Texas

States - Big Screen

Everything's Bigger in Texas, including the number of job options in integrated settings at competitive wages for individuals with disabilities. The Lone Star state is a place where anyone, including those with disabilities, can live the American Dream… Deep in the Heart of Texas! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Texas' VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.86%
Change from
2014 to 2015
27,469,114
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.01%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,584,428
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.04%
Change from
2014 to 2015
626,445
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.97%
Change from
2014 to 2015
39.54%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.01%
Change from
2014 to 2015
75.28%

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 26,448,193 26,956,958 27,469,114
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,602,460 1,616,223 1,584,428
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 619,692 613,660 626,445
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 10,802,460 11,106,300 11,346,637
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 38.67% 37.97% 39.54%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.69% 75.29% 75.28%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.20% 5.10% 4.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.00% 22.10% 20.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.80% 16.60% 15.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,489,714 1,497,762 1,524,865
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 1,557,444 1,603,277 1,601,481
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,333,668 2,392,261 2,402,094
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 412,755 422,849 425,070
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 964,494 978,202 984,782
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 19,256 18,845 19,232
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 61,371 64,338 73,273
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,576 1,771 1,634
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 71,164 69,100 71,874
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 146,368 131,875 133,169

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 17,346 18,624 19,684
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.10% 3.30% 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 574,276 574,012 569,586

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 24,957 30,553 35,158
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 53,929 60,533 66,891
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 165,862 173,707 185,621
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.00% 17.60% 18.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.20% 4.60% 6.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10% 4.80% 5.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.70% 1.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 44.00% 43.50% 38.90%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 7,341 11,116 17,078
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 7,286 11,549 15,079
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,250 4,148 4,552
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 102,092 104,481 100,400

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 45,361 53,307 54,851
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 483 687 633
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 232 346 365
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 48.00% 50.00% 58.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.89 1.31 1.33

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
20,692
N/A
20,127
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 14 N/A 32
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 3,999 N/A 4,564
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 7,132 N/A 6,449
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 5,018 N/A 4,782
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 3,408 N/A 3,375
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,121 N/A 925
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 37.70% 41.80% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 21,430 19,773
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 914,022 916,755
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 780 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 607 658 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $4,236,000 $966,000 $5,842,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $99,239,000 $116,626,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $142,770,000 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 4.00% 8.00% 11.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 15,706 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A 616 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A 24,650 25,599
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 7.50 14.40 11.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.00% 66.17% 67.53%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.00% 13.93% 14.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.00% 1.19% 1.22%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.70% 99.74% 99.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 27.00% 26.77% 24.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.00% 61.55% 54.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 69.00% 71.65% 67.36%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.00% 34.77% 29.24%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 7,034,752
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 6,822
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,436,521
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 4,235,134
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 5,671,655
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 1,090
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,482
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 4,572
AbilityOne wages (products). $12,142,783
AbilityOne wages (services). $54,025,955

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 2 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 6 1 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 104 105 72
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 4 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 112 76
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 19 17
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 8,938 5,605
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 856 618
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 9,814 6,240

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

At the federal, state, and local levels, TWC continues to make great strides toward a streamlined and coordinated one-stop delivery system serving adults and youth with disabilities and employers that employ these individuals. TWC’s executive director and the commissioner of assistive and rehabilitative services (transferred to TWC as of September 2016) participate as ex officio members of the Governor’s Committee on People with Disabilities. TWC also serves on state-level interagency councils and workgroups supporting gateways for individuals with disabilities, such as the Employment First Task Force and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services’ (DADS) Promoting Independence Advisory Council. Other memberships have included the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services’ (DARS) Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Advisory Council, and HHSC’s House Bill 1230 Workgroup on Transition Services for Youth with Disabilities. TWC will also continue to coordinate with the State Independent Living Council (SILC) and the Centers for Independent Living (CILs) to serve mutual consumers who need employment assistance as well as assistance with independent living resources. In this vein, TWC has collaborated with a number of agencies in developing guidance, such as a transition and employment guide for Texas students with disabilities. (Page 72)

  • DRS co–chairs and participates in the legislatively mandated Employment First Task Force charged with writing and making recommendations to implement an Employment First statewide policy, and providing information and/or training to providers, stakeholders, and the general public on employment as the first option for any publicly funded service.
  • Membership and participation in Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE).
  • Representation on:
  • The Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities
  • The Council for Advising and Planning (CAP) for the Prevention and Treatment of Mental and Substance Use Disorders
  • Texas Clubhouse Coalition
  • Texas Alliance for the Mentally Ill
  • Texas Coordinating Council for Veteran Services (TCCVS)
  • Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Council (TBIAC)
  • HHSC Office of Acquired Brain Injury (OABI)
  • State Independent Living Council (SILC)
  • Texas Interagency Council for the Homeless
  • DADS Consumer Direction Workgroup
  • HHSC Medicaid/CHIP CRCG
  • Texas Technology Access Program Advisory Council (Page 244)

Also, DARS co-chairs the Employment First Task Force (EFTF), which was created as a result of SB 1226 and was passed by the 83rd Texas Legislature (2013). The EFTF consists of 26 members (seven represent state agencies) appointed by the HHSC executive commissioner. The purpose of the EFTF is to promote competitive employment of individuals with disabilities, with the expectation that individuals with disabilities are able to meet the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as any other working-age adult.

The 83rd legislature established Employment First Policy for Texas, which makes competitive employment and earning a living wage a priority and the preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.

The EFTF’s responsibilities include designing an education and outreach process, developing recommendations for policy, procedure, and rule changes necessary to implement the employment first policy, and providing reports to the governor’s office, Texas legislature, and HHSC executive commissioner. The first report was submitted in Fall 2014. The next report is due in the fall of 2016. (Page 300)

Customized Employment

DRS ensures that staff are well–qualified to assist individuals with disabilities. There is emphasis of educational requirements at the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral levels, in fields related to rehabilitation. However, the degree field may include other degrees that prepare individuals to work with consumers and employers. For example, bachelor degrees might include not only vocational rehabilitation counseling, but also social work, psychology, disability studies, business administration, human resources, special education, supported employment, customized employment, economics, or another field that reasonably prepares individuals to work with consumers and employers. For individuals hired at the bachelor’s level, there is a requirement for at least one year of paid or unpaid experience related to direct work with individuals with disabilities. (Page 258)

  • Continued focus on the foundations of the VR process for counselors and RSTs, including accurate eligibility determination, inclusion of consumers in planning for service delivery, thorough assessing and planning practices, models for vocational counseling, informed consumer choice, service to culturally diverse populations, good purchasing practices, supported employment, customized employment and other strategies for quality employment assistance, service delivery, and effective case note documentation;
  • Training in working with employers and consumers to increase knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998, the Olmstead decision, available independence initiatives, and VR participation in the Workforce Investment Act to enhance employment options and employment knowledge; (Page 260 All)
Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

Achieving excellence in accessibility is based on three core principles: 

  • ensuring that all customers can effectively use workforce products and services;
  • creating a workspace accessible for individuals with disabilities; and
  • complying with all federal and state legal requirements (Page 127) 

Determine compliance with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA §188. Both programmatic and physical accessibility are addressed during an EO compliance review.

As recipients of WIOA funding, Boards are monitored on-site based on a three-year rotation schedule, as referenced in the State Methods of Administration (MOA) maintained on file with DOL’s Civil Rights Center (DOL-CRC). All 28 Boards are scheduled for an EO review within a designated three-year period. Dates for EO monitoring reviews generally align with those of the TWC’s annual Board monitoring review. (Page 128)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

DRS program specialists provide the following training:

  • Annual training on VR and independent living services to DADS Home and Community–Based Services (HCS) waiver utilization review nurses, Private Provider Association of Texas members, community center staff, including consumer benefits officers, and the Statewide Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Consortium;
  • Training on VR services and benefits and work incentives to HHSC Managed Care Organization (MCO) service coordinators and management, STAR+PLUS, and other service providers and Medicaid waiver case managers;
  • Training on DARS employment services and benefits and work incentives to members of the seven statewide mental health peer–operated support groups;
  • Training on benefits and work incentives every six months for DRS and DBS staff, long–term supports and services providers involved in the MFP employment pilot grant, and DADS and DSHS central office staff. The providers and DADS/DSHS staff get monthly follow–up training via teleconference and written materials, as well as ongoing technical assistance on specific benefits and work incentives issues;
  • A four–hour benefits overview to CRPs statewide, and currently planning with UNT to provide this overview via webinar;
  • Overview of benefits and work incentives to DADS staff, providers, and other community stakeholders throughout the year;
  • Overview to DADS service coordinators, case managers, private providers, and other staff on DRS VR services and best practices for mutually served consumers;
  • Overview of Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) to community partners;
  • Training to CRPs statewide on best practices in the provision of employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities; and
  • Training on Assistive Technology to community partners. (Page 251)

Result in competitive integrated employment outcomes for VR consumers by: 

  • Developing and implementing agency-wide business strategies with a regional focus that creates a unified comprehensive approach to business development, including working with DRS on a new statewide joint Business Relations Team, the formation of regional Outreach Services and Coordination Teams, and the development and joint use of a new business database tracking tool;
  • Providing Employment Assistance Training to staff, to instruct on how to best contact and meet the needs of our business partners;
  • Identifying and accessing higher wage employment opportunities by aligning DBS/DRS business development activities and consumer service provisions to maximize high wage opportunities. This is the goal of the current DBS Work Matters project; and
  • Aligning counseling critical thinking processes around employment opportunities and data to engage consumers in defining their optimal vocational opportunities. During FFY 2015, DBS began a pilot project within the Austin Regional Office in an effort to begin initiating this particular strategy. 

Success will be measured by: 

  • An increase of employers being served by DARS;
  • An increase of successful employment outcomes for DBS consumers;
  • A positive impact on consumer salaries by increasing weekly wages;
  • Maximizing consumer potential and capabilities based on their job readiness; and
  • Increasing job placement vendor effectiveness in matching consumer abilities with employment opportunities. (Page 425)

A pilot program in the Austin region teaches a systematic decision-making process to staff, which includes tools to provide consumers with accurate labor market data and jobs in their geographic area. This process helps consumers make a decision using criteria set forth by the consumer based on data from several resources.

S&I Measure 1.2: Of the individuals exiting the VR program after receiving services, a minimum of 68.9 percent will have achieved an employment outcome. 

  • Performance: In 2015, 75.20 percent of the individuals exiting the DBS VR program after receiving services achieved an employment outcome. (S&I Report) 

To maintain satisfactory performance on this indicator, DBS continues training and reinforcement of the appropriate use of

  1. Extended evaluation to serve consumers with the most significant disabilities and
  2. A thorough comprehensive assessment before VR Counselors develop the individualized plan for employment. DARS is also developing additional tools for counselors to use during situational assessments to improve the information obtained to inform eligibility decisions. (Page 453)
Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

TWC plans to continue to emphasize the availability of a variety of financial literacy activities into the service-delivery strategy within the one-stop delivery system. Under WIOA, states are encouraged to develop and implement strategies for workforce areas to use to coordinate financial literacy services to participants and provide financial literacy activities to youth. TWC agrees with the need for services that foster financial education and literacy services, including financial capability, and encourages partnerships and contracts between Boards and the agencies delivering them.

Comment 6: The Texas State Independent Living Council (SILC) supports the state plan with the following additions.

  • A Coordination of Independent Living section should be added, with the role of SILC and Texas’ Centers for Independent Living (CIL) expressly stated. ( Page 135)

TWC allocates youth formula funds to Boards, that in turn contract with service providers to deliver services to youth in their respective workforce areas. Boards are required to meet all federal and state programmatic requirements. TWC maintains a rigorous performance and accountability system, holding Boards accountable for their performance as it pertains to the youth program as it does with other workforce programs, and Boards have rigorous standards in place for their contracted service providers. Boards must ensure that all 14 program elements—including new WIOA program elements such as financial literacy and services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in workforce areas—are available to youth participants. (Page 163)

Benefits

Approximately 12 percent of the Texas population is estimated to have some type of disability. TWC is committed to providing services to this population; TWC promotes competitive employment of individuals with disabilities coupled with the expectation that they are able to meet the same employment standards and responsibilities as other working-age adults. All working-age individuals with disabilities, including young adults, are offered factual information regarding employment as an individual with a disability, including the relationship between an individual’s earned income and the individual’s public benefits.

The VR program—currently housed at DARS, but moving to TWC on September 1, 2016—helps individuals with disabilities prepare for, find, and keep jobs, and helps students with disabilities plan the jump from school to work. Work-related services are individualized and may include counseling, training, medical treatment, assistive devices, job placement assistance, and other services. (Page 44)

  • Custodial parents are 21 percent less likely to receive TANF benefits; and
  • More than $191 million in child support was collected through August 2015, some of which was used to repay TANF, Medicaid, foster care, and child support collections programs. (Page 64)

Helping customers with disabilities in a Workforce Solutions Office environment; 

  • Resources and funding sources for support services and employment accommodations; and
  • The effects that employment may have on Social Security disability benefits. (Page 129)

Workforce areas that provide quality services will have access to additional resources to meet the employers’ needs, job seekers, and incumbent workers. Additionally, the waiver will allow TWC to continue to promote the cost benefits of improved administrative efficiencies, encouraging the increased leveraging of resources within the workforce areas. As a result, TWC will increase services such as enhanced education, employment, and training opportunities for disadvantaged populations and individuals with multiple barriers to employment. (Page 174)

DRS develops partnerships with schools and community organizations to help students with disabilities make a smooth transition to adulthood and work. DRS has counselors throughout the state that have a role in preparing students with disabilities for entry into the workplace. VR counselors coordinate closely with high schools to ensure appropriate students are referred to the VR program. Counselors work with schools to identify students receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) as early as possible in the process to address concerns regarding impact of employment on benefits and to provide resources for benefits counseling.

VR counselors have flexible work schedules that allow them to participate in school activities, parent meetings, community forums, summer skill-building activities, job clubs, etc. (Page 238)

DARS is currently in the process of collaborating with TEA to update the Letter of Agreement, including the addition of pre-employment transition services as defined in §361.48 and other requirements of WIOA, operationalizing a referral process of students with the highest needs, and a process for invitations to Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) meetings. The final agreement will be between TEA and TWC following the transfer of the VR program in FFY’17 as required by SB 208. Counselors work with schools to identify students receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) as early as possible in the process to address concerns regarding impact of employment on benefits and to provide resources for benefits counseling. DRS has specialty TVRCs and VRCs who are liaisons for high schools and partner with the educational system to more appropriately serve transition-age students seeking assistance to access adult vocational services. Partnering with ISDs allows counselors to use office space on campus to ensure that student consumers have access to resources available through the workforce investment system, community, businesses, and other partners necessary to build a network of support. VR counselors use various tools and strategies in their coordination with schools. The School Plan is a tool available to counselors for planning with their assigned schools. It provides an outline for open communication about each party’s expectations and goals for the school year. Counselors are encouraged to develop a School Plan with each assigned school before that school year begins, and update it as necessary throughout the year. (Page 240)

DRS works with DADS and HHSC Medicaid/CHIP to ensure service definitions in the 1915(c) home– and community–based waivers accurately reflect Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and Rehabilitation Services Administration regulations. This partnership allows services that result in competitive employment to be delivered efficiently and timely through the payor of first resort.

  • DRS provides annual training to DSHS Community Benefits Officers on SSI and SSDI benefits and work incentives and offers free intensive training and technical assistance to DADS staff and providers to become Benefits Subject Matter Resource staff.
  • DRS co–chairs and participates in the legislatively mandated Employment First Task Force charged with writing and making recommendations to implement an Employment First statewide policy, and providing information and/or training to providers, stakeholders, and the general public on employment as the first option for any publicly funded service.
  • Membership and participation in Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE).
  • Representation on:
  • The Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities
  • The Council for Advising and Planning (CAP) for the Prevention and Treatment of Mental and Substance Use Disorders
  • Texas Clubhouse Coalition
  • Texas Alliance for the Mentally Ill
  • Texas Coordinating Council for Veteran Services (TCCVS)
  • Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Council (TBIAC)
  • HHSC Office of Acquired Brain Injury (OABI)
  • State Independent Living Council (SILC)
  • Texas Interagency Council for the Homeless
  • DADS Consumer Direction Workgroup
  • HHSC Medicaid/CHIP CRCG
  • Texas Technology Access Program Advisory Council (Page 244)

The Business Relations Team also developed and disseminated additional resources to Texas businesses, including a new Business Services web site, available at http://www.dars.state.tx.us/services/servicesforbusiness.shtml. This web site provides information about the benefits of partnering with DARS, including available services and business testimonials, as well as resources such as the GUIDE FOR HIRING PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES and helpful websites.

The Business Relations Team is also increasing coordination with other state and federal entities that administer employment training programs. The result of this coordination is a growth in the number of jointly held business symposia and job fairs in communities across Texas. The team’s efforts to partner with TWC, Local Workforce Development Boards, and the U.S. Department of Labor Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs will help ensure that local businesses and Texans with disabilities seeking competitive employment have the greatest level of support, resources, and services available to help them succeed. (Page 246)

Annual training on VR and independent living services to DADS Home and Community–Based Services (HCS) waiver utilization review nurses, Private Provider Association of Texas members, community center staff, including consumer benefits officers, and the Statewide Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Consortium;

  • Training on VR services and benefits and work incentives to HHSC Managed Care Organization (MCO) service coordinators and management, STAR+PLUS, and other service providers and Medicaid waiver case managers;
  • Training on DARS employment services and benefits and work incentives to members of the seven statewide mental health peer–operated support groups;
  • Training on benefits and work incentives every six months for DRS and DBS staff, long–term supports and services providers involved in the MFP employment pilot grant, and DADS and DSHS central office staff. The providers and DADS/DSHS staff get monthly follow–up training via teleconference and written materials, as well as ongoing technical assistance on specific benefits and work incentives issues;
  • A four–hour benefits overview to CRPs statewide, and currently planning with UNT to provide this overview via webinar; (Page 251)

Concern over loss of benefits is a barrier identified through multiple surveys. Staff reported low levels of knowledge of how work impacts Social Security benefits. Both staff and stakeholders expressed that concern over loss of benefits is a disincentive to work. 

Areas for Improvement 

While the consumer survey reported that consumers were satisfied with their jobs and wages, the stakeholder survey indicated dissatisfaction that was echoed in the town hall meetings. Customer service issues such as responsiveness were noted as issues. The lack of and quality of service providers (CRP providers) in some areas of the state was also a stated concern. In general, there appears to be a perception that there is too much bureaucracy that impedes the rehabilitation process, particularly related to the eligibility process. (Page 270)

DRS has a liaison with the American G.I. Forum that targets the needs of Hispanic veterans and has assigned a bilingual counselor who has completed the Social Security work incentive training to work with significantly disabled veterans drawing SSDI benefits but who want to work.

  • A number of counselors are participating in training to learn to speak other languages and attending sign language classes.
  • DRS establishes specialized caseloads for certain disabilities to help develop the expertise needed to most benefit the consumers served. (Page 286)

DRS will improve consumer employment outcomes for target populations by: 

  • Strengthening and expanding collaboration, outreach, and education with various partners to efficiently and effectively use existing resources.
  • Assessing business processes, policy, training, and organizational capacity on an ongoing basis to make consistent improvements in employment outcomes.
  • Increasing employer knowledge and awareness regarding the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
  • Increasing consumer knowledge and awareness of DRS services and benefits offered to individuals with disabilities in target populations to obtain or retain employment. (Page 291)
School to Work Transition

The VR program—currently housed at DARS, but moving to TWC on September 1, 2016—helps individuals with disabilities prepare for, find, and keep jobs, and helps students with disabilities plan the jump from school to work. Work-related services are individualized and may include counseling, training, medical treatment, assistive devices, job placement assistance, and other services.

TWC additionally promotes partnerships with employers to overcome barriers to meeting workforce needs with the creative use of technology and innovation. TWC takes steps to ensure that the staff of public schools, vocational service programs, and community-based organizations are trained and supported to assist all individuals with disabilities in achieving competitive employment. TWC also promotes the availability and accessibility of individualized training designed to prepare an individual with a disability for the individual’s preferred employment. To this end, individuals with disabilities are given the opportunity to understand and explore options for education and training, including postsecondary, graduate and postgraduate education, vocational or technical training, or other training, as pathways to employment. (Page 44)

Project SEARCH is a pre-employment training program that is a business led, one-year school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the workplace. The program includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. Project SEARCH serves students with significant intellectual and developmental disabilities. Typically, these are students who are on an IEP and in their last year of high school eligibility. The goal for these consumers is competitive employment within the business where the worksite rotations occur or at another business.

Project SEARCH has expanded from one original program site established in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital in Ohio, to over 340 sites internationally. Project SEARCH in Texas began in 2007 with Seton Healthcare Family in Austin. As of fall 2015, Texas has 17 Project SEARCH sites. Each site is led by a host of businesses and includes key partners, including DARS VR, ISDs, and CRPs. The expansion of this program in Texas is due in part to a five-year grant awarded by the Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities (TCDD). The grant pays for technical assistance from the Project SEARCH staff in Ohio that may be needed to start any new sites, as well as supporting the collaborative effort from all agencies involved. In its first year, the grant started three sites in the 2013-2014 school year, in addition to the three sites that already existed in Austin. In the 2014-2015 school year, five additional sites were added, which brought the total number of Project SEARCH sites in Texas to 17. Each Project SEARCH site typically has 8-12 participants per year. The total number of consumers participating in Project SEARCH for the 2015-2016 school year is 144. The 17 Project SEARCH sites. (Pages 247-248)

Expand initiatives like Project Search, a school-to-work internship program that provides work experience to help young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities between the ages of 18 and 22 transition to employment. One example of Project Search is the collaboration between Austin Independent School District, DARS, and the Seton Health Care family that provides internships for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

  • The 28 Workforce Development Boards (WDB) work closely with DARS and it is anticipated that the transfer of VR to TWC will enable an enhanced team approach that will benefit consumers and increase their employment outcomes.
  • For persons with IDD, they may need more time to get adjusted to the job.
  • Each activity for transition-age students should be geared to prepare them for employment and should include activities such as summer work experience opportunities. (Page 337)
Data Collection

TWC provides the main automated systems used by the local Boards and other grantees for job matching, data collection, and case management, including adult education and vocational rehabilitation, as well as child care assistance. In addition, the Boards and other grantees use a financial reporting system developed by TWC.

WorkInTexas.com - WorkInTexas.com is Texas’ Labor Exchange System, as mandated by the Wagner-Peyser Act, and operated in cooperative effort with JobCentral, the National Labor Exchange system. WorkInTexas.com is a comprehensive online job search resource and job matching system developed and maintained by TWC, and provides: (Page 82)

TWC operates a collection of different IT systems to capture participant information, services, and outcomes. Many of these systems were legacy systems that were transferred to TWC as programs were moved to the agency. TWC supports efforts to increase efficiency while maintaining quality levels of service through judicious use of resources and adhering to policy (local, state, and federal). To these ends, TWC is currently evaluating workforce system solutions in other states to better unite the case management and job search functions of our programs. As successful systems are identified, TWC and Texas Workforce Solutions look to demo their delivery with Boards. While TWC is exploring ways to either integrate or replace these systems, such changes would not be completed during the life of this plan. ( Page 118)

Consumer Satisfaction Surveys 

DRS and DBS conduct ongoing consumer satisfaction surveys in order to assess how VR consumers feel about the services they have received or are receiving. Consumers in the eligibility, in-plan, and closed phases of services are surveyed separately. The surveys are extensive, and approximately 7,500 DRS consumers and 1,024 DBS consumers completed the consumer satisfaction surveys. The reports from the 2013 surveys were submitted to DARS and RCT in January 2014. While including all of the results from the consumer satisfaction surveys does not fit the scope of this CSNA, several of the questions were particularly relevant and helped inform it. (Page 226)

While the CSNA provides insight into the needs of individuals with disabilities, there are multiple limitations in the methods that should be considered when using the findings. First, the samples used were convenience samples that cannot represent the views of any group. Second, it is unknown how technology issues impacted the completion of online surveys by screen reader users. Several individuals did call to complete phone surveys, but others may have refrained due to concerns over confidentiality. Also, given the constraints of the data collection methods used, assessment findings related to the geographical location of unserved and underserved populations in the state are limited. DRS has plans to expand the capacity and use of various data collection methods, which is expected to yield valuable information throughout the next three fiscal years. (Page 268)

The next CSNA will be the product of an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will culminate with a comprehensive report to be published in 2017.

DRS and DBS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work and RCT to engage in a continuous process of collecting and analyzing data for a robust and effective assessment of the needs of Texans with disabilities. In recognition of WIOA’s focus on students with disabilities and youth, pre-employment transition services, and supported employment, and in addition to the methodology used in the most recent CSNA, efforts going forward have been enhanced to include surveys and/or focus groups throughout the state with staff, transition-age consumers, families, TEA representatives, home-school networks, and other stakeholders. (Page 272)

The data collection and assessment process is underway for the next CSNA that will culminate with the publication of a comprehensive report in 2017. In recognition of WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and pre-employment transition services, CSNA efforts going forward have been enhanced to assess needs in these areas.

State Rehabilitation Council Support 

The RCT is the state rehabilitation council for DRS and DBS. RCT assists DARS in fulfilling the requirements of the federal Rehabilitation Act for the delivery of quality, consumer-responsive VR services. Its stated mission is: “The Rehabilitation Council of Texas, partnering with the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services, advocates for Texans with disabilities in the vocational rehabilitation process.” Funds are allocated for the operation of RCT to meet the goals and objectives set forth in its resource plan. RCT is a valued and active partner in the development of VR goals, priorities, and policies. RCT reviews, analyzes, and advises DARS about performance related to VR eligibility; the extent, scope, effectiveness of VR services; policy changes related to service delivery to VR consumers; and other functions related to the VR program performed by DARS. RCT also reviews and analyzes consumer satisfaction with VR services provided and assists DARS in developing VR State Plans and in conducting the comprehensive statewide needs assessment. (Page 288)

During fall 2013 through spring 2014, DRS, DBS, and RCT collaborated with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work to conduct a comprehensive statewide needs assessment (CSNA). The CSNA findings were initially summarized in the DRS and DBS FY 2015 State Plans for VR. They inform the 2015-2017 State Plans for VR. The next CSNA will be the product of an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will culminate with a comprehensive report to be published in 2017. DRS and DBS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work. In recognition of WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and preemployment transition services, efforts going forward have been enhanced to assess needs in these areas. (Page 293)

Development of the next CSNA has begun with an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will result in the 2017 report. DBS and DRS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work and RCT to accomplish a more robust and effective assessment of the needs of Texans with disabilities. In response to WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS), the current data collection focuses on the needs of those consumers. In addition to the methodology used in the 2014 CSNA, data collection for the 2017 CSNA includes surveys and/or focus groups throughout the state with staff, students and youth with disabilities, families, Texas Education Agency (TEA) representatives, homeschool networks, and other stakeholders. (Page 391)

Development of the next CSNA has begun with an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will result in the 2017 report. DBS and DRS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work and RCT to accomplish a more robust and effective assessment of the needs of Texans with disabilities. In response to WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS), the current data collection focuses on the needs of those consumers. In addition to the methodology used in the 2014 CSNA, data collection for the 2017 CSNA includes surveys and/or focus groups throughout the state with staff, students and youth with disabilities, families, TEA representatives, homeschool networks, and other stakeholders. (Page 402)

LIMITED ACCESS TO COMPUTERS 

A second resource in short supply that hinders rural SCSEP services is access to computers and the Internet. Low–income older job seekers often have limited or no computer skills. These skills are not only required by employers but important for participants to access the Internet, register in WorkInTexas.com and other online job search databases, and develop Internet search skills. Grantees’ field staff members, including participant staff, need access to computers for data collection and communications in a state with such extensive rural areas. Improving access to computers in rural areas will increase the amount of computer and online training available for participants. To address rural technology needs, grantees will contact local businesses, governmental agencies, public libraries, and community– and faith–based organizations regarding ongoing computer and Internet access for participants on an ongoing basis.   (Page 501)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

Under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Governor of each State must submit a Unified or Combined State Plan to the U.S. Secretary of Labor that outlines a four-year workforce development strategy for the State’s workforce development system. The publicly-funded workforce system is a national network of Federal, State, regional, and local agencies and organizations that provide a range of employment, education, training, and related services and supports to help all jobseekers secure good jobs while providing businesses with the skilled workers they need to compete in the global economy. States must have approved Unified or Combined State Plans in place to receive funding for core programs. WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

Employment Networks

DRS coordinates with the Social Security Administration to encourage CRPs to become Employment Networks (ENs) under the Ticket to Work Program. DRS and select CRPs participate in the Partnership Plus program.

Currently there are 39 active ENs in Texas that are DRS CRPs, and 30 who are Workforce Solutions Offices. Of the 3,554 tickets received by these 69 ENs, 61 percent were assigned to DRS CRP ENs. (Page 250)

Coordination with Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program 

DBS coordinates with state agencies and private providers functioning as employment networks under the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Programs by: 

  • Cooperating with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to encourage Community Rehabilitation Program providers (CRPs) to become employment networks (ENs) under the Ticket to Work Program; and
  • Providing advanced payments to CRP-ENs through the Ticket to Work Partnership Plus Program, which allows CRP-ENs to provide ongoing support or job retention services that advance employment or increase earnings after a consumer’s VR case is closed. (Page 347)

DBS uses its current partnership with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to encourage Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) providers to become employment networks (ENs) under the SSA Ticket to Work Program. DBS offers incentive payments to CRP-ENs that provide 

  1. Supported employment or job placement services during the provision of VR services, and
  2. Extended supports to Ticket to Work consumers after VR case closure in order to advance employment or increase consumer earnings. (Page 368, 369, 370, 415)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 63

Texas SB 2027: Evaluation of Regional Employment and Training Opportunities for People with Disabilities - 09/01/2017

“(A) The Health and Human Services Commission in conjunction with the Texas Workforce Commission shall conduct a study regarding occupational training programs available in this state for individuals with an intellectual disability.

(B)The study must:

determine regions in this state where the training programs should be improved or expanded; and determine strategies for placing trained individuals with intellectual disabilities into fulfilling jobs using existing or improved training programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Training Initiatives - 07/01/2017

“To provide educational opportunities to enhance services provided across the state, Texas Health and Human Services develops and provides free training. Training initiatives are based on identified needs of services providers, individuals receiving services and supports, and emerging and best practices.”

Topics include employment, SSI/SSDI benefits, Employment First, Positive Behavior Management and Support, and mental health and trauma-informed care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Medicaid Person-Centered Planning Training - 02/16/2017

This page lists the Person-Centered Planning Training Requirements for various providers, caseworkers, state employees, etc. if they are part of a planning team. It also includes a link to sign up for trainings.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Council of Developmental Disability: State Plan Goals 2017-2021 - 01/01/2017

“Goal 1: Create and support promising practices that enable people with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities and to have control over their own lives by September 30, 2021.

Goal 2: Improve and/or expand community-based systems to better support people with developmental disabilities or families of children with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities by September 30, 2021.

Goal 3: Increase the access that individuals with developmental disabilities and families of individuals with developmental disabilities have to information, training, and support to advocate for themselves and/or to collaborate with allies to impact public policy, service systems, and community supports.

Goal 4: Ensure there is ongoing support and technical assistance for the Council to identify and engage in issues according to the Council’s priorities and mission.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Health and Human Services Transformation - 09/01/2016

“In 2015, Texas Health and Human Services (HHS) began a transformation effort to produce a more efficient, effective, and responsive system. In September of 2016 the first phase of that effort became operational.

The goals of the transformation are to create a system that:

Is easier to navigate for people who need information, benefits, or services Aligns with the HHS mission, business, and statutory responsibilities Breaks down operational silos to create greater program integration Creates clear lines of accountability within the organization Develops clearly defined and objective performance metrics for all areas of the organization”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Combined State Plan for The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 07/01/2016

"Texas proposes through this Combined State Plan (plan) to implement jointly administered activities concerning the following core programs and two optional programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA):

The Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs The Wagner-Peyser Employment Service (ES) program, including the Agricultural Outreach Plan The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act program The Vocational Rehabilitation program The Senior Community Service Employment Program"
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education

Texas Home Living Program (TxHmL) - Amended Rules Effective 3/2016 - 03/20/2016

“The Texas Home Living (TxHmL) program provides selected essential services and supports to people with an intellectual disability or a related condition who live in their own home or their family's home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Youth Empowerment Services (YES) Waiver Program Payment Rates - 03/15/2016

Public comments will be received on proposed payment rates for Supported Employment and Employment Assistance provided under the Youth Empowerment Services (YES) waiver program operated by the Department of State Health Services (DSHS). The revised payment rates are proposed to be effective March 15, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Employment First Policy - 02/26/2016

“The Health and Human Services Commission acknowledges the policy of the state, as set forth in Texas Government Code §531.02447, that earning a living wage through integrated, competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.  The health and human services (HHS) agencies will promote integrated, competitive employment of individuals with disabilities and affirm they are capable of meeting the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as other working-age adults by incorporating the Employment First policy and guiding principles in to agency policies, procedures, and rules.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

TX Health and Human Services Commission: General Provisions - 09/01/2015

“It is the policy of the state that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Texas SB 2027: Evaluation of Regional Employment and Training Opportunities for People with Disabilities - 09/01/2017

“(A) The Health and Human Services Commission in conjunction with the Texas Workforce Commission shall conduct a study regarding occupational training programs available in this state for individuals with an intellectual disability.

(B)The study must:

determine regions in this state where the training programs should be improved or expanded; and determine strategies for placing trained individuals with intellectual disabilities into fulfilling jobs using existing or improved training programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

TX Health and Human Services Commission: General Provisions - 09/01/2015

“It is the policy of the state that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas SB 1664 (ABLE Act) - 06/19/2015

"An act relating to the establishment of the Texas Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program…(1) to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, and (2) to provide secure funding for qualified disability expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act, the Supplemental Security Income program under title XVI of the Social Security Act, the beneficiary's employment, and other sources."

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Texas SB 1664 - 06/19/2015

"An act relating to the establishment of the Texas Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program…(1) to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, and (2) to provide secure funding for qualified disability expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act, the Supplemental Security Income program under title XVI of the Social Security Act, the beneficiary's employment, and other sources."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Texas SB 7: Enacting Community First Choice - 06/14/2013

“AN ACT relating to improving the delivery and quality of certain health and human services, including the delivery and quality of Medicaid acute care services and long-term services and supports.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

2013 Employment Assistance and Supported Employment Bill - 06/14/2013

This acts relates to the provision of employment assistance and supported employment to certain Medicaid waiver program participants. Assistance includes providing assistance to an individual that helps them locate paid employment in the community.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Texas 2013 Employment First Bill (S.B 1226) - 06/14/2013

The act establishes an employment-first policy and task force to promote integrated competitive employment opportunities that provide a living wage for individuals with disabilities. The Texas Education Agency and the Texas Workforce Commission will jointly adopt and implement the policy.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Human Resources Code Section 32.075 (Employment Assistance)

This code defines “Employment assistance” as, “assistance provided to an individual to help the individual locate paid employment in the community.” It defines “Supported employment” as, “assistance provided, in order to sustain paid employment, to an individual who, because of a disability, requires intensive, ongoing support to be self-employed, work from home, or perform in a work setting at which individuals without disabilities are employed. Supported employment includes adaptations, supervision, and training related to an individual's diagnosis.” It also lists the medical assistance waivers to which Supported Employment applies.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Human Resources Code, Section 121.003

This code addresses discrimination that is prohibited by law in the state of Texas, especially pertaining to people with disabilities. Among other measures, it specifically states that, “It is the policy of the state that persons with disabilities be employed by the state, by political subdivisions of the state, in the public schools, and in all other employment supported in whole or in part by public funds on the same terms and conditions as persons without disabilities, unless it is shown that there is no reasonable accommodation that would enable a person with a disability to perform the essential elements of a job.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Texas Labor Code, Sections 21.051 - 21.061 (Disability Discrimination)

This labor code states that an employer, employment agency or labor organization commits an unlawful act if it discriminates against individuals due to a disability or segregates or classifies them in a manner that would deprive them of an employment opportunity or otherwise adversely affect their status as an employee.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

Texas Council of Developmental Disability: State Plan Goals 2017-2021 - 01/01/2017

“Goal 1: Create and support promising practices that enable people with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities and to have control over their own lives by September 30, 2021.

Goal 2: Improve and/or expand community-based systems to better support people with developmental disabilities or families of children with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities by September 30, 2021.

Goal 3: Increase the access that individuals with developmental disabilities and families of individuals with developmental disabilities have to information, training, and support to advocate for themselves and/or to collaborate with allies to impact public policy, service systems, and community supports.

Goal 4: Ensure there is ongoing support and technical assistance for the Council to identify and engage in issues according to the Council’s priorities and mission.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Health and Human Services Transformation - 09/01/2016

“In 2015, Texas Health and Human Services (HHS) began a transformation effort to produce a more efficient, effective, and responsive system. In September of 2016 the first phase of that effort became operational.

The goals of the transformation are to create a system that:

Is easier to navigate for people who need information, benefits, or services Aligns with the HHS mission, business, and statutory responsibilities Breaks down operational silos to create greater program integration Creates clear lines of accountability within the organization Develops clearly defined and objective performance metrics for all areas of the organization”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Employment First Policy - 02/26/2016

“The Health and Human Services Commission acknowledges the policy of the state, as set forth in Texas Government Code §531.02447, that earning a living wage through integrated, competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.  The health and human services (HHS) agencies will promote integrated, competitive employment of individuals with disabilities and affirm they are capable of meeting the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as other working-age adults by incorporating the Employment First policy and guiding principles in to agency policies, procedures, and rules.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Texas Department of Aging and Disabilities (DADs) Guide to Employment for People with Disabilities - 05/01/2015

“The purpose of this guide is to provide information on how to support and assist working-age people with disabilities who are receiving DADS services to obtain and maintain competitive, integrated employment. Through this guide, DADS intends to provide information on best practices and resources that can help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. The guide includes success stories of people with disabilities who, as a result of receiving the appropriate supports and services, have secured fulfilling employment...”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Education Agency Employment First Policy - 03/25/2015

“TEA hereby adopts the state's policy that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits. TEA will evaluate recommendations made by the Employment-First Task Force and will adopt rules as necessary that are consistent with the policy.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas FY 2015 Plans for Vocational Rehabilitation and Supported Employment Services Programs - 09/30/2014

“The Division for Rehabilitation Services (DRS) recognizes that collaboration with community organizations and other state agencies is essential to achieving successful employment outcomes for consumers with the most significant disabilities. DRS seeks opportunities to identify, develop, and implement cooperative agreements with other state agencies and appropriate entities, particularly when these agreements establish a framework to assist with the provision of supported employment services and extended services for consumers with the most significant disabilities.

Plans for Improving Supported Employment Services: DRS plans to…develop and implement an improved benchmark system for the provision of specific supported employment services statewide; explore complimentary services for specific populations like persons with autism and mental health diagnoses; develop a supported employment technical assistance training model for DRS staff members to improve their ability to determine when supported employment services are needed; and develop tools that will help staff members monitor and provide guidance to supported employment contract providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DARS Provider Supported Self-Employment Diagram - 02/15/2011

This diagram serves as a guide for Dept. of Assistive and Rehabilitation Services providers for the process of supported employment, It contains guidelines and benchmarks, including an emphasis on the process of Discovery.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Workforce Commission Employment First Policy

“TWC will promote competitive employment of individuals with disabilities and the expectation that they are able to meet the same employment standards, responsibilities and expectations as other working-age adults. TWC acknowledges that it is the policy of the state, as set forth in Texas Government Code §531.02447, ‘that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.’”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Guide For Hiring People With Disability

The Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), in conjunction with Office of the Federal Contract Compliance Program (OFCCP) and a group of local businesses has produced this guide on attracting and hiring people with disabilities. DARS works in partnership with Texans with disabilities and families with children who have developmental delays to improve the quality of their lives and to enable their full participation in society. The DARS Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program helps people with disabilities to prepare for, find and keep employment. DARS services can reduce the need for support from other public benefits and services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Texas Combined State Plan for The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 07/01/2016

"Texas proposes through this Combined State Plan (plan) to implement jointly administered activities concerning the following core programs and two optional programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA):

The Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs The Wagner-Peyser Employment Service (ES) program, including the Agricultural Outreach Plan The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act program The Vocational Rehabilitation program The Senior Community Service Employment Program"
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education

Texas State Plans for VR Services and Supported Employment Services Programs - 09/30/2014

“The Division for Rehabilitation Services (DRS) recognizes that collaboration with community organizations and other state agencies is essential to achieving successful employment outcomes for consumers with the most significant disabilities. DRS seeks opportunities to identify, develop, and implement cooperative agreements with other state agencies and appropriate entities, particularly when these agreements establish a framework to assist with the provision of supported employment services and extended services for consumers with the most significant disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Task Force Home Page

The Employment First Task Force, authorized by Senate Bill 1226 (83rd Legislature, Regular Session, 2013), was established by the Texas Health and Human Services Commission executive commissioner to promote competitive employment of people with disabilities and the expectation that individuals with disabilities are able to meet the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as any other working-age adult.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Dept of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services and Dept of Aging and Disability Services MOA

Recognizing the need to coordinate the provision of services to individuals receiving services from the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) who may be eligible for or are receiving Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) or Independent Living (IL) services from the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), DARS and DADS enter into this Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) in accordance with the provisions of CFR §361.53(d) and 111.0525(b) of the Texas Human Resources Code. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Texas Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2012

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

In FY2012, Texas was awarded an EDI grant for an expansion of supported employment through Consumer Operated Services Programs.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Texas Medicaid Balancing Incentives Program - 09/04/2012

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) partner in implementing The Balancing Incentive Program (BIP), which “increases the Federal Matching Assistance Percentage to participating states through September 2015 in exchange for states making certain structural reforms to increase access to Medicaid community based long-term services and supports (LTSS).”    “These required structural reforms include…   • implementing a "no wrong door" eligibility and enrollment system;    • developing core standardized assessment instruments; and    • ensuring case management activities are conflict free.”   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Ticket to Work - 06/25/2008

“Under the Ticket to Work Program and Title II and Title XVI of the Act, SSA issues “tickets” to SSDI and SSI blind or disabled beneficiaries. In this voluntary program, each beneficiary who receives a ticket can use it to obtain services from a provider, known as an employment network (EN), or from a state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agency. The VR agency in Texas is the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS)…

The intent of the Ticket to Work Program is to…establish a system in which qualified ENs provide employment and other support services (e.g., case management, benefits counseling, and job training); provide individualized tickets to beneficiaries for the “purchase” of services from approved ENs; and give beneficiaries a real choice in obtaining the services, education, and technology needed to find, enter, and maintain employment within an expanding universe of service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Customized Employment Grant (Transition Adjustment and Career Education/TACE)

The demonstration project was conducted in local workforce development centers across the state.  It was designed to, “To enhance the capability of One-Stop Career Centers to deliver services to people with disabilities, bridging education and job development with customized employment services” by integrating customized employment services with existing services, creating customized employment opportunities for people with disabilities and increasing the capacity of centers and its partners to provide high-quality customized employment services through intensive staff training (e.g., developing a capacity building curriculum).

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Training and Technical Assistance to Providers (T-TAP)

“T-TAP is a national training and technical assistance center to help community rehabilitation providers make the transition from providing segregated employment services to finding people with disabilities jobs in the community. The specific target audience is employment agencies that hold 14(c) subminimum wage certificates, which allow employers to pay people less than minimum wage and are typically used in the disability field to pay workers piece rates at sheltered workshops. Activities include online courses, satellite telecasts, regional employment forums, intensive consultation to selected agencies, and policy research. The Institute for Community Inclusion and Virginia Commonwealth University work in partnership on this project. T-TAP [was] funded from 2002 to 2007 by the Office of Disability and Employment Policy at the U.S. Department of Labor.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Customized Employment Grant (Transition Adjustment and Career Education/TACE)

The demonstration project was conducted in local workforce development centers across the state. It was designed to, “To enhance the capability of One-Stop Career Centers to deliver services to people with disabilities, bridging education and job development with customized employment services” by integrating customized employment services with existing services, creating customized employment opportunities for people with disabilities and increasing the capacity of centers and its partners to provide high-quality customized employment services through intensive staff training (e.g., developing a capacity building curriculum).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Medicaid Buy-In Program

The program “offers low-cost Medicaid health care services — including community-based services and supports to working people with a disability. Some people might have to pay a monthly fee” to receive services which include but not limited to:  • Doctor / clinic visits  • Mental health care  • Occupational therapy (help learning how to do everyday tasks)  • X-rays  • Physical therapy (help learning how to move around better or become stronger)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Money Follows The Person

“The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) will receive approximately $33.6 million in new funding over the next five years, which will be paired with existing state and federal funding for a total of $143 million. The agency will use the money to enhance its successful Money Follows the Person (MFP) initiative and expand its effort for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and persons with behavioral health needs.

The MFP initiative helps people who are receiving long-term services and supports in a nursing facility return to the community to receive their services without having to be placed on a community services interest list.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Training Initiatives - 07/01/2017

“To provide educational opportunities to enhance services provided across the state, Texas Health and Human Services develops and provides free training. Training initiatives are based on identified needs of services providers, individuals receiving services and supports, and emerging and best practices.”

Topics include employment, SSI/SSDI benefits, Employment First, Positive Behavior Management and Support, and mental health and trauma-informed care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Medicaid Person-Centered Planning Training - 02/16/2017

This page lists the Person-Centered Planning Training Requirements for various providers, caseworkers, state employees, etc. if they are part of a planning team. It also includes a link to sign up for trainings.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Texas Customized Self-Employment Project: The Customized Employment Plan Design

This presentation describes Customized Employment as “a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both.”  It focuses heavily on the processes and value of Discovery in the employment process.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

The Texas Customized Self-Employment Project

This presentation presents Self-Employment as a viable employment option for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Texas Department of Assistive & Rehabilitative Services (DARS) Customized Self-Employment System Development Initiative

“This proposal is designed to support and implement the phased development of a financially, technically and programmatically viable system of TX DARS for prospective business owners in TX with disabilities, who require customized employment services and are applying for, or receiving, DARS counseling and services to develop small businesses.   Specifically, this initiative is designed to research, identify and develop an outcome payment model and rate structure for customized self-employment, including: DARS Counselor CRC certification level, online and onsite training and technical assistance; and, intensive multi-certification, online and onsite training for DARS vendors throughout the state of Texas.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Texas Transition and Employment Guide

This transition and employment guide is for you, the student in Texas public school, who may have received special education services due to a disability. It also provides helpful information for your parents. This guide has steps you and your parents can take to make sure you are able to find the right work or educational choices for you after high school. It also tells you where to get the services you will need after high school.    The guide is divided into sections on Self Advocacy, Transition Services, Employment and Supported Employment, Social Security Programs, Community and Long Term Services and Supports, Postsecondary Educational Programs and Services, Information Sharing, and Guardianship and Alternatives. Each section has phone numbers, emails, and websites to help you find what you need. At the end of each section and at the end of the guide, you will find a timeline of steps that you and your parents can take as you make the transition from student to adult.”  
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Wal-Mart to Pay $150,000 to Settle EEOC Age and Disability Discrimination Suit - 02/19/2015

“Under the terms of the two-year consent decree settling the case, Wal-Mart will pay $150,000 in relief to Moorman. In addition, Wal-Mart agreed to provide training for employees on the ADA and the ADEA. The training will include an instruction on the kind of conduct that may constitute unlawful discrimination or harassment, as well as an instruction on Wal-Mart's procedures for handling requests for reasonable accommodations under the ADA. Wal-Mart will also report to the EEOC regarding its compliance with the consent decree and post a notice to employees about the settlement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Texas Wendy’s Consent Decree - 10/10/2012

“Under the terms of the two-year consent decree settling the case, Wendy's will pay $41,500 in relief to a person who applied to a job with the company, but was denied despite his qualifications. “In addition, Wendy's has agreed to provide training for all managers and supervisory employees, including its company president, on the ADA. The training will include a discussion related to hiring individuals with disabilities. In addition, the training will include a specific instruction on communication devices, such as the use of the Texas Relay System or video relay service regarding communication between Wendy's employees and applicants with hearing impairments.’“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Texas Steward et. al. v. Perry et. al (2013)

“On August 19, 2013, the United States, private Plaintiffs and the State of Texas filed an Interim Settlement Agreement to enable Texans with intellectual and other developmental disabilities to live in the community rather than nursing facilities. The Interim Settlement Agreement is awaiting court approval…[It] partially addresses the Civil Rights Division's finding that the State of Texas failed to serve individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the most integrated setting appropriate to those individuals' needs, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Olmstead v. L.C.” “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Texas Home Living Program (TxHmL) - Amended Rules Effective 3/2016 - 03/20/2016

“The Texas Home Living (TxHmL) program provides selected essential services and supports to people with an intellectual disability or a related condition who live in their own home or their family's home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Youth Empowerment Services (YES) Waiver Program Payment Rates - 03/15/2016

Public comments will be received on proposed payment rates for Supported Employment and Employment Assistance provided under the Youth Empowerment Services (YES) waiver program operated by the Department of State Health Services (DSHS). The revised payment rates are proposed to be effective March 15, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Community First Choice - 06/01/2015

“Senate Bill 7 from the 2013 Texas Legislature requires the Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) to put in place a cost-effective option for attendant and habilitation services for people with disabilities who have STAR+PLUS Medicaid coverage.

A federal option, called Community First Choice, allows states to provide home and community-based attendant services and supports to Medicaid recipients with disabilities. This option provides states with a 6 percent increase in federal matching funds for Medicaid for these services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Balancing Incentives Program - 09/04/2012

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) partner in implementing The Balancing Incentive Program (BIP), which “increases the Federal Matching Assistance Percentage to participating states through September 2015 in exchange for states making certain structural reforms to increase access to Medicaid community based long-term services and supports (LTSS).”    “These required structural reforms include…implementing a "no wrong door" eligibility and enrollment system; developing core standardized assessment instruments; and ensuring case management activities are conflict free.”   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Buy-In Program

The program “offers low-cost Medicaid health care services — including community-based services and supports to working people with a disability. Some people might have to pay a monthly fee” to receive services which include but not limited to:    • Doctor / clinic visits     • Mental health care     • Occupational therapy (help learning how to do everyday tasks)    • X-rays     • Physical therapy (help learning how to move around better or become stronger)  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Money Follows The Person

“The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) will receive approximately $33.6 million in new funding over the next five years, which will be paired with existing state and federal funding for a total of $143 million. The agency will use the money to enhance its successful Money Follows the Person (MFP) initiative and expand its effort for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and persons with behavioral health needs.”   “The MFP initiative helps people who are receiving long-term services and supports in a nursing facility return to the community to receive their services without having to be placed on a community services interest list.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Medicaid State Plan

The state plan is the officially recognized document describing the nature and scope of the State of Texas Medicaid program. As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act, the plan was developed by the state and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Essentially, the plan is the state's agreement that it will conform to the requirements of the Social Security Act and the official issuances of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas HCBS Transition Plan

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has released a final rule that defines the settings in which states can offer Medicaid Home and Community Based Services (HCBS). This website will serve as a place where you can submit comments about the rule and the way its provisions will be set up within Texas Medicaid.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Youth Empowerment Services

“The Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Department of State Health Services (DSHS) developed the Youth Empowerment Services (YES) Waiver, which provides comprehensive home and community-based mental health services to youth between the ages of 3 and 18, up to a youth's 19th birthday, who have a serious emotional disturbance. The YES Waiver not only provides flexible supports and specialized services to children and youth at risk of institutionalization and/or out-of-home placement due to their serious emotional disturbance, but also strives to provide hope to families by offering services aimed at keeping children and youth in their homes and communities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“HCS provides individualized services and supports to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities who are living with their family, in their own home or in other community settings, such as small group homes.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Everything's Bigger in Texas, including the number of job options in integrated settings at competitive wages for individuals with disabilities. The Lone Star state is a place where anyone, including those with disabilities, can live the American Dream… Deep in the Heart of Texas! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Texas' VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.86%
Change from
2014 to 2015
27,469,114
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.01%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,584,428
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.04%
Change from
2014 to 2015
626,445
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.97%
Change from
2014 to 2015
39.54%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.01%
Change from
2014 to 2015
75.28%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 26,448,193 26,956,958 27,469,114
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,602,460 1,616,223 1,584,428
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 619,692 613,660 626,445
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 10,802,460 11,106,300 11,346,637
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 38.67% 37.97% 39.54%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.69% 75.29% 75.28%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.20% 5.10% 4.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.00% 22.10% 20.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.80% 16.60% 15.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,489,714 1,497,762 1,524,865
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 1,557,444 1,603,277 1,601,481
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,333,668 2,392,261 2,402,094
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 412,755 422,849 425,070
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 964,494 978,202 984,782
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 19,256 18,845 19,232
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 61,371 64,338 73,273
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,576 1,771 1,634
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 71,164 69,100 71,874
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 146,368 131,875 133,169

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 17,346 18,624 19,684
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.10% 3.30% 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 574,276 574,012 569,586

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 24,957 30,553 35,158
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 53,929 60,533 66,891
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 165,862 173,707 185,621
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.00% 17.60% 18.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.20% 4.60% 6.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10% 4.80% 5.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.70% 1.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 44.00% 43.50% 38.90%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 7,341 11,116 17,078
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 7,286 11,549 15,079
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,250 4,148 4,552
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 102,092 104,481 100,400

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 45,361 53,307 54,851
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 483 687 633
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 232 346 365
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 48.00% 50.00% 58.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.89 1.31 1.33

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
20,692
N/A
20,127
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 14 N/A 32
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 3,999 N/A 4,564
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 7,132 N/A 6,449
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 5,018 N/A 4,782
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 3,408 N/A 3,375
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,121 N/A 925
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 37.70% 41.80% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 21,430 19,773
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 914,022 916,755
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 780 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 607 658 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $4,236,000 $966,000 $5,842,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $99,239,000 $116,626,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $142,770,000 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 4.00% 8.00% 11.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 15,706 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A 616 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A 24,650 25,599
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 7.50 14.40 11.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.00% 66.17% 67.53%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.00% 13.93% 14.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.00% 1.19% 1.22%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.70% 99.74% 99.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 27.00% 26.77% 24.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.00% 61.55% 54.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 69.00% 71.65% 67.36%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.00% 34.77% 29.24%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 7,034,752
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 6,822
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,436,521
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 4,235,134
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 5,671,655
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 1,090
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,482
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 4,572
AbilityOne wages (products). $12,142,783
AbilityOne wages (services). $54,025,955

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 2 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 6 1 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 104 105 72
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 4 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 112 76
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 19 17
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 8,938 5,605
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 856 618
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 9,814 6,240

 

WIOA Proflie

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

At the federal, state, and local levels, TWC continues to make great strides toward a streamlined and coordinated one-stop delivery system serving adults and youth with disabilities and employers that employ these individuals. TWC’s executive director and the commissioner of assistive and rehabilitative services (transferred to TWC as of September 2016) participate as ex officio members of the Governor’s Committee on People with Disabilities. TWC also serves on state-level interagency councils and workgroups supporting gateways for individuals with disabilities, such as the Employment First Task Force and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services’ (DADS) Promoting Independence Advisory Council. Other memberships have included the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services’ (DARS) Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Advisory Council, and HHSC’s House Bill 1230 Workgroup on Transition Services for Youth with Disabilities. TWC will also continue to coordinate with the State Independent Living Council (SILC) and the Centers for Independent Living (CILs) to serve mutual consumers who need employment assistance as well as assistance with independent living resources. In this vein, TWC has collaborated with a number of agencies in developing guidance, such as a transition and employment guide for Texas students with disabilities. (Page 72)

  • DRS co–chairs and participates in the legislatively mandated Employment First Task Force charged with writing and making recommendations to implement an Employment First statewide policy, and providing information and/or training to providers, stakeholders, and the general public on employment as the first option for any publicly funded service.
  • Membership and participation in Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE).
  • Representation on:
  • The Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities
  • The Council for Advising and Planning (CAP) for the Prevention and Treatment of Mental and Substance Use Disorders
  • Texas Clubhouse Coalition
  • Texas Alliance for the Mentally Ill
  • Texas Coordinating Council for Veteran Services (TCCVS)
  • Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Council (TBIAC)
  • HHSC Office of Acquired Brain Injury (OABI)
  • State Independent Living Council (SILC)
  • Texas Interagency Council for the Homeless
  • DADS Consumer Direction Workgroup
  • HHSC Medicaid/CHIP CRCG
  • Texas Technology Access Program Advisory Council (Page 244)

Also, DARS co-chairs the Employment First Task Force (EFTF), which was created as a result of SB 1226 and was passed by the 83rd Texas Legislature (2013). The EFTF consists of 26 members (seven represent state agencies) appointed by the HHSC executive commissioner. The purpose of the EFTF is to promote competitive employment of individuals with disabilities, with the expectation that individuals with disabilities are able to meet the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as any other working-age adult.

The 83rd legislature established Employment First Policy for Texas, which makes competitive employment and earning a living wage a priority and the preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.

The EFTF’s responsibilities include designing an education and outreach process, developing recommendations for policy, procedure, and rule changes necessary to implement the employment first policy, and providing reports to the governor’s office, Texas legislature, and HHSC executive commissioner. The first report was submitted in Fall 2014. The next report is due in the fall of 2016. (Page 300)

Customized Employment

DRS ensures that staff are well–qualified to assist individuals with disabilities. There is emphasis of educational requirements at the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral levels, in fields related to rehabilitation. However, the degree field may include other degrees that prepare individuals to work with consumers and employers. For example, bachelor degrees might include not only vocational rehabilitation counseling, but also social work, psychology, disability studies, business administration, human resources, special education, supported employment, customized employment, economics, or another field that reasonably prepares individuals to work with consumers and employers. For individuals hired at the bachelor’s level, there is a requirement for at least one year of paid or unpaid experience related to direct work with individuals with disabilities. (Page 258)

  • Continued focus on the foundations of the VR process for counselors and RSTs, including accurate eligibility determination, inclusion of consumers in planning for service delivery, thorough assessing and planning practices, models for vocational counseling, informed consumer choice, service to culturally diverse populations, good purchasing practices, supported employment, customized employment and other strategies for quality employment assistance, service delivery, and effective case note documentation;
  • Training in working with employers and consumers to increase knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998, the Olmstead decision, available independence initiatives, and VR participation in the Workforce Investment Act to enhance employment options and employment knowledge; (Page 260 All)
Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

Achieving excellence in accessibility is based on three core principles: 

  • ensuring that all customers can effectively use workforce products and services;
  • creating a workspace accessible for individuals with disabilities; and
  • complying with all federal and state legal requirements (Page 127) 

Determine compliance with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA §188. Both programmatic and physical accessibility are addressed during an EO compliance review.

As recipients of WIOA funding, Boards are monitored on-site based on a three-year rotation schedule, as referenced in the State Methods of Administration (MOA) maintained on file with DOL’s Civil Rights Center (DOL-CRC). All 28 Boards are scheduled for an EO review within a designated three-year period. Dates for EO monitoring reviews generally align with those of the TWC’s annual Board monitoring review. (Page 128)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

DRS program specialists provide the following training:

  • Annual training on VR and independent living services to DADS Home and Community–Based Services (HCS) waiver utilization review nurses, Private Provider Association of Texas members, community center staff, including consumer benefits officers, and the Statewide Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Consortium;
  • Training on VR services and benefits and work incentives to HHSC Managed Care Organization (MCO) service coordinators and management, STAR+PLUS, and other service providers and Medicaid waiver case managers;
  • Training on DARS employment services and benefits and work incentives to members of the seven statewide mental health peer–operated support groups;
  • Training on benefits and work incentives every six months for DRS and DBS staff, long–term supports and services providers involved in the MFP employment pilot grant, and DADS and DSHS central office staff. The providers and DADS/DSHS staff get monthly follow–up training via teleconference and written materials, as well as ongoing technical assistance on specific benefits and work incentives issues;
  • A four–hour benefits overview to CRPs statewide, and currently planning with UNT to provide this overview via webinar;
  • Overview of benefits and work incentives to DADS staff, providers, and other community stakeholders throughout the year;
  • Overview to DADS service coordinators, case managers, private providers, and other staff on DRS VR services and best practices for mutually served consumers;
  • Overview of Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) to community partners;
  • Training to CRPs statewide on best practices in the provision of employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities; and
  • Training on Assistive Technology to community partners. (Page 251)

Result in competitive integrated employment outcomes for VR consumers by: 

  • Developing and implementing agency-wide business strategies with a regional focus that creates a unified comprehensive approach to business development, including working with DRS on a new statewide joint Business Relations Team, the formation of regional Outreach Services and Coordination Teams, and the development and joint use of a new business database tracking tool;
  • Providing Employment Assistance Training to staff, to instruct on how to best contact and meet the needs of our business partners;
  • Identifying and accessing higher wage employment opportunities by aligning DBS/DRS business development activities and consumer service provisions to maximize high wage opportunities. This is the goal of the current DBS Work Matters project; and
  • Aligning counseling critical thinking processes around employment opportunities and data to engage consumers in defining their optimal vocational opportunities. During FFY 2015, DBS began a pilot project within the Austin Regional Office in an effort to begin initiating this particular strategy. 

Success will be measured by: 

  • An increase of employers being served by DARS;
  • An increase of successful employment outcomes for DBS consumers;
  • A positive impact on consumer salaries by increasing weekly wages;
  • Maximizing consumer potential and capabilities based on their job readiness; and
  • Increasing job placement vendor effectiveness in matching consumer abilities with employment opportunities. (Page 425)

A pilot program in the Austin region teaches a systematic decision-making process to staff, which includes tools to provide consumers with accurate labor market data and jobs in their geographic area. This process helps consumers make a decision using criteria set forth by the consumer based on data from several resources.

S&I Measure 1.2: Of the individuals exiting the VR program after receiving services, a minimum of 68.9 percent will have achieved an employment outcome. 

  • Performance: In 2015, 75.20 percent of the individuals exiting the DBS VR program after receiving services achieved an employment outcome. (S&I Report) 

To maintain satisfactory performance on this indicator, DBS continues training and reinforcement of the appropriate use of

  1. Extended evaluation to serve consumers with the most significant disabilities and
  2. A thorough comprehensive assessment before VR Counselors develop the individualized plan for employment. DARS is also developing additional tools for counselors to use during situational assessments to improve the information obtained to inform eligibility decisions. (Page 453)
Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

TWC plans to continue to emphasize the availability of a variety of financial literacy activities into the service-delivery strategy within the one-stop delivery system. Under WIOA, states are encouraged to develop and implement strategies for workforce areas to use to coordinate financial literacy services to participants and provide financial literacy activities to youth. TWC agrees with the need for services that foster financial education and literacy services, including financial capability, and encourages partnerships and contracts between Boards and the agencies delivering them.

Comment 6: The Texas State Independent Living Council (SILC) supports the state plan with the following additions.

  • A Coordination of Independent Living section should be added, with the role of SILC and Texas’ Centers for Independent Living (CIL) expressly stated. ( Page 135)

TWC allocates youth formula funds to Boards, that in turn contract with service providers to deliver services to youth in their respective workforce areas. Boards are required to meet all federal and state programmatic requirements. TWC maintains a rigorous performance and accountability system, holding Boards accountable for their performance as it pertains to the youth program as it does with other workforce programs, and Boards have rigorous standards in place for their contracted service providers. Boards must ensure that all 14 program elements—including new WIOA program elements such as financial literacy and services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in workforce areas—are available to youth participants. (Page 163)

Benefits

Approximately 12 percent of the Texas population is estimated to have some type of disability. TWC is committed to providing services to this population; TWC promotes competitive employment of individuals with disabilities coupled with the expectation that they are able to meet the same employment standards and responsibilities as other working-age adults. All working-age individuals with disabilities, including young adults, are offered factual information regarding employment as an individual with a disability, including the relationship between an individual’s earned income and the individual’s public benefits.

The VR program—currently housed at DARS, but moving to TWC on September 1, 2016—helps individuals with disabilities prepare for, find, and keep jobs, and helps students with disabilities plan the jump from school to work. Work-related services are individualized and may include counseling, training, medical treatment, assistive devices, job placement assistance, and other services. (Page 44)

  • Custodial parents are 21 percent less likely to receive TANF benefits; and
  • More than $191 million in child support was collected through August 2015, some of which was used to repay TANF, Medicaid, foster care, and child support collections programs. (Page 64)

Helping customers with disabilities in a Workforce Solutions Office environment; 

  • Resources and funding sources for support services and employment accommodations; and
  • The effects that employment may have on Social Security disability benefits. (Page 129)

Workforce areas that provide quality services will have access to additional resources to meet the employers’ needs, job seekers, and incumbent workers. Additionally, the waiver will allow TWC to continue to promote the cost benefits of improved administrative efficiencies, encouraging the increased leveraging of resources within the workforce areas. As a result, TWC will increase services such as enhanced education, employment, and training opportunities for disadvantaged populations and individuals with multiple barriers to employment. (Page 174)

DRS develops partnerships with schools and community organizations to help students with disabilities make a smooth transition to adulthood and work. DRS has counselors throughout the state that have a role in preparing students with disabilities for entry into the workplace. VR counselors coordinate closely with high schools to ensure appropriate students are referred to the VR program. Counselors work with schools to identify students receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) as early as possible in the process to address concerns regarding impact of employment on benefits and to provide resources for benefits counseling.

VR counselors have flexible work schedules that allow them to participate in school activities, parent meetings, community forums, summer skill-building activities, job clubs, etc. (Page 238)

DARS is currently in the process of collaborating with TEA to update the Letter of Agreement, including the addition of pre-employment transition services as defined in §361.48 and other requirements of WIOA, operationalizing a referral process of students with the highest needs, and a process for invitations to Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) meetings. The final agreement will be between TEA and TWC following the transfer of the VR program in FFY’17 as required by SB 208. Counselors work with schools to identify students receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) as early as possible in the process to address concerns regarding impact of employment on benefits and to provide resources for benefits counseling. DRS has specialty TVRCs and VRCs who are liaisons for high schools and partner with the educational system to more appropriately serve transition-age students seeking assistance to access adult vocational services. Partnering with ISDs allows counselors to use office space on campus to ensure that student consumers have access to resources available through the workforce investment system, community, businesses, and other partners necessary to build a network of support. VR counselors use various tools and strategies in their coordination with schools. The School Plan is a tool available to counselors for planning with their assigned schools. It provides an outline for open communication about each party’s expectations and goals for the school year. Counselors are encouraged to develop a School Plan with each assigned school before that school year begins, and update it as necessary throughout the year. (Page 240)

DRS works with DADS and HHSC Medicaid/CHIP to ensure service definitions in the 1915(c) home– and community–based waivers accurately reflect Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and Rehabilitation Services Administration regulations. This partnership allows services that result in competitive employment to be delivered efficiently and timely through the payor of first resort.

  • DRS provides annual training to DSHS Community Benefits Officers on SSI and SSDI benefits and work incentives and offers free intensive training and technical assistance to DADS staff and providers to become Benefits Subject Matter Resource staff.
  • DRS co–chairs and participates in the legislatively mandated Employment First Task Force charged with writing and making recommendations to implement an Employment First statewide policy, and providing information and/or training to providers, stakeholders, and the general public on employment as the first option for any publicly funded service.
  • Membership and participation in Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE).
  • Representation on:
  • The Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities
  • The Council for Advising and Planning (CAP) for the Prevention and Treatment of Mental and Substance Use Disorders
  • Texas Clubhouse Coalition
  • Texas Alliance for the Mentally Ill
  • Texas Coordinating Council for Veteran Services (TCCVS)
  • Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Council (TBIAC)
  • HHSC Office of Acquired Brain Injury (OABI)
  • State Independent Living Council (SILC)
  • Texas Interagency Council for the Homeless
  • DADS Consumer Direction Workgroup
  • HHSC Medicaid/CHIP CRCG
  • Texas Technology Access Program Advisory Council (Page 244)

The Business Relations Team also developed and disseminated additional resources to Texas businesses, including a new Business Services web site, available at http://www.dars.state.tx.us/services/servicesforbusiness.shtml. This web site provides information about the benefits of partnering with DARS, including available services and business testimonials, as well as resources such as the GUIDE FOR HIRING PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES and helpful websites.

The Business Relations Team is also increasing coordination with other state and federal entities that administer employment training programs. The result of this coordination is a growth in the number of jointly held business symposia and job fairs in communities across Texas. The team’s efforts to partner with TWC, Local Workforce Development Boards, and the U.S. Department of Labor Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs will help ensure that local businesses and Texans with disabilities seeking competitive employment have the greatest level of support, resources, and services available to help them succeed. (Page 246)

Annual training on VR and independent living services to DADS Home and Community–Based Services (HCS) waiver utilization review nurses, Private Provider Association of Texas members, community center staff, including consumer benefits officers, and the Statewide Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Consortium;

  • Training on VR services and benefits and work incentives to HHSC Managed Care Organization (MCO) service coordinators and management, STAR+PLUS, and other service providers and Medicaid waiver case managers;
  • Training on DARS employment services and benefits and work incentives to members of the seven statewide mental health peer–operated support groups;
  • Training on benefits and work incentives every six months for DRS and DBS staff, long–term supports and services providers involved in the MFP employment pilot grant, and DADS and DSHS central office staff. The providers and DADS/DSHS staff get monthly follow–up training via teleconference and written materials, as well as ongoing technical assistance on specific benefits and work incentives issues;
  • A four–hour benefits overview to CRPs statewide, and currently planning with UNT to provide this overview via webinar; (Page 251)

Concern over loss of benefits is a barrier identified through multiple surveys. Staff reported low levels of knowledge of how work impacts Social Security benefits. Both staff and stakeholders expressed that concern over loss of benefits is a disincentive to work. 

Areas for Improvement 

While the consumer survey reported that consumers were satisfied with their jobs and wages, the stakeholder survey indicated dissatisfaction that was echoed in the town hall meetings. Customer service issues such as responsiveness were noted as issues. The lack of and quality of service providers (CRP providers) in some areas of the state was also a stated concern. In general, there appears to be a perception that there is too much bureaucracy that impedes the rehabilitation process, particularly related to the eligibility process. (Page 270)

DRS has a liaison with the American G.I. Forum that targets the needs of Hispanic veterans and has assigned a bilingual counselor who has completed the Social Security work incentive training to work with significantly disabled veterans drawing SSDI benefits but who want to work.

  • A number of counselors are participating in training to learn to speak other languages and attending sign language classes.
  • DRS establishes specialized caseloads for certain disabilities to help develop the expertise needed to most benefit the consumers served. (Page 286)

DRS will improve consumer employment outcomes for target populations by: 

  • Strengthening and expanding collaboration, outreach, and education with various partners to efficiently and effectively use existing resources.
  • Assessing business processes, policy, training, and organizational capacity on an ongoing basis to make consistent improvements in employment outcomes.
  • Increasing employer knowledge and awareness regarding the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
  • Increasing consumer knowledge and awareness of DRS services and benefits offered to individuals with disabilities in target populations to obtain or retain employment. (Page 291)
School to Work Transition

The VR program—currently housed at DARS, but moving to TWC on September 1, 2016—helps individuals with disabilities prepare for, find, and keep jobs, and helps students with disabilities plan the jump from school to work. Work-related services are individualized and may include counseling, training, medical treatment, assistive devices, job placement assistance, and other services.

TWC additionally promotes partnerships with employers to overcome barriers to meeting workforce needs with the creative use of technology and innovation. TWC takes steps to ensure that the staff of public schools, vocational service programs, and community-based organizations are trained and supported to assist all individuals with disabilities in achieving competitive employment. TWC also promotes the availability and accessibility of individualized training designed to prepare an individual with a disability for the individual’s preferred employment. To this end, individuals with disabilities are given the opportunity to understand and explore options for education and training, including postsecondary, graduate and postgraduate education, vocational or technical training, or other training, as pathways to employment. (Page 44)

Project SEARCH is a pre-employment training program that is a business led, one-year school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the workplace. The program includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. Project SEARCH serves students with significant intellectual and developmental disabilities. Typically, these are students who are on an IEP and in their last year of high school eligibility. The goal for these consumers is competitive employment within the business where the worksite rotations occur or at another business.

Project SEARCH has expanded from one original program site established in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital in Ohio, to over 340 sites internationally. Project SEARCH in Texas began in 2007 with Seton Healthcare Family in Austin. As of fall 2015, Texas has 17 Project SEARCH sites. Each site is led by a host of businesses and includes key partners, including DARS VR, ISDs, and CRPs. The expansion of this program in Texas is due in part to a five-year grant awarded by the Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities (TCDD). The grant pays for technical assistance from the Project SEARCH staff in Ohio that may be needed to start any new sites, as well as supporting the collaborative effort from all agencies involved. In its first year, the grant started three sites in the 2013-2014 school year, in addition to the three sites that already existed in Austin. In the 2014-2015 school year, five additional sites were added, which brought the total number of Project SEARCH sites in Texas to 17. Each Project SEARCH site typically has 8-12 participants per year. The total number of consumers participating in Project SEARCH for the 2015-2016 school year is 144. The 17 Project SEARCH sites. (Pages 247-248)

Expand initiatives like Project Search, a school-to-work internship program that provides work experience to help young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities between the ages of 18 and 22 transition to employment. One example of Project Search is the collaboration between Austin Independent School District, DARS, and the Seton Health Care family that provides internships for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

  • The 28 Workforce Development Boards (WDB) work closely with DARS and it is anticipated that the transfer of VR to TWC will enable an enhanced team approach that will benefit consumers and increase their employment outcomes.
  • For persons with IDD, they may need more time to get adjusted to the job.
  • Each activity for transition-age students should be geared to prepare them for employment and should include activities such as summer work experience opportunities. (Page 337)
Data Collection

TWC provides the main automated systems used by the local Boards and other grantees for job matching, data collection, and case management, including adult education and vocational rehabilitation, as well as child care assistance. In addition, the Boards and other grantees use a financial reporting system developed by TWC.

WorkInTexas.com - WorkInTexas.com is Texas’ Labor Exchange System, as mandated by the Wagner-Peyser Act, and operated in cooperative effort with JobCentral, the National Labor Exchange system. WorkInTexas.com is a comprehensive online job search resource and job matching system developed and maintained by TWC, and provides: (Page 82)

TWC operates a collection of different IT systems to capture participant information, services, and outcomes. Many of these systems were legacy systems that were transferred to TWC as programs were moved to the agency. TWC supports efforts to increase efficiency while maintaining quality levels of service through judicious use of resources and adhering to policy (local, state, and federal). To these ends, TWC is currently evaluating workforce system solutions in other states to better unite the case management and job search functions of our programs. As successful systems are identified, TWC and Texas Workforce Solutions look to demo their delivery with Boards. While TWC is exploring ways to either integrate or replace these systems, such changes would not be completed during the life of this plan. ( Page 118)

Consumer Satisfaction Surveys 

DRS and DBS conduct ongoing consumer satisfaction surveys in order to assess how VR consumers feel about the services they have received or are receiving. Consumers in the eligibility, in-plan, and closed phases of services are surveyed separately. The surveys are extensive, and approximately 7,500 DRS consumers and 1,024 DBS consumers completed the consumer satisfaction surveys. The reports from the 2013 surveys were submitted to DARS and RCT in January 2014. While including all of the results from the consumer satisfaction surveys does not fit the scope of this CSNA, several of the questions were particularly relevant and helped inform it. (Page 226)

While the CSNA provides insight into the needs of individuals with disabilities, there are multiple limitations in the methods that should be considered when using the findings. First, the samples used were convenience samples that cannot represent the views of any group. Second, it is unknown how technology issues impacted the completion of online surveys by screen reader users. Several individuals did call to complete phone surveys, but others may have refrained due to concerns over confidentiality. Also, given the constraints of the data collection methods used, assessment findings related to the geographical location of unserved and underserved populations in the state are limited. DRS has plans to expand the capacity and use of various data collection methods, which is expected to yield valuable information throughout the next three fiscal years. (Page 268)

The next CSNA will be the product of an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will culminate with a comprehensive report to be published in 2017.

DRS and DBS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work and RCT to engage in a continuous process of collecting and analyzing data for a robust and effective assessment of the needs of Texans with disabilities. In recognition of WIOA’s focus on students with disabilities and youth, pre-employment transition services, and supported employment, and in addition to the methodology used in the most recent CSNA, efforts going forward have been enhanced to include surveys and/or focus groups throughout the state with staff, transition-age consumers, families, TEA representatives, home-school networks, and other stakeholders. (Page 272)

The data collection and assessment process is underway for the next CSNA that will culminate with the publication of a comprehensive report in 2017. In recognition of WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and pre-employment transition services, CSNA efforts going forward have been enhanced to assess needs in these areas.

State Rehabilitation Council Support 

The RCT is the state rehabilitation council for DRS and DBS. RCT assists DARS in fulfilling the requirements of the federal Rehabilitation Act for the delivery of quality, consumer-responsive VR services. Its stated mission is: “The Rehabilitation Council of Texas, partnering with the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services, advocates for Texans with disabilities in the vocational rehabilitation process.” Funds are allocated for the operation of RCT to meet the goals and objectives set forth in its resource plan. RCT is a valued and active partner in the development of VR goals, priorities, and policies. RCT reviews, analyzes, and advises DARS about performance related to VR eligibility; the extent, scope, effectiveness of VR services; policy changes related to service delivery to VR consumers; and other functions related to the VR program performed by DARS. RCT also reviews and analyzes consumer satisfaction with VR services provided and assists DARS in developing VR State Plans and in conducting the comprehensive statewide needs assessment. (Page 288)

During fall 2013 through spring 2014, DRS, DBS, and RCT collaborated with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work to conduct a comprehensive statewide needs assessment (CSNA). The CSNA findings were initially summarized in the DRS and DBS FY 2015 State Plans for VR. They inform the 2015-2017 State Plans for VR. The next CSNA will be the product of an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will culminate with a comprehensive report to be published in 2017. DRS and DBS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work. In recognition of WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and preemployment transition services, efforts going forward have been enhanced to assess needs in these areas. (Page 293)

Development of the next CSNA has begun with an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will result in the 2017 report. DBS and DRS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work and RCT to accomplish a more robust and effective assessment of the needs of Texans with disabilities. In response to WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS), the current data collection focuses on the needs of those consumers. In addition to the methodology used in the 2014 CSNA, data collection for the 2017 CSNA includes surveys and/or focus groups throughout the state with staff, students and youth with disabilities, families, Texas Education Agency (TEA) representatives, homeschool networks, and other stakeholders. (Page 391)

Development of the next CSNA has begun with an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will result in the 2017 report. DBS and DRS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work and RCT to accomplish a more robust and effective assessment of the needs of Texans with disabilities. In response to WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS), the current data collection focuses on the needs of those consumers. In addition to the methodology used in the 2014 CSNA, data collection for the 2017 CSNA includes surveys and/or focus groups throughout the state with staff, students and youth with disabilities, families, TEA representatives, homeschool networks, and other stakeholders. (Page 402)

LIMITED ACCESS TO COMPUTERS 

A second resource in short supply that hinders rural SCSEP services is access to computers and the Internet. Low–income older job seekers often have limited or no computer skills. These skills are not only required by employers but important for participants to access the Internet, register in WorkInTexas.com and other online job search databases, and develop Internet search skills. Grantees’ field staff members, including participant staff, need access to computers for data collection and communications in a state with such extensive rural areas. Improving access to computers in rural areas will increase the amount of computer and online training available for participants. To address rural technology needs, grantees will contact local businesses, governmental agencies, public libraries, and community– and faith–based organizations regarding ongoing computer and Internet access for participants on an ongoing basis.   (Page 501)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

Under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Governor of each State must submit a Unified or Combined State Plan to the U.S. Secretary of Labor that outlines a four-year workforce development strategy for the State’s workforce development system. The publicly-funded workforce system is a national network of Federal, State, regional, and local agencies and organizations that provide a range of employment, education, training, and related services and supports to help all jobseekers secure good jobs while providing businesses with the skilled workers they need to compete in the global economy. States must have approved Unified or Combined State Plans in place to receive funding for core programs. WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

Employment Networks

DRS coordinates with the Social Security Administration to encourage CRPs to become Employment Networks (ENs) under the Ticket to Work Program. DRS and select CRPs participate in the Partnership Plus program.

Currently there are 39 active ENs in Texas that are DRS CRPs, and 30 who are Workforce Solutions Offices. Of the 3,554 tickets received by these 69 ENs, 61 percent were assigned to DRS CRP ENs. (Page 250)

Coordination with Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program 

DBS coordinates with state agencies and private providers functioning as employment networks under the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Programs by: 

  • Cooperating with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to encourage Community Rehabilitation Program providers (CRPs) to become employment networks (ENs) under the Ticket to Work Program; and
  • Providing advanced payments to CRP-ENs through the Ticket to Work Partnership Plus Program, which allows CRP-ENs to provide ongoing support or job retention services that advance employment or increase earnings after a consumer’s VR case is closed. (Page 347)

DBS uses its current partnership with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to encourage Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) providers to become employment networks (ENs) under the SSA Ticket to Work Program. DBS offers incentive payments to CRP-ENs that provide 

  1. Supported employment or job placement services during the provision of VR services, and
  2. Extended supports to Ticket to Work consumers after VR case closure in order to advance employment or increase consumer earnings. (Page 368, 369, 370, 415)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 63

Texas SB 2027: Evaluation of Regional Employment and Training Opportunities for People with Disabilities - 09/01/2017

“(A) The Health and Human Services Commission in conjunction with the Texas Workforce Commission shall conduct a study regarding occupational training programs available in this state for individuals with an intellectual disability.

(B)The study must:

determine regions in this state where the training programs should be improved or expanded; and determine strategies for placing trained individuals with intellectual disabilities into fulfilling jobs using existing or improved training programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Training Initiatives - 07/01/2017

“To provide educational opportunities to enhance services provided across the state, Texas Health and Human Services develops and provides free training. Training initiatives are based on identified needs of services providers, individuals receiving services and supports, and emerging and best practices.”

Topics include employment, SSI/SSDI benefits, Employment First, Positive Behavior Management and Support, and mental health and trauma-informed care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Medicaid Person-Centered Planning Training - 02/16/2017

This page lists the Person-Centered Planning Training Requirements for various providers, caseworkers, state employees, etc. if they are part of a planning team. It also includes a link to sign up for trainings.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Council of Developmental Disability: State Plan Goals 2017-2021 - 01/01/2017

“Goal 1: Create and support promising practices that enable people with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities and to have control over their own lives by September 30, 2021.

Goal 2: Improve and/or expand community-based systems to better support people with developmental disabilities or families of children with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities by September 30, 2021.

Goal 3: Increase the access that individuals with developmental disabilities and families of individuals with developmental disabilities have to information, training, and support to advocate for themselves and/or to collaborate with allies to impact public policy, service systems, and community supports.

Goal 4: Ensure there is ongoing support and technical assistance for the Council to identify and engage in issues according to the Council’s priorities and mission.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Health and Human Services Transformation - 09/01/2016

“In 2015, Texas Health and Human Services (HHS) began a transformation effort to produce a more efficient, effective, and responsive system. In September of 2016 the first phase of that effort became operational.

The goals of the transformation are to create a system that:

Is easier to navigate for people who need information, benefits, or services Aligns with the HHS mission, business, and statutory responsibilities Breaks down operational silos to create greater program integration Creates clear lines of accountability within the organization Develops clearly defined and objective performance metrics for all areas of the organization”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Combined State Plan for The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 07/01/2016

"Texas proposes through this Combined State Plan (plan) to implement jointly administered activities concerning the following core programs and two optional programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA):

The Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs The Wagner-Peyser Employment Service (ES) program, including the Agricultural Outreach Plan The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act program The Vocational Rehabilitation program The Senior Community Service Employment Program"
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education

Texas Home Living Program (TxHmL) - Amended Rules Effective 3/2016 - 03/20/2016

“The Texas Home Living (TxHmL) program provides selected essential services and supports to people with an intellectual disability or a related condition who live in their own home or their family's home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Youth Empowerment Services (YES) Waiver Program Payment Rates - 03/15/2016

Public comments will be received on proposed payment rates for Supported Employment and Employment Assistance provided under the Youth Empowerment Services (YES) waiver program operated by the Department of State Health Services (DSHS). The revised payment rates are proposed to be effective March 15, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Employment First Policy - 02/26/2016

“The Health and Human Services Commission acknowledges the policy of the state, as set forth in Texas Government Code §531.02447, that earning a living wage through integrated, competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.  The health and human services (HHS) agencies will promote integrated, competitive employment of individuals with disabilities and affirm they are capable of meeting the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as other working-age adults by incorporating the Employment First policy and guiding principles in to agency policies, procedures, and rules.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

TX Health and Human Services Commission: General Provisions - 09/01/2015

“It is the policy of the state that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Texas SB 2027: Evaluation of Regional Employment and Training Opportunities for People with Disabilities - 09/01/2017

“(A) The Health and Human Services Commission in conjunction with the Texas Workforce Commission shall conduct a study regarding occupational training programs available in this state for individuals with an intellectual disability.

(B)The study must:

determine regions in this state where the training programs should be improved or expanded; and determine strategies for placing trained individuals with intellectual disabilities into fulfilling jobs using existing or improved training programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

TX Health and Human Services Commission: General Provisions - 09/01/2015

“It is the policy of the state that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas SB 1664 (ABLE Act) - 06/19/2015

"An act relating to the establishment of the Texas Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program…(1) to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, and (2) to provide secure funding for qualified disability expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act, the Supplemental Security Income program under title XVI of the Social Security Act, the beneficiary's employment, and other sources."

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Texas SB 1664 - 06/19/2015

"An act relating to the establishment of the Texas Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program…(1) to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, and (2) to provide secure funding for qualified disability expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act, the Supplemental Security Income program under title XVI of the Social Security Act, the beneficiary's employment, and other sources."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Texas SB 7: Enacting Community First Choice - 06/14/2013

“AN ACT relating to improving the delivery and quality of certain health and human services, including the delivery and quality of Medicaid acute care services and long-term services and supports.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

2013 Employment Assistance and Supported Employment Bill - 06/14/2013

This acts relates to the provision of employment assistance and supported employment to certain Medicaid waiver program participants. Assistance includes providing assistance to an individual that helps them locate paid employment in the community.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Texas 2013 Employment First Bill (S.B 1226) - 06/14/2013

The act establishes an employment-first policy and task force to promote integrated competitive employment opportunities that provide a living wage for individuals with disabilities. The Texas Education Agency and the Texas Workforce Commission will jointly adopt and implement the policy.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Human Resources Code Section 32.075 (Employment Assistance)

This code defines “Employment assistance” as, “assistance provided to an individual to help the individual locate paid employment in the community.” It defines “Supported employment” as, “assistance provided, in order to sustain paid employment, to an individual who, because of a disability, requires intensive, ongoing support to be self-employed, work from home, or perform in a work setting at which individuals without disabilities are employed. Supported employment includes adaptations, supervision, and training related to an individual's diagnosis.” It also lists the medical assistance waivers to which Supported Employment applies.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Human Resources Code, Section 121.003

This code addresses discrimination that is prohibited by law in the state of Texas, especially pertaining to people with disabilities. Among other measures, it specifically states that, “It is the policy of the state that persons with disabilities be employed by the state, by political subdivisions of the state, in the public schools, and in all other employment supported in whole or in part by public funds on the same terms and conditions as persons without disabilities, unless it is shown that there is no reasonable accommodation that would enable a person with a disability to perform the essential elements of a job.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Texas Labor Code, Sections 21.051 - 21.061 (Disability Discrimination)

This labor code states that an employer, employment agency or labor organization commits an unlawful act if it discriminates against individuals due to a disability or segregates or classifies them in a manner that would deprive them of an employment opportunity or otherwise adversely affect their status as an employee.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

Texas Council of Developmental Disability: State Plan Goals 2017-2021 - 01/01/2017

“Goal 1: Create and support promising practices that enable people with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities and to have control over their own lives by September 30, 2021.

Goal 2: Improve and/or expand community-based systems to better support people with developmental disabilities or families of children with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities by September 30, 2021.

Goal 3: Increase the access that individuals with developmental disabilities and families of individuals with developmental disabilities have to information, training, and support to advocate for themselves and/or to collaborate with allies to impact public policy, service systems, and community supports.

Goal 4: Ensure there is ongoing support and technical assistance for the Council to identify and engage in issues according to the Council’s priorities and mission.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Health and Human Services Transformation - 09/01/2016

“In 2015, Texas Health and Human Services (HHS) began a transformation effort to produce a more efficient, effective, and responsive system. In September of 2016 the first phase of that effort became operational.

The goals of the transformation are to create a system that:

Is easier to navigate for people who need information, benefits, or services Aligns with the HHS mission, business, and statutory responsibilities Breaks down operational silos to create greater program integration Creates clear lines of accountability within the organization Develops clearly defined and objective performance metrics for all areas of the organization”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Employment First Policy - 02/26/2016

“The Health and Human Services Commission acknowledges the policy of the state, as set forth in Texas Government Code §531.02447, that earning a living wage through integrated, competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.  The health and human services (HHS) agencies will promote integrated, competitive employment of individuals with disabilities and affirm they are capable of meeting the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as other working-age adults by incorporating the Employment First policy and guiding principles in to agency policies, procedures, and rules.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Texas Department of Aging and Disabilities (DADs) Guide to Employment for People with Disabilities - 05/01/2015

“The purpose of this guide is to provide information on how to support and assist working-age people with disabilities who are receiving DADS services to obtain and maintain competitive, integrated employment. Through this guide, DADS intends to provide information on best practices and resources that can help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. The guide includes success stories of people with disabilities who, as a result of receiving the appropriate supports and services, have secured fulfilling employment...”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Education Agency Employment First Policy - 03/25/2015

“TEA hereby adopts the state's policy that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits. TEA will evaluate recommendations made by the Employment-First Task Force and will adopt rules as necessary that are consistent with the policy.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas FY 2015 Plans for Vocational Rehabilitation and Supported Employment Services Programs - 09/30/2014

“The Division for Rehabilitation Services (DRS) recognizes that collaboration with community organizations and other state agencies is essential to achieving successful employment outcomes for consumers with the most significant disabilities. DRS seeks opportunities to identify, develop, and implement cooperative agreements with other state agencies and appropriate entities, particularly when these agreements establish a framework to assist with the provision of supported employment services and extended services for consumers with the most significant disabilities.

Plans for Improving Supported Employment Services: DRS plans to…develop and implement an improved benchmark system for the provision of specific supported employment services statewide; explore complimentary services for specific populations like persons with autism and mental health diagnoses; develop a supported employment technical assistance training model for DRS staff members to improve their ability to determine when supported employment services are needed; and develop tools that will help staff members monitor and provide guidance to supported employment contract providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DARS Provider Supported Self-Employment Diagram - 02/15/2011

This diagram serves as a guide for Dept. of Assistive and Rehabilitation Services providers for the process of supported employment, It contains guidelines and benchmarks, including an emphasis on the process of Discovery.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Workforce Commission Employment First Policy

“TWC will promote competitive employment of individuals with disabilities and the expectation that they are able to meet the same employment standards, responsibilities and expectations as other working-age adults. TWC acknowledges that it is the policy of the state, as set forth in Texas Government Code §531.02447, ‘that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.’”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Guide For Hiring People With Disability

The Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), in conjunction with Office of the Federal Contract Compliance Program (OFCCP) and a group of local businesses has produced this guide on attracting and hiring people with disabilities. DARS works in partnership with Texans with disabilities and families with children who have developmental delays to improve the quality of their lives and to enable their full participation in society. The DARS Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program helps people with disabilities to prepare for, find and keep employment. DARS services can reduce the need for support from other public benefits and services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Texas Combined State Plan for The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 07/01/2016

"Texas proposes through this Combined State Plan (plan) to implement jointly administered activities concerning the following core programs and two optional programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA):

The Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs The Wagner-Peyser Employment Service (ES) program, including the Agricultural Outreach Plan The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act program The Vocational Rehabilitation program The Senior Community Service Employment Program"
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education

Texas State Plans for VR Services and Supported Employment Services Programs - 09/30/2014

“The Division for Rehabilitation Services (DRS) recognizes that collaboration with community organizations and other state agencies is essential to achieving successful employment outcomes for consumers with the most significant disabilities. DRS seeks opportunities to identify, develop, and implement cooperative agreements with other state agencies and appropriate entities, particularly when these agreements establish a framework to assist with the provision of supported employment services and extended services for consumers with the most significant disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Task Force Home Page

The Employment First Task Force, authorized by Senate Bill 1226 (83rd Legislature, Regular Session, 2013), was established by the Texas Health and Human Services Commission executive commissioner to promote competitive employment of people with disabilities and the expectation that individuals with disabilities are able to meet the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as any other working-age adult.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Dept of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services and Dept of Aging and Disability Services MOA

Recognizing the need to coordinate the provision of services to individuals receiving services from the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) who may be eligible for or are receiving Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) or Independent Living (IL) services from the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), DARS and DADS enter into this Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) in accordance with the provisions of CFR §361.53(d) and 111.0525(b) of the Texas Human Resources Code. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Texas Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2012

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

In FY2012, Texas was awarded an EDI grant for an expansion of supported employment through Consumer Operated Services Programs.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Texas Medicaid Balancing Incentives Program - 09/04/2012

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) partner in implementing The Balancing Incentive Program (BIP), which “increases the Federal Matching Assistance Percentage to participating states through September 2015 in exchange for states making certain structural reforms to increase access to Medicaid community based long-term services and supports (LTSS).”    “These required structural reforms include…   • implementing a "no wrong door" eligibility and enrollment system;    • developing core standardized assessment instruments; and    • ensuring case management activities are conflict free.”   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Ticket to Work - 06/25/2008

“Under the Ticket to Work Program and Title II and Title XVI of the Act, SSA issues “tickets” to SSDI and SSI blind or disabled beneficiaries. In this voluntary program, each beneficiary who receives a ticket can use it to obtain services from a provider, known as an employment network (EN), or from a state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agency. The VR agency in Texas is the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS)…

The intent of the Ticket to Work Program is to…establish a system in which qualified ENs provide employment and other support services (e.g., case management, benefits counseling, and job training); provide individualized tickets to beneficiaries for the “purchase” of services from approved ENs; and give beneficiaries a real choice in obtaining the services, education, and technology needed to find, enter, and maintain employment within an expanding universe of service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Customized Employment Grant (Transition Adjustment and Career Education/TACE)

The demonstration project was conducted in local workforce development centers across the state.  It was designed to, “To enhance the capability of One-Stop Career Centers to deliver services to people with disabilities, bridging education and job development with customized employment services” by integrating customized employment services with existing services, creating customized employment opportunities for people with disabilities and increasing the capacity of centers and its partners to provide high-quality customized employment services through intensive staff training (e.g., developing a capacity building curriculum).

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Training and Technical Assistance to Providers (T-TAP)

“T-TAP is a national training and technical assistance center to help community rehabilitation providers make the transition from providing segregated employment services to finding people with disabilities jobs in the community. The specific target audience is employment agencies that hold 14(c) subminimum wage certificates, which allow employers to pay people less than minimum wage and are typically used in the disability field to pay workers piece rates at sheltered workshops. Activities include online courses, satellite telecasts, regional employment forums, intensive consultation to selected agencies, and policy research. The Institute for Community Inclusion and Virginia Commonwealth University work in partnership on this project. T-TAP [was] funded from 2002 to 2007 by the Office of Disability and Employment Policy at the U.S. Department of Labor.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Customized Employment Grant (Transition Adjustment and Career Education/TACE)

The demonstration project was conducted in local workforce development centers across the state. It was designed to, “To enhance the capability of One-Stop Career Centers to deliver services to people with disabilities, bridging education and job development with customized employment services” by integrating customized employment services with existing services, creating customized employment opportunities for people with disabilities and increasing the capacity of centers and its partners to provide high-quality customized employment services through intensive staff training (e.g., developing a capacity building curriculum).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Medicaid Buy-In Program

The program “offers low-cost Medicaid health care services — including community-based services and supports to working people with a disability. Some people might have to pay a monthly fee” to receive services which include but not limited to:  • Doctor / clinic visits  • Mental health care  • Occupational therapy (help learning how to do everyday tasks)  • X-rays  • Physical therapy (help learning how to move around better or become stronger)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Money Follows The Person

“The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) will receive approximately $33.6 million in new funding over the next five years, which will be paired with existing state and federal funding for a total of $143 million. The agency will use the money to enhance its successful Money Follows the Person (MFP) initiative and expand its effort for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and persons with behavioral health needs.

The MFP initiative helps people who are receiving long-term services and supports in a nursing facility return to the community to receive their services without having to be placed on a community services interest list.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Training Initiatives - 07/01/2017

“To provide educational opportunities to enhance services provided across the state, Texas Health and Human Services develops and provides free training. Training initiatives are based on identified needs of services providers, individuals receiving services and supports, and emerging and best practices.”

Topics include employment, SSI/SSDI benefits, Employment First, Positive Behavior Management and Support, and mental health and trauma-informed care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Medicaid Person-Centered Planning Training - 02/16/2017

This page lists the Person-Centered Planning Training Requirements for various providers, caseworkers, state employees, etc. if they are part of a planning team. It also includes a link to sign up for trainings.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Texas Customized Self-Employment Project: The Customized Employment Plan Design

This presentation describes Customized Employment as “a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both.”  It focuses heavily on the processes and value of Discovery in the employment process.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

The Texas Customized Self-Employment Project

This presentation presents Self-Employment as a viable employment option for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Texas Department of Assistive & Rehabilitative Services (DARS) Customized Self-Employment System Development Initiative

“This proposal is designed to support and implement the phased development of a financially, technically and programmatically viable system of TX DARS for prospective business owners in TX with disabilities, who require customized employment services and are applying for, or receiving, DARS counseling and services to develop small businesses.   Specifically, this initiative is designed to research, identify and develop an outcome payment model and rate structure for customized self-employment, including: DARS Counselor CRC certification level, online and onsite training and technical assistance; and, intensive multi-certification, online and onsite training for DARS vendors throughout the state of Texas.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Texas Transition and Employment Guide

This transition and employment guide is for you, the student in Texas public school, who may have received special education services due to a disability. It also provides helpful information for your parents. This guide has steps you and your parents can take to make sure you are able to find the right work or educational choices for you after high school. It also tells you where to get the services you will need after high school.    The guide is divided into sections on Self Advocacy, Transition Services, Employment and Supported Employment, Social Security Programs, Community and Long Term Services and Supports, Postsecondary Educational Programs and Services, Information Sharing, and Guardianship and Alternatives. Each section has phone numbers, emails, and websites to help you find what you need. At the end of each section and at the end of the guide, you will find a timeline of steps that you and your parents can take as you make the transition from student to adult.”  
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Wal-Mart to Pay $150,000 to Settle EEOC Age and Disability Discrimination Suit - 02/19/2015

“Under the terms of the two-year consent decree settling the case, Wal-Mart will pay $150,000 in relief to Moorman. In addition, Wal-Mart agreed to provide training for employees on the ADA and the ADEA. The training will include an instruction on the kind of conduct that may constitute unlawful discrimination or harassment, as well as an instruction on Wal-Mart's procedures for handling requests for reasonable accommodations under the ADA. Wal-Mart will also report to the EEOC regarding its compliance with the consent decree and post a notice to employees about the settlement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Texas Wendy’s Consent Decree - 10/10/2012

“Under the terms of the two-year consent decree settling the case, Wendy's will pay $41,500 in relief to a person who applied to a job with the company, but was denied despite his qualifications. “In addition, Wendy's has agreed to provide training for all managers and supervisory employees, including its company president, on the ADA. The training will include a discussion related to hiring individuals with disabilities. In addition, the training will include a specific instruction on communication devices, such as the use of the Texas Relay System or video relay service regarding communication between Wendy's employees and applicants with hearing impairments.’“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Texas Steward et. al. v. Perry et. al (2013)

“On August 19, 2013, the United States, private Plaintiffs and the State of Texas filed an Interim Settlement Agreement to enable Texans with intellectual and other developmental disabilities to live in the community rather than nursing facilities. The Interim Settlement Agreement is awaiting court approval…[It] partially addresses the Civil Rights Division's finding that the State of Texas failed to serve individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the most integrated setting appropriate to those individuals' needs, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Olmstead v. L.C.” “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Texas Home Living Program (TxHmL) - Amended Rules Effective 3/2016 - 03/20/2016

“The Texas Home Living (TxHmL) program provides selected essential services and supports to people with an intellectual disability or a related condition who live in their own home or their family's home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Youth Empowerment Services (YES) Waiver Program Payment Rates - 03/15/2016

Public comments will be received on proposed payment rates for Supported Employment and Employment Assistance provided under the Youth Empowerment Services (YES) waiver program operated by the Department of State Health Services (DSHS). The revised payment rates are proposed to be effective March 15, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Community First Choice - 06/01/2015

“Senate Bill 7 from the 2013 Texas Legislature requires the Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) to put in place a cost-effective option for attendant and habilitation services for people with disabilities who have STAR+PLUS Medicaid coverage.

A federal option, called Community First Choice, allows states to provide home and community-based attendant services and supports to Medicaid recipients with disabilities. This option provides states with a 6 percent increase in federal matching funds for Medicaid for these services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Balancing Incentives Program - 09/04/2012

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) partner in implementing The Balancing Incentive Program (BIP), which “increases the Federal Matching Assistance Percentage to participating states through September 2015 in exchange for states making certain structural reforms to increase access to Medicaid community based long-term services and supports (LTSS).”    “These required structural reforms include…implementing a "no wrong door" eligibility and enrollment system; developing core standardized assessment instruments; and ensuring case management activities are conflict free.”   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Buy-In Program

The program “offers low-cost Medicaid health care services — including community-based services and supports to working people with a disability. Some people might have to pay a monthly fee” to receive services which include but not limited to:    • Doctor / clinic visits     • Mental health care     • Occupational therapy (help learning how to do everyday tasks)    • X-rays     • Physical therapy (help learning how to move around better or become stronger)  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Money Follows The Person

“The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) will receive approximately $33.6 million in new funding over the next five years, which will be paired with existing state and federal funding for a total of $143 million. The agency will use the money to enhance its successful Money Follows the Person (MFP) initiative and expand its effort for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and persons with behavioral health needs.”   “The MFP initiative helps people who are receiving long-term services and supports in a nursing facility return to the community to receive their services without having to be placed on a community services interest list.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Medicaid State Plan

The state plan is the officially recognized document describing the nature and scope of the State of Texas Medicaid program. As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act, the plan was developed by the state and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Essentially, the plan is the state's agreement that it will conform to the requirements of the Social Security Act and the official issuances of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas HCBS Transition Plan

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has released a final rule that defines the settings in which states can offer Medicaid Home and Community Based Services (HCBS). This website will serve as a place where you can submit comments about the rule and the way its provisions will be set up within Texas Medicaid.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Youth Empowerment Services

“The Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Department of State Health Services (DSHS) developed the Youth Empowerment Services (YES) Waiver, which provides comprehensive home and community-based mental health services to youth between the ages of 3 and 18, up to a youth's 19th birthday, who have a serious emotional disturbance. The YES Waiver not only provides flexible supports and specialized services to children and youth at risk of institutionalization and/or out-of-home placement due to their serious emotional disturbance, but also strives to provide hope to families by offering services aimed at keeping children and youth in their homes and communities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“HCS provides individualized services and supports to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities who are living with their family, in their own home or in other community settings, such as small group homes.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Everything's Bigger in Texas, including the number of job options in integrated settings at competitive wages for individuals with disabilities. The Lone Star state is a place where anyone, including those with disabilities, can live the American Dream… Deep in the Heart of Texas! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Texas' VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.86%
Change from
2014 to 2015
27,469,114
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.01%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,584,428
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.04%
Change from
2014 to 2015
626,445
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.97%
Change from
2014 to 2015
39.54%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.01%
Change from
2014 to 2015
75.28%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 26,448,193 26,956,958 27,469,114
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,602,460 1,616,223 1,584,428
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 619,692 613,660 626,445
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 10,802,460 11,106,300 11,346,637
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 38.67% 37.97% 39.54%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.69% 75.29% 75.28%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.20% 5.10% 4.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 23.00% 22.10% 20.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.80% 16.60% 15.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,489,714 1,497,762 1,524,865
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 1,557,444 1,603,277 1,601,481
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,333,668 2,392,261 2,402,094
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 412,755 422,849 425,070
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 964,494 978,202 984,782
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 19,256 18,845 19,232
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 61,371 64,338 73,273
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,576 1,771 1,634
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 71,164 69,100 71,874
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 146,368 131,875 133,169

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 17,346 18,624 19,684
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.10% 3.30% 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 574,276 574,012 569,586

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 24,957 30,553 35,158
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 53,929 60,533 66,891
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 165,862 173,707 185,621
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.00% 17.60% 18.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.20% 4.60% 6.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10% 4.80% 5.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.70% 1.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 44.00% 43.50% 38.90%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 7,341 11,116 17,078
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 7,286 11,549 15,079
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,250 4,148 4,552
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 102,092 104,481 100,400

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 45,361 53,307 54,851
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 483 687 633
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 232 346 365
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 48.00% 50.00% 58.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.89 1.31 1.33

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
20,692
N/A
20,127
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 14 N/A 32
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 3,999 N/A 4,564
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 7,132 N/A 6,449
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 5,018 N/A 4,782
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 3,408 N/A 3,375
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,121 N/A 925
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 37.70% 41.80% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 21,430 19,773
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 914,022 916,755
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 780 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 607 658 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $4,236,000 $966,000 $5,842,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $99,239,000 $116,626,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $142,770,000 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 4.00% 8.00% 11.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 15,706 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A 616 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A 24,650 25,599
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 7.50 14.40 11.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.00% 66.17% 67.53%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.00% 13.93% 14.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.00% 1.19% 1.22%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.70% 99.74% 99.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 27.00% 26.77% 24.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.00% 61.55% 54.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 69.00% 71.65% 67.36%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.00% 34.77% 29.24%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 7,034,752
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 6,822
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,436,521
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 4,235,134
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 5,671,655
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 1,090
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,482
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 4,572
AbilityOne wages (products). $12,142,783
AbilityOne wages (services). $54,025,955

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 2 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 6 1 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 104 105 72
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 4 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 112 76
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 19 17
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 8,938 5,605
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 856 618
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 9,814 6,240

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

At the federal, state, and local levels, TWC continues to make great strides toward a streamlined and coordinated one-stop delivery system serving adults and youth with disabilities and employers that employ these individuals. TWC’s executive director and the commissioner of assistive and rehabilitative services (transferred to TWC as of September 2016) participate as ex officio members of the Governor’s Committee on People with Disabilities. TWC also serves on state-level interagency councils and workgroups supporting gateways for individuals with disabilities, such as the Employment First Task Force and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services’ (DADS) Promoting Independence Advisory Council. Other memberships have included the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services’ (DARS) Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Advisory Council, and HHSC’s House Bill 1230 Workgroup on Transition Services for Youth with Disabilities. TWC will also continue to coordinate with the State Independent Living Council (SILC) and the Centers for Independent Living (CILs) to serve mutual consumers who need employment assistance as well as assistance with independent living resources. In this vein, TWC has collaborated with a number of agencies in developing guidance, such as a transition and employment guide for Texas students with disabilities. (Page 72)

  • DRS co–chairs and participates in the legislatively mandated Employment First Task Force charged with writing and making recommendations to implement an Employment First statewide policy, and providing information and/or training to providers, stakeholders, and the general public on employment as the first option for any publicly funded service.
  • Membership and participation in Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE).
  • Representation on:
  • The Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities
  • The Council for Advising and Planning (CAP) for the Prevention and Treatment of Mental and Substance Use Disorders
  • Texas Clubhouse Coalition
  • Texas Alliance for the Mentally Ill
  • Texas Coordinating Council for Veteran Services (TCCVS)
  • Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Council (TBIAC)
  • HHSC Office of Acquired Brain Injury (OABI)
  • State Independent Living Council (SILC)
  • Texas Interagency Council for the Homeless
  • DADS Consumer Direction Workgroup
  • HHSC Medicaid/CHIP CRCG
  • Texas Technology Access Program Advisory Council (Page 244)

Also, DARS co-chairs the Employment First Task Force (EFTF), which was created as a result of SB 1226 and was passed by the 83rd Texas Legislature (2013). The EFTF consists of 26 members (seven represent state agencies) appointed by the HHSC executive commissioner. The purpose of the EFTF is to promote competitive employment of individuals with disabilities, with the expectation that individuals with disabilities are able to meet the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as any other working-age adult.

The 83rd legislature established Employment First Policy for Texas, which makes competitive employment and earning a living wage a priority and the preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.

The EFTF’s responsibilities include designing an education and outreach process, developing recommendations for policy, procedure, and rule changes necessary to implement the employment first policy, and providing reports to the governor’s office, Texas legislature, and HHSC executive commissioner. The first report was submitted in Fall 2014. The next report is due in the fall of 2016. (Page 300)

Customized Employment

DRS ensures that staff are well–qualified to assist individuals with disabilities. There is emphasis of educational requirements at the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral levels, in fields related to rehabilitation. However, the degree field may include other degrees that prepare individuals to work with consumers and employers. For example, bachelor degrees might include not only vocational rehabilitation counseling, but also social work, psychology, disability studies, business administration, human resources, special education, supported employment, customized employment, economics, or another field that reasonably prepares individuals to work with consumers and employers. For individuals hired at the bachelor’s level, there is a requirement for at least one year of paid or unpaid experience related to direct work with individuals with disabilities. (Page 258)

  • Continued focus on the foundations of the VR process for counselors and RSTs, including accurate eligibility determination, inclusion of consumers in planning for service delivery, thorough assessing and planning practices, models for vocational counseling, informed consumer choice, service to culturally diverse populations, good purchasing practices, supported employment, customized employment and other strategies for quality employment assistance, service delivery, and effective case note documentation;
  • Training in working with employers and consumers to increase knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998, the Olmstead decision, available independence initiatives, and VR participation in the Workforce Investment Act to enhance employment options and employment knowledge; (Page 260 All)
Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

Achieving excellence in accessibility is based on three core principles: 

  • ensuring that all customers can effectively use workforce products and services;
  • creating a workspace accessible for individuals with disabilities; and
  • complying with all federal and state legal requirements (Page 127) 

Determine compliance with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA §188. Both programmatic and physical accessibility are addressed during an EO compliance review.

As recipients of WIOA funding, Boards are monitored on-site based on a three-year rotation schedule, as referenced in the State Methods of Administration (MOA) maintained on file with DOL’s Civil Rights Center (DOL-CRC). All 28 Boards are scheduled for an EO review within a designated three-year period. Dates for EO monitoring reviews generally align with those of the TWC’s annual Board monitoring review. (Page 128)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

DRS program specialists provide the following training:

  • Annual training on VR and independent living services to DADS Home and Community–Based Services (HCS) waiver utilization review nurses, Private Provider Association of Texas members, community center staff, including consumer benefits officers, and the Statewide Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Consortium;
  • Training on VR services and benefits and work incentives to HHSC Managed Care Organization (MCO) service coordinators and management, STAR+PLUS, and other service providers and Medicaid waiver case managers;
  • Training on DARS employment services and benefits and work incentives to members of the seven statewide mental health peer–operated support groups;
  • Training on benefits and work incentives every six months for DRS and DBS staff, long–term supports and services providers involved in the MFP employment pilot grant, and DADS and DSHS central office staff. The providers and DADS/DSHS staff get monthly follow–up training via teleconference and written materials, as well as ongoing technical assistance on specific benefits and work incentives issues;
  • A four–hour benefits overview to CRPs statewide, and currently planning with UNT to provide this overview via webinar;
  • Overview of benefits and work incentives to DADS staff, providers, and other community stakeholders throughout the year;
  • Overview to DADS service coordinators, case managers, private providers, and other staff on DRS VR services and best practices for mutually served consumers;
  • Overview of Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) to community partners;
  • Training to CRPs statewide on best practices in the provision of employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities; and
  • Training on Assistive Technology to community partners. (Page 251)

Result in competitive integrated employment outcomes for VR consumers by: 

  • Developing and implementing agency-wide business strategies with a regional focus that creates a unified comprehensive approach to business development, including working with DRS on a new statewide joint Business Relations Team, the formation of regional Outreach Services and Coordination Teams, and the development and joint use of a new business database tracking tool;
  • Providing Employment Assistance Training to staff, to instruct on how to best contact and meet the needs of our business partners;
  • Identifying and accessing higher wage employment opportunities by aligning DBS/DRS business development activities and consumer service provisions to maximize high wage opportunities. This is the goal of the current DBS Work Matters project; and
  • Aligning counseling critical thinking processes around employment opportunities and data to engage consumers in defining their optimal vocational opportunities. During FFY 2015, DBS began a pilot project within the Austin Regional Office in an effort to begin initiating this particular strategy. 

Success will be measured by: 

  • An increase of employers being served by DARS;
  • An increase of successful employment outcomes for DBS consumers;
  • A positive impact on consumer salaries by increasing weekly wages;
  • Maximizing consumer potential and capabilities based on their job readiness; and
  • Increasing job placement vendor effectiveness in matching consumer abilities with employment opportunities. (Page 425)

A pilot program in the Austin region teaches a systematic decision-making process to staff, which includes tools to provide consumers with accurate labor market data and jobs in their geographic area. This process helps consumers make a decision using criteria set forth by the consumer based on data from several resources.

S&I Measure 1.2: Of the individuals exiting the VR program after receiving services, a minimum of 68.9 percent will have achieved an employment outcome. 

  • Performance: In 2015, 75.20 percent of the individuals exiting the DBS VR program after receiving services achieved an employment outcome. (S&I Report) 

To maintain satisfactory performance on this indicator, DBS continues training and reinforcement of the appropriate use of

  1. Extended evaluation to serve consumers with the most significant disabilities and
  2. A thorough comprehensive assessment before VR Counselors develop the individualized plan for employment. DARS is also developing additional tools for counselors to use during situational assessments to improve the information obtained to inform eligibility decisions. (Page 453)
Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

TWC plans to continue to emphasize the availability of a variety of financial literacy activities into the service-delivery strategy within the one-stop delivery system. Under WIOA, states are encouraged to develop and implement strategies for workforce areas to use to coordinate financial literacy services to participants and provide financial literacy activities to youth. TWC agrees with the need for services that foster financial education and literacy services, including financial capability, and encourages partnerships and contracts between Boards and the agencies delivering them.

Comment 6: The Texas State Independent Living Council (SILC) supports the state plan with the following additions.

  • A Coordination of Independent Living section should be added, with the role of SILC and Texas’ Centers for Independent Living (CIL) expressly stated. ( Page 135)

TWC allocates youth formula funds to Boards, that in turn contract with service providers to deliver services to youth in their respective workforce areas. Boards are required to meet all federal and state programmatic requirements. TWC maintains a rigorous performance and accountability system, holding Boards accountable for their performance as it pertains to the youth program as it does with other workforce programs, and Boards have rigorous standards in place for their contracted service providers. Boards must ensure that all 14 program elements—including new WIOA program elements such as financial literacy and services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in workforce areas—are available to youth participants. (Page 163)

Benefits

Approximately 12 percent of the Texas population is estimated to have some type of disability. TWC is committed to providing services to this population; TWC promotes competitive employment of individuals with disabilities coupled with the expectation that they are able to meet the same employment standards and responsibilities as other working-age adults. All working-age individuals with disabilities, including young adults, are offered factual information regarding employment as an individual with a disability, including the relationship between an individual’s earned income and the individual’s public benefits.

The VR program—currently housed at DARS, but moving to TWC on September 1, 2016—helps individuals with disabilities prepare for, find, and keep jobs, and helps students with disabilities plan the jump from school to work. Work-related services are individualized and may include counseling, training, medical treatment, assistive devices, job placement assistance, and other services. (Page 44)

  • Custodial parents are 21 percent less likely to receive TANF benefits; and
  • More than $191 million in child support was collected through August 2015, some of which was used to repay TANF, Medicaid, foster care, and child support collections programs. (Page 64)

Helping customers with disabilities in a Workforce Solutions Office environment; 

  • Resources and funding sources for support services and employment accommodations; and
  • The effects that employment may have on Social Security disability benefits. (Page 129)

Workforce areas that provide quality services will have access to additional resources to meet the employers’ needs, job seekers, and incumbent workers. Additionally, the waiver will allow TWC to continue to promote the cost benefits of improved administrative efficiencies, encouraging the increased leveraging of resources within the workforce areas. As a result, TWC will increase services such as enhanced education, employment, and training opportunities for disadvantaged populations and individuals with multiple barriers to employment. (Page 174)

DRS develops partnerships with schools and community organizations to help students with disabilities make a smooth transition to adulthood and work. DRS has counselors throughout the state that have a role in preparing students with disabilities for entry into the workplace. VR counselors coordinate closely with high schools to ensure appropriate students are referred to the VR program. Counselors work with schools to identify students receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) as early as possible in the process to address concerns regarding impact of employment on benefits and to provide resources for benefits counseling.

VR counselors have flexible work schedules that allow them to participate in school activities, parent meetings, community forums, summer skill-building activities, job clubs, etc. (Page 238)

DARS is currently in the process of collaborating with TEA to update the Letter of Agreement, including the addition of pre-employment transition services as defined in §361.48 and other requirements of WIOA, operationalizing a referral process of students with the highest needs, and a process for invitations to Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) meetings. The final agreement will be between TEA and TWC following the transfer of the VR program in FFY’17 as required by SB 208. Counselors work with schools to identify students receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) as early as possible in the process to address concerns regarding impact of employment on benefits and to provide resources for benefits counseling. DRS has specialty TVRCs and VRCs who are liaisons for high schools and partner with the educational system to more appropriately serve transition-age students seeking assistance to access adult vocational services. Partnering with ISDs allows counselors to use office space on campus to ensure that student consumers have access to resources available through the workforce investment system, community, businesses, and other partners necessary to build a network of support. VR counselors use various tools and strategies in their coordination with schools. The School Plan is a tool available to counselors for planning with their assigned schools. It provides an outline for open communication about each party’s expectations and goals for the school year. Counselors are encouraged to develop a School Plan with each assigned school before that school year begins, and update it as necessary throughout the year. (Page 240)

DRS works with DADS and HHSC Medicaid/CHIP to ensure service definitions in the 1915(c) home– and community–based waivers accurately reflect Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and Rehabilitation Services Administration regulations. This partnership allows services that result in competitive employment to be delivered efficiently and timely through the payor of first resort.

  • DRS provides annual training to DSHS Community Benefits Officers on SSI and SSDI benefits and work incentives and offers free intensive training and technical assistance to DADS staff and providers to become Benefits Subject Matter Resource staff.
  • DRS co–chairs and participates in the legislatively mandated Employment First Task Force charged with writing and making recommendations to implement an Employment First statewide policy, and providing information and/or training to providers, stakeholders, and the general public on employment as the first option for any publicly funded service.
  • Membership and participation in Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE).
  • Representation on:
  • The Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities
  • The Council for Advising and Planning (CAP) for the Prevention and Treatment of Mental and Substance Use Disorders
  • Texas Clubhouse Coalition
  • Texas Alliance for the Mentally Ill
  • Texas Coordinating Council for Veteran Services (TCCVS)
  • Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Council (TBIAC)
  • HHSC Office of Acquired Brain Injury (OABI)
  • State Independent Living Council (SILC)
  • Texas Interagency Council for the Homeless
  • DADS Consumer Direction Workgroup
  • HHSC Medicaid/CHIP CRCG
  • Texas Technology Access Program Advisory Council (Page 244)

The Business Relations Team also developed and disseminated additional resources to Texas businesses, including a new Business Services web site, available at http://www.dars.state.tx.us/services/servicesforbusiness.shtml. This web site provides information about the benefits of partnering with DARS, including available services and business testimonials, as well as resources such as the GUIDE FOR HIRING PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES and helpful websites.

The Business Relations Team is also increasing coordination with other state and federal entities that administer employment training programs. The result of this coordination is a growth in the number of jointly held business symposia and job fairs in communities across Texas. The team’s efforts to partner with TWC, Local Workforce Development Boards, and the U.S. Department of Labor Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs will help ensure that local businesses and Texans with disabilities seeking competitive employment have the greatest level of support, resources, and services available to help them succeed. (Page 246)

Annual training on VR and independent living services to DADS Home and Community–Based Services (HCS) waiver utilization review nurses, Private Provider Association of Texas members, community center staff, including consumer benefits officers, and the Statewide Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Consortium;

  • Training on VR services and benefits and work incentives to HHSC Managed Care Organization (MCO) service coordinators and management, STAR+PLUS, and other service providers and Medicaid waiver case managers;
  • Training on DARS employment services and benefits and work incentives to members of the seven statewide mental health peer–operated support groups;
  • Training on benefits and work incentives every six months for DRS and DBS staff, long–term supports and services providers involved in the MFP employment pilot grant, and DADS and DSHS central office staff. The providers and DADS/DSHS staff get monthly follow–up training via teleconference and written materials, as well as ongoing technical assistance on specific benefits and work incentives issues;
  • A four–hour benefits overview to CRPs statewide, and currently planning with UNT to provide this overview via webinar; (Page 251)

Concern over loss of benefits is a barrier identified through multiple surveys. Staff reported low levels of knowledge of how work impacts Social Security benefits. Both staff and stakeholders expressed that concern over loss of benefits is a disincentive to work. 

Areas for Improvement 

While the consumer survey reported that consumers were satisfied with their jobs and wages, the stakeholder survey indicated dissatisfaction that was echoed in the town hall meetings. Customer service issues such as responsiveness were noted as issues. The lack of and quality of service providers (CRP providers) in some areas of the state was also a stated concern. In general, there appears to be a perception that there is too much bureaucracy that impedes the rehabilitation process, particularly related to the eligibility process. (Page 270)

DRS has a liaison with the American G.I. Forum that targets the needs of Hispanic veterans and has assigned a bilingual counselor who has completed the Social Security work incentive training to work with significantly disabled veterans drawing SSDI benefits but who want to work.

  • A number of counselors are participating in training to learn to speak other languages and attending sign language classes.
  • DRS establishes specialized caseloads for certain disabilities to help develop the expertise needed to most benefit the consumers served. (Page 286)

DRS will improve consumer employment outcomes for target populations by: 

  • Strengthening and expanding collaboration, outreach, and education with various partners to efficiently and effectively use existing resources.
  • Assessing business processes, policy, training, and organizational capacity on an ongoing basis to make consistent improvements in employment outcomes.
  • Increasing employer knowledge and awareness regarding the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
  • Increasing consumer knowledge and awareness of DRS services and benefits offered to individuals with disabilities in target populations to obtain or retain employment. (Page 291)
School to Work Transition

The VR program—currently housed at DARS, but moving to TWC on September 1, 2016—helps individuals with disabilities prepare for, find, and keep jobs, and helps students with disabilities plan the jump from school to work. Work-related services are individualized and may include counseling, training, medical treatment, assistive devices, job placement assistance, and other services.

TWC additionally promotes partnerships with employers to overcome barriers to meeting workforce needs with the creative use of technology and innovation. TWC takes steps to ensure that the staff of public schools, vocational service programs, and community-based organizations are trained and supported to assist all individuals with disabilities in achieving competitive employment. TWC also promotes the availability and accessibility of individualized training designed to prepare an individual with a disability for the individual’s preferred employment. To this end, individuals with disabilities are given the opportunity to understand and explore options for education and training, including postsecondary, graduate and postgraduate education, vocational or technical training, or other training, as pathways to employment. (Page 44)

Project SEARCH is a pre-employment training program that is a business led, one-year school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the workplace. The program includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. Project SEARCH serves students with significant intellectual and developmental disabilities. Typically, these are students who are on an IEP and in their last year of high school eligibility. The goal for these consumers is competitive employment within the business where the worksite rotations occur or at another business.

Project SEARCH has expanded from one original program site established in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital in Ohio, to over 340 sites internationally. Project SEARCH in Texas began in 2007 with Seton Healthcare Family in Austin. As of fall 2015, Texas has 17 Project SEARCH sites. Each site is led by a host of businesses and includes key partners, including DARS VR, ISDs, and CRPs. The expansion of this program in Texas is due in part to a five-year grant awarded by the Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities (TCDD). The grant pays for technical assistance from the Project SEARCH staff in Ohio that may be needed to start any new sites, as well as supporting the collaborative effort from all agencies involved. In its first year, the grant started three sites in the 2013-2014 school year, in addition to the three sites that already existed in Austin. In the 2014-2015 school year, five additional sites were added, which brought the total number of Project SEARCH sites in Texas to 17. Each Project SEARCH site typically has 8-12 participants per year. The total number of consumers participating in Project SEARCH for the 2015-2016 school year is 144. The 17 Project SEARCH sites. (Pages 247-248)

Expand initiatives like Project Search, a school-to-work internship program that provides work experience to help young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities between the ages of 18 and 22 transition to employment. One example of Project Search is the collaboration between Austin Independent School District, DARS, and the Seton Health Care family that provides internships for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

  • The 28 Workforce Development Boards (WDB) work closely with DARS and it is anticipated that the transfer of VR to TWC will enable an enhanced team approach that will benefit consumers and increase their employment outcomes.
  • For persons with IDD, they may need more time to get adjusted to the job.
  • Each activity for transition-age students should be geared to prepare them for employment and should include activities such as summer work experience opportunities. (Page 337)
Data Collection

TWC provides the main automated systems used by the local Boards and other grantees for job matching, data collection, and case management, including adult education and vocational rehabilitation, as well as child care assistance. In addition, the Boards and other grantees use a financial reporting system developed by TWC.

WorkInTexas.com - WorkInTexas.com is Texas’ Labor Exchange System, as mandated by the Wagner-Peyser Act, and operated in cooperative effort with JobCentral, the National Labor Exchange system. WorkInTexas.com is a comprehensive online job search resource and job matching system developed and maintained by TWC, and provides: (Page 82)

TWC operates a collection of different IT systems to capture participant information, services, and outcomes. Many of these systems were legacy systems that were transferred to TWC as programs were moved to the agency. TWC supports efforts to increase efficiency while maintaining quality levels of service through judicious use of resources and adhering to policy (local, state, and federal). To these ends, TWC is currently evaluating workforce system solutions in other states to better unite the case management and job search functions of our programs. As successful systems are identified, TWC and Texas Workforce Solutions look to demo their delivery with Boards. While TWC is exploring ways to either integrate or replace these systems, such changes would not be completed during the life of this plan. ( Page 118)

Consumer Satisfaction Surveys 

DRS and DBS conduct ongoing consumer satisfaction surveys in order to assess how VR consumers feel about the services they have received or are receiving. Consumers in the eligibility, in-plan, and closed phases of services are surveyed separately. The surveys are extensive, and approximately 7,500 DRS consumers and 1,024 DBS consumers completed the consumer satisfaction surveys. The reports from the 2013 surveys were submitted to DARS and RCT in January 2014. While including all of the results from the consumer satisfaction surveys does not fit the scope of this CSNA, several of the questions were particularly relevant and helped inform it. (Page 226)

While the CSNA provides insight into the needs of individuals with disabilities, there are multiple limitations in the methods that should be considered when using the findings. First, the samples used were convenience samples that cannot represent the views of any group. Second, it is unknown how technology issues impacted the completion of online surveys by screen reader users. Several individuals did call to complete phone surveys, but others may have refrained due to concerns over confidentiality. Also, given the constraints of the data collection methods used, assessment findings related to the geographical location of unserved and underserved populations in the state are limited. DRS has plans to expand the capacity and use of various data collection methods, which is expected to yield valuable information throughout the next three fiscal years. (Page 268)

The next CSNA will be the product of an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will culminate with a comprehensive report to be published in 2017.

DRS and DBS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work and RCT to engage in a continuous process of collecting and analyzing data for a robust and effective assessment of the needs of Texans with disabilities. In recognition of WIOA’s focus on students with disabilities and youth, pre-employment transition services, and supported employment, and in addition to the methodology used in the most recent CSNA, efforts going forward have been enhanced to include surveys and/or focus groups throughout the state with staff, transition-age consumers, families, TEA representatives, home-school networks, and other stakeholders. (Page 272)

The data collection and assessment process is underway for the next CSNA that will culminate with the publication of a comprehensive report in 2017. In recognition of WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and pre-employment transition services, CSNA efforts going forward have been enhanced to assess needs in these areas.

State Rehabilitation Council Support 

The RCT is the state rehabilitation council for DRS and DBS. RCT assists DARS in fulfilling the requirements of the federal Rehabilitation Act for the delivery of quality, consumer-responsive VR services. Its stated mission is: “The Rehabilitation Council of Texas, partnering with the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services, advocates for Texans with disabilities in the vocational rehabilitation process.” Funds are allocated for the operation of RCT to meet the goals and objectives set forth in its resource plan. RCT is a valued and active partner in the development of VR goals, priorities, and policies. RCT reviews, analyzes, and advises DARS about performance related to VR eligibility; the extent, scope, effectiveness of VR services; policy changes related to service delivery to VR consumers; and other functions related to the VR program performed by DARS. RCT also reviews and analyzes consumer satisfaction with VR services provided and assists DARS in developing VR State Plans and in conducting the comprehensive statewide needs assessment. (Page 288)

During fall 2013 through spring 2014, DRS, DBS, and RCT collaborated with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work to conduct a comprehensive statewide needs assessment (CSNA). The CSNA findings were initially summarized in the DRS and DBS FY 2015 State Plans for VR. They inform the 2015-2017 State Plans for VR. The next CSNA will be the product of an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will culminate with a comprehensive report to be published in 2017. DRS and DBS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work. In recognition of WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and preemployment transition services, efforts going forward have been enhanced to assess needs in these areas. (Page 293)

Development of the next CSNA has begun with an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will result in the 2017 report. DBS and DRS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work and RCT to accomplish a more robust and effective assessment of the needs of Texans with disabilities. In response to WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS), the current data collection focuses on the needs of those consumers. In addition to the methodology used in the 2014 CSNA, data collection for the 2017 CSNA includes surveys and/or focus groups throughout the state with staff, students and youth with disabilities, families, Texas Education Agency (TEA) representatives, homeschool networks, and other stakeholders. (Page 391)

Development of the next CSNA has begun with an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will result in the 2017 report. DBS and DRS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work and RCT to accomplish a more robust and effective assessment of the needs of Texans with disabilities. In response to WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS), the current data collection focuses on the needs of those consumers. In addition to the methodology used in the 2014 CSNA, data collection for the 2017 CSNA includes surveys and/or focus groups throughout the state with staff, students and youth with disabilities, families, TEA representatives, homeschool networks, and other stakeholders. (Page 402)

LIMITED ACCESS TO COMPUTERS 

A second resource in short supply that hinders rural SCSEP services is access to computers and the Internet. Low–income older job seekers often have limited or no computer skills. These skills are not only required by employers but important for participants to access the Internet, register in WorkInTexas.com and other online job search databases, and develop Internet search skills. Grantees’ field staff members, including participant staff, need access to computers for data collection and communications in a state with such extensive rural areas. Improving access to computers in rural areas will increase the amount of computer and online training available for participants. To address rural technology needs, grantees will contact local businesses, governmental agencies, public libraries, and community– and faith–based organizations regarding ongoing computer and Internet access for participants on an ongoing basis.   (Page 501)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

Under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Governor of each State must submit a Unified or Combined State Plan to the U.S. Secretary of Labor that outlines a four-year workforce development strategy for the State’s workforce development system. The publicly-funded workforce system is a national network of Federal, State, regional, and local agencies and organizations that provide a range of employment, education, training, and related services and supports to help all jobseekers secure good jobs while providing businesses with the skilled workers they need to compete in the global economy. States must have approved Unified or Combined State Plans in place to receive funding for core programs. WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

Employment Networks

DRS coordinates with the Social Security Administration to encourage CRPs to become Employment Networks (ENs) under the Ticket to Work Program. DRS and select CRPs participate in the Partnership Plus program.

Currently there are 39 active ENs in Texas that are DRS CRPs, and 30 who are Workforce Solutions Offices. Of the 3,554 tickets received by these 69 ENs, 61 percent were assigned to DRS CRP ENs. (Page 250)

Coordination with Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program 

DBS coordinates with state agencies and private providers functioning as employment networks under the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Programs by: 

  • Cooperating with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to encourage Community Rehabilitation Program providers (CRPs) to become employment networks (ENs) under the Ticket to Work Program; and
  • Providing advanced payments to CRP-ENs through the Ticket to Work Partnership Plus Program, which allows CRP-ENs to provide ongoing support or job retention services that advance employment or increase earnings after a consumer’s VR case is closed. (Page 347)

DBS uses its current partnership with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to encourage Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) providers to become employment networks (ENs) under the SSA Ticket to Work Program. DBS offers incentive payments to CRP-ENs that provide 

  1. Supported employment or job placement services during the provision of VR services, and
  2. Extended supports to Ticket to Work consumers after VR case closure in order to advance employment or increase consumer earnings. (Page 368, 369, 370, 415)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 63

Texas SB 2027: Evaluation of Regional Employment and Training Opportunities for People with Disabilities - 09/01/2017

“(A) The Health and Human Services Commission in conjunction with the Texas Workforce Commission shall conduct a study regarding occupational training programs available in this state for individuals with an intellectual disability.

(B)The study must:

determine regions in this state where the training programs should be improved or expanded; and determine strategies for placing trained individuals with intellectual disabilities into fulfilling jobs using existing or improved training programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Training Initiatives - 07/01/2017

“To provide educational opportunities to enhance services provided across the state, Texas Health and Human Services develops and provides free training. Training initiatives are based on identified needs of services providers, individuals receiving services and supports, and emerging and best practices.”

Topics include employment, SSI/SSDI benefits, Employment First, Positive Behavior Management and Support, and mental health and trauma-informed care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Medicaid Person-Centered Planning Training - 02/16/2017

This page lists the Person-Centered Planning Training Requirements for various providers, caseworkers, state employees, etc. if they are part of a planning team. It also includes a link to sign up for trainings.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Council of Developmental Disability: State Plan Goals 2017-2021 - 01/01/2017

“Goal 1: Create and support promising practices that enable people with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities and to have control over their own lives by September 30, 2021.

Goal 2: Improve and/or expand community-based systems to better support people with developmental disabilities or families of children with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities by September 30, 2021.

Goal 3: Increase the access that individuals with developmental disabilities and families of individuals with developmental disabilities have to information, training, and support to advocate for themselves and/or to collaborate with allies to impact public policy, service systems, and community supports.

Goal 4: Ensure there is ongoing support and technical assistance for the Council to identify and engage in issues according to the Council’s priorities and mission.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Health and Human Services Transformation - 09/01/2016

“In 2015, Texas Health and Human Services (HHS) began a transformation effort to produce a more efficient, effective, and responsive system. In September of 2016 the first phase of that effort became operational.

The goals of the transformation are to create a system that:

Is easier to navigate for people who need information, benefits, or services Aligns with the HHS mission, business, and statutory responsibilities Breaks down operational silos to create greater program integration Creates clear lines of accountability within the organization Develops clearly defined and objective performance metrics for all areas of the organization”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Combined State Plan for The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 07/01/2016

"Texas proposes through this Combined State Plan (plan) to implement jointly administered activities concerning the following core programs and two optional programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA):

The Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs The Wagner-Peyser Employment Service (ES) program, including the Agricultural Outreach Plan The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act program The Vocational Rehabilitation program The Senior Community Service Employment Program"
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education

Texas Home Living Program (TxHmL) - Amended Rules Effective 3/2016 - 03/20/2016

“The Texas Home Living (TxHmL) program provides selected essential services and supports to people with an intellectual disability or a related condition who live in their own home or their family's home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Youth Empowerment Services (YES) Waiver Program Payment Rates - 03/15/2016

Public comments will be received on proposed payment rates for Supported Employment and Employment Assistance provided under the Youth Empowerment Services (YES) waiver program operated by the Department of State Health Services (DSHS). The revised payment rates are proposed to be effective March 15, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Employment First Policy - 02/26/2016

“The Health and Human Services Commission acknowledges the policy of the state, as set forth in Texas Government Code §531.02447, that earning a living wage through integrated, competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.  The health and human services (HHS) agencies will promote integrated, competitive employment of individuals with disabilities and affirm they are capable of meeting the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as other working-age adults by incorporating the Employment First policy and guiding principles in to agency policies, procedures, and rules.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

TX Health and Human Services Commission: General Provisions - 09/01/2015

“It is the policy of the state that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Texas SB 2027: Evaluation of Regional Employment and Training Opportunities for People with Disabilities - 09/01/2017

“(A) The Health and Human Services Commission in conjunction with the Texas Workforce Commission shall conduct a study regarding occupational training programs available in this state for individuals with an intellectual disability.

(B)The study must:

determine regions in this state where the training programs should be improved or expanded; and determine strategies for placing trained individuals with intellectual disabilities into fulfilling jobs using existing or improved training programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

TX Health and Human Services Commission: General Provisions - 09/01/2015

“It is the policy of the state that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas SB 1664 (ABLE Act) - 06/19/2015

"An act relating to the establishment of the Texas Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program…(1) to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, and (2) to provide secure funding for qualified disability expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act, the Supplemental Security Income program under title XVI of the Social Security Act, the beneficiary's employment, and other sources."

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Texas SB 1664 - 06/19/2015

"An act relating to the establishment of the Texas Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program…(1) to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, and (2) to provide secure funding for qualified disability expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act, the Supplemental Security Income program under title XVI of the Social Security Act, the beneficiary's employment, and other sources."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Texas SB 7: Enacting Community First Choice - 06/14/2013

“AN ACT relating to improving the delivery and quality of certain health and human services, including the delivery and quality of Medicaid acute care services and long-term services and supports.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

2013 Employment Assistance and Supported Employment Bill - 06/14/2013

This acts relates to the provision of employment assistance and supported employment to certain Medicaid waiver program participants. Assistance includes providing assistance to an individual that helps them locate paid employment in the community.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Texas 2013 Employment First Bill (S.B 1226) - 06/14/2013

The act establishes an employment-first policy and task force to promote integrated competitive employment opportunities that provide a living wage for individuals with disabilities. The Texas Education Agency and the Texas Workforce Commission will jointly adopt and implement the policy.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Human Resources Code Section 32.075 (Employment Assistance)

This code defines “Employment assistance” as, “assistance provided to an individual to help the individual locate paid employment in the community.” It defines “Supported employment” as, “assistance provided, in order to sustain paid employment, to an individual who, because of a disability, requires intensive, ongoing support to be self-employed, work from home, or perform in a work setting at which individuals without disabilities are employed. Supported employment includes adaptations, supervision, and training related to an individual's diagnosis.” It also lists the medical assistance waivers to which Supported Employment applies.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Human Resources Code, Section 121.003

This code addresses discrimination that is prohibited by law in the state of Texas, especially pertaining to people with disabilities. Among other measures, it specifically states that, “It is the policy of the state that persons with disabilities be employed by the state, by political subdivisions of the state, in the public schools, and in all other employment supported in whole or in part by public funds on the same terms and conditions as persons without disabilities, unless it is shown that there is no reasonable accommodation that would enable a person with a disability to perform the essential elements of a job.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Texas Labor Code, Sections 21.051 - 21.061 (Disability Discrimination)

This labor code states that an employer, employment agency or labor organization commits an unlawful act if it discriminates against individuals due to a disability or segregates or classifies them in a manner that would deprive them of an employment opportunity or otherwise adversely affect their status as an employee.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

Texas Council of Developmental Disability: State Plan Goals 2017-2021 - 01/01/2017

“Goal 1: Create and support promising practices that enable people with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities and to have control over their own lives by September 30, 2021.

Goal 2: Improve and/or expand community-based systems to better support people with developmental disabilities or families of children with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities by September 30, 2021.

Goal 3: Increase the access that individuals with developmental disabilities and families of individuals with developmental disabilities have to information, training, and support to advocate for themselves and/or to collaborate with allies to impact public policy, service systems, and community supports.

Goal 4: Ensure there is ongoing support and technical assistance for the Council to identify and engage in issues according to the Council’s priorities and mission.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Health and Human Services Transformation - 09/01/2016

“In 2015, Texas Health and Human Services (HHS) began a transformation effort to produce a more efficient, effective, and responsive system. In September of 2016 the first phase of that effort became operational.

The goals of the transformation are to create a system that:

Is easier to navigate for people who need information, benefits, or services Aligns with the HHS mission, business, and statutory responsibilities Breaks down operational silos to create greater program integration Creates clear lines of accountability within the organization Develops clearly defined and objective performance metrics for all areas of the organization”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Employment First Policy - 02/26/2016

“The Health and Human Services Commission acknowledges the policy of the state, as set forth in Texas Government Code §531.02447, that earning a living wage through integrated, competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.  The health and human services (HHS) agencies will promote integrated, competitive employment of individuals with disabilities and affirm they are capable of meeting the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as other working-age adults by incorporating the Employment First policy and guiding principles in to agency policies, procedures, and rules.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Texas Department of Aging and Disabilities (DADs) Guide to Employment for People with Disabilities - 05/01/2015

“The purpose of this guide is to provide information on how to support and assist working-age people with disabilities who are receiving DADS services to obtain and maintain competitive, integrated employment. Through this guide, DADS intends to provide information on best practices and resources that can help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. The guide includes success stories of people with disabilities who, as a result of receiving the appropriate supports and services, have secured fulfilling employment...”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Education Agency Employment First Policy - 03/25/2015

“TEA hereby adopts the state's policy that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits. TEA will evaluate recommendations made by the Employment-First Task Force and will adopt rules as necessary that are consistent with the policy.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas FY 2015 Plans for Vocational Rehabilitation and Supported Employment Services Programs - 09/30/2014

“The Division for Rehabilitation Services (DRS) recognizes that collaboration with community organizations and other state agencies is essential to achieving successful employment outcomes for consumers with the most significant disabilities. DRS seeks opportunities to identify, develop, and implement cooperative agreements with other state agencies and appropriate entities, particularly when these agreements establish a framework to assist with the provision of supported employment services and extended services for consumers with the most significant disabilities.

Plans for Improving Supported Employment Services: DRS plans to…develop and implement an improved benchmark system for the provision of specific supported employment services statewide; explore complimentary services for specific populations like persons with autism and mental health diagnoses; develop a supported employment technical assistance training model for DRS staff members to improve their ability to determine when supported employment services are needed; and develop tools that will help staff members monitor and provide guidance to supported employment contract providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DARS Provider Supported Self-Employment Diagram - 02/15/2011

This diagram serves as a guide for Dept. of Assistive and Rehabilitation Services providers for the process of supported employment, It contains guidelines and benchmarks, including an emphasis on the process of Discovery.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Workforce Commission Employment First Policy

“TWC will promote competitive employment of individuals with disabilities and the expectation that they are able to meet the same employment standards, responsibilities and expectations as other working-age adults. TWC acknowledges that it is the policy of the state, as set forth in Texas Government Code §531.02447, ‘that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.’”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Guide For Hiring People With Disability

The Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), in conjunction with Office of the Federal Contract Compliance Program (OFCCP) and a group of local businesses has produced this guide on attracting and hiring people with disabilities. DARS works in partnership with Texans with disabilities and families with children who have developmental delays to improve the quality of their lives and to enable their full participation in society. The DARS Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program helps people with disabilities to prepare for, find and keep employment. DARS services can reduce the need for support from other public benefits and services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Texas Combined State Plan for The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 07/01/2016

"Texas proposes through this Combined State Plan (plan) to implement jointly administered activities concerning the following core programs and two optional programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA):

The Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs The Wagner-Peyser Employment Service (ES) program, including the Agricultural Outreach Plan The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act program The Vocational Rehabilitation program The Senior Community Service Employment Program"
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education

Texas State Plans for VR Services and Supported Employment Services Programs - 09/30/2014

“The Division for Rehabilitation Services (DRS) recognizes that collaboration with community organizations and other state agencies is essential to achieving successful employment outcomes for consumers with the most significant disabilities. DRS seeks opportunities to identify, develop, and implement cooperative agreements with other state agencies and appropriate entities, particularly when these agreements establish a framework to assist with the provision of supported employment services and extended services for consumers with the most significant disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Task Force Home Page

The Employment First Task Force, authorized by Senate Bill 1226 (83rd Legislature, Regular Session, 2013), was established by the Texas Health and Human Services Commission executive commissioner to promote competitive employment of people with disabilities and the expectation that individuals with disabilities are able to meet the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as any other working-age adult.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Dept of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services and Dept of Aging and Disability Services MOA

Recognizing the need to coordinate the provision of services to individuals receiving services from the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) who may be eligible for or are receiving Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) or Independent Living (IL) services from the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), DARS and DADS enter into this Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) in accordance with the provisions of CFR §361.53(d) and 111.0525(b) of the Texas Human Resources Code. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Texas Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2012

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

In FY2012, Texas was awarded an EDI grant for an expansion of supported employment through Consumer Operated Services Programs.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Texas Medicaid Balancing Incentives Program - 09/04/2012

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) partner in implementing The Balancing Incentive Program (BIP), which “increases the Federal Matching Assistance Percentage to participating states through September 2015 in exchange for states making certain structural reforms to increase access to Medicaid community based long-term services and supports (LTSS).”    “These required structural reforms include…   • implementing a "no wrong door" eligibility and enrollment system;    • developing core standardized assessment instruments; and    • ensuring case management activities are conflict free.”   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Ticket to Work - 06/25/2008

“Under the Ticket to Work Program and Title II and Title XVI of the Act, SSA issues “tickets” to SSDI and SSI blind or disabled beneficiaries. In this voluntary program, each beneficiary who receives a ticket can use it to obtain services from a provider, known as an employment network (EN), or from a state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agency. The VR agency in Texas is the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS)…

The intent of the Ticket to Work Program is to…establish a system in which qualified ENs provide employment and other support services (e.g., case management, benefits counseling, and job training); provide individualized tickets to beneficiaries for the “purchase” of services from approved ENs; and give beneficiaries a real choice in obtaining the services, education, and technology needed to find, enter, and maintain employment within an expanding universe of service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Customized Employment Grant (Transition Adjustment and Career Education/TACE)

The demonstration project was conducted in local workforce development centers across the state.  It was designed to, “To enhance the capability of One-Stop Career Centers to deliver services to people with disabilities, bridging education and job development with customized employment services” by integrating customized employment services with existing services, creating customized employment opportunities for people with disabilities and increasing the capacity of centers and its partners to provide high-quality customized employment services through intensive staff training (e.g., developing a capacity building curriculum).

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Training and Technical Assistance to Providers (T-TAP)

“T-TAP is a national training and technical assistance center to help community rehabilitation providers make the transition from providing segregated employment services to finding people with disabilities jobs in the community. The specific target audience is employment agencies that hold 14(c) subminimum wage certificates, which allow employers to pay people less than minimum wage and are typically used in the disability field to pay workers piece rates at sheltered workshops. Activities include online courses, satellite telecasts, regional employment forums, intensive consultation to selected agencies, and policy research. The Institute for Community Inclusion and Virginia Commonwealth University work in partnership on this project. T-TAP [was] funded from 2002 to 2007 by the Office of Disability and Employment Policy at the U.S. Department of Labor.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Customized Employment Grant (Transition Adjustment and Career Education/TACE)

The demonstration project was conducted in local workforce development centers across the state. It was designed to, “To enhance the capability of One-Stop Career Centers to deliver services to people with disabilities, bridging education and job development with customized employment services” by integrating customized employment services with existing services, creating customized employment opportunities for people with disabilities and increasing the capacity of centers and its partners to provide high-quality customized employment services through intensive staff training (e.g., developing a capacity building curriculum).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Medicaid Buy-In Program

The program “offers low-cost Medicaid health care services — including community-based services and supports to working people with a disability. Some people might have to pay a monthly fee” to receive services which include but not limited to:  • Doctor / clinic visits  • Mental health care  • Occupational therapy (help learning how to do everyday tasks)  • X-rays  • Physical therapy (help learning how to move around better or become stronger)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Money Follows The Person

“The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) will receive approximately $33.6 million in new funding over the next five years, which will be paired with existing state and federal funding for a total of $143 million. The agency will use the money to enhance its successful Money Follows the Person (MFP) initiative and expand its effort for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and persons with behavioral health needs.

The MFP initiative helps people who are receiving long-term services and supports in a nursing facility return to the community to receive their services without having to be placed on a community services interest list.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Training Initiatives - 07/01/2017

“To provide educational opportunities to enhance services provided across the state, Texas Health and Human Services develops and provides free training. Training initiatives are based on identified needs of services providers, individuals receiving services and supports, and emerging and best practices.”

Topics include employment, SSI/SSDI benefits, Employment First, Positive Behavior Management and Support, and mental health and trauma-informed care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Medicaid Person-Centered Planning Training - 02/16/2017

This page lists the Person-Centered Planning Training Requirements for various providers, caseworkers, state employees, etc. if they are part of a planning team. It also includes a link to sign up for trainings.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Texas Customized Self-Employment Project: The Customized Employment Plan Design

This presentation describes Customized Employment as “a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both.”  It focuses heavily on the processes and value of Discovery in the employment process.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

The Texas Customized Self-Employment Project

This presentation presents Self-Employment as a viable employment option for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Texas Department of Assistive & Rehabilitative Services (DARS) Customized Self-Employment System Development Initiative

“This proposal is designed to support and implement the phased development of a financially, technically and programmatically viable system of TX DARS for prospective business owners in TX with disabilities, who require customized employment services and are applying for, or receiving, DARS counseling and services to develop small businesses.   Specifically, this initiative is designed to research, identify and develop an outcome payment model and rate structure for customized self-employment, including: DARS Counselor CRC certification level, online and onsite training and technical assistance; and, intensive multi-certification, online and onsite training for DARS vendors throughout the state of Texas.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Texas Transition and Employment Guide

This transition and employment guide is for you, the student in Texas public school, who may have received special education services due to a disability. It also provides helpful information for your parents. This guide has steps you and your parents can take to make sure you are able to find the right work or educational choices for you after high school. It also tells you where to get the services you will need after high school.    The guide is divided into sections on Self Advocacy, Transition Services, Employment and Supported Employment, Social Security Programs, Community and Long Term Services and Supports, Postsecondary Educational Programs and Services, Information Sharing, and Guardianship and Alternatives. Each section has phone numbers, emails, and websites to help you find what you need. At the end of each section and at the end of the guide, you will find a timeline of steps that you and your parents can take as you make the transition from student to adult.”  
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Wal-Mart to Pay $150,000 to Settle EEOC Age and Disability Discrimination Suit - 02/19/2015

“Under the terms of the two-year consent decree settling the case, Wal-Mart will pay $150,000 in relief to Moorman. In addition, Wal-Mart agreed to provide training for employees on the ADA and the ADEA. The training will include an instruction on the kind of conduct that may constitute unlawful discrimination or harassment, as well as an instruction on Wal-Mart's procedures for handling requests for reasonable accommodations under the ADA. Wal-Mart will also report to the EEOC regarding its compliance with the consent decree and post a notice to employees about the settlement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Texas Wendy’s Consent Decree - 10/10/2012

“Under the terms of the two-year consent decree settling the case, Wendy's will pay $41,500 in relief to a person who applied to a job with the company, but was denied despite his qualifications. “In addition, Wendy's has agreed to provide training for all managers and supervisory employees, including its company president, on the ADA. The training will include a discussion related to hiring individuals with disabilities. In addition, the training will include a specific instruction on communication devices, such as the use of the Texas Relay System or video relay service regarding communication between Wendy's employees and applicants with hearing impairments.’“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Texas Steward et. al. v. Perry et. al (2013)

“On August 19, 2013, the United States, private Plaintiffs and the State of Texas filed an Interim Settlement Agreement to enable Texans with intellectual and other developmental disabilities to live in the community rather than nursing facilities. The Interim Settlement Agreement is awaiting court approval…[It] partially addresses the Civil Rights Division's finding that the State of Texas failed to serve individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the most integrated setting appropriate to those individuals' needs, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Olmstead v. L.C.” “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Texas Home Living Program (TxHmL) - Amended Rules Effective 3/2016 - 03/20/2016

“The Texas Home Living (TxHmL) program provides selected essential services and supports to people with an intellectual disability or a related condition who live in their own home or their family's home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Youth Empowerment Services (YES) Waiver Program Payment Rates - 03/15/2016

Public comments will be received on proposed payment rates for Supported Employment and Employment Assistance provided under the Youth Empowerment Services (YES) waiver program operated by the Department of State Health Services (DSHS). The revised payment rates are proposed to be effective March 15, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Community First Choice - 06/01/2015

“Senate Bill 7 from the 2013 Texas Legislature requires the Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) to put in place a cost-effective option for attendant and habilitation services for people with disabilities who have STAR+PLUS Medicaid coverage.

A federal option, called Community First Choice, allows states to provide home and community-based attendant services and supports to Medicaid recipients with disabilities. This option provides states with a 6 percent increase in federal matching funds for Medicaid for these services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Balancing Incentives Program - 09/04/2012

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) partner in implementing The Balancing Incentive Program (BIP), which “increases the Federal Matching Assistance Percentage to participating states through September 2015 in exchange for states making certain structural reforms to increase access to Medicaid community based long-term services and supports (LTSS).”    “These required structural reforms include…implementing a "no wrong door" eligibility and enrollment system; developing core standardized assessment instruments; and ensuring case management activities are conflict free.”   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Buy-In Program

The program “offers low-cost Medicaid health care services — including community-based services and supports to working people with a disability. Some people might have to pay a monthly fee” to receive services which include but not limited to:    • Doctor / clinic visits     • Mental health care     • Occupational therapy (help learning how to do everyday tasks)    • X-rays     • Physical therapy (help learning how to move around better or become stronger)  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Money Follows The Person

“The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) will receive approximately $33.6 million in new funding over the next five years, which will be paired with existing state and federal funding for a total of $143 million. The agency will use the money to enhance its successful Money Follows the Person (MFP) initiative and expand its effort for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and persons with behavioral health needs.”   “The MFP initiative helps people who are receiving long-term services and supports in a nursing facility return to the community to receive their services without having to be placed on a community services interest list.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Medicaid State Plan

The state plan is the officially recognized document describing the nature and scope of the State of Texas Medicaid program. As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act, the plan was developed by the state and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Essentially, the plan is the state's agreement that it will conform to the requirements of the Social Security Act and the official issuances of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas HCBS Transition Plan

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has released a final rule that defines the settings in which states can offer Medicaid Home and Community Based Services (HCBS). This website will serve as a place where you can submit comments about the rule and the way its provisions will be set up within Texas Medicaid.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Youth Empowerment Services

“The Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Department of State Health Services (DSHS) developed the Youth Empowerment Services (YES) Waiver, which provides comprehensive home and community-based mental health services to youth between the ages of 3 and 18, up to a youth's 19th birthday, who have a serious emotional disturbance. The YES Waiver not only provides flexible supports and specialized services to children and youth at risk of institutionalization and/or out-of-home placement due to their serious emotional disturbance, but also strives to provide hope to families by offering services aimed at keeping children and youth in their homes and communities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“HCS provides individualized services and supports to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities who are living with their family, in their own home or in other community settings, such as small group homes.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

Everything's Bigger in Texas, including the number of job options in integrated settings at competitive wages for individuals with disabilities. The Lone Star state is a place where anyone, including those with disabilities, can live the American Dream… Deep in the Heart of Texas! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Texas' VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.86%
Change from
2014 to 2015
27,469,114
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.01%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,584,428
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.04%
Change from
2014 to 2015
626,445
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.97%
Change from
2014 to 2015
39.54%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.01%
Change from
2014 to 2015
75.28%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 27,469,114
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,584,428
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 626,445
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 11,346,637
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.54%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.28%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,524,865
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 1,601,481
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,402,094
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 425,070
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 984,782
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 19,232
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 73,273
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,634
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 71,874
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 133,169

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 19,684
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 569,586

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 35,158
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 66,891
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 185,621
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 18.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 38.90%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 17,078
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 15,079
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 4,552
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 100,400

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 54,851
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 633
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 365
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.33

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
20,127
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 32
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 4,564
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 6,449
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 4,782
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 3,375
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 925
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 19,773
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 916,755
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $5,842,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $116,626,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 11.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 25,599
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 67.53%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.22%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.36%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.24%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 7,034,752
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 6,822
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,436,521
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 4,235,134
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 5,671,655
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 1,090
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,482
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 4,572
AbilityOne wages (products). $12,142,783
AbilityOne wages (services). $54,025,955

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 72
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 76
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 17
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 5,605
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 618
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6,240

 

WIOA Proflie

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

At the federal, state, and local levels, TWC continues to make great strides toward a streamlined and coordinated one-stop delivery system serving adults and youth with disabilities and employers that employ these individuals. TWC’s executive director and the commissioner of assistive and rehabilitative services (transferred to TWC as of September 2016) participate as ex officio members of the Governor’s Committee on People with Disabilities. TWC also serves on state-level interagency councils and workgroups supporting gateways for individuals with disabilities, such as the Employment First Task Force and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services’ (DADS) Promoting Independence Advisory Council. Other memberships have included the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services’ (DARS) Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Advisory Council, and HHSC’s House Bill 1230 Workgroup on Transition Services for Youth with Disabilities. TWC will also continue to coordinate with the State Independent Living Council (SILC) and the Centers for Independent Living (CILs) to serve mutual consumers who need employment assistance as well as assistance with independent living resources. In this vein, TWC has collaborated with a number of agencies in developing guidance, such as a transition and employment guide for Texas students with disabilities. (Page 72)

  • DRS co–chairs and participates in the legislatively mandated Employment First Task Force charged with writing and making recommendations to implement an Employment First statewide policy, and providing information and/or training to providers, stakeholders, and the general public on employment as the first option for any publicly funded service.
  • Membership and participation in Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE).
  • Representation on:
  • The Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities
  • The Council for Advising and Planning (CAP) for the Prevention and Treatment of Mental and Substance Use Disorders
  • Texas Clubhouse Coalition
  • Texas Alliance for the Mentally Ill
  • Texas Coordinating Council for Veteran Services (TCCVS)
  • Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Council (TBIAC)
  • HHSC Office of Acquired Brain Injury (OABI)
  • State Independent Living Council (SILC)
  • Texas Interagency Council for the Homeless
  • DADS Consumer Direction Workgroup
  • HHSC Medicaid/CHIP CRCG
  • Texas Technology Access Program Advisory Council (Page 244)

Also, DARS co-chairs the Employment First Task Force (EFTF), which was created as a result of SB 1226 and was passed by the 83rd Texas Legislature (2013). The EFTF consists of 26 members (seven represent state agencies) appointed by the HHSC executive commissioner. The purpose of the EFTF is to promote competitive employment of individuals with disabilities, with the expectation that individuals with disabilities are able to meet the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as any other working-age adult.

The 83rd legislature established Employment First Policy for Texas, which makes competitive employment and earning a living wage a priority and the preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.

The EFTF’s responsibilities include designing an education and outreach process, developing recommendations for policy, procedure, and rule changes necessary to implement the employment first policy, and providing reports to the governor’s office, Texas legislature, and HHSC executive commissioner. The first report was submitted in Fall 2014. The next report is due in the fall of 2016. (Page 300)

Customized Employment

DRS ensures that staff are well–qualified to assist individuals with disabilities. There is emphasis of educational requirements at the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral levels, in fields related to rehabilitation. However, the degree field may include other degrees that prepare individuals to work with consumers and employers. For example, bachelor degrees might include not only vocational rehabilitation counseling, but also social work, psychology, disability studies, business administration, human resources, special education, supported employment, customized employment, economics, or another field that reasonably prepares individuals to work with consumers and employers. For individuals hired at the bachelor’s level, there is a requirement for at least one year of paid or unpaid experience related to direct work with individuals with disabilities. (Page 258)

  • Continued focus on the foundations of the VR process for counselors and RSTs, including accurate eligibility determination, inclusion of consumers in planning for service delivery, thorough assessing and planning practices, models for vocational counseling, informed consumer choice, service to culturally diverse populations, good purchasing practices, supported employment, customized employment and other strategies for quality employment assistance, service delivery, and effective case note documentation;
  • Training in working with employers and consumers to increase knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998, the Olmstead decision, available independence initiatives, and VR participation in the Workforce Investment Act to enhance employment options and employment knowledge; (Page 260 All)
Braiding/Blending Resources

No specific disability related information found.

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

Achieving excellence in accessibility is based on three core principles: 

  • ensuring that all customers can effectively use workforce products and services;
  • creating a workspace accessible for individuals with disabilities; and
  • complying with all federal and state legal requirements (Page 127) 

Determine compliance with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA §188. Both programmatic and physical accessibility are addressed during an EO compliance review.

As recipients of WIOA funding, Boards are monitored on-site based on a three-year rotation schedule, as referenced in the State Methods of Administration (MOA) maintained on file with DOL’s Civil Rights Center (DOL-CRC). All 28 Boards are scheduled for an EO review within a designated three-year period. Dates for EO monitoring reviews generally align with those of the TWC’s annual Board monitoring review. (Page 128)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

DRS program specialists provide the following training:

  • Annual training on VR and independent living services to DADS Home and Community–Based Services (HCS) waiver utilization review nurses, Private Provider Association of Texas members, community center staff, including consumer benefits officers, and the Statewide Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Consortium;
  • Training on VR services and benefits and work incentives to HHSC Managed Care Organization (MCO) service coordinators and management, STAR+PLUS, and other service providers and Medicaid waiver case managers;
  • Training on DARS employment services and benefits and work incentives to members of the seven statewide mental health peer–operated support groups;
  • Training on benefits and work incentives every six months for DRS and DBS staff, long–term supports and services providers involved in the MFP employment pilot grant, and DADS and DSHS central office staff. The providers and DADS/DSHS staff get monthly follow–up training via teleconference and written materials, as well as ongoing technical assistance on specific benefits and work incentives issues;
  • A four–hour benefits overview to CRPs statewide, and currently planning with UNT to provide this overview via webinar;
  • Overview of benefits and work incentives to DADS staff, providers, and other community stakeholders throughout the year;
  • Overview to DADS service coordinators, case managers, private providers, and other staff on DRS VR services and best practices for mutually served consumers;
  • Overview of Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) to community partners;
  • Training to CRPs statewide on best practices in the provision of employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities; and
  • Training on Assistive Technology to community partners. (Page 251)

Result in competitive integrated employment outcomes for VR consumers by: 

  • Developing and implementing agency-wide business strategies with a regional focus that creates a unified comprehensive approach to business development, including working with DRS on a new statewide joint Business Relations Team, the formation of regional Outreach Services and Coordination Teams, and the development and joint use of a new business database tracking tool;
  • Providing Employment Assistance Training to staff, to instruct on how to best contact and meet the needs of our business partners;
  • Identifying and accessing higher wage employment opportunities by aligning DBS/DRS business development activities and consumer service provisions to maximize high wage opportunities. This is the goal of the current DBS Work Matters project; and
  • Aligning counseling critical thinking processes around employment opportunities and data to engage consumers in defining their optimal vocational opportunities. During FFY 2015, DBS began a pilot project within the Austin Regional Office in an effort to begin initiating this particular strategy. 

Success will be measured by: 

  • An increase of employers being served by DARS;
  • An increase of successful employment outcomes for DBS consumers;
  • A positive impact on consumer salaries by increasing weekly wages;
  • Maximizing consumer potential and capabilities based on their job readiness; and
  • Increasing job placement vendor effectiveness in matching consumer abilities with employment opportunities. (Page 425)

A pilot program in the Austin region teaches a systematic decision-making process to staff, which includes tools to provide consumers with accurate labor market data and jobs in their geographic area. This process helps consumers make a decision using criteria set forth by the consumer based on data from several resources.

S&I Measure 1.2: Of the individuals exiting the VR program after receiving services, a minimum of 68.9 percent will have achieved an employment outcome. 

  • Performance: In 2015, 75.20 percent of the individuals exiting the DBS VR program after receiving services achieved an employment outcome. (S&I Report) 

To maintain satisfactory performance on this indicator, DBS continues training and reinforcement of the appropriate use of

  1. Extended evaluation to serve consumers with the most significant disabilities and
  2. A thorough comprehensive assessment before VR Counselors develop the individualized plan for employment. DARS is also developing additional tools for counselors to use during situational assessments to improve the information obtained to inform eligibility decisions. (Page 453)
Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

TWC plans to continue to emphasize the availability of a variety of financial literacy activities into the service-delivery strategy within the one-stop delivery system. Under WIOA, states are encouraged to develop and implement strategies for workforce areas to use to coordinate financial literacy services to participants and provide financial literacy activities to youth. TWC agrees with the need for services that foster financial education and literacy services, including financial capability, and encourages partnerships and contracts between Boards and the agencies delivering them.

Comment 6: The Texas State Independent Living Council (SILC) supports the state plan with the following additions.

  • A Coordination of Independent Living section should be added, with the role of SILC and Texas’ Centers for Independent Living (CIL) expressly stated. ( Page 135)

TWC allocates youth formula funds to Boards, that in turn contract with service providers to deliver services to youth in their respective workforce areas. Boards are required to meet all federal and state programmatic requirements. TWC maintains a rigorous performance and accountability system, holding Boards accountable for their performance as it pertains to the youth program as it does with other workforce programs, and Boards have rigorous standards in place for their contracted service providers. Boards must ensure that all 14 program elements—including new WIOA program elements such as financial literacy and services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in workforce areas—are available to youth participants. (Page 163)

Benefits

Approximately 12 percent of the Texas population is estimated to have some type of disability. TWC is committed to providing services to this population; TWC promotes competitive employment of individuals with disabilities coupled with the expectation that they are able to meet the same employment standards and responsibilities as other working-age adults. All working-age individuals with disabilities, including young adults, are offered factual information regarding employment as an individual with a disability, including the relationship between an individual’s earned income and the individual’s public benefits.

The VR program—currently housed at DARS, but moving to TWC on September 1, 2016—helps individuals with disabilities prepare for, find, and keep jobs, and helps students with disabilities plan the jump from school to work. Work-related services are individualized and may include counseling, training, medical treatment, assistive devices, job placement assistance, and other services. (Page 44)

  • Custodial parents are 21 percent less likely to receive TANF benefits; and
  • More than $191 million in child support was collected through August 2015, some of which was used to repay TANF, Medicaid, foster care, and child support collections programs. (Page 64)

Helping customers with disabilities in a Workforce Solutions Office environment; 

  • Resources and funding sources for support services and employment accommodations; and
  • The effects that employment may have on Social Security disability benefits. (Page 129)

Workforce areas that provide quality services will have access to additional resources to meet the employers’ needs, job seekers, and incumbent workers. Additionally, the waiver will allow TWC to continue to promote the cost benefits of improved administrative efficiencies, encouraging the increased leveraging of resources within the workforce areas. As a result, TWC will increase services such as enhanced education, employment, and training opportunities for disadvantaged populations and individuals with multiple barriers to employment. (Page 174)

DRS develops partnerships with schools and community organizations to help students with disabilities make a smooth transition to adulthood and work. DRS has counselors throughout the state that have a role in preparing students with disabilities for entry into the workplace. VR counselors coordinate closely with high schools to ensure appropriate students are referred to the VR program. Counselors work with schools to identify students receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) as early as possible in the process to address concerns regarding impact of employment on benefits and to provide resources for benefits counseling.

VR counselors have flexible work schedules that allow them to participate in school activities, parent meetings, community forums, summer skill-building activities, job clubs, etc. (Page 238)

DARS is currently in the process of collaborating with TEA to update the Letter of Agreement, including the addition of pre-employment transition services as defined in §361.48 and other requirements of WIOA, operationalizing a referral process of students with the highest needs, and a process for invitations to Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) meetings. The final agreement will be between TEA and TWC following the transfer of the VR program in FFY’17 as required by SB 208. Counselors work with schools to identify students receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) as early as possible in the process to address concerns regarding impact of employment on benefits and to provide resources for benefits counseling. DRS has specialty TVRCs and VRCs who are liaisons for high schools and partner with the educational system to more appropriately serve transition-age students seeking assistance to access adult vocational services. Partnering with ISDs allows counselors to use office space on campus to ensure that student consumers have access to resources available through the workforce investment system, community, businesses, and other partners necessary to build a network of support. VR counselors use various tools and strategies in their coordination with schools. The School Plan is a tool available to counselors for planning with their assigned schools. It provides an outline for open communication about each party’s expectations and goals for the school year. Counselors are encouraged to develop a School Plan with each assigned school before that school year begins, and update it as necessary throughout the year. (Page 240)

DRS works with DADS and HHSC Medicaid/CHIP to ensure service definitions in the 1915(c) home– and community–based waivers accurately reflect Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and Rehabilitation Services Administration regulations. This partnership allows services that result in competitive employment to be delivered efficiently and timely through the payor of first resort.

  • DRS provides annual training to DSHS Community Benefits Officers on SSI and SSDI benefits and work incentives and offers free intensive training and technical assistance to DADS staff and providers to become Benefits Subject Matter Resource staff.
  • DRS co–chairs and participates in the legislatively mandated Employment First Task Force charged with writing and making recommendations to implement an Employment First statewide policy, and providing information and/or training to providers, stakeholders, and the general public on employment as the first option for any publicly funded service.
  • Membership and participation in Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE).
  • Representation on:
  • The Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities
  • The Council for Advising and Planning (CAP) for the Prevention and Treatment of Mental and Substance Use Disorders
  • Texas Clubhouse Coalition
  • Texas Alliance for the Mentally Ill
  • Texas Coordinating Council for Veteran Services (TCCVS)
  • Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Council (TBIAC)
  • HHSC Office of Acquired Brain Injury (OABI)
  • State Independent Living Council (SILC)
  • Texas Interagency Council for the Homeless
  • DADS Consumer Direction Workgroup
  • HHSC Medicaid/CHIP CRCG
  • Texas Technology Access Program Advisory Council (Page 244)

The Business Relations Team also developed and disseminated additional resources to Texas businesses, including a new Business Services web site, available at http://www.dars.state.tx.us/services/servicesforbusiness.shtml. This web site provides information about the benefits of partnering with DARS, including available services and business testimonials, as well as resources such as the GUIDE FOR HIRING PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES and helpful websites.

The Business Relations Team is also increasing coordination with other state and federal entities that administer employment training programs. The result of this coordination is a growth in the number of jointly held business symposia and job fairs in communities across Texas. The team’s efforts to partner with TWC, Local Workforce Development Boards, and the U.S. Department of Labor Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs will help ensure that local businesses and Texans with disabilities seeking competitive employment have the greatest level of support, resources, and services available to help them succeed. (Page 246)

Annual training on VR and independent living services to DADS Home and Community–Based Services (HCS) waiver utilization review nurses, Private Provider Association of Texas members, community center staff, including consumer benefits officers, and the Statewide Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Consortium;

  • Training on VR services and benefits and work incentives to HHSC Managed Care Organization (MCO) service coordinators and management, STAR+PLUS, and other service providers and Medicaid waiver case managers;
  • Training on DARS employment services and benefits and work incentives to members of the seven statewide mental health peer–operated support groups;
  • Training on benefits and work incentives every six months for DRS and DBS staff, long–term supports and services providers involved in the MFP employment pilot grant, and DADS and DSHS central office staff. The providers and DADS/DSHS staff get monthly follow–up training via teleconference and written materials, as well as ongoing technical assistance on specific benefits and work incentives issues;
  • A four–hour benefits overview to CRPs statewide, and currently planning with UNT to provide this overview via webinar; (Page 251)

Concern over loss of benefits is a barrier identified through multiple surveys. Staff reported low levels of knowledge of how work impacts Social Security benefits. Both staff and stakeholders expressed that concern over loss of benefits is a disincentive to work. 

Areas for Improvement 

While the consumer survey reported that consumers were satisfied with their jobs and wages, the stakeholder survey indicated dissatisfaction that was echoed in the town hall meetings. Customer service issues such as responsiveness were noted as issues. The lack of and quality of service providers (CRP providers) in some areas of the state was also a stated concern. In general, there appears to be a perception that there is too much bureaucracy that impedes the rehabilitation process, particularly related to the eligibility process. (Page 270)

DRS has a liaison with the American G.I. Forum that targets the needs of Hispanic veterans and has assigned a bilingual counselor who has completed the Social Security work incentive training to work with significantly disabled veterans drawing SSDI benefits but who want to work.

  • A number of counselors are participating in training to learn to speak other languages and attending sign language classes.
  • DRS establishes specialized caseloads for certain disabilities to help develop the expertise needed to most benefit the consumers served. (Page 286)

DRS will improve consumer employment outcomes for target populations by: 

  • Strengthening and expanding collaboration, outreach, and education with various partners to efficiently and effectively use existing resources.
  • Assessing business processes, policy, training, and organizational capacity on an ongoing basis to make consistent improvements in employment outcomes.
  • Increasing employer knowledge and awareness regarding the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.
  • Increasing consumer knowledge and awareness of DRS services and benefits offered to individuals with disabilities in target populations to obtain or retain employment. (Page 291)
School to Work Transition

The VR program—currently housed at DARS, but moving to TWC on September 1, 2016—helps individuals with disabilities prepare for, find, and keep jobs, and helps students with disabilities plan the jump from school to work. Work-related services are individualized and may include counseling, training, medical treatment, assistive devices, job placement assistance, and other services.

TWC additionally promotes partnerships with employers to overcome barriers to meeting workforce needs with the creative use of technology and innovation. TWC takes steps to ensure that the staff of public schools, vocational service programs, and community-based organizations are trained and supported to assist all individuals with disabilities in achieving competitive employment. TWC also promotes the availability and accessibility of individualized training designed to prepare an individual with a disability for the individual’s preferred employment. To this end, individuals with disabilities are given the opportunity to understand and explore options for education and training, including postsecondary, graduate and postgraduate education, vocational or technical training, or other training, as pathways to employment. (Page 44)

Project SEARCH is a pre-employment training program that is a business led, one-year school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the workplace. The program includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. Project SEARCH serves students with significant intellectual and developmental disabilities. Typically, these are students who are on an IEP and in their last year of high school eligibility. The goal for these consumers is competitive employment within the business where the worksite rotations occur or at another business.

Project SEARCH has expanded from one original program site established in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital in Ohio, to over 340 sites internationally. Project SEARCH in Texas began in 2007 with Seton Healthcare Family in Austin. As of fall 2015, Texas has 17 Project SEARCH sites. Each site is led by a host of businesses and includes key partners, including DARS VR, ISDs, and CRPs. The expansion of this program in Texas is due in part to a five-year grant awarded by the Texas Council for Developmental Disabilities (TCDD). The grant pays for technical assistance from the Project SEARCH staff in Ohio that may be needed to start any new sites, as well as supporting the collaborative effort from all agencies involved. In its first year, the grant started three sites in the 2013-2014 school year, in addition to the three sites that already existed in Austin. In the 2014-2015 school year, five additional sites were added, which brought the total number of Project SEARCH sites in Texas to 17. Each Project SEARCH site typically has 8-12 participants per year. The total number of consumers participating in Project SEARCH for the 2015-2016 school year is 144. The 17 Project SEARCH sites. (Pages 247-248)

Expand initiatives like Project Search, a school-to-work internship program that provides work experience to help young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities between the ages of 18 and 22 transition to employment. One example of Project Search is the collaboration between Austin Independent School District, DARS, and the Seton Health Care family that provides internships for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

  • The 28 Workforce Development Boards (WDB) work closely with DARS and it is anticipated that the transfer of VR to TWC will enable an enhanced team approach that will benefit consumers and increase their employment outcomes.
  • For persons with IDD, they may need more time to get adjusted to the job.
  • Each activity for transition-age students should be geared to prepare them for employment and should include activities such as summer work experience opportunities. (Page 337)
Data Collection

TWC provides the main automated systems used by the local Boards and other grantees for job matching, data collection, and case management, including adult education and vocational rehabilitation, as well as child care assistance. In addition, the Boards and other grantees use a financial reporting system developed by TWC.

WorkInTexas.com - WorkInTexas.com is Texas’ Labor Exchange System, as mandated by the Wagner-Peyser Act, and operated in cooperative effort with JobCentral, the National Labor Exchange system. WorkInTexas.com is a comprehensive online job search resource and job matching system developed and maintained by TWC, and provides: (Page 82)

TWC operates a collection of different IT systems to capture participant information, services, and outcomes. Many of these systems were legacy systems that were transferred to TWC as programs were moved to the agency. TWC supports efforts to increase efficiency while maintaining quality levels of service through judicious use of resources and adhering to policy (local, state, and federal). To these ends, TWC is currently evaluating workforce system solutions in other states to better unite the case management and job search functions of our programs. As successful systems are identified, TWC and Texas Workforce Solutions look to demo their delivery with Boards. While TWC is exploring ways to either integrate or replace these systems, such changes would not be completed during the life of this plan. ( Page 118)

Consumer Satisfaction Surveys 

DRS and DBS conduct ongoing consumer satisfaction surveys in order to assess how VR consumers feel about the services they have received or are receiving. Consumers in the eligibility, in-plan, and closed phases of services are surveyed separately. The surveys are extensive, and approximately 7,500 DRS consumers and 1,024 DBS consumers completed the consumer satisfaction surveys. The reports from the 2013 surveys were submitted to DARS and RCT in January 2014. While including all of the results from the consumer satisfaction surveys does not fit the scope of this CSNA, several of the questions were particularly relevant and helped inform it. (Page 226)

While the CSNA provides insight into the needs of individuals with disabilities, there are multiple limitations in the methods that should be considered when using the findings. First, the samples used were convenience samples that cannot represent the views of any group. Second, it is unknown how technology issues impacted the completion of online surveys by screen reader users. Several individuals did call to complete phone surveys, but others may have refrained due to concerns over confidentiality. Also, given the constraints of the data collection methods used, assessment findings related to the geographical location of unserved and underserved populations in the state are limited. DRS has plans to expand the capacity and use of various data collection methods, which is expected to yield valuable information throughout the next three fiscal years. (Page 268)

The next CSNA will be the product of an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will culminate with a comprehensive report to be published in 2017.

DRS and DBS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work and RCT to engage in a continuous process of collecting and analyzing data for a robust and effective assessment of the needs of Texans with disabilities. In recognition of WIOA’s focus on students with disabilities and youth, pre-employment transition services, and supported employment, and in addition to the methodology used in the most recent CSNA, efforts going forward have been enhanced to include surveys and/or focus groups throughout the state with staff, transition-age consumers, families, TEA representatives, home-school networks, and other stakeholders. (Page 272)

The data collection and assessment process is underway for the next CSNA that will culminate with the publication of a comprehensive report in 2017. In recognition of WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and pre-employment transition services, CSNA efforts going forward have been enhanced to assess needs in these areas.

State Rehabilitation Council Support 

The RCT is the state rehabilitation council for DRS and DBS. RCT assists DARS in fulfilling the requirements of the federal Rehabilitation Act for the delivery of quality, consumer-responsive VR services. Its stated mission is: “The Rehabilitation Council of Texas, partnering with the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services, advocates for Texans with disabilities in the vocational rehabilitation process.” Funds are allocated for the operation of RCT to meet the goals and objectives set forth in its resource plan. RCT is a valued and active partner in the development of VR goals, priorities, and policies. RCT reviews, analyzes, and advises DARS about performance related to VR eligibility; the extent, scope, effectiveness of VR services; policy changes related to service delivery to VR consumers; and other functions related to the VR program performed by DARS. RCT also reviews and analyzes consumer satisfaction with VR services provided and assists DARS in developing VR State Plans and in conducting the comprehensive statewide needs assessment. (Page 288)

During fall 2013 through spring 2014, DRS, DBS, and RCT collaborated with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work to conduct a comprehensive statewide needs assessment (CSNA). The CSNA findings were initially summarized in the DRS and DBS FY 2015 State Plans for VR. They inform the 2015-2017 State Plans for VR. The next CSNA will be the product of an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will culminate with a comprehensive report to be published in 2017. DRS and DBS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work. In recognition of WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and preemployment transition services, efforts going forward have been enhanced to assess needs in these areas. (Page 293)

Development of the next CSNA has begun with an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will result in the 2017 report. DBS and DRS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work and RCT to accomplish a more robust and effective assessment of the needs of Texans with disabilities. In response to WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS), the current data collection focuses on the needs of those consumers. In addition to the methodology used in the 2014 CSNA, data collection for the 2017 CSNA includes surveys and/or focus groups throughout the state with staff, students and youth with disabilities, families, Texas Education Agency (TEA) representatives, homeschool networks, and other stakeholders. (Page 391)

Development of the next CSNA has begun with an ongoing data collection and assessment process that will result in the 2017 report. DBS and DRS are continuing their collaboration with the Child and Family Research Institute of the University of Texas School of Social Work and RCT to accomplish a more robust and effective assessment of the needs of Texans with disabilities. In response to WIOA’s focus on students and youth with disabilities and pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS), the current data collection focuses on the needs of those consumers. In addition to the methodology used in the 2014 CSNA, data collection for the 2017 CSNA includes surveys and/or focus groups throughout the state with staff, students and youth with disabilities, families, TEA representatives, homeschool networks, and other stakeholders. (Page 402)

LIMITED ACCESS TO COMPUTERS 

A second resource in short supply that hinders rural SCSEP services is access to computers and the Internet. Low–income older job seekers often have limited or no computer skills. These skills are not only required by employers but important for participants to access the Internet, register in WorkInTexas.com and other online job search databases, and develop Internet search skills. Grantees’ field staff members, including participant staff, need access to computers for data collection and communications in a state with such extensive rural areas. Improving access to computers in rural areas will increase the amount of computer and online training available for participants. To address rural technology needs, grantees will contact local businesses, governmental agencies, public libraries, and community– and faith–based organizations regarding ongoing computer and Internet access for participants on an ongoing basis.   (Page 501)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

Under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), the Governor of each State must submit a Unified or Combined State Plan to the U.S. Secretary of Labor that outlines a four-year workforce development strategy for the State’s workforce development system. The publicly-funded workforce system is a national network of Federal, State, regional, and local agencies and organizations that provide a range of employment, education, training, and related services and supports to help all jobseekers secure good jobs while providing businesses with the skilled workers they need to compete in the global economy. States must have approved Unified or Combined State Plans in place to receive funding for core programs. WIOA reforms planning requirements, previously governed by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), to foster better alignment of Federal investments in job training, to integrate service delivery across programs and improve efficiency in service delivery, and to ensure that the workforce system is job-driven and matches employers with skilled individuals. One of WIOA’s principal areas of reform is to require States to plan across core programs and include this planning process in the Unified or Combined State Plans. This reform promotes a shared understanding of the workforce needs within each State and fosters development of more comprehensive and integrated approaches, such as career pathways and sector strategies, for addressing the needs of businesses and workers. Successful implementation of many of these approaches called for within WIOA requires robust relationships across programs. WIOA requires States and local areas to enhance coordination and partnerships with local entities and supportive service agencies for strengthened service delivery, including through Unified or Combined State Plans. (Page 4)

Employment Networks

DRS coordinates with the Social Security Administration to encourage CRPs to become Employment Networks (ENs) under the Ticket to Work Program. DRS and select CRPs participate in the Partnership Plus program.

Currently there are 39 active ENs in Texas that are DRS CRPs, and 30 who are Workforce Solutions Offices. Of the 3,554 tickets received by these 69 ENs, 61 percent were assigned to DRS CRP ENs. (Page 250)

Coordination with Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program 

DBS coordinates with state agencies and private providers functioning as employment networks under the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Programs by: 

  • Cooperating with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to encourage Community Rehabilitation Program providers (CRPs) to become employment networks (ENs) under the Ticket to Work Program; and
  • Providing advanced payments to CRP-ENs through the Ticket to Work Partnership Plus Program, which allows CRP-ENs to provide ongoing support or job retention services that advance employment or increase earnings after a consumer’s VR case is closed. (Page 347)

DBS uses its current partnership with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to encourage Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) providers to become employment networks (ENs) under the SSA Ticket to Work Program. DBS offers incentive payments to CRP-ENs that provide 

  1. Supported employment or job placement services during the provision of VR services, and
  2. Extended supports to Ticket to Work consumers after VR case closure in order to advance employment or increase consumer earnings. (Page 368, 369, 370, 415)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 63

Texas SB 2027: Evaluation of Regional Employment and Training Opportunities for People with Disabilities - 09/01/2017

“(A) The Health and Human Services Commission in conjunction with the Texas Workforce Commission shall conduct a study regarding occupational training programs available in this state for individuals with an intellectual disability.

(B)The study must:

determine regions in this state where the training programs should be improved or expanded; and determine strategies for placing trained individuals with intellectual disabilities into fulfilling jobs using existing or improved training programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Training Initiatives - 07/01/2017

“To provide educational opportunities to enhance services provided across the state, Texas Health and Human Services develops and provides free training. Training initiatives are based on identified needs of services providers, individuals receiving services and supports, and emerging and best practices.”

Topics include employment, SSI/SSDI benefits, Employment First, Positive Behavior Management and Support, and mental health and trauma-informed care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Medicaid Person-Centered Planning Training - 02/16/2017

This page lists the Person-Centered Planning Training Requirements for various providers, caseworkers, state employees, etc. if they are part of a planning team. It also includes a link to sign up for trainings.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Council of Developmental Disability: State Plan Goals 2017-2021 - 01/01/2017

“Goal 1: Create and support promising practices that enable people with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities and to have control over their own lives by September 30, 2021.

Goal 2: Improve and/or expand community-based systems to better support people with developmental disabilities or families of children with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities by September 30, 2021.

Goal 3: Increase the access that individuals with developmental disabilities and families of individuals with developmental disabilities have to information, training, and support to advocate for themselves and/or to collaborate with allies to impact public policy, service systems, and community supports.

Goal 4: Ensure there is ongoing support and technical assistance for the Council to identify and engage in issues according to the Council’s priorities and mission.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Health and Human Services Transformation - 09/01/2016

“In 2015, Texas Health and Human Services (HHS) began a transformation effort to produce a more efficient, effective, and responsive system. In September of 2016 the first phase of that effort became operational.

The goals of the transformation are to create a system that:

Is easier to navigate for people who need information, benefits, or services Aligns with the HHS mission, business, and statutory responsibilities Breaks down operational silos to create greater program integration Creates clear lines of accountability within the organization Develops clearly defined and objective performance metrics for all areas of the organization”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Combined State Plan for The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 07/01/2016

"Texas proposes through this Combined State Plan (plan) to implement jointly administered activities concerning the following core programs and two optional programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA):

The Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs The Wagner-Peyser Employment Service (ES) program, including the Agricultural Outreach Plan The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act program The Vocational Rehabilitation program The Senior Community Service Employment Program"
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education

Texas Home Living Program (TxHmL) - Amended Rules Effective 3/2016 - 03/20/2016

“The Texas Home Living (TxHmL) program provides selected essential services and supports to people with an intellectual disability or a related condition who live in their own home or their family's home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Youth Empowerment Services (YES) Waiver Program Payment Rates - 03/15/2016

Public comments will be received on proposed payment rates for Supported Employment and Employment Assistance provided under the Youth Empowerment Services (YES) waiver program operated by the Department of State Health Services (DSHS). The revised payment rates are proposed to be effective March 15, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Employment First Policy - 02/26/2016

“The Health and Human Services Commission acknowledges the policy of the state, as set forth in Texas Government Code §531.02447, that earning a living wage through integrated, competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.  The health and human services (HHS) agencies will promote integrated, competitive employment of individuals with disabilities and affirm they are capable of meeting the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as other working-age adults by incorporating the Employment First policy and guiding principles in to agency policies, procedures, and rules.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

TX Health and Human Services Commission: General Provisions - 09/01/2015

“It is the policy of the state that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Texas SB 2027: Evaluation of Regional Employment and Training Opportunities for People with Disabilities - 09/01/2017

“(A) The Health and Human Services Commission in conjunction with the Texas Workforce Commission shall conduct a study regarding occupational training programs available in this state for individuals with an intellectual disability.

(B)The study must:

determine regions in this state where the training programs should be improved or expanded; and determine strategies for placing trained individuals with intellectual disabilities into fulfilling jobs using existing or improved training programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

TX Health and Human Services Commission: General Provisions - 09/01/2015

“It is the policy of the state that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas SB 1664 (ABLE Act) - 06/19/2015

"An act relating to the establishment of the Texas Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program…(1) to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, and (2) to provide secure funding for qualified disability expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act, the Supplemental Security Income program under title XVI of the Social Security Act, the beneficiary's employment, and other sources."

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Texas SB 1664 - 06/19/2015

"An act relating to the establishment of the Texas Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program…(1) to encourage and assist individuals and families in saving funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, and (2) to provide secure funding for qualified disability expenses on behalf of designated beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not supplant, benefits provided through private insurance, the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act, the Supplemental Security Income program under title XVI of the Social Security Act, the beneficiary's employment, and other sources."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Texas SB 7: Enacting Community First Choice - 06/14/2013

“AN ACT relating to improving the delivery and quality of certain health and human services, including the delivery and quality of Medicaid acute care services and long-term services and supports.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

2013 Employment Assistance and Supported Employment Bill - 06/14/2013

This acts relates to the provision of employment assistance and supported employment to certain Medicaid waiver program participants. Assistance includes providing assistance to an individual that helps them locate paid employment in the community.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Texas 2013 Employment First Bill (S.B 1226) - 06/14/2013

The act establishes an employment-first policy and task force to promote integrated competitive employment opportunities that provide a living wage for individuals with disabilities. The Texas Education Agency and the Texas Workforce Commission will jointly adopt and implement the policy.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Human Resources Code Section 32.075 (Employment Assistance)

This code defines “Employment assistance” as, “assistance provided to an individual to help the individual locate paid employment in the community.” It defines “Supported employment” as, “assistance provided, in order to sustain paid employment, to an individual who, because of a disability, requires intensive, ongoing support to be self-employed, work from home, or perform in a work setting at which individuals without disabilities are employed. Supported employment includes adaptations, supervision, and training related to an individual's diagnosis.” It also lists the medical assistance waivers to which Supported Employment applies.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Human Resources Code, Section 121.003

This code addresses discrimination that is prohibited by law in the state of Texas, especially pertaining to people with disabilities. Among other measures, it specifically states that, “It is the policy of the state that persons with disabilities be employed by the state, by political subdivisions of the state, in the public schools, and in all other employment supported in whole or in part by public funds on the same terms and conditions as persons without disabilities, unless it is shown that there is no reasonable accommodation that would enable a person with a disability to perform the essential elements of a job.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Texas Labor Code, Sections 21.051 - 21.061 (Disability Discrimination)

This labor code states that an employer, employment agency or labor organization commits an unlawful act if it discriminates against individuals due to a disability or segregates or classifies them in a manner that would deprive them of an employment opportunity or otherwise adversely affect their status as an employee.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

Texas Council of Developmental Disability: State Plan Goals 2017-2021 - 01/01/2017

“Goal 1: Create and support promising practices that enable people with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities and to have control over their own lives by September 30, 2021.

Goal 2: Improve and/or expand community-based systems to better support people with developmental disabilities or families of children with developmental disabilities to be fully included in their communities by September 30, 2021.

Goal 3: Increase the access that individuals with developmental disabilities and families of individuals with developmental disabilities have to information, training, and support to advocate for themselves and/or to collaborate with allies to impact public policy, service systems, and community supports.

Goal 4: Ensure there is ongoing support and technical assistance for the Council to identify and engage in issues according to the Council’s priorities and mission.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Health and Human Services Transformation - 09/01/2016

“In 2015, Texas Health and Human Services (HHS) began a transformation effort to produce a more efficient, effective, and responsive system. In September of 2016 the first phase of that effort became operational.

The goals of the transformation are to create a system that:

Is easier to navigate for people who need information, benefits, or services Aligns with the HHS mission, business, and statutory responsibilities Breaks down operational silos to create greater program integration Creates clear lines of accountability within the organization Develops clearly defined and objective performance metrics for all areas of the organization”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Employment First Policy - 02/26/2016

“The Health and Human Services Commission acknowledges the policy of the state, as set forth in Texas Government Code §531.02447, that earning a living wage through integrated, competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.  The health and human services (HHS) agencies will promote integrated, competitive employment of individuals with disabilities and affirm they are capable of meeting the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as other working-age adults by incorporating the Employment First policy and guiding principles in to agency policies, procedures, and rules.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Texas Department of Aging and Disabilities (DADs) Guide to Employment for People with Disabilities - 05/01/2015

“The purpose of this guide is to provide information on how to support and assist working-age people with disabilities who are receiving DADS services to obtain and maintain competitive, integrated employment. Through this guide, DADS intends to provide information on best practices and resources that can help improve employment outcomes for people with disabilities. The guide includes success stories of people with disabilities who, as a result of receiving the appropriate supports and services, have secured fulfilling employment...”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Education Agency Employment First Policy - 03/25/2015

“TEA hereby adopts the state's policy that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits. TEA will evaluate recommendations made by the Employment-First Task Force and will adopt rules as necessary that are consistent with the policy.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas FY 2015 Plans for Vocational Rehabilitation and Supported Employment Services Programs - 09/30/2014

“The Division for Rehabilitation Services (DRS) recognizes that collaboration with community organizations and other state agencies is essential to achieving successful employment outcomes for consumers with the most significant disabilities. DRS seeks opportunities to identify, develop, and implement cooperative agreements with other state agencies and appropriate entities, particularly when these agreements establish a framework to assist with the provision of supported employment services and extended services for consumers with the most significant disabilities.

Plans for Improving Supported Employment Services: DRS plans to…develop and implement an improved benchmark system for the provision of specific supported employment services statewide; explore complimentary services for specific populations like persons with autism and mental health diagnoses; develop a supported employment technical assistance training model for DRS staff members to improve their ability to determine when supported employment services are needed; and develop tools that will help staff members monitor and provide guidance to supported employment contract providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DARS Provider Supported Self-Employment Diagram - 02/15/2011

This diagram serves as a guide for Dept. of Assistive and Rehabilitation Services providers for the process of supported employment, It contains guidelines and benchmarks, including an emphasis on the process of Discovery.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Workforce Commission Employment First Policy

“TWC will promote competitive employment of individuals with disabilities and the expectation that they are able to meet the same employment standards, responsibilities and expectations as other working-age adults. TWC acknowledges that it is the policy of the state, as set forth in Texas Government Code §531.02447, ‘that earning a living wage through competitive employment in the general workforce is the priority and preferred outcome for working-age individuals with disabilities who receive public benefits.’”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Guide For Hiring People With Disability

The Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), in conjunction with Office of the Federal Contract Compliance Program (OFCCP) and a group of local businesses has produced this guide on attracting and hiring people with disabilities. DARS works in partnership with Texans with disabilities and families with children who have developmental delays to improve the quality of their lives and to enable their full participation in society. The DARS Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program helps people with disabilities to prepare for, find and keep employment. DARS services can reduce the need for support from other public benefits and services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Texas Combined State Plan for The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 07/01/2016

"Texas proposes through this Combined State Plan (plan) to implement jointly administered activities concerning the following core programs and two optional programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA):

The Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs The Wagner-Peyser Employment Service (ES) program, including the Agricultural Outreach Plan The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act program The Vocational Rehabilitation program The Senior Community Service Employment Program"
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education

Texas State Plans for VR Services and Supported Employment Services Programs - 09/30/2014

“The Division for Rehabilitation Services (DRS) recognizes that collaboration with community organizations and other state agencies is essential to achieving successful employment outcomes for consumers with the most significant disabilities. DRS seeks opportunities to identify, develop, and implement cooperative agreements with other state agencies and appropriate entities, particularly when these agreements establish a framework to assist with the provision of supported employment services and extended services for consumers with the most significant disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Task Force Home Page

The Employment First Task Force, authorized by Senate Bill 1226 (83rd Legislature, Regular Session, 2013), was established by the Texas Health and Human Services Commission executive commissioner to promote competitive employment of people with disabilities and the expectation that individuals with disabilities are able to meet the same employment standards, responsibilities, and expectations as any other working-age adult.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Dept of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services and Dept of Aging and Disability Services MOA

Recognizing the need to coordinate the provision of services to individuals receiving services from the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) who may be eligible for or are receiving Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) or Independent Living (IL) services from the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), DARS and DADS enter into this Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) in accordance with the provisions of CFR §361.53(d) and 111.0525(b) of the Texas Human Resources Code. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Texas Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2012

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

In FY2012, Texas was awarded an EDI grant for an expansion of supported employment through Consumer Operated Services Programs.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Texas Medicaid Balancing Incentives Program - 09/04/2012

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) partner in implementing The Balancing Incentive Program (BIP), which “increases the Federal Matching Assistance Percentage to participating states through September 2015 in exchange for states making certain structural reforms to increase access to Medicaid community based long-term services and supports (LTSS).”    “These required structural reforms include…   • implementing a "no wrong door" eligibility and enrollment system;    • developing core standardized assessment instruments; and    • ensuring case management activities are conflict free.”   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Ticket to Work - 06/25/2008

“Under the Ticket to Work Program and Title II and Title XVI of the Act, SSA issues “tickets” to SSDI and SSI blind or disabled beneficiaries. In this voluntary program, each beneficiary who receives a ticket can use it to obtain services from a provider, known as an employment network (EN), or from a state vocational rehabilitation (VR) agency. The VR agency in Texas is the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS)…

The intent of the Ticket to Work Program is to…establish a system in which qualified ENs provide employment and other support services (e.g., case management, benefits counseling, and job training); provide individualized tickets to beneficiaries for the “purchase” of services from approved ENs; and give beneficiaries a real choice in obtaining the services, education, and technology needed to find, enter, and maintain employment within an expanding universe of service providers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Customized Employment Grant (Transition Adjustment and Career Education/TACE)

The demonstration project was conducted in local workforce development centers across the state.  It was designed to, “To enhance the capability of One-Stop Career Centers to deliver services to people with disabilities, bridging education and job development with customized employment services” by integrating customized employment services with existing services, creating customized employment opportunities for people with disabilities and increasing the capacity of centers and its partners to provide high-quality customized employment services through intensive staff training (e.g., developing a capacity building curriculum).

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Texas Training and Technical Assistance to Providers (T-TAP)

“T-TAP is a national training and technical assistance center to help community rehabilitation providers make the transition from providing segregated employment services to finding people with disabilities jobs in the community. The specific target audience is employment agencies that hold 14(c) subminimum wage certificates, which allow employers to pay people less than minimum wage and are typically used in the disability field to pay workers piece rates at sheltered workshops. Activities include online courses, satellite telecasts, regional employment forums, intensive consultation to selected agencies, and policy research. The Institute for Community Inclusion and Virginia Commonwealth University work in partnership on this project. T-TAP [was] funded from 2002 to 2007 by the Office of Disability and Employment Policy at the U.S. Department of Labor.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Customized Employment Grant (Transition Adjustment and Career Education/TACE)

The demonstration project was conducted in local workforce development centers across the state. It was designed to, “To enhance the capability of One-Stop Career Centers to deliver services to people with disabilities, bridging education and job development with customized employment services” by integrating customized employment services with existing services, creating customized employment opportunities for people with disabilities and increasing the capacity of centers and its partners to provide high-quality customized employment services through intensive staff training (e.g., developing a capacity building curriculum).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Medicaid Buy-In Program

The program “offers low-cost Medicaid health care services — including community-based services and supports to working people with a disability. Some people might have to pay a monthly fee” to receive services which include but not limited to:  • Doctor / clinic visits  • Mental health care  • Occupational therapy (help learning how to do everyday tasks)  • X-rays  • Physical therapy (help learning how to move around better or become stronger)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Money Follows The Person

“The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) will receive approximately $33.6 million in new funding over the next five years, which will be paired with existing state and federal funding for a total of $143 million. The agency will use the money to enhance its successful Money Follows the Person (MFP) initiative and expand its effort for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and persons with behavioral health needs.

The MFP initiative helps people who are receiving long-term services and supports in a nursing facility return to the community to receive their services without having to be placed on a community services interest list.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Texas Department of Health and Human Services Training Initiatives - 07/01/2017

“To provide educational opportunities to enhance services provided across the state, Texas Health and Human Services develops and provides free training. Training initiatives are based on identified needs of services providers, individuals receiving services and supports, and emerging and best practices.”

Topics include employment, SSI/SSDI benefits, Employment First, Positive Behavior Management and Support, and mental health and trauma-informed care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Medicaid Person-Centered Planning Training - 02/16/2017

This page lists the Person-Centered Planning Training Requirements for various providers, caseworkers, state employees, etc. if they are part of a planning team. It also includes a link to sign up for trainings.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Texas Customized Self-Employment Project: The Customized Employment Plan Design

This presentation describes Customized Employment as “a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both.”  It focuses heavily on the processes and value of Discovery in the employment process.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

The Texas Customized Self-Employment Project

This presentation presents Self-Employment as a viable employment option for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Texas Department of Assistive & Rehabilitative Services (DARS) Customized Self-Employment System Development Initiative

“This proposal is designed to support and implement the phased development of a financially, technically and programmatically viable system of TX DARS for prospective business owners in TX with disabilities, who require customized employment services and are applying for, or receiving, DARS counseling and services to develop small businesses.   Specifically, this initiative is designed to research, identify and develop an outcome payment model and rate structure for customized self-employment, including: DARS Counselor CRC certification level, online and onsite training and technical assistance; and, intensive multi-certification, online and onsite training for DARS vendors throughout the state of Texas.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Texas Transition and Employment Guide

This transition and employment guide is for you, the student in Texas public school, who may have received special education services due to a disability. It also provides helpful information for your parents. This guide has steps you and your parents can take to make sure you are able to find the right work or educational choices for you after high school. It also tells you where to get the services you will need after high school.    The guide is divided into sections on Self Advocacy, Transition Services, Employment and Supported Employment, Social Security Programs, Community and Long Term Services and Supports, Postsecondary Educational Programs and Services, Information Sharing, and Guardianship and Alternatives. Each section has phone numbers, emails, and websites to help you find what you need. At the end of each section and at the end of the guide, you will find a timeline of steps that you and your parents can take as you make the transition from student to adult.”  
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Wal-Mart to Pay $150,000 to Settle EEOC Age and Disability Discrimination Suit - 02/19/2015

“Under the terms of the two-year consent decree settling the case, Wal-Mart will pay $150,000 in relief to Moorman. In addition, Wal-Mart agreed to provide training for employees on the ADA and the ADEA. The training will include an instruction on the kind of conduct that may constitute unlawful discrimination or harassment, as well as an instruction on Wal-Mart's procedures for handling requests for reasonable accommodations under the ADA. Wal-Mart will also report to the EEOC regarding its compliance with the consent decree and post a notice to employees about the settlement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Texas Wendy’s Consent Decree - 10/10/2012

“Under the terms of the two-year consent decree settling the case, Wendy's will pay $41,500 in relief to a person who applied to a job with the company, but was denied despite his qualifications. “In addition, Wendy's has agreed to provide training for all managers and supervisory employees, including its company president, on the ADA. The training will include a discussion related to hiring individuals with disabilities. In addition, the training will include a specific instruction on communication devices, such as the use of the Texas Relay System or video relay service regarding communication between Wendy's employees and applicants with hearing impairments.’“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Texas Steward et. al. v. Perry et. al (2013)

“On August 19, 2013, the United States, private Plaintiffs and the State of Texas filed an Interim Settlement Agreement to enable Texans with intellectual and other developmental disabilities to live in the community rather than nursing facilities. The Interim Settlement Agreement is awaiting court approval…[It] partially addresses the Civil Rights Division's finding that the State of Texas failed to serve individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the most integrated setting appropriate to those individuals' needs, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Olmstead v. L.C.” “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 10 of 12

Texas Home Living Program (TxHmL) - Amended Rules Effective 3/2016 - 03/20/2016

“The Texas Home Living (TxHmL) program provides selected essential services and supports to people with an intellectual disability or a related condition who live in their own home or their family's home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Youth Empowerment Services (YES) Waiver Program Payment Rates - 03/15/2016

Public comments will be received on proposed payment rates for Supported Employment and Employment Assistance provided under the Youth Empowerment Services (YES) waiver program operated by the Department of State Health Services (DSHS). The revised payment rates are proposed to be effective March 15, 2016

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Community First Choice - 06/01/2015

“Senate Bill 7 from the 2013 Texas Legislature requires the Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) to put in place a cost-effective option for attendant and habilitation services for people with disabilities who have STAR+PLUS Medicaid coverage.

A federal option, called Community First Choice, allows states to provide home and community-based attendant services and supports to Medicaid recipients with disabilities. This option provides states with a 6 percent increase in federal matching funds for Medicaid for these services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Balancing Incentives Program - 09/04/2012

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) partner in implementing The Balancing Incentive Program (BIP), which “increases the Federal Matching Assistance Percentage to participating states through September 2015 in exchange for states making certain structural reforms to increase access to Medicaid community based long-term services and supports (LTSS).”    “These required structural reforms include…implementing a "no wrong door" eligibility and enrollment system; developing core standardized assessment instruments; and ensuring case management activities are conflict free.”   
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Buy-In Program

The program “offers low-cost Medicaid health care services — including community-based services and supports to working people with a disability. Some people might have to pay a monthly fee” to receive services which include but not limited to:    • Doctor / clinic visits     • Mental health care     • Occupational therapy (help learning how to do everyday tasks)    • X-rays     • Physical therapy (help learning how to move around better or become stronger)  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Money Follows The Person

“The Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) will receive approximately $33.6 million in new funding over the next five years, which will be paired with existing state and federal funding for a total of $143 million. The agency will use the money to enhance its successful Money Follows the Person (MFP) initiative and expand its effort for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and persons with behavioral health needs.”   “The MFP initiative helps people who are receiving long-term services and supports in a nursing facility return to the community to receive their services without having to be placed on a community services interest list.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Medicaid State Plan

The state plan is the officially recognized document describing the nature and scope of the State of Texas Medicaid program. As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act, the plan was developed by the state and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Essentially, the plan is the state's agreement that it will conform to the requirements of the Social Security Act and the official issuances of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas HCBS Transition Plan

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has released a final rule that defines the settings in which states can offer Medicaid Home and Community Based Services (HCBS). This website will serve as a place where you can submit comments about the rule and the way its provisions will be set up within Texas Medicaid.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Texas Youth Empowerment Services

“The Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) and the Department of State Health Services (DSHS) developed the Youth Empowerment Services (YES) Waiver, which provides comprehensive home and community-based mental health services to youth between the ages of 3 and 18, up to a youth's 19th birthday, who have a serious emotional disturbance. The YES Waiver not only provides flexible supports and specialized services to children and youth at risk of institutionalization and/or out-of-home placement due to their serious emotional disturbance, but also strives to provide hope to families by offering services aimed at keeping children and youth in their homes and communities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Texas Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“HCS provides individualized services and supports to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities who are living with their family, in their own home or in other community settings, such as small group homes.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

Everything's Bigger in Texas, including the number of job options in integrated settings at competitive wages for individuals with disabilities. The Lone Star state is a place where anyone, including those with disabilities, can live the American Dream… Deep in the Heart of Texas! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Texas' VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.86%
Change from
2014 to 2015
27,469,114
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.01%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,584,428
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.04%
Change from
2014 to 2015
626,445
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.97%
Change from
2014 to 2015
39.54%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.01%
Change from
2014 to 2015
75.28%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 27,469,114
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 1,584,428
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 626,445
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 11,346,637
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.54%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.28%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 1,524,865
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 1,601,481
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 2,402,094
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 425,070
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 984,782
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 19,232
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 73,273
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,634
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 71,874
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 133,169

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 19,684
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 569,586

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 35,158
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 66,891
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 185,621
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 18.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.60%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.80%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 38.90%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 17,078
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 15,079
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 4,552
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 100,400

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 54,851
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 633
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 365
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.33

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
20,127
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 32
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 4,564
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 6,449
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 4,782
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 3,375
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 925
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 19,773
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 916,755
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $5,842,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $116,626,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 11.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 25,599
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 67.53%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.22%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.36%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.24%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 7,034,752
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 6,822
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,436,521
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 4,235,134
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 5,671,655
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 1,090
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,482
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 4,572
AbilityOne wages (products). $12,142,783
AbilityOne wages (services). $54,025,955

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 72
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 76
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 17
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 5,605
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 618
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6,240