations have access to all CTE courses and use the same curriculum and assessment as other students. One of the successes observed through the use of competency profiles as a measurement approach for occupational attainment has been the value they have for CTE teachers and special education teachers working together to develop students’ IEPs. After the review of the required competencies, support is given to special education students through educational assistants for success in the classroom. Modification of curriculum, equipment, and teaching methodologies are offered, when needed, for success in the course. Several regional offices provided in-service training for teachers in the use of competency profiles in the development of IEPs. (Page 423-424) Title IV

The Division requests a waiver of state wideness in order to maintain thirty Third Party Agreements with thirty-five (LEAs). These Third Party Agreements are designed to provide enhanced and concentrated services to Transition School to Work students/clients covered by the agreements. The Division has a contract with each entity that is consistent with Federal regulations (34 CFR § 361.26) and includes the following provisions:
1. The vocational rehabilitation services to be provided are identified in Section A. Scope of Services in each contract (Each contract has been submitted separately to RSA to provide the written assurances requested for this attachment);
2. The LEA assures that non-Federal funds are made available to the Division by committing to their maintenance of effort in Section E.13 of the contract;
3. The LEA assures that the Division’s approval is required before services are provided with the Division’s counselor determining eligibility for each client served; (Page 486) Title IV

When a student who is eligible based on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) standards reaches the age of fourteen (14), the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team , as defined by 34 CFR § 300.344, formulates a statement of transition service needs as a component of the IEP. The Division’s staff is invited and to the extent possible participates in these IEP meetings. (Page 491) Title IV

The IEP team, which should include the Division’s staff when invited and when available, parent and student, determines that the student should be referred for VR services. The Division’s staff should inform the student and parents, preferable at the IEP meeting, the purpose of the vocational rehabilitation program. VR Staff make every effort to attend IEP meetings, however due to staff resources this is not always possible. However information regarding VR Services is made available during IEP meetings.
The Transition School to Work Unit within the VR program is working with the Department of Education on how to incorporate VR services information into the IEP meeting. The Director of the Unit has been trained on Easy IEPs. In the provision of the Pre-Employment Transition Services, students with disabilities and their families will start receiving information on VR services as early as age fourteen. Information will be made available to Middle school staff in order to assist with the beginning the transition. (Page 492) Title IV

The DSU has hired 9 Pre-Employment Transition Specialists and 3 Pre-employment Transition Supervisors to coordinate services provided in their areas, identify Local Education Agencies (LEAs) who have a need for Pre-Employment Transition Services, and recruit Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs). They will match interested schools and willing CRPs and/or provide services where there are students with disabilities who need the service.
The Pre-Employment Transition Specialists will work with the schools to identify students who are of working age who want to become VR clients and make referrals to the VR Counselor assigned to the school. (Pages 492-493) Title IV

There are 28 Pre-Employment Transition Community Rehabilitation Providers providing services.
The LEA’s involved in the interagency agreement with the Division should cooperate in developing and coordinating services for students and youth with disabilities within each respective agency’s legal authority. The ultimate goal of each agency participating in the agreement is to provide, or cause to be provided, a continuum of appropriate services leading to transition from school into employment. The agreement provides for:
1. Consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;
2. Consultation and technical assistance on providing reasonable accommodations;
3. Transition planning by personnel of the Division of Rehabilitation Services and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) of 2004 (P.L. 108-446); (Page 493) Title IV 

The interagency agreement identifies the financial responsibility of the Department of Education (DOE) to ensure that individuals who are IDEIA eligible receive a free appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment. A free appropriate public education means regular and special education and related services which:
1. Are provided at public expense, under public supervision and direction, and without charge to the parent;
2. Meet the standards established by state law, including the requirements of IDEIA Part B and the Rules, Regulations and Minimum Standards for the Governance of Tennessee Public Schools, issued by DOE;
3. Include preschool, elementary school, and secondary school (including appropriate vocational, career or work experience education); and
4. Are provided in conformity with an IEP. (Page 494) Title I

The Division currently contracts with forty-four LEAs as part of its transition initiative. The contracts provide for a menu of needed and additional services chosen by the LEA to assist in the transitioning of students from school to work. All services provided under these contracts/agreements have a VR employment focus. All services provided under these contracts/agreements are in keeping with all state plan requirements to include our state’s Order of Selection requirements. Services provided under these contracts/agreements are only available to applicants for, or recipients of, services of the Division. The Division will strive to increase the number of contracts with LEAs as allowed by the Division’s and LEAs’ funding availability.
Although the Division utilizes contracts with LEAs as part of its transition initiative, all decisions affecting eligibility for VR services, the nature and scope of available services, and the provision of these services remain the sole responsibility of the VR counselor employed by the Division. VR staff is responsible for determinations to close cases and for all allocations of expenditures for services. (Page 495) Title IV

The purpose of this MOU, is to state how these agencies will work together to provide transition school to work services to students and youth with disabilities.
The Division continues to recognize the value of the involvement of its State Rehabilitation Council in personnel development activities. It is the policy of the Division to give the Council ongoing review and input on the development of issues associated with the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development.
The Council continues to be involved with CSPD issues associated with the recruitment and retention of staff, such as; counselor salaries and pay incentives for the successful attainment of counselors with a Master's degree in Rehabilitation and also training for existing staff to obtain a Master's Degree in Rehabilitation. (Page 516) Title IV

Overall, respondents (38%) are sometimes satisfied with the services VR clients receive from TN Rehabilitation Services. Twenty-four percent are satisfied and 21% are dissatisfied. Two respondents listed not applicable, two were very dissatisfied, and one person stated that they were very satisfied with the services VR clients receive. One stakeholder praised VR’s improvements made in “Working on developing relationships with future clients before they leave high school; actively participating in meaningful IEP transition meetings.”
According to survey results, 48% of stakeholders straddled the fence in their belief that VR Counselors fully understand how and why a client’s disability affects their chances of employment. Twenty-four percent agree and 17% percent disagree that VR Counselors understand the impact a disability has on employment. Eleven of the Stakeholders felt that employment opportunities were an unmet need of individuals with disabilities. One respondent shared that “There seems to be a lack of creativity to find positions that are compatible with their disabilities.” (Page 518) Title IV

• Increase in Pre-Employment Transition Services. The state plan includes several updates to the pre-employment transition service activities occurring throughout the state in sections a, d, e, f, g, l, and m.
• Increase in Local Education Association (LEA). The state plan includes several updates to its work with local education agencies in sections a, d, g, l, o, and p. Most notably, the number of LEAs served by the Transition School to Work program has increased. (Page 525) Title IV

The Division also elects not to serve eligible individuals, regardless of any established order of selection, who require specific services or equipment to maintain employment. The Division expects to serve 12,754 existing and new Priority Category 1 and 2 in 2018. Of this number, the Division expects to provide services for 8,928 Priority Category 1 cases and 3,826 Priority Category 2 cases.
The Division will monitor staffing needs to determine if there is sufficient manpower to schedule releases of Priority Category 3 and 4 cases for services or open all Priority Category 3 cases for services. Therefore, continuation of the Order of Selection mandated by the Rehabilitation Act of
1973, as amended, to determine which eligible individuals will be served under an IPE is still warranted due to staffing deficiencies.
The Division monitors services and expenditures on a continuous basis, allowing the Division to manage available funds and staff to assure sustainability of services for cases placed in an open priority category and receiving services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). Additionally, adequate funds will continue to be conserved and staffing deficiencies monitored to provide assessment services for all applicants expected to apply throughout the year to determine eligibility and to provide services for those eligible individuals in an open priority category within the Order of Selection. (Page 532) Title IV

6. Continuing to support expansion of Transition School-to-Work services by continuing to work with Local Education Agencies (LEA’s) in the maintenance of existing partnerships and the creation of additional partnerships to provide vocational rehabilitation services targeted specifically to that LEA’s school system. Continuing to work with and educate school personnel on the mission and scope of the Division in order to maximize services from both entities to better serve our mutual clientele to include appropriate qualified interpreters/accommodations for students that are in LEA/School to Work programs. The newly hired Transition School to Work Director will manage this process. (Page 537) Title IV

The Division will develop strategies for increasing referrals of transition school to work clients through local education agencies. Special focus will include the identification of any underserved population at the regional level.
ACHIEVEMENT: In Federal Fiscal Year the Program had 2358 successful employment outcomes. This is a 9% increase over FY2014’s successful employment outcomes of 2159. The VR Program continued focused collaborative efforts with numerous state agencies, in addition to collaboration with Universities across the state. In FFY 2015 Transition School to Work contracts were increased. (Page 541) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Tennessee’s plan to utilize wage record data, which includes SSNs, wages, and employer information such as the FEIN, is founded in compliance with confidentiality provisions in 20 CFR Section 603, as well as in accordance with the emerging requirements of the SWIS (State Wage Interchange System) data sharing agreement. TEGL 7-16, Data Matching to Facilitate WIOA Performance Reporting, also is being used to guide the process and direction of partnership agreements, similar to MOUs, which define, if needed, authorized data share staff among program and IT staff of the TN agencies noted above. One of the options under TEGL 7-16 is a centralized process carried out by TDLWD which consolidates earnings and post-secondary attainment into the full PIRL reporting file; but it will be December 2016 before this decision is fully approved, through full engagement with partners. TDLWD also will engage internal staff, already authorized to view and handle education data under FERPA, to extend the reach of the department’s sharing agreements with the University of Tennessee. This will authorize the transfer to TDLWD of TN’s longitudinal data, named P20, which is currently being used to track student and thus WIOA participant progress through career pathways carried out in the partnership with OCTAE, AE, and all core programs under WIOA. (Page 144) Title I

Fifteen percent (15%) of the Basic VR grant must be set aside for the provision of Pre-ETS services. TN VR provides the 5 Pre-ETS services through contracts with qualified Community Rehabilitation Partners (CRPs), Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and/or VR staff.

The 5 Pre-Employment Transition Services are:

  1. Job Exploration Counseling can be provided in classroom or a work setting of in-demand occupations. Counseling can include completing interest inventories to determine a student’s interests, job shadowing, exploration of Career Pathways, and researching local labor market information that apply to the student’s interests.
  2. Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school or after-school opportunities, or experiences outside of the traditional school settings (including internships). It is provided in an integrated environment in the community to the maximum extent possible;
  3. Counseling on Post-Secondary Opportunities, which may include exploration and preparation for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary education programs at institutions of higher education;
  4. Workplace Readiness Training for the development of social skills and independent living skills necessary for successful employment. This may include skill acquisition as well as opportunities to apply newly acquired knowledge.
  5. Instruction in self-Advocacy, which may include Self-Determination, Life Skills Training and peer mentoring from individuals with disabilities working in competitive integrated employment. Recipients learn about their rights, responsibilities, and how to request accommodations for post-secondary education placement as well as employment. (Page 223) Title I

The 5 Pre-Employment Transition Services are:
1. Job Exploration Counseling can be provided in classroom or a work setting of in-demand occupations. Counseling can include completing interest inventories to determine a student’s interests, job shadowing, exploration of Career Pathways, and researching local labor market information that apply to the student’s interests.
2. Work-Based Learning Experiences, which may include in-school or after-school opportunities, or experiences outside of the traditional school settings (including internships). It is provided in an integrated environment in the community to the maximum extent possible;
3. Counseling on Post-Secondary Opportunities, which may include exploration and preparation for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary education programs at institutions of higher education;
4. Workplace Readiness Training for the development of social skills and independent living skills necessary for successful employment. This may include skill acquisition as well as opportunities to apply newly acquired knowledge.
5. Instruction in self-Advocacy, which may include Self-Determination, Life Skills Training and peer mentoring from individuals with disabilities working in competitive integrated employment. Recipients learn about their rights, responsibilities, and how to request accommodations for post-secondary education placement as well as employment.  (Page 504) Title IV
 

Apprenticeship

These local teams will coordinate activities geared to connecting employees, affected by the layoffs/closings, to other employment opportunities to minimize the time needed for unemployment insurance assistance. In addition to connecting dislocated workers to employment, Rapid Response teams will also work to connect participants to training opportunities through WIOA and partner programs, including the higher education system. In addition to connecting participants to formal training opportunities, Rapid Response teams will also work with the AJCs to connect participants to apprenticeships, to OJTs, and other dislocated worker re-employment activities. Rapid Response funds will be used to assist with the expenses associated with technical features such as Jobs4TN, the mobile units, materials, and staff time associated with Rapid Response activities. (Page 158) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~5. Program Administration for the Supported Employment Title VI Supplement:
a. The designated State unit assures that it will include in the VR services portion of the Unified or Combined State Plan all information required by section 606 of the Rehabilitation Act.
b. The designated State agency assures that it will submit reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the Commissioner may require and collects the information required by section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under title I and individuals receiving supported employment services under title VI of the Rehabilitation Act.
c. The designated state unit will coordinate activities with any other State agency that is functioning as an employment network under the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency program under Section 1148 of the Social Security Act.

6. Financial Administration of the Supported Employment Program:
a. The designated State agency assures that it will expend no more than 2.5 percent of the State’s allotment under title VI for administrative costs of carrying out this program; and, the designated State agency or agencies will provide, directly or indirectly through public or private entities, non-Federal contributions in an amount that is not less than 10 percent of the costs of carrying out supported employment services provided to youth with the most significant disabilities with the funds reserved for such purpose under section 603(d) of the Rehabilitation Act, in accordance with section 606(b)(7)(G) and (H) of the Rehabilitation Act. (Pages 272-273) Title I

 Continuing to support expansion of supported employment services by actively seeking out, training, and monitoring community rehabilitation providers; especially in the more rural areas, that are willing to provide supported employment services to vocational rehabilitation clients with the most significant disabilities; and by fostering partnerships with DIDD and chapters of The ARC in Tennessee to implement employment network projects with community rehabilitation providers. The Division is striving to have shared vendors with DIDD in order to access services for shared clients. The Division is expanding participation in the Individual Placement Model of Supported Employment (IPS) statewide. (Page 537) Title IV

13. Continuing to support the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program and use of other Social Security work incentives that benefit clients by continuing contract with the Benefits to Work Company. This company provides Social Security benefits counseling to clients before and after the Individualized Plan for Employment process. Currently the Division contracts with Benefits to Work to provide outreach to communities on how working affects Social Security Benefits, work incentives, and benefits planning. The agency will also continue to promote the most effective use of Ticket to Work Employment Network programs for the Division and our partners. (Page 538) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~There is a small pilot supported employment program for individuals with intellectual and development disabilities that have a behavioral health diagnosis. This pilot program is utilizing IPS in providing SE services. IPS is a promising employment service model for non-behavioral health individuals. The Division along with the DIDD, DMHSAS, and the CRP are testing the applicability of the IPS model in serving individuals with said diagnoses.

For FFY 2018, the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) has selected Tennessee as a Core and Vision Quest state to receive technical assistance under the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). As a Core state, TN will be assisted in Employer Engagement and Provider Transformation. TN’s goal to increase the number of providers undergoing transformation and increasing the people engaged in competitive integrated employment. As a Vision Quest state, TN will receive guidance about funding and expansion of IPS services in partnership with VR, DMHSAS, and TennCare. (Page 264) Title I

Data Collection

Of the 92 who responded, 48 stated that few clients have jobs when they leave the VR program. Forty-two (42%) stated that most clients have jobs and only 2 stated none of their clients have jobs when they leave the program. Most clients, 60-79%, currently receive checks from the government such as SSI or SSDI, according to 30% of the VR Staff respondents. Another 28% stated that 80-90% of their clients receive SSI or SSDI. Half of the staff who responded has Master’s degrees. Another fourth have a bachelor’s degree. Twenty-six people skipped this question. Most respondents are between the age of 45-64 years of age. (Page 522) Title IV

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~2018 UPDATE: The Division continues to monitor timeliness of eligibility determinations and development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). Monthly rates have met or exceeded the established performance metrics of 92% and 90% respectively. Additionally, the Division continues to monitor the success rate of case closures. To date, the Division has not achieved its goal of meeting or exceeding the federal rate of 55.8%. The success rate for FFY 2017 was 50.8%.

OBJECTIVE 2.2: Meet or exceed the Federal ratio of the average hourly wage of individuals who achieved competitive employment to the average hourly wage of all employed individuals in the State of 0.520. Fifty-two percent of closures should be working at wages of $10-$11 per hour.

ACHIEVEMENT: The VR Program did not meet this goal. The ratio has consistently been 0.49, meaning Forty-nine percent of the successful closures were work at wages of $10-$11 per hour.

2018 UPDATE: The Average reported hourly wage of clients closed successfully in FFY 2017 was $10.01. The Division continues to strive for meeting or exceeding the federal ratio for wages. To date, the Division has not achieved this goal. (Page 261) Title I

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Branding and outreach materials will be a statewide theme including the national DOL brand information. o Common definitions will be established to support all funding streams’ understanding and requirements. o A performance management dashboard inclusive of State Board measures and locally selected measures will be required to help drive positive behaviors in regard to employers. o The rapid response will be included in the regional and local business service team responsibilities. Rapid Response activities have been functionally aligned and provided through local workforce areas to establish a more integrated seamless approach to helping job seekers and business customers. Title I has the primary responsibility to provide Rapid Response activities. o AJC certification requirements will include business service parameters that each local business service team must meet or exceed. o Business service teams are expected to collaborate with job seeker services to fill positions and focus training on needed skills and knowledge. (Page 104) Title I

A critical factor in meeting the skills needs of employers is an understanding of exactly what those needs are. TDLWD will work with its education and economic development partners to clearly identify and forecast employer needs to be aligned with the industry clusters and sectors identified in the Governor’s vision. Concerning the cornerstone of the Governor’s Jobs and Economic Development Goal and Objectives, TDLWD considers employers to be primary customers. The Workforce System focuses on “people for jobs” and “jobs for people”; that can be achieved through a collaborative relationship among partners. Outreach and promotion as well as providing time sensitive and effective customized screening and recruiting services have developed strong ongoing relationships with employers. The Department will: 122. Enhance relationships with employers currently served through local AJCs via Labor Exchange, Veterans Programs, the Trade Act, Re-employment Services, Unemployment Insurance, and Local Workforce Area Business Service efforts. This includes working with TNECD to identify, connect and serve companies with workforce needs. 123. Establish protocol and policy to deliver employer services through a functionally aligned approach with seamless service delivery. 124. Establish an AJC certification process that has standards required for business services statewide 125. Continue to provide and track training to Workforce System partners to build the capacity to serve employers and to better understand labor market information data and analyses (Page 105) Title I

Tennessee’s workforce development system, both regional and local, requires that programs and providers co-locate, coordinate, and integrate activities and information so that the system is cohesive and accessible for individuals and businesses alike. Accountability goals increase the long-term employment outcomes for individuals seeking services, especially those with barriers to employment; to improve services to employers; and to demonstrate continuous improvement. The certification policy is the foundation for aligning programs, policies, and activities in the State’s Workforce System. This policy will assess the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility in accordance with section 188 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) and will undergird continuous improvement of one-stop centers. It specifies minimum standards for the service menu and customer service to be met and branding requirements that demonstrate a statewide Workforce System. This certification process will demonstrate that the local workforce development boards can ensure that employment and training programs in their communities operate at the highest level of quality and consistency while satisfying the expectations and needs of their customers. (Pages 125-126) Title I

Veterans

Integration of the DVOP and LVER into the WIOA Service Delivery system is accomplished by utilizing in-place procedures for servicing Veterans with SBEs and combining them with the new policies and processes that will support the law. Per US Dept. of Veterans Affairs, there are 501,907 Veterans in Tennessee. Those between ages 18-64 are 450,313kii. INCREASING VETERANS TRANSITION SERVICES Tennessee has developed a partnership with the Tennessee College of Applied Technology (TCAT) and the Army Career and Alumni Program (ACAP) at Fort Campbell Army base. This partnership is to provide production line training (Mechatronics) and certification to transitioning service members, allowing veteran participants to obtain the necessary skills required by manufacturing. (Page 98) Title I

One Stop partners are included in the intake process for JVSG DVOP services. Upon entering the AJC, Veterans are met by a front desk staff member, who asks several questions to help identify veterans and their needs. After identifying the veteran’s purpose for visiting the AJC, a staff member will conduct an intake assessment using the Veterans Service Form (VSF) to identify any significant barriers preventing employment. Upon identifying SBEs, partner staff members refer the veteran to the DVOP. Those veterans who do not have SBEs, however still require employment services and are provided services by our AJC staff, but not from a DVOP. Furthermore, when necessary, JVSG staff is often consulted with by AJC staff regarding military, DD-214, and other language translation in addition to other employment/ service related questions, as needed. JVSG, DVOP/ LVER, integration into the One Stop extends beyond co-location. Veterans seeking services at affiliate centers, that do not have DVOP within that facility, still receive priority of service. After the staff identifies a veteran, an initial needs assessment will be conducted, and a determination of services will be made at that time. In addition, the VSF form is completed to help identify SBEs and additional barriers that may require intensive services from a DVOP. Upon identifying that the veteran has SBEs, the DVOP assigned to that county will be notified. Within 24 hours, the DVOP makes contact and schedules an appointment to meet with the veteran and proceeds with the subsequent intensive services. (Page 99) Title I

Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes: a. How the State intends to provide employment, training and job placement services to veterans and eligible persons under the JVSG Employment Outlook for Veterans 1. The Overall Employment Outlook for Veterans The employment outlook for Veterans in Tennessee is expected to be above that for their civilian counterparts. Continued technological advances in military equipment and the requisite training to operate and maintain this gear make Veterans highly competitive in a broad spectrum of markets. A lack of required (I.E. Healthcare, CDL, etc.) certification because of “State Mandated” formal educational training remains a challenge for some Veterans in certain career fields. However, programs like the Post 9/11 GI Bill and the Transition Assistance Program along with proposed state legislative action to allow for the use of military schooling to be used in lieu of in-state instruction, are dealing with these difficulties and provide opportunities along with information and training to enhance the accreditation process for recently separated Veterans in a variety of career fields. The “Soft skills” Veterans possess also make them desirable to potential employers and include; leadership, a strong work ethic, teamwork, loyalty and a desire to succeed, just to name a few. 2. Opportunities for Veterans Areas of growth specifically being promoted by the current administration are jobs in the automotive and healthcare sectors. Hankook manufacturing from Korea has agreed to build a new tire plant in Clarksville Tennessee (Montgomery County) that will employ 1500+ people. One of the deciding factors for them locating in Clarksville was the close proximity of Ft. Campbell and the large pool of available transitioning and residential Veterans. Additionally, the current automotive industry in Tennessee is expanding, with Nissan committed to increasing production of the Nissan Leaf in Smyrna. GM will also continue to produce the Chevy Volt at the Spring Hill plant and Volkswagen is expanding with plans to grow their production facility in Chattanooga. In addition to the specific auto manufacturers, the companies that support those facilities continue to grow as well. As an example, Automotive Energy Supply Corporation (AESC), the company that produces the battery for the Leaf is expanding to meet the higher level of demand through increased production. (Page 310) Title IV

The advantage of hiring Veterans is a topic that needs to be presented to an employer on a consistent basis. Tennessee’s American Job Centers (AJCs), through the Business Services Team (BST), will provide an effective conduit to promote Veterans to businesses as a sound and wise investment. Federal contractors and subcontractors are also targeted as companies that not only can benefit from the hiring of Veterans, but they are also informed about their responsibilities under the Office of Federal Contract and Compliance Programs (OFCCP) and Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act (VEVRAA) guidelines as well. This is done through our BST, which includes the Local Veterans’ Employment Representative (LVER), the Local Office Site Leads, Wagner-Peyser (W/P) staff, Local Workforce Development Area (LWDA) staff as well as the Tennessee’s Department of Labors’ Workforce Development (TDLWD) Marketing Services Team within the Service Delivery System. All provide valuable information about promoting Veterans within a variety of venues including job fair participation, Chamber of Commerce meetings, Society of Human Resource Managers (SHRM) meetings, employer visits, public radio and television service spots and departmental brochures. Besides the benefits of hiring Veterans, employers are also informed about the assistance available to them at the AJC, such as the ability to conduct individual hiring fairs and notification of job opportunities to potential candidates. (Page 311) Title IV

TDLWD has determined that the appropriate placement of DVOP/LVER personnel is paramount to the success of the program. For DVOPs, careful study of state demographics and associated evidence indicates that targeted veteran subgroups are predominately located in Tennessee’s metropolitan areas. However, many counties outside of the MSAs have sufficient Veteran population to warrant the presence of a DVOP. Most DVOP Specialists will be assigned to a comprehensive Career Center where other supportive services are readily available. In the areas where there are additional organizations such as VA VR&E offices, Homeless Shelters and other Community Partners, a DVOP from the local AJC has a partnership with them to provide Intensive Services to those who require additional assistance to become job ready. Services will be provided to Veterans who have identified themselves as having an SBE. LVER staff will be placed throughout the state to reach out to employers and promote the benefits of hiring veterans. One way this promotion process can be accomplished is by introducing employers to the immediate tangible benefits such as the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC, when funded) that is available to them when they hire Veterans. In addition to the tangible incentives they can get are the short and long-range benefits gained from the intangible “soft skills” Veterans bring to the hiring table, teamwork, trainability, leadership, diversity in the workplace, and a host of others that are inherent to the military experience. By “showcasing” our Veterans, the LVER staff increases job opportunities for them. Every effort is made to keep vacancies of staff positions down below the 60-day time frame as directed. The Veterans Program Coordinator (VPC) will ensure that Tennessee’s Department of Human Resources is aware of the unique funding stream of the JVSG and will keep all vacancies filled within the 60-day mandate. TDLWD will ensure that all new hires for DVOP and LVER will attend NVTI for mandatory training within the required 18 month time period. (Pages 313-314) Title IV

1. Primary Duties: The LVER will actively advocate for employment and training opportunities with business, industry, and community-based organizations on behalf of Veterans consistent with VPL 03-14, VPL 03-14 Ch1, VPL 03-14 Ch2, VPL 04-14. LVERs will be assigned duties that promote to employers, employer associations, and business groups the advantages of hiring veterans and will be part of the “Business Services Team” within the AJC that conduct outreach activities to these entities. The following activities will be part of this program: 2. In conjunction with employers, conduct job searches and workshops and establish job search groups to facilitate the use of the TDLWD labor exchange system to enhance their employee search activities. 3. Form effective relationships with the business community and trade unions to enhance the availability of employment and training opportunities for Veterans. o Encourage businesses to hire Veterans and to provide OJT and Apprenticeship programs geared to the Veteran community. o Maintain current labor market information on trends and adjust strategies accordingly. 4. Work with training providers and credentialing bodies to promote opportunities for Veterans. o Encourage employers in professions requiring licensure or certification to develop OJT and/or apprenticeship programs for Veterans. o Promote the participation of Veterans in programs leading to certification or licensure. o Advocate with training providers and credentialing agencies for recognition of equivalent military training. 5. Plan and participate in job fairs to provide employment opportunities for Veterans. The LVER will facilitate this by: o Initiating contact and developing relationships with employers, community leaders, labor unions, veterans’ organizations, and training program representatives to develop their commitment to providing employment and training opportunities for Veterans. o Maintaining current information regarding a full range of employment and training options available to Veterans. (Pages 316-317) Title IV

7. Employer Relations: The LVER will establish and maintain regular contact with employers in order to maximize the development of employment and training opportunities for the Veteran community. 8. Develop an employer contact plan designed to encourage the employment of Veterans by the use of business and community organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce, Human Resource Groups, and others as determined to be beneficial in the facilitation of hiring Veterans. This can be accomplished by: o Personal Visits o Phone Calls o E-mail Contact o Internet Connections or other means deemed effective (Page 318) Title IV

1. DVOP and LVER Integration DVOPs and LVERs are fully integrated into the TDLWD Labor Exchange System to form a comprehensive delivery team that provides services to Veterans that address their employment and training needs. All AJCs (with the exception of two located in extremely rural locations) have assigned Veteran staff, with LVERs and DVOPs assigned according to the population of their target groups and the needs of the community. DVOPs are assigned to areas with the highest concentration of Veterans, including disabled, homeless, and other Veterans with SBE. LVER assignments are based on the employer population and the probabilities of economic growth in their areas. Urban areas will normally have both LVER and DVOP staff assigned to ensure effective service to all Veterans. AJC Staff will work together in a comprehensive manner, respective of their roles and responsibilities, to provide assistance to Veterans in need which will foster job developments created with the employers in these highly industrialized and diverse environments. Suburban and rural (agricultural) areas will normally be assigned a LVER or DVOP as indicated by the factors previously mentioned. (Page 319) Title IV

4.In-Demand Careers In coordination with the DVOP, and after receiving names of Veterans who have been deemed “job ready”, the LVER will work with local industry leaders as well as Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (ECD) to identify the requisite skill sets needed for in-demand careers for their area and develop opportunities for training through programs such as OJT through WIOA. Additionally, the LVER will coordinate with state educational facilities such as the Tennessee Technology Centers (TTC) to foster attendance in training programs for those in-demand jobs. 5. Public Outreach to Veterans concerning Employment and Training Opportunities In addition to the efforts of the DVOP and LVER staff, TDLWD Marketing Services Staff (part of the BST) will promote the available services, including employment and job training opportunities, to veterans in a variety of forums in which they are involved. These can include job fairs, Chamber of Commerce meetings, Society of Human Resources Managers (SHRM) meetings, employer visits, public radio, television spots, and departmental brochures. (Page 320) Title IV

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.
The Division maintains an ongoing interagency agreement with the Tennessee Department of Education, Tennessee Department of Children’s Services, Tennessee Department of Finance and Administration, Bureau of TennCare, Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Tennessee Department of Health, Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services and Tennessee Department of Corrections. The agreement, along with the Division’s policy manual and Standard Procedures Directives, outlines the plans, policies and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the participation of the Division staff in transition planning and the referral of students with disabilities to the Division for a determination of eligibility for VR services.  (Page 211) Title I

II. Service Contracts:

A. The Division plans to continue service contracts with the following community rehabilitation providers to ensure quality services statewide provided funding is available:

  • Clovernook
  • Department of Education
  • National Federation for the Blind
  • Southeast TN Human Resource Agency
  • Technology Centers: East Tennessee Technology Access in Knoxville; Signal Centers; Technology Access Center of Middle Tennessee in Nashville; West Tennessee Special Technology Access Resource (STAR) Center in Jackson; and Mid-South ACT in Memphis
  • Tennessee Disability Coalition Benefits to Work
  • University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy Education and Employment
  • Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
  • Statewide Independent Living Council
  • STAR Center
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Labor and Workforce Development
  • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. (Page 219) Title I

The Division has interagency arrangements and coordination with the following entities for the provision of supported employment services and extended services:

1. The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities;

2. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders;

3. The Tennessee Employment Consortium, an independent association of community rehabilitation providers and state agencies developed jointly by the Division, the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and the Tennessee Council on Developmental Disabilities to provide a forum for all stakeholders to review and discuss state policies and share best practices; (Page 220) Title I

5. Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, to provide customized employment services through their system of Career Centers on behalf of VR clients and business and industry. The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for individuals with mental illness and substance related disorders. Utilizing an evidence based Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model of supported employment; Tennessee Division of Health Care Finance and Administration, Division of TennCare for provision of employment services for individuals enrolled in Employment and Community First CHOICES. The Department of Education for the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services. (Page 502) Title IV

It is the continued goal of the Division to provide quality supported employment services which are delivered in an effective, efficient and timely manner. Supported employment services are provided through Letters of Agreement with community rehabilitation providers, and in cooperation with the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. The community rehabilitation providers must assure that on-going support (extended) services will be provided prior to the implementation of supported employment services or will be developed as natural supports during training. The Division has an excellent supported employment program along with training and support activities to ensure the continued provision of quality supported employment services. These programs are ongoing and are not subject to a specific timeline. Prime examples of these ongoing activities are:

1. Through contract with the University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy, Education and Employment (CLEE), the Division funds three supported employment consultants who are charged with the responsibility of working with our many supported employment community rehabilitation providers in providing training and technical assistance to the staff who provide services to our clients. These same consultants also work with the Division staff on an as needed basis to provide technical assistance. (Page 534) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Community and Social Service occupations are also expected to increase by 2.4 percent annually and expected to have more than 6600 openings each year. However, median wages are in the middle range, at $39,580, but still above the state median of $33,860. Fast-growing occupations include marriage and family therapists (4.4 percent annually), community health workers (3.8 percent), and substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors (3.6 percent). Reducing the opioid crisis will likely cause growth in these areas to continue. Some of the largest occupations include clergy, directors of religious activities; and child, family, and school social workers (660 openings expected annually) (Page 29) Title I

Continue the Eligibility Review Interview (ERI) program in which claimants will be more accurately assigned Claimant Characteristic Codes based upon a review of work and layoff history from the same employer. This program will flag claimants who have reached their return to work date and verify the continuing eligibility of all claimants. Examine SBR opportunities as well as penalty and interest collections for fraud detection and prevention solutions. Continue to use the Treasury Offset Program (TOP) to recover improper payments. Continues use of standalone Recovery unit poised to addresses the recovery of overpaid benefits. Unit will utilize multiple strategies such as liens, garnishments, correspondence, and out bound telephone calls to those that have an outstanding debt to the agency. There are also utilizing a change to write off law that allows us more time to collect the debt. Recovery unit will also partner with Lexis Nexis to implement Business Data Enrichment Solution. This process will help with recovery of benefits by searching for alternative addresses and contact information. It will also look at assets to determine the claimant ability to pay back benefits. This process will give us another tool to go after those claimants that have not updated contact information as well it will determine their ability to pay back the benefits based on assets. (Page 361) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 74

Job Placement for Veterans - 07/09/2020

“Finding a meaningful career after military service can feel overwhelming but our American Job Centers across the state offer variety of services that include resource centers, job fairs, workshops, employment strategies, WIOA Scholarships, career counseling, job search assistance, access to job training and certifications, and labor market information. Our American Job Centers have dedicated Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Specialist (DVOP) staff who themselves have served in the military and are ready to assist veterans in finding long term suitable employment and gain access to training and education opportunities.“

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

An Order Transferring the Tennessee Early Intervention System from the Department of Education to the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/02/2019

“WHEREAS, the Tennessee Early Intervention System (hereinafter "TEIS") is a voluntary educational program for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families that is designed to support, facilitate, and encourage the child's development and participation in family and community activities, as well as assist families in encouraging and participating in the child's development…

Effective July 1,2020, the management and operation of TEIS shall be transferred from the Department of Education to the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, which shall serve as the State lead agency under Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act under 20 U.S.C. 1a35(a)(10). Notwithstanding this transfer, nine TEIS positions shall be maintained by the Department of Education to ensure implementation of IDEA's child find responsibilities and appropriate transitions for children and families into pre-K and K-12 educational settings…

As of July 1 ,2020, the Commissioner of the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities shall control, manage, and oversee all aspects of TEIS, including statutory and regulatory functions.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

State Rehabilitation Council 2019 Annual Report - 12/01/2019

“On behalf of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) of Tennessee, I am privileged to present the 2019 SRC Annual Report to provide an update on the Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and to highlight the work of the SRC during the past year. We address the key accomplishments of the VR program during 2019 and look to the future to improve services provided to individuals with disabilities in Tennessee.  The report also reviews the responsibilities of the SRC and its achievements during the past year as we serve as the voice of the consumer to review, analyze and advise the VR program.

 

A highlight of the annual report is the inclusion of customer success stories to convey a picture of the VR program in a way which pure data cannot.  These stories reflect individuals at different stages in life and with a variety of backgrounds, experiences, abilities and interests who all share a desire to obtain competitive integrated employment and who required the support of the VR program in order to achieve that goal.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA
  • Data Sharing

1915(c) Waiver Changes to Employment and Day Services - 11/25/2019

“Training Outline:

1. Why and how waiver changes were developed (slides 4-7)

2. Overview of waiver changes

• New services (slides 8-45)

➢Summary and detailed requirements

➢ Justifications (IOGs)

• Other notable changes (slides 46-51)

3. Overview of service request process (

slides 52-64)

4. Documentation guidance (slides 65-69)

5. FAQs (slides 70-72)

6. Recommended resources (slides 73 -74)”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/22/2019

“WHEREAS, Tennesseans with disabilities, including mental illnesses and substance abuse disorders, experience disproportionately high levels of unemployment and underemployment; and

WHEREAS, people with disabilities in Tennessee share with the state's other six million residents the desire to achieve personal success and economic self-sufficiency through meaningful work in their communities and deserve the same opportunity for employment as all Tennesseans…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Lee, Governor of the State of Tennessee, do hereby proclaim the month of October 2019 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in Tennessee and encourage all citizens to join me in this worthy observance.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Family & Children’s Service was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—vulnerable and underserved, uninsured and under-insured; LEP; disabled; hourly wage workers (restaurant and retail workers); and those transitioning between employment and employer-sponsored insurance. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with State Farm & Farm Bureau Insurance Agents and Brokers, Music Health Alliance, Nashville Mayor’s Office, Restaurant and Bar Associations, TN Department of Labor, TN Workforce Development, Department Employment Agencies, Local social service, community action agencies, and healthcare providers, and Local libraries.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mary MoorePhone: (615) 320-0591Email: Mary.Hunt@fcsnashville.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Data Collection Frequently Asked Questions - 05/11/2019

~~“The TN SPDC Tool serves as an easy way for providers to deliver data to their program director.

Data is collected for all individuals receiving DIDD residential, day, and/or employment services regardless of their employment status. However if a person only receives Behavior or Personal Assistance services, they are not included in this data collection.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Department of Human Services Teams Up with CVS Health to Provide Workforce Training to Individuals with Disabilities - 05/08/2019

~~“The Tennessee Department of Human Services (TDHS) has joined with CVS Health to unveil an innovative program to help individuals with disabilities find jobs in Tennessee’s growing health care industry.

The partnership recently constructed a mock CVS Pharmacy inside the Vocational Rehabilitation program’s Tennessee Rehabilitation Center (TRC) in Smyrna where students are now receiving job training in two areas that lead to consideration for a career with CVS Health, the nation’s premier healthcare innovation company with more than 4,700 colleagues in the state."

More information can be found by accessing the web link.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Beneficiary Support System - 05/03/2019

~~“As part of TennCare’s Beneficiary Support System (BSS), Disability Rights TN contracts with TennCare to help people with long term services and supports (LTSS) or who may qualify for LTSS by• explaining member rights and responsibilities• answering questions about TennCare programs• resolving concerns or complaints• filing appeals or finding the status of an appeal” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee Self-Determination Waiver Program TN.0427.R03.01 - 04/01/2019

~~“The primary purpose of this amendment is to revise the Service Specification for “Employment and Day Services” to separate the service category into distinct employment and day service types with separate service specifications, provider qualifications and reimbursement/rate structures in order to provide increased choice and flexibility for waiver participants, align incentives toward competitive integrated employment and community participation, and increase transparency with respect to the types of day services provided as well as payment for those services, as part of Tennessee’s approved Statewide Transition Plan for compliance with the HCBS Settings Rule.  Proposed changes include:

Establishing Supported Employment-Individual Employment Support, Supported Employment-Small Group Employment Support, Community Participation Supports, Facility-Based Day Supports and Intermittent Employment and Community Integration Wraparound Supports as separate services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Tennessee HB 1276: Supporting Business Owners with Disabilities - 06/06/2017

“As enacted, adds "businesses owned by persons with disabilities" to the Tennessee Minority-Owned, Woman-Owned and Small Business Procurement and Contracting Act; requires that the annual report made by the chief procurement officer concerning the awarding of purchases to minority-owned business, woman-owned business, service-disabled veteran-owned business, or small business and the total value of awards made also include the total dollar amount of purchases awarded to all businesses in this state”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee SB 1162 - 05/18/2015

"Section 1. This act shall be known and may be cited as 'The Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act.' Section 2. The purpose of this act is to authorize the establishment of a qualified ABLE program as an agency or instrumentality of the state to assist an eligible individual in saving money to meet the eligible individual’s qualified disability expenses. The intent of the program is to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee HB 896/SB 429 (ABLE) - 02/05/2015

The purpose of this bill is to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence,  and quality of life; and (2) To provide secure funding for disability-related expenses on behalf of individuals with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the supplemental security income program under Title XVI of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C.§§ 1381 et seq.);the TennCare programs under Title XIX of the Social Security Act, (42 U.S.C. §§1396 et seq.); or any successor to the TennCare program administered pursuant to the federal Medicaid laws, the individual’s employment, and other sources  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Tennessee Title Code 67

A job tax credit of five thousand dollars ($5,000) for each net new full-time employee job, and two thousand dollars ($2,000) for each net new part-time employee job, for a person with disabilities who is receiving state services directly related to such disabilities, shall be allowed against a taxpayer's franchise and excise liability tax for that year; provided, that:            (A)  The employment of such individual creates a net increase in the number of persons with disabilities employed by the taxpayer within the ninety-day period immediately preceding the employment;            (B)  The taxpayer provides such employment for at least twelve (12) consecutive months and for no less than the minimal hours per week; and for employees enrolled in the minimal health care benefits described in subdivision (g)(1), for respective full-time employment jobs and part-time employment jobs;   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

An Order Transferring the Tennessee Early Intervention System from the Department of Education to the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 12/02/2019

“WHEREAS, the Tennessee Early Intervention System (hereinafter "TEIS") is a voluntary educational program for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families that is designed to support, facilitate, and encourage the child's development and participation in family and community activities, as well as assist families in encouraging and participating in the child's development…

Effective July 1,2020, the management and operation of TEIS shall be transferred from the Department of Education to the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, which shall serve as the State lead agency under Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act under 20 U.S.C. 1a35(a)(10). Notwithstanding this transfer, nine TEIS positions shall be maintained by the Department of Education to ensure implementation of IDEA's child find responsibilities and appropriate transitions for children and families into pre-K and K-12 educational settings…

As of July 1 ,2020, the Commissioner of the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities shall control, manage, and oversee all aspects of TEIS, including statutory and regulatory functions.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/22/2019

“WHEREAS, Tennesseans with disabilities, including mental illnesses and substance abuse disorders, experience disproportionately high levels of unemployment and underemployment; and

WHEREAS, people with disabilities in Tennessee share with the state's other six million residents the desire to achieve personal success and economic self-sufficiency through meaningful work in their communities and deserve the same opportunity for employment as all Tennesseans…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Lee, Governor of the State of Tennessee, do hereby proclaim the month of October 2019 as Disability Employment Awareness Month in Tennessee and encourage all citizens to join me in this worthy observance.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Governor’s Executive Order Order Establishing The Tennessee Employment First I - 06/19/2013

“NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Haslam, Governor of the State of Tennessee… do hereby order and direct the following:

1. State agencies coordinate efforts to increase opportunities for integrated and competitive employment for Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities, mental illnesses, substance abuse disorders and other disabilities.2. The Tennessee Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities convene an Employment First Taskforce (“Taskforce”).3 The Taskforce shall consist of representatives from the agencies administering disability services, family members of persons receiving employment services, vocational rehabilitation, workforce services and education, as well as consumer advocates and third party disability services providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 33

Job Placement for Veterans - 07/09/2020

“Finding a meaningful career after military service can feel overwhelming but our American Job Centers across the state offer variety of services that include resource centers, job fairs, workshops, employment strategies, WIOA Scholarships, career counseling, job search assistance, access to job training and certifications, and labor market information. Our American Job Centers have dedicated Disabled Veteran Outreach Program Specialist (DVOP) staff who themselves have served in the military and are ready to assist veterans in finding long term suitable employment and gain access to training and education opportunities.“

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

State Rehabilitation Council 2019 Annual Report - 12/01/2019

“On behalf of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) of Tennessee, I am privileged to present the 2019 SRC Annual Report to provide an update on the Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and to highlight the work of the SRC during the past year. We address the key accomplishments of the VR program during 2019 and look to the future to improve services provided to individuals with disabilities in Tennessee.  The report also reviews the responsibilities of the SRC and its achievements during the past year as we serve as the voice of the consumer to review, analyze and advise the VR program.

 

A highlight of the annual report is the inclusion of customer success stories to convey a picture of the VR program in a way which pure data cannot.  These stories reflect individuals at different stages in life and with a variety of backgrounds, experiences, abilities and interests who all share a desire to obtain competitive integrated employment and who required the support of the VR program in order to achieve that goal.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans
  • WIOA
  • Data Sharing

1915(c) Waiver Changes to Employment and Day Services - 11/25/2019

“Training Outline:

1. Why and how waiver changes were developed (slides 4-7)

2. Overview of waiver changes

• New services (slides 8-45)

➢Summary and detailed requirements

➢ Justifications (IOGs)

• Other notable changes (slides 46-51)

3. Overview of service request process (

slides 52-64)

4. Documentation guidance (slides 65-69)

5. FAQs (slides 70-72)

6. Recommended resources (slides 73 -74)”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Employment Data Collection Frequently Asked Questions - 05/11/2019

~~“The TN SPDC Tool serves as an easy way for providers to deliver data to their program director.

Data is collected for all individuals receiving DIDD residential, day, and/or employment services regardless of their employment status. However if a person only receives Behavior or Personal Assistance services, they are not included in this data collection.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Tennessee DIDD Annual Report 2018 - 04/01/2019

~~“The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) is the state department responsible for administration and oversight of community-based services for Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The department operates with more than 1,400 state employees and 400 community providers to serve approximately 7,800 people with intellectual disabilities through its Home and Community Based Waivers and 4,500 people through the Family Support Program. It also operates 38 Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) program including the Harold Jordan Center, and three seating and positioning clinics across Tennessee”. More information can be found by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Data Sharing

About the Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities - 01/26/2019

~~“The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) is the state agency responsible for administering services and support to Tennesseans with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This is done in several ways, including Medicaid waiver Home and Community Based Services (HCBS), state-operated ICF/IIDs, and the Family Support Program. DIDD administers services directly or through contracts with community providers. DIDD strives to partner with the people it supports and their family members and friends.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

2018 Homelessness Action Plan for the Chattanooga Community - 12/04/2018

~~“As part of the Housing First model, the Chattanooga community embraces permanent supportive housing interventions for the chronically homeless. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) defines chronic homelessness as a person with a disabling condition who experiences continual homelessness for at least one year or four periods of homelessness within three years. Permanent supportive housing program recipients usually have a diagnosed disability, including serious mental illness or disabling drug addiction. Deploying a Housing First model and investing in permanent supportive housing can help people experiencing chronic homelessness who suffer from serious mental illness and substance use disorders access and maintain housing over time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Apprenticeship Engagement Strategy - 12/01/2018

~~“Vision and GoalsProvide every Tennessean with education and high quality job opportunitieso For Tennessee to offer apprenticeships to increase education, learning, and employment opportunities for customers with disabilities and provide quality candidates for businesso Provide adults with a direct pathway from training to apprenticeship/workforceo Create a process for developing local talent for the technology and healthcare industry” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transportation Distribution and Logistics: Apprenticeship Acceleration in West Tennessee - 12/01/2018

~~“For veterans, benefits  of apprenticeship  programs  can include  a structured transition  process, ability to use GI Bill benefits in combination with apprenticeship incentives, and facilitation of skillset translation from a military to civilian environment. For women, apprenticeship programs can lead to economic self-sufficiency and access to high wage occupations they otherwise may not consider.    For persons  with  disabilities  who  may  not  perform  well  on  standardized  testing, apprenticeships can provide an alternative means of training that is better aligned to their strengths. However, the challenge may be in qualifying for apprenticeship programs as these individuals may not meet entrance criteria.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Services Offered by the Nashville Regional Office - 11/25/2018

~~“VA’s Nashville Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Tennessee and at the Fort Campbell Military Base in Kentucky. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and elderly, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Department of Human Services Teams Up with CVS Health to Provide Workforce Training to Individuals with Disabilities - 05/08/2019

~~“The Tennessee Department of Human Services (TDHS) has joined with CVS Health to unveil an innovative program to help individuals with disabilities find jobs in Tennessee’s growing health care industry.

The partnership recently constructed a mock CVS Pharmacy inside the Vocational Rehabilitation program’s Tennessee Rehabilitation Center (TRC) in Smyrna where students are now receiving job training in two areas that lead to consideration for a career with CVS Health, the nation’s premier healthcare innovation company with more than 4,700 colleagues in the state."

More information can be found by accessing the web link.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding Between The Tennessee Vocational Rehabilitation Program and The State of Tennessee Bureau of TennCare, Division of Long Term Services and Supports - 03/20/2017

“This Memorandum is entered into and based upon the philosophy of Employment First which is based upon the premise that all citizens, including individuals with significant disabilities, are capable of full participation in integrated employment and community life. Because both VR and TennCare offer employment supports for people with disabilities, this Memorandum is intended to ensure that each agency provides those services to common customers in coordination with the other to ensure efficient use of resources and effective delivery of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee’s Independent Living & Developmental Disabilities Network: Joint Publication on Network Programs and Collaborations - 03/01/2017

“In September 2015, Tennessee agencies funded through the Developmental Disabilities Act and Tennessee’s Independent Living programs funded through the Rehabilitation Act met to begin strategic coordination among our organizations. Having been recently relocated to a new federal Administration on Disabilities, our programs had an opportunity to increase our impact in Tennessee by joining forces to address common goals. Together we established a shared priority: improving youth transition outcomes through postsecondary education and job training that leads to competitive and integrated employment. Since that time, our two networks continue to meet together to work on details of joint projects, including this publication!

We hope you find this publication informative and that you learn something new about the programs across Tennessee funded under the Independent Living Administration and the Developmental Disabilities Act. Please reach out to us to find ways that you can become involved in our work. We are always interested in hearing from Tennesseans with disabilities about your experiences in getting supports and services you need.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Memorandum of Understanding between DIDD and VR - 01/07/2016

On December 14, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Division of Rehabilitation Services, Vocational Rehabilitation Program and DIDD was finalized. In 2014, both agencies started discussing the option of creating an MOU through a Vision Quest workgroup (as part of the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program) spearheaded by two ODEP Subject Matter Experts: Dr. Stephen Hall and Sara Murphy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding for School-to-Work Transition - 08/05/2015

Five state agencies have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to improve services and better prepare youth with disabilities to transition from school into integrated employment in the community.  The MOU focuses on students age 14 years and over and aims to ensure all youth with disabilities leaving secondary education are prepared for either post-secondary training and/or integrated employment appropriate for their preferences, interests, skills and abilities.  “It’s vitally important that all state agencies work together to make sure youth with disabilities leave school and have the opportunity to contribute to the workforce,” Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD) Commissioner Debra Payne said.  “It takes a team effort to make sure they have the training and support necessary to make that happen."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Interagency Agreement Regarding IDEA - 07/01/2012

“The purpose of this Agreement is to identify and define the financial responsibilities of the Parties to this Agreement and to facilitate the provision and coordination of services for all infants, toddlers, children, youth and adults who are IDEA eligible. This Agreement formalizes policies, procedures, and fiscal responsibilities of the parties relating to IDEA.” 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Employment Consortium - 06/01/2007

“The Tennessee Employment Consortium (TEC) is a statewide organization focused on increasing the number of Tennesseans in integrated employment. The consortium comprises volunteers from the state's Division of Mental Retardation Services (DMRS) and Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Tennessee Council on Developmental Disabilities, the ARC of Tennessee, the Center on Disability and Employment at the University of Tennessee, community rehabilitation providers (CRPs), family members, and other stakeholders. TEC's ability to organize collaborative activities across state agencies, advocacy organizations, and CRPs has played an important role in increasing integrated employment outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance - 05/01/2007

~~“The Tennessee Inclusive Higher Education Alliance was formed in May 2007 to increase awareness about the need for postsecondary opportunities in Tennessee, to gather information about postsecondary programs in other states, and to develop a pilot program on a Tennessee college campus. “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “Our partnership is focused on helping: Self-Advocates to aspire toward competitive work; Employers to recognize the contributions people with disabilities can make in the workplace; Educators to prepare young people with disabilities with strong skills and opportunities; Families to communicate high expectations from an early age; and State Systems and Disability Agencies to support real work for real pay.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

The ARC Tennessee

~~“ The Arc Tennessee is a grassroots, non-profit, statewide advocacy organization for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. Founded in 1952, The Arc Tennessee is affiliated with The Arc United States and works collaboratively with local chapters across the state.The Arc Tennessee values diversity and does not discriminate based on race, ethnicity, religion, age, geographic location, sexual orientation, gender, level of disability or Limited English Proficiency.Our MissionThe Arc Tennessee empowers people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families to actively participate in the community throughout their lifetime.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Tennessee Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) - 10/01/2011

“The TDEI project will replicate and improve upon the experience of the Disability Navigator Program (DPN) active in the nine (9) participating WIBs [Workforce Investment Boards]. The DPN Initiative provided a bridge between One-Stop Career Center staff, private and public partners, and the disability community. Each participating WIB will be responsible for tailoring a basic set of services to the needs of their local population with disabilities, as well as potential employers. Three (3) WIBs will offer services to customers with disabilities in primarily rural areas. The TDEI will rely on the states two Work Incentives Planning and Assistance service providers to assist it to work with Social Security disability beneficiaries.” The grant ended in 2014.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AIDD Partnerships in Employment

TennesseeWorks Partnership: Changing the Employment Landscape“The Vanderbilt Kennedy University Center for Excellence in DevelopmentalDisabilities and 28 agencies and organizations will develop a vibrant collaborativeacross the state to increase the number of young people accessing competitiveemployment prior to leaving high school; increase the capacity and commitmentamong families and practitioners to support competitive employment and careerdevelopment; raise expectations among youth, families, educators and providers;reallocate resources and funding streams toward competitive employment; andincrease the number of families and educators accessing professional development,resources, and supports addressing competitive employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Family & Children’s Service was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—vulnerable and underserved, uninsured and under-insured; LEP; disabled; hourly wage workers (restaurant and retail workers); and those transitioning between employment and employer-sponsored insurance. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with State Farm & Farm Bureau Insurance Agents and Brokers, Music Health Alliance, Nashville Mayor’s Office, Restaurant and Bar Associations, TN Department of Labor, TN Workforce Development, Department Employment Agencies, Local social service, community action agencies, and healthcare providers, and Local libraries.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Mary MoorePhone: (615) 320-0591Email: Mary.Hunt@fcsnashville.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Tennessee - 01/31/2019

~~“Supporting Strong Transitions for Youth with Disabilities

Welcome to Tennessee’s online home for training and resources on preparing students with disabilities for life after high school. Consider this the “blueprint” to building a comprehensive transition program for your students. Learn about the best practices and practical strategies for special educators, families, and other transition team members as you fill your toolbox with key tools for success.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Guide for Provider Transformation to an Employment First Service Model - 06/15/2016

~~Transition to an Employment First Service Model Guide is issuedOrganizations that are successful in their transformation to an Employment First provider agency share three elements, all of which should be addressed:1. Strategy:  What will you do?2. Structure:  Who does it?3. Systems:  How will your agency do it?

An understanding of these elements can give a framework for an agency to understandwhat parts of the organization need to be changed. In order to help agencies decide what to change, an Agency Assessment is provided in the Appendices.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Readiness program (ERP)

"The focus of this program is to prepare students in the areas of employment and life skills. In depth instruction is provided in three critical domains of adult living: daily living skills, self-determination/interpersonal skills, and employment skills. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate their readiness for employment. Positive work behaviors and market ready skills will enable students to be more independent, motivated, and successful."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment and Individuals With Disabilities

This sheet contains tips and resources related to customized and supported employment in relation to Tennessee Disability Pathfinder and TennesseeWorks.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Employment First Trainings

MG&A articles & presentations on Customized Employment and Discovery from the TDI&DD website.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health

University of Tennessee, Center for Literacy, Education and Employment

“ Support for diversity and inclusion is a value at the core of the Center for Literacy, Education and Employment (CLEE). In addition, we determine the direction of our work by listening to and learning from practitioners, policymakers, business leaders and community leaders, as well as the academic community. As a result, the Center has a long history of involvement in advocacy efforts in the fields of literacy, education and employment, particularly those focused on supporting ALL individuals to flourish in an increasingly complex and interconnected world.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Tennessee Works

“We’re transforming the employment landscape for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the state. Meaningful work. Real pay. Opportunities for every Tennessean with a disability.” “This new website is an online resource for those in our state committed to these goals. [You can] [s]elect your role… to find comprehensive information, trainings, videos, success stories, and many other resources to equip, inform, and inspire your work.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Clover Bottom, Greene Valley, and Nat T. Winston Developmental Centers - Memorandum Approving Exit Plan (2015) - 01/29/2015

To effectively facilitate reform in mental health services, the Court cannot allow “perfect to become the enemy of good” nor allow the concepts of federalism and separation of powers to be ignored. The Court concludes that the Exit Plan presented by the Parties is “fair, reasonable, and adequate” and provides the next iteration of improvement to the lives of those with disabilities in Tennessee. It will test political will and legislative leadership to continue that progress and to determine how best to care for those often left in the shadows.    For the reasons detailed above, the Court will grant the unopposed joint motion seeking approval of an Exit Plan (Docket No. 1118-1) and entry of a proposed Agreed Order (Docket No. 1118-2). The Motion to Intervene brought by conservators of GVDC residents and Citizens for a Better Tennessee (Docket No. 1121) will be denied. .  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Beneficiary Support System - 05/03/2019

~~“As part of TennCare’s Beneficiary Support System (BSS), Disability Rights TN contracts with TennCare to help people with long term services and supports (LTSS) or who may qualify for LTSS by• explaining member rights and responsibilities• answering questions about TennCare programs• resolving concerns or complaints• filing appeals or finding the status of an appeal” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee Self-Determination Waiver Program TN.0427.R03.01 - 04/01/2019

~~“The primary purpose of this amendment is to revise the Service Specification for “Employment and Day Services” to separate the service category into distinct employment and day service types with separate service specifications, provider qualifications and reimbursement/rate structures in order to provide increased choice and flexibility for waiver participants, align incentives toward competitive integrated employment and community participation, and increase transparency with respect to the types of day services provided as well as payment for those services, as part of Tennessee’s approved Statewide Transition Plan for compliance with the HCBS Settings Rule.  Proposed changes include:

Establishing Supported Employment-Individual Employment Support, Supported Employment-Small Group Employment Support, Community Participation Supports, Facility-Based Day Supports and Intermittent Employment and Community Integration Wraparound Supports as separate services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Comprehensive Aggregate Cap Home and Community Based Services (or "CAC") Waiver - 04/01/2019

~~“An individual’s Individual Support Plan may include more than one non-residential habilitation service (SE-IES; Supported Employment-Small Group Employment Supports; Community Participation Supports; Intermittent Employment and Community Integration Wrap-Around Supports; Facility-Based Day Supports); however, they may not be billed for during the same period of time (e.g., the same 15 minute or hour unit of time). A provider of SE-IES services may also receive Social Security’s Ticket to Work Outcome and Milestone payments. These payments do not conflict with CMS regulatory requirements and do not constitute an overpayment of Federal dollars for services provided.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee Home and Community-Based Services Settings Rule Statewide Transition Plan (11/2015) Amended Based on Public Comment (2/2016) - 07/31/2018

~~1915 (c) waiver settings assessed included:• Residential Habilitation• Employment and Day (Community and Facility Based Day, In-home Day, and Supported Employment)• Family Model Residential Support• Medical Residential Services• Supported Living

1115 CHOICES waiver settings assessed included:•Adult Day Care•Assisted Care Living Facility•Critical Adult Care Home

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Employment and Community First CHOICES (Employment Program) - 07/01/2016

~~The Employment and Community First CHOICES program is administered by TennCare through its contracted managed care organizations.  It offers services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  Services in the program will help people become employed and live as independently as possible in the community.  All new enrollment is in the Employment and Community First CHOICES program, as DIDD’s waivers are closed to new enrollment.

There is a limited amount of funding available to serve people each year.  That means not everyone who wants to apply can enroll or get services right away.." 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Tennessee State Plan Amendment (SPA) 16-0001 (approved 3-22-2016) - 03/22/2016

The State covers low-income families and children for Transitional Medical Assistance (TMA) under section 1925 of the Social Security Act (the Act). This coverage is provided for families who no longer qualify under section 1931 of the Act due to increased earned income, or working hours, from the caretaker relative’s employment, or due to the loss of a time-limited earned income disregard. (1902(a)(52), 1902(e)(1), and 1925 of the Act)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Tennessee Medicaid State Plan

Tennessee’s full state plan for TennCare, Tennessee’s Medicaid Program.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Tennessee 1915(c) Home and Community Based Service "Self Determination Waiver Program "

The Self-Determination Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive, integrated settings and engage in community life. Services are delivered in a manner which ensures each individual’s rights of privacy, dignity, respect and freedom from coercion and restraint; optimizes individual initiative, autonomy, and independence in making life choices; and are delivered in a manner that comports fully with standards applicable to HCBS settings delivered under Section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act…  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

TN The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02)

~~“The Self-Determination Waiver (0427.R02) serves children and adults with intellectual disabilities and children under age six with developmental delay who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the Self-Determination waiver, would require placement in a private ICF/IID.

The Self-Determination Waiver Program affords persons supported the opportunity to directly manage selected services, including the recruitment and management of service providers. Participants and families (as appropriate) electing self-direction are empowered and have the responsibility for managing, in accordance with waiver service definitions and limitations, a self-determination budget affording flexibility in service design and delivery. The Self-Determination Waiver Program serves persons who have an established non-institutional place of residence where they live with their family, a non-related caregiver or in their own home and whose needs can be met effectively by the combination of waiver services through this program and natural and other supports available to them. The Self-Determination Waiver does not include residential services such as supported living.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap Waiver (#0357.R03)

~~“The Comprehensive Aggregate Cap (CAC) Waiver (#0357.R03), formerly known as the Arlington Waiver, serves individuals with intellectual disabilities who are former members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Arlington Developmental Center), current members of the certified class in the United States vs. the State of Tennessee, et al. (Clover Bottom Developmental Center), and individuals transitioned from the Statewide Waiver (#0128) upon its renewal on January 1, 2015, because they were identified by the state as receiving services in excess of the individual cost neutrality cap established for the Statewide Waiver. These are individuals who have been institutionalized in a public institution, are part of a certified class because they were determined to be at risk of placement in a public institution, or have significant services/support needs consistent with that of the population served in a public ICF/IID and who qualify for and, absent the provision of services provided under the CAC waiver, would require placement in an ICF/IID.

The CAC Waiver offers a continuum of services that are selected by each individual pursuant to a person-centered planning process and support each person’s independence and full integration into the community, including opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings and engage in community life.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

Tennessee is the Volunteer State, and its outstanding Employment First initiatives for individuals with disabilities show why this state exemplifies "America at its Best!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Tennessee’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.8%
Change from
2017 to 2018
6,770,010
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.69%
Change from
2017 to 2018
552,942
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.14%
Change from
2017 to 2018
184,851
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0.45%
Change from
2017 to 2018
33.43%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.44%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.18%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 6,770,010
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 552,942
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 184,851
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,725,255
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.43%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.18%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 494,694
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 534,166
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 835,143
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 156,250
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 24,494
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,909
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 8,862
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 18,506
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 5,921

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 5,044
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 241,307

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 10,730
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 24,420
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 44,279
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 24.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 36.80%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 837
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) su