U.S. Virgin Islands [Territory]

States - Big Screen

"United in Pride and Hope": Standing united in the hope that all people with disabilities can work at integrated competitive jobs..

2016 State Population.
1.03%
Change from
2010 to 2016
107,510
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
5,164

General

2010 2016
Population. 106,405 107,510
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 5,164 N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 1,545

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 53
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 267
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 278
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 19.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2016
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 70
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. N/A

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
73
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 3
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 11
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 16
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 32
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 11
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 0
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 8
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 2,090
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 56.44%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 18.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.64%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 68.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.76%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 44.83%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the United States Virgin Islands differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The United States Virgin Islands Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The United States Virgin Islands Department of Human Services is the single state agency.    Through section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $273.8 million in Medicaid funding to the United States Virgin Islands.    For the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate based on the state’s per capita income. For the United States Virgin Islands, all Medicaid expenditures are matched until the Medicaid base funds and the Affordable Care Act funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing The United States Virgin Islands’ FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

The United States Virgin Islands was awarded $24.9 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. The United States Virgin Islands must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disability EmploymentThe Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) is engaged in disability employment activities. We work towards the goal of getting and keeping people with disabilities employed. In order to achieve these goals, we work with our community partners on initiatives for job coach training, employment training for people with disabilities, and person-centered planning activities, while working to develop customized employment solutions in partnership with people with disabilities. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ticket to Work - 01/01/2019

~~“What is Ticket to Work?

Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for Social Security disability beneficiaries who want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence.

More information about the Ticket to Work Law can be found by accessing the weblink, or by contacting our Employment Network at (340) 277-3335.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OEF//OIF POST—DEPLOYMENT FACTSHEET - 01/01/2019

~~“A GUIDE FOR EMPLOYERS AND SUPERVISORS- Returning to Work after Deployment• Educate co-workers. Before the service member returns to work, meet with their co-workers. Explain the importance of being supportive of the service member. Remind employees not to ask sensitive questions. This includes questions about injuries or combat experiences. • Update the service member. Meet with service members to discuss their job duties. Give them detailed job tasks that are manageable. Explain any new policies or staff changes.  This will help them feel part of the work force again.• Educate the returning service member. This can include any job- related training or education requirements. This will help them feel more confident in their skills. • Allow for readjustment time. Be aware that everyone is different. Some people need more time adjust. Encourage the service member to ask for guidance and support. Make sure they take breaks throughout the day. This will help reduce excess stress. • Provide special accommodations. Plan for the special needs of those who have been injured. The service member’s family can help identify potential problem areas at work.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Supported Employment Program - 01/01/2019

~~“This program supports costs for employment training expenses, work adjustment skills and job placement for individuals with the most severe disabilities.

Through an agreement on a fee-for-service basis with Work-Able Inc., a not-for-profit agency, this program provides individualized placement services for persons with severe disabilities who cannot benefit from traditional employment opportunities and require on-the-job support for a specified period of time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabilities and Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“This office administers the Division of Disabilities, Vocational and Rehabilitation Services that provide programs to assist individuals with disabilities, physical or mental impairments that constitute or result in substantial impediment(s) to employment, by providing those services which will help them to achieve an employment outcome.

The Special Services Unit of this program provides services to Disabled Adults and Adult Foster Care, administers the Disabled Persons Fund and provides support for the Community Rehabilitation Facility, Developmental Disabilities Council and cancer care programs, and assists disabled persons in obtaining handicapped parking permits”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Virgin Islands for 2017-2019 - 01/01/2017

~~“The CIL express an ongoing interest in developing a format for administering an annual consumer satisfaction survey. SILC board will work with CIL staff to jointly develop instrument which will express the level of satisfaction or non-satisfaction of consumers with the services provided to them by the CIL”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Ticket to Work - 01/01/2019

~~“What is Ticket to Work?

Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for Social Security disability beneficiaries who want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence.

More information about the Ticket to Work Law can be found by accessing the weblink, or by contacting our Employment Network at (340) 277-3335.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OEF//OIF POST—DEPLOYMENT FACTSHEET - 01/01/2019

~~“A GUIDE FOR EMPLOYERS AND SUPERVISORS- Returning to Work after Deployment• Educate co-workers. Before the service member returns to work, meet with their co-workers. Explain the importance of being supportive of the service member. Remind employees not to ask sensitive questions. This includes questions about injuries or combat experiences. • Update the service member. Meet with service members to discuss their job duties. Give them detailed job tasks that are manageable. Explain any new policies or staff changes.  This will help them feel part of the work force again.• Educate the returning service member. This can include any job- related training or education requirements. This will help them feel more confident in their skills. • Allow for readjustment time. Be aware that everyone is different. Some people need more time adjust. Encourage the service member to ask for guidance and support. Make sure they take breaks throughout the day. This will help reduce excess stress. • Provide special accommodations. Plan for the special needs of those who have been injured. The service member’s family can help identify potential problem areas at work.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Supported Employment Program - 01/01/2019

~~“This program supports costs for employment training expenses, work adjustment skills and job placement for individuals with the most severe disabilities.

Through an agreement on a fee-for-service basis with Work-Able Inc., a not-for-profit agency, this program provides individualized placement services for persons with severe disabilities who cannot benefit from traditional employment opportunities and require on-the-job support for a specified period of time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabilities and Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“This office administers the Division of Disabilities, Vocational and Rehabilitation Services that provide programs to assist individuals with disabilities, physical or mental impairments that constitute or result in substantial impediment(s) to employment, by providing those services which will help them to achieve an employment outcome.

The Special Services Unit of this program provides services to Disabled Adults and Adult Foster Care, administers the Disabled Persons Fund and provides support for the Community Rehabilitation Facility, Developmental Disabilities Council and cancer care programs, and assists disabled persons in obtaining handicapped parking permits”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Virgin Islands for 2017-2019 - 01/01/2017

~~“The CIL express an ongoing interest in developing a format for administering an annual consumer satisfaction survey. SILC board will work with CIL staff to jointly develop instrument which will express the level of satisfaction or non-satisfaction of consumers with the services provided to them by the CIL”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disability EmploymentThe Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) is engaged in disability employment activities. We work towards the goal of getting and keeping people with disabilities employed. In order to achieve these goals, we work with our community partners on initiatives for job coach training, employment training for people with disabilities, and person-centered planning activities, while working to develop customized employment solutions in partnership with people with disabilities. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the United States Virgin Islands differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The United States Virgin Islands Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The United States Virgin Islands Department of Human Services is the single state agency.    Through section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $273.8 million in Medicaid funding to the United States Virgin Islands.    For the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate based on the state’s per capita income. For the United States Virgin Islands, all Medicaid expenditures are matched until the Medicaid base funds and the Affordable Care Act funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing The United States Virgin Islands’ FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

The United States Virgin Islands was awarded $24.9 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. The United States Virgin Islands must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

"United in Pride and Hope": Standing united in the hope that all people with disabilities can work at integrated competitive jobs..

2016 State Population.
1.03%
Change from
2010 to 2016
107,510
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
5,164

State Data

General

2010 2016
Population. 106,405 107,510
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 5,164 N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 1,545

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 53
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 267
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 278
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 19.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2016
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 70
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. N/A

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
73
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 3
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 11
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 16
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 32
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 11
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 0
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 8
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 2,090
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 56.44%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 18.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.64%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 68.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.76%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 44.83%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the United States Virgin Islands differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The United States Virgin Islands Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The United States Virgin Islands Department of Human Services is the single state agency.    Through section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $273.8 million in Medicaid funding to the United States Virgin Islands.    For the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate based on the state’s per capita income. For the United States Virgin Islands, all Medicaid expenditures are matched until the Medicaid base funds and the Affordable Care Act funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing The United States Virgin Islands’ FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

The United States Virgin Islands was awarded $24.9 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. The United States Virgin Islands must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disability EmploymentThe Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) is engaged in disability employment activities. We work towards the goal of getting and keeping people with disabilities employed. In order to achieve these goals, we work with our community partners on initiatives for job coach training, employment training for people with disabilities, and person-centered planning activities, while working to develop customized employment solutions in partnership with people with disabilities. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ticket to Work - 01/01/2019

~~“What is Ticket to Work?

Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for Social Security disability beneficiaries who want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence.

More information about the Ticket to Work Law can be found by accessing the weblink, or by contacting our Employment Network at (340) 277-3335.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OEF//OIF POST—DEPLOYMENT FACTSHEET - 01/01/2019

~~“A GUIDE FOR EMPLOYERS AND SUPERVISORS- Returning to Work after Deployment• Educate co-workers. Before the service member returns to work, meet with their co-workers. Explain the importance of being supportive of the service member. Remind employees not to ask sensitive questions. This includes questions about injuries or combat experiences. • Update the service member. Meet with service members to discuss their job duties. Give them detailed job tasks that are manageable. Explain any new policies or staff changes.  This will help them feel part of the work force again.• Educate the returning service member. This can include any job- related training or education requirements. This will help them feel more confident in their skills. • Allow for readjustment time. Be aware that everyone is different. Some people need more time adjust. Encourage the service member to ask for guidance and support. Make sure they take breaks throughout the day. This will help reduce excess stress. • Provide special accommodations. Plan for the special needs of those who have been injured. The service member’s family can help identify potential problem areas at work.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Supported Employment Program - 01/01/2019

~~“This program supports costs for employment training expenses, work adjustment skills and job placement for individuals with the most severe disabilities.

Through an agreement on a fee-for-service basis with Work-Able Inc., a not-for-profit agency, this program provides individualized placement services for persons with severe disabilities who cannot benefit from traditional employment opportunities and require on-the-job support for a specified period of time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabilities and Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“This office administers the Division of Disabilities, Vocational and Rehabilitation Services that provide programs to assist individuals with disabilities, physical or mental impairments that constitute or result in substantial impediment(s) to employment, by providing those services which will help them to achieve an employment outcome.

The Special Services Unit of this program provides services to Disabled Adults and Adult Foster Care, administers the Disabled Persons Fund and provides support for the Community Rehabilitation Facility, Developmental Disabilities Council and cancer care programs, and assists disabled persons in obtaining handicapped parking permits”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Virgin Islands for 2017-2019 - 01/01/2017

~~“The CIL express an ongoing interest in developing a format for administering an annual consumer satisfaction survey. SILC board will work with CIL staff to jointly develop instrument which will express the level of satisfaction or non-satisfaction of consumers with the services provided to them by the CIL”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Ticket to Work - 01/01/2019

~~“What is Ticket to Work?

Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for Social Security disability beneficiaries who want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence.

More information about the Ticket to Work Law can be found by accessing the weblink, or by contacting our Employment Network at (340) 277-3335.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OEF//OIF POST—DEPLOYMENT FACTSHEET - 01/01/2019

~~“A GUIDE FOR EMPLOYERS AND SUPERVISORS- Returning to Work after Deployment• Educate co-workers. Before the service member returns to work, meet with their co-workers. Explain the importance of being supportive of the service member. Remind employees not to ask sensitive questions. This includes questions about injuries or combat experiences. • Update the service member. Meet with service members to discuss their job duties. Give them detailed job tasks that are manageable. Explain any new policies or staff changes.  This will help them feel part of the work force again.• Educate the returning service member. This can include any job- related training or education requirements. This will help them feel more confident in their skills. • Allow for readjustment time. Be aware that everyone is different. Some people need more time adjust. Encourage the service member to ask for guidance and support. Make sure they take breaks throughout the day. This will help reduce excess stress. • Provide special accommodations. Plan for the special needs of those who have been injured. The service member’s family can help identify potential problem areas at work.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Supported Employment Program - 01/01/2019

~~“This program supports costs for employment training expenses, work adjustment skills and job placement for individuals with the most severe disabilities.

Through an agreement on a fee-for-service basis with Work-Able Inc., a not-for-profit agency, this program provides individualized placement services for persons with severe disabilities who cannot benefit from traditional employment opportunities and require on-the-job support for a specified period of time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabilities and Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“This office administers the Division of Disabilities, Vocational and Rehabilitation Services that provide programs to assist individuals with disabilities, physical or mental impairments that constitute or result in substantial impediment(s) to employment, by providing those services which will help them to achieve an employment outcome.

The Special Services Unit of this program provides services to Disabled Adults and Adult Foster Care, administers the Disabled Persons Fund and provides support for the Community Rehabilitation Facility, Developmental Disabilities Council and cancer care programs, and assists disabled persons in obtaining handicapped parking permits”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Virgin Islands for 2017-2019 - 01/01/2017

~~“The CIL express an ongoing interest in developing a format for administering an annual consumer satisfaction survey. SILC board will work with CIL staff to jointly develop instrument which will express the level of satisfaction or non-satisfaction of consumers with the services provided to them by the CIL”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disability EmploymentThe Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) is engaged in disability employment activities. We work towards the goal of getting and keeping people with disabilities employed. In order to achieve these goals, we work with our community partners on initiatives for job coach training, employment training for people with disabilities, and person-centered planning activities, while working to develop customized employment solutions in partnership with people with disabilities. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the United States Virgin Islands differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The United States Virgin Islands Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The United States Virgin Islands Department of Human Services is the single state agency.    Through section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $273.8 million in Medicaid funding to the United States Virgin Islands.    For the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate based on the state’s per capita income. For the United States Virgin Islands, all Medicaid expenditures are matched until the Medicaid base funds and the Affordable Care Act funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing The United States Virgin Islands’ FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

The United States Virgin Islands was awarded $24.9 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. The United States Virgin Islands must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

"United in Pride and Hope": Standing united in the hope that all people with disabilities can work at integrated competitive jobs..

2016 State Population.
1.03%
Change from
2010 to 2016
107,510
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
5,164

State Data

General

2010 2016
Population. 106,405 107,510
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 5,164 N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 1,545

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 53
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 267
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 278
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 19.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2016
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 70
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. N/A

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
73
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 3
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 11
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 16
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 32
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 11
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 0
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 8
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 2,090
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 56.44%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 18.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.64%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 68.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.76%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 44.83%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the United States Virgin Islands differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The United States Virgin Islands Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The United States Virgin Islands Department of Human Services is the single state agency.    Through section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $273.8 million in Medicaid funding to the United States Virgin Islands.    For the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate based on the state’s per capita income. For the United States Virgin Islands, all Medicaid expenditures are matched until the Medicaid base funds and the Affordable Care Act funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing The United States Virgin Islands’ FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

The United States Virgin Islands was awarded $24.9 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. The United States Virgin Islands must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disability EmploymentThe Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) is engaged in disability employment activities. We work towards the goal of getting and keeping people with disabilities employed. In order to achieve these goals, we work with our community partners on initiatives for job coach training, employment training for people with disabilities, and person-centered planning activities, while working to develop customized employment solutions in partnership with people with disabilities. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ticket to Work - 01/01/2019

~~“What is Ticket to Work?

Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for Social Security disability beneficiaries who want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence.

More information about the Ticket to Work Law can be found by accessing the weblink, or by contacting our Employment Network at (340) 277-3335.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OEF//OIF POST—DEPLOYMENT FACTSHEET - 01/01/2019

~~“A GUIDE FOR EMPLOYERS AND SUPERVISORS- Returning to Work after Deployment• Educate co-workers. Before the service member returns to work, meet with their co-workers. Explain the importance of being supportive of the service member. Remind employees not to ask sensitive questions. This includes questions about injuries or combat experiences. • Update the service member. Meet with service members to discuss their job duties. Give them detailed job tasks that are manageable. Explain any new policies or staff changes.  This will help them feel part of the work force again.• Educate the returning service member. This can include any job- related training or education requirements. This will help them feel more confident in their skills. • Allow for readjustment time. Be aware that everyone is different. Some people need more time adjust. Encourage the service member to ask for guidance and support. Make sure they take breaks throughout the day. This will help reduce excess stress. • Provide special accommodations. Plan for the special needs of those who have been injured. The service member’s family can help identify potential problem areas at work.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Supported Employment Program - 01/01/2019

~~“This program supports costs for employment training expenses, work adjustment skills and job placement for individuals with the most severe disabilities.

Through an agreement on a fee-for-service basis with Work-Able Inc., a not-for-profit agency, this program provides individualized placement services for persons with severe disabilities who cannot benefit from traditional employment opportunities and require on-the-job support for a specified period of time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabilities and Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“This office administers the Division of Disabilities, Vocational and Rehabilitation Services that provide programs to assist individuals with disabilities, physical or mental impairments that constitute or result in substantial impediment(s) to employment, by providing those services which will help them to achieve an employment outcome.

The Special Services Unit of this program provides services to Disabled Adults and Adult Foster Care, administers the Disabled Persons Fund and provides support for the Community Rehabilitation Facility, Developmental Disabilities Council and cancer care programs, and assists disabled persons in obtaining handicapped parking permits”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Virgin Islands for 2017-2019 - 01/01/2017

~~“The CIL express an ongoing interest in developing a format for administering an annual consumer satisfaction survey. SILC board will work with CIL staff to jointly develop instrument which will express the level of satisfaction or non-satisfaction of consumers with the services provided to them by the CIL”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Ticket to Work - 01/01/2019

~~“What is Ticket to Work?

Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for Social Security disability beneficiaries who want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence.

More information about the Ticket to Work Law can be found by accessing the weblink, or by contacting our Employment Network at (340) 277-3335.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OEF//OIF POST—DEPLOYMENT FACTSHEET - 01/01/2019

~~“A GUIDE FOR EMPLOYERS AND SUPERVISORS- Returning to Work after Deployment• Educate co-workers. Before the service member returns to work, meet with their co-workers. Explain the importance of being supportive of the service member. Remind employees not to ask sensitive questions. This includes questions about injuries or combat experiences. • Update the service member. Meet with service members to discuss their job duties. Give them detailed job tasks that are manageable. Explain any new policies or staff changes.  This will help them feel part of the work force again.• Educate the returning service member. This can include any job- related training or education requirements. This will help them feel more confident in their skills. • Allow for readjustment time. Be aware that everyone is different. Some people need more time adjust. Encourage the service member to ask for guidance and support. Make sure they take breaks throughout the day. This will help reduce excess stress. • Provide special accommodations. Plan for the special needs of those who have been injured. The service member’s family can help identify potential problem areas at work.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Supported Employment Program - 01/01/2019

~~“This program supports costs for employment training expenses, work adjustment skills and job placement for individuals with the most severe disabilities.

Through an agreement on a fee-for-service basis with Work-Able Inc., a not-for-profit agency, this program provides individualized placement services for persons with severe disabilities who cannot benefit from traditional employment opportunities and require on-the-job support for a specified period of time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabilities and Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“This office administers the Division of Disabilities, Vocational and Rehabilitation Services that provide programs to assist individuals with disabilities, physical or mental impairments that constitute or result in substantial impediment(s) to employment, by providing those services which will help them to achieve an employment outcome.

The Special Services Unit of this program provides services to Disabled Adults and Adult Foster Care, administers the Disabled Persons Fund and provides support for the Community Rehabilitation Facility, Developmental Disabilities Council and cancer care programs, and assists disabled persons in obtaining handicapped parking permits”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Virgin Islands for 2017-2019 - 01/01/2017

~~“The CIL express an ongoing interest in developing a format for administering an annual consumer satisfaction survey. SILC board will work with CIL staff to jointly develop instrument which will express the level of satisfaction or non-satisfaction of consumers with the services provided to them by the CIL”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disability EmploymentThe Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) is engaged in disability employment activities. We work towards the goal of getting and keeping people with disabilities employed. In order to achieve these goals, we work with our community partners on initiatives for job coach training, employment training for people with disabilities, and person-centered planning activities, while working to develop customized employment solutions in partnership with people with disabilities. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the United States Virgin Islands differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The United States Virgin Islands Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The United States Virgin Islands Department of Human Services is the single state agency.    Through section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $273.8 million in Medicaid funding to the United States Virgin Islands.    For the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate based on the state’s per capita income. For the United States Virgin Islands, all Medicaid expenditures are matched until the Medicaid base funds and the Affordable Care Act funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing The United States Virgin Islands’ FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

The United States Virgin Islands was awarded $24.9 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. The United States Virgin Islands must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phablet

Snapshot

"United in Pride and Hope": Standing united in the hope that all people with disabilities can work at integrated competitive jobs..

2016 State Population.
1.03%
Change from
2010 to 2016
107,510
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
5,164

State Data

General

2016
Population. 107,510
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 1,545

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 53
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 267
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 278
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 19.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2016
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 70
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. N/A

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
73
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 3
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 11
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 16
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 32
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 11
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 0
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 8
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 2,090
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 56.44%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 18.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.64%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 68.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.76%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 44.83%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the United States Virgin Islands differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The United States Virgin Islands Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The United States Virgin Islands Department of Human Services is the single state agency.    Through section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $273.8 million in Medicaid funding to the United States Virgin Islands.    For the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate based on the state’s per capita income. For the United States Virgin Islands, all Medicaid expenditures are matched until the Medicaid base funds and the Affordable Care Act funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing The United States Virgin Islands’ FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

The United States Virgin Islands was awarded $24.9 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. The United States Virgin Islands must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disability EmploymentThe Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) is engaged in disability employment activities. We work towards the goal of getting and keeping people with disabilities employed. In order to achieve these goals, we work with our community partners on initiatives for job coach training, employment training for people with disabilities, and person-centered planning activities, while working to develop customized employment solutions in partnership with people with disabilities. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ticket to Work - 01/01/2019

~~“What is Ticket to Work?

Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for Social Security disability beneficiaries who want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence.

More information about the Ticket to Work Law can be found by accessing the weblink, or by contacting our Employment Network at (340) 277-3335.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OEF//OIF POST—DEPLOYMENT FACTSHEET - 01/01/2019

~~“A GUIDE FOR EMPLOYERS AND SUPERVISORS- Returning to Work after Deployment• Educate co-workers. Before the service member returns to work, meet with their co-workers. Explain the importance of being supportive of the service member. Remind employees not to ask sensitive questions. This includes questions about injuries or combat experiences. • Update the service member. Meet with service members to discuss their job duties. Give them detailed job tasks that are manageable. Explain any new policies or staff changes.  This will help them feel part of the work force again.• Educate the returning service member. This can include any job- related training or education requirements. This will help them feel more confident in their skills. • Allow for readjustment time. Be aware that everyone is different. Some people need more time adjust. Encourage the service member to ask for guidance and support. Make sure they take breaks throughout the day. This will help reduce excess stress. • Provide special accommodations. Plan for the special needs of those who have been injured. The service member’s family can help identify potential problem areas at work.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Supported Employment Program - 01/01/2019

~~“This program supports costs for employment training expenses, work adjustment skills and job placement for individuals with the most severe disabilities.

Through an agreement on a fee-for-service basis with Work-Able Inc., a not-for-profit agency, this program provides individualized placement services for persons with severe disabilities who cannot benefit from traditional employment opportunities and require on-the-job support for a specified period of time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabilities and Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“This office administers the Division of Disabilities, Vocational and Rehabilitation Services that provide programs to assist individuals with disabilities, physical or mental impairments that constitute or result in substantial impediment(s) to employment, by providing those services which will help them to achieve an employment outcome.

The Special Services Unit of this program provides services to Disabled Adults and Adult Foster Care, administers the Disabled Persons Fund and provides support for the Community Rehabilitation Facility, Developmental Disabilities Council and cancer care programs, and assists disabled persons in obtaining handicapped parking permits”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Virgin Islands for 2017-2019 - 01/01/2017

~~“The CIL express an ongoing interest in developing a format for administering an annual consumer satisfaction survey. SILC board will work with CIL staff to jointly develop instrument which will express the level of satisfaction or non-satisfaction of consumers with the services provided to them by the CIL”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Ticket to Work - 01/01/2019

~~“What is Ticket to Work?

Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for Social Security disability beneficiaries who want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence.

More information about the Ticket to Work Law can be found by accessing the weblink, or by contacting our Employment Network at (340) 277-3335.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OEF//OIF POST—DEPLOYMENT FACTSHEET - 01/01/2019

~~“A GUIDE FOR EMPLOYERS AND SUPERVISORS- Returning to Work after Deployment• Educate co-workers. Before the service member returns to work, meet with their co-workers. Explain the importance of being supportive of the service member. Remind employees not to ask sensitive questions. This includes questions about injuries or combat experiences. • Update the service member. Meet with service members to discuss their job duties. Give them detailed job tasks that are manageable. Explain any new policies or staff changes.  This will help them feel part of the work force again.• Educate the returning service member. This can include any job- related training or education requirements. This will help them feel more confident in their skills. • Allow for readjustment time. Be aware that everyone is different. Some people need more time adjust. Encourage the service member to ask for guidance and support. Make sure they take breaks throughout the day. This will help reduce excess stress. • Provide special accommodations. Plan for the special needs of those who have been injured. The service member’s family can help identify potential problem areas at work.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Supported Employment Program - 01/01/2019

~~“This program supports costs for employment training expenses, work adjustment skills and job placement for individuals with the most severe disabilities.

Through an agreement on a fee-for-service basis with Work-Able Inc., a not-for-profit agency, this program provides individualized placement services for persons with severe disabilities who cannot benefit from traditional employment opportunities and require on-the-job support for a specified period of time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabilities and Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“This office administers the Division of Disabilities, Vocational and Rehabilitation Services that provide programs to assist individuals with disabilities, physical or mental impairments that constitute or result in substantial impediment(s) to employment, by providing those services which will help them to achieve an employment outcome.

The Special Services Unit of this program provides services to Disabled Adults and Adult Foster Care, administers the Disabled Persons Fund and provides support for the Community Rehabilitation Facility, Developmental Disabilities Council and cancer care programs, and assists disabled persons in obtaining handicapped parking permits”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Virgin Islands for 2017-2019 - 01/01/2017

~~“The CIL express an ongoing interest in developing a format for administering an annual consumer satisfaction survey. SILC board will work with CIL staff to jointly develop instrument which will express the level of satisfaction or non-satisfaction of consumers with the services provided to them by the CIL”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disability EmploymentThe Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) is engaged in disability employment activities. We work towards the goal of getting and keeping people with disabilities employed. In order to achieve these goals, we work with our community partners on initiatives for job coach training, employment training for people with disabilities, and person-centered planning activities, while working to develop customized employment solutions in partnership with people with disabilities. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the United States Virgin Islands differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The United States Virgin Islands Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The United States Virgin Islands Department of Human Services is the single state agency.    Through section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $273.8 million in Medicaid funding to the United States Virgin Islands.    For the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate based on the state’s per capita income. For the United States Virgin Islands, all Medicaid expenditures are matched until the Medicaid base funds and the Affordable Care Act funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing The United States Virgin Islands’ FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

The United States Virgin Islands was awarded $24.9 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. The United States Virgin Islands must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phone

Snapshot

"United in Pride and Hope": Standing united in the hope that all people with disabilities can work at integrated competitive jobs..

2016 State Population.
1.03%
Change from
2010 to 2016
107,510
2010 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
100%
Change from
to 2010
5,164

State Data

General

2016
Population. 107,510
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). N/A
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). N/A
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). N/A
State/National unemployment rate. N/A
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). N/A
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). N/A
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) N/A
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 1,545

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 53
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 267
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 278
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 19.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2016
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 70
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. N/A

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
73
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 3
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 11
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 16
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 32
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 11
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 0
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 8
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 2,090
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 56.44%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 18.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 3.64%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 100.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.14%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 68.97%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.76%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 44.83%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the United States Virgin Islands differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The United States Virgin Islands Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The United States Virgin Islands Department of Human Services is the single state agency.    Through section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $273.8 million in Medicaid funding to the United States Virgin Islands.    For the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate based on the state’s per capita income. For the United States Virgin Islands, all Medicaid expenditures are matched until the Medicaid base funds and the Affordable Care Act funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing The United States Virgin Islands’ FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

The United States Virgin Islands was awarded $24.9 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. The United States Virgin Islands must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disability EmploymentThe Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) is engaged in disability employment activities. We work towards the goal of getting and keeping people with disabilities employed. In order to achieve these goals, we work with our community partners on initiatives for job coach training, employment training for people with disabilities, and person-centered planning activities, while working to develop customized employment solutions in partnership with people with disabilities. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ticket to Work - 01/01/2019

~~“What is Ticket to Work?

Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for Social Security disability beneficiaries who want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence.

More information about the Ticket to Work Law can be found by accessing the weblink, or by contacting our Employment Network at (340) 277-3335.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OEF//OIF POST—DEPLOYMENT FACTSHEET - 01/01/2019

~~“A GUIDE FOR EMPLOYERS AND SUPERVISORS- Returning to Work after Deployment• Educate co-workers. Before the service member returns to work, meet with their co-workers. Explain the importance of being supportive of the service member. Remind employees not to ask sensitive questions. This includes questions about injuries or combat experiences. • Update the service member. Meet with service members to discuss their job duties. Give them detailed job tasks that are manageable. Explain any new policies or staff changes.  This will help them feel part of the work force again.• Educate the returning service member. This can include any job- related training or education requirements. This will help them feel more confident in their skills. • Allow for readjustment time. Be aware that everyone is different. Some people need more time adjust. Encourage the service member to ask for guidance and support. Make sure they take breaks throughout the day. This will help reduce excess stress. • Provide special accommodations. Plan for the special needs of those who have been injured. The service member’s family can help identify potential problem areas at work.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Supported Employment Program - 01/01/2019

~~“This program supports costs for employment training expenses, work adjustment skills and job placement for individuals with the most severe disabilities.

Through an agreement on a fee-for-service basis with Work-Able Inc., a not-for-profit agency, this program provides individualized placement services for persons with severe disabilities who cannot benefit from traditional employment opportunities and require on-the-job support for a specified period of time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabilities and Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“This office administers the Division of Disabilities, Vocational and Rehabilitation Services that provide programs to assist individuals with disabilities, physical or mental impairments that constitute or result in substantial impediment(s) to employment, by providing those services which will help them to achieve an employment outcome.

The Special Services Unit of this program provides services to Disabled Adults and Adult Foster Care, administers the Disabled Persons Fund and provides support for the Community Rehabilitation Facility, Developmental Disabilities Council and cancer care programs, and assists disabled persons in obtaining handicapped parking permits”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Virgin Islands for 2017-2019 - 01/01/2017

~~“The CIL express an ongoing interest in developing a format for administering an annual consumer satisfaction survey. SILC board will work with CIL staff to jointly develop instrument which will express the level of satisfaction or non-satisfaction of consumers with the services provided to them by the CIL”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Ticket to Work - 01/01/2019

~~“What is Ticket to Work?

Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for Social Security disability beneficiaries who want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence.

More information about the Ticket to Work Law can be found by accessing the weblink, or by contacting our Employment Network at (340) 277-3335.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

OEF//OIF POST—DEPLOYMENT FACTSHEET - 01/01/2019

~~“A GUIDE FOR EMPLOYERS AND SUPERVISORS- Returning to Work after Deployment• Educate co-workers. Before the service member returns to work, meet with their co-workers. Explain the importance of being supportive of the service member. Remind employees not to ask sensitive questions. This includes questions about injuries or combat experiences. • Update the service member. Meet with service members to discuss their job duties. Give them detailed job tasks that are manageable. Explain any new policies or staff changes.  This will help them feel part of the work force again.• Educate the returning service member. This can include any job- related training or education requirements. This will help them feel more confident in their skills. • Allow for readjustment time. Be aware that everyone is different. Some people need more time adjust. Encourage the service member to ask for guidance and support. Make sure they take breaks throughout the day. This will help reduce excess stress. • Provide special accommodations. Plan for the special needs of those who have been injured. The service member’s family can help identify potential problem areas at work.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Supported Employment Program - 01/01/2019

~~“This program supports costs for employment training expenses, work adjustment skills and job placement for individuals with the most severe disabilities.

Through an agreement on a fee-for-service basis with Work-Able Inc., a not-for-profit agency, this program provides individualized placement services for persons with severe disabilities who cannot benefit from traditional employment opportunities and require on-the-job support for a specified period of time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Disabilities and Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“This office administers the Division of Disabilities, Vocational and Rehabilitation Services that provide programs to assist individuals with disabilities, physical or mental impairments that constitute or result in substantial impediment(s) to employment, by providing those services which will help them to achieve an employment outcome.

The Special Services Unit of this program provides services to Disabled Adults and Adult Foster Care, administers the Disabled Persons Fund and provides support for the Community Rehabilitation Facility, Developmental Disabilities Council and cancer care programs, and assists disabled persons in obtaining handicapped parking permits”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Virgin Islands for 2017-2019 - 01/01/2017

~~“The CIL express an ongoing interest in developing a format for administering an annual consumer satisfaction survey. SILC board will work with CIL staff to jointly develop instrument which will express the level of satisfaction or non-satisfaction of consumers with the services provided to them by the CIL”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

The Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) - 01/01/2019

~~“Disability EmploymentThe Virgin Islands University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (VIUCEDD) is engaged in disability employment activities. We work towards the goal of getting and keeping people with disabilities employed. In order to achieve these goals, we work with our community partners on initiatives for job coach training, employment training for people with disabilities, and person-centered planning activities, while working to develop customized employment solutions in partnership with people with disabilities. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in the United States Virgin Islands differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The United States Virgin Islands Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The United States Virgin Islands Department of Human Services is the single state agency.    Through section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $273.8 million in Medicaid funding to the United States Virgin Islands.    For the 50 states and the District of Columbia, the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate based on the state’s per capita income. For the United States Virgin Islands, all Medicaid expenditures are matched until the Medicaid base funds and the Affordable Care Act funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing The United States Virgin Islands’ FMAP to 57.2%.

Medicaid-Marketplace Overview

The United States Virgin Islands was awarded $24.9 million for its Medicaid program in lieu of establishing a health marketplace. The United States Virgin Islands must exhaust its Affordable Care Act (section 2005) allotment prior to using these funds.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies