Utah

States - Big Screen

"Industry" is the motto of the Beehive State, and it's easy to see why Utah is "Still the Right Place" for individuals with disabilities to find competitive, integrated employment opportunities and socioeconomic advancement through Employment First.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Utah’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.88%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,161,105
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.81%
Change from
2017 to 2018
155,329
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.56%
Change from
2017 to 2018
72,186
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.56%
Change from
2017 to 2018
46.47%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.3%
Change from
2017 to 2018
79.90%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 3,051,217 3,101,833 3,161,105
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 159,024 150,964 155,329
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 74,767 74,754 72,186
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,287,144 1,331,953 1,361,619
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 47.02% 49.52% 46.47%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.93% 79.66% 79.90%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.40% 3.20% 3.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 15.60% 13.20% 13.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 9.60% 9.30% 8.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 152,163 149,134 147,515
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 146,902 147,430 152,952
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 269,121 265,100 265,814
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 3,891 2,936 4,232
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 28,937 30,446 29,496
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,540 4,319 4,758
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 3,980 3,346 5,155
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,589 1,912 2,685
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 7,287 8,107 7,419
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,657 10,844 10,404

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,730 2,811 2,998
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 9.40% 9.50% 10.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 47,560 46,926 46,048

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,483 6,348 6,474
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 10,601 10,063 9,900
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 28,754 25,662 25,116
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.50% 24.70% 25.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 4.30% 3.70%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 2.20% 2.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 0.10% 0.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 9.40% 11.40% 10.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 11 821 713
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 35 426 409
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 37 10 114
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,753 2,196 1,920

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 21,669 20,275 16,922
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.07 0.08 0.08

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 1,080 2 2,358
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 327 797 966
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 30.00% 33.00% 41.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.27 26.60 32.24

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,986
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 58 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 141 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 443 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,003 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,934 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 16 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 25.50% 23.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,975 3,421 3,551
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 70,883 71,139 70,742
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 40 43 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 94 92 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $5,108,000 $6,378,000 $6,985,575
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $33,462,000 $38,575,000 $42,466,312
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 23.00% 28.00% 26.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,689 2,600 2,724
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 27.10 33.10 30.23

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.45% 61.57% 63.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.37% 10.68% 10.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.49% 2.61% 2.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 92.41% 92.07% 88.40%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 19.35% 20.74% 20.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 64.63% 66.82% 68.77%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 79.46% 82.63% 84.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 45.28% 46.08% 48.53%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 694,868
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 936
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 2,404
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 183,093
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 185,496
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 20
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 137
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 157
AbilityOne wages (products). $17,389
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,417,562

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 2 3
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 14 13 14
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 17 16 18
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 5 3 4
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,327 1,004 1,294
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 182 177
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,332 1,189 1,475

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~The Utah Employment First Partnership is a shared commitment among the Utah Department of Workforce Services (DWS), the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) to improve state-government services focused on persons with disabilities, helping them to achieve competitive, integrated and community-based employment. Utah’s Employment First Initiative supports workforce development. It expects, encourages, provides, creates and rewards integrated employment in the workforce. It is the first and preferred outcome for working-age youth and adults with disabilities at minimum wage or higher. This program focuses on individuals with complex and significant disabilities for whom job placement in the past has been limited or traditionally has not occurred. (Page 33) Title I

USOR has developed and maintains cooperative agreements where necessary with federal and state agencies not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system. USOR maintains cooperative agreements with DWS, Utah State Board of Education (USBE), Utah Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Utah Department of Community and Culture (UDCC), and GOED. As required by Utah State legislation USOR has developed a MOU and coordinated plan with DWS and DSPD (Utah’s DD agency) to carry out services related to employment for persons with significant disabilities. Additional agreements exist relevant to the "Employment First" initiatives in Utah. USOR also maintains cooperative agreements with all local public education school districts, the Veterans Administration (VA), local mental health organizations, and other entities involved in workforce development services including shared projects with the Department of Health (DOH). In addition, USOR participates in the statewide workforce development system through participation on the State Workforce Development Board. (Page 173) Title I

USOR has cooperative agreements with local school districts, community rehabilitation programs, and DSPD to provide Supported Employment services to individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities, including youth. Additional cooperative agreements that will extend supports for disadvantaged populations such as mental health and youth are being developed. USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation which makes employment the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized and/or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. (Page 177-178) Title I

USOR maintains a long standing cooperative agreement with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), which is the state agency responsible for providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. These funds are ongoing and available to provide long term services for individuals who have utilized VR supports, are on the DSPD wait list, and need long term supported employment services. USOR is also partnered with DSPD in Employment First legislation, which makes employment the first and preferred option of individuals with disabilities, including those with developmental disabilities. (Page 181) Title I

Through a cooperative relationship between USOR and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), supported employment services have been expanded to a targeted population through the provision of long-term funding from the Utah State Legislature. These funds are designated to support individuals who have previously been on a waiting list for DSPD SE funding. The USOR Supported Employment Coordinator will collaborate with CRPs and DSPD to ensure compliance with Employment First Legislation. (Page 194) Title IV

USOR launched a school-to-work project, through ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP),?designed to braid? funding, access partner agency supports, and provide a pathway for students with the most significant disabilities to competitive, integrated employment. (Page 204) Title IV

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation and has partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities and the Utah State Board of Education (and LEAs) in “school to work pilots” in 5 sites to increase competitive, integrated outcomes for students with disabilities who would normally be slated to enter a day program (non integrated setting) or subminimum wage employment setting upon graduation from high school. Community Rehabilitation Programs and USOR staff who are involved in these pilots have had the opportunity to receive training on Customized Employment. (Page 210) Title IV

Barriers to engaging all individuals with disabilities in competitive, integrated employment has been changing attitudes and beliefs about disability and work. Outreach efforts are underway to educate parents, educators, and other community providers about the benefits of competitive integrated employment. To this end, USOR has developed an informational flyer about the Settings Rule, Employment First Initiative, and Section 511. These information flyers will be used to educate the community and will be disseminated widely. (Page 210) Title IV

• Goal 2.4: Increase collaboration and coordination with partner community agencies whose goals, services and laws align with providing competitive integrated employment and career opportunities for persons with disabilities
o Strategy 2.4 (A): Align policies and procedures for supported employment with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule and Utah’s Employment First Legislation (Pages 215-216) Title IV

Utah applied for and were awarded Employment First State Leadership and Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) resources from the Office of Disability and Employment Policy (ODEP) in 2015. The Transition and Supported Employment Coordinator was the co-lead/coordinator from 2015-2017 and therefore USOR was involved in the decision-making and implementation of the technical assistance provided by ODEP. EFSLMP resources afforded Utah the opportunity to assist agencies who provide HCBS medicaid waiver funding to receive technical assistance in becoming more community based. As a result, some of the agencies developed (or expanded on ) employment units within their agencies and became vendors with USOR to provide SE and SJBT milestones to assist clients in accessing CIE. Utah also received resources from ODEP to implement School to Work Pilots which utilized a team approach with USOR, DWS/WDD, DSPD, LEAs, and CRP partners to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school/post high school. Although some providers received technical assistance to make the shift to more integrated settings, some have not made steps to follow through with meeting goals. (Page 216) Title IV

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation to increase access and eliminate disparities in access to state VR Services and Supported Employment. Employment is the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post-high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD waiting list through the provision of long-term funding from the Utah State Legislature. This partnership is a key initiative to eliminate systemic barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities. In addition, USOR continues seek out opportunities to support individuals with disabilities in competitive integrated employment. Additionally, USOR believes alignment with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule will increase opportunities for competitive integrated employment opportunities. USOR will provide outreach and opportunities for individuals experiencing sheltered work or segregated day programs and sub-minimum wages to access VR services in order increase competitive integrated employment. (Pages 221-222) Title IV

USOR partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Utah State Board of Education, Utah Department of Mental Health, and Community Rehabilitation Programs to increase life skills training options and coordinate goals for competitive integrated employment opportunities. Life Skills training is available as a stand alone service and in conjunction with a variety of services offered through VR, DSPD, and Mental Health facilities. USOR has successfully added life skills training options from community and private mental health providers. USOR’s coordination with other agencies ensures that life skills are available through all stages of the employment preparation process. This partnership has also been instrumental to USOR’s efforts to promote competitive integrated employment options for individuals who are newly seeking employment under the HBCS settings rule, Utah’s Employment First Initiative, and Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act. Coordinating efforts has allowed USOR to participate in demonstration and pilot projects that increase resources and capacity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 223) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~• USOR has partnered with the Utah State Board of Education, DWS Workforce Development Division and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities to implement “School to Work” pilots in 5 different school districts in Utah. The “School to Work” pilot teams utilize the Customized Employment process to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school or post high school. Teams work collaboratively to serve students and blend/braid funding so that students can access services needed to become employed and independent. (Page 31) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Pages 108-109) Title I

The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) has set a goal to serve 200 individuals with Title VI funds through supported employment services during FFY 2017. During FFY 2014, USOR served 208 individuals eligible for supported employment and 180 in FFY 2015. During FFY 2015, 61 individuals eligible for supported employment services were closed as successfully employed in competitive and integrated settings. The implementation of the Order of Selection had an impact on USOR’s ability to serve all clients, including those eligible for Supported Employment (SE). As USOR has opened the Priority Category 1: Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (MSD), USOR anticipates it will be able to increase the number of individuals receiving Title VI SE funding under Individualized Plan for Employments (IPEs). In addition, Goal 1.2 listed in this Unified Plan is specifically designed to continue to assess and improve the provision of SE and Customized Employment services provided in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). (Page 203) Title IV

As laws, agencies, and federal guidance change, USOR is committed to amending and updating policies to provide SE supports to both adults and youth as appropriate. USOR has been expanding upon and developing resources for three supported employment pathways (Individual Placement and Support, Customized Employment, and Traditional Supported Employment) which lead to long term placement services through partnership with DSPD, USOE, DSAMH, and DWS. USOR continues to partner with UATT/UCAT to increase student access to any necessary and appropriate assistive technology needed for success. (Page 204) Title I

USOR has engaged several committees in addition to resources from WINTAC to review and revise service delivery models for Supported Employment (SE), Customized Employment (CE) and Supported Job Based Training (SJBT). In addition, USOR is participating in several pilot projects to expand and improve SE and CE services in partnership with extended service providers. These pilot projects have extended the original completion date for this strategy but have proved invaluable to CE and SE expansion and innovation. (Page 206) Title IV

o Strategy 3.4 (B): USOR will update policies and procedures to provide supported employment and customized employment to clients in order to assist them in leaving segregated employment settings and gaining competitive integrated employment in their community. Activity B.1: USOR will update policies chapters, as needed, to better align with providing the necessary supports and services that persons with the most significant disabilities will need, to prevent segregated employment and subminimum wages. (Page 218) Title IV

USOR created a milestone payment program to streamline services and outcomes from Community Resource Providers (CRPs). USOR created a position for a statewide coordinator for Supported Employment and Customized Employment services who helps to oversee CRP activities. Additionally, USOR has a CRP committee that meets regularly and a CRP policy manual to provide guidance and consistency in services. The results of these efforts have been a significant increase in the total number of CRPs offering services to VR customers across the state. USOR is exploring options for assisting in the establishment of transition-focused CRP services through competitive state bidding. (Page 220) Title IV

USOR expanded services to Students and Youth with Disabilities through development of fee-for service options for Pre-Employment Transition Services and contracts, increasing VR Counselor connections with schools, and leveraging partnerships with other agencies. By leveraging existing staff resources and increasing coordination with partner agencies, VR successfully expanded outreach services and connected more students and youth to VR services. Training was provided to service provider and partner agencies resulting in new fee for service options and six contract Pre-ETS providers. USOR has expanded Supported Employment service delivery options by increasing the variety of placement methods available to meet individual client’s needs. The increase in models allows VR Counselors and client to select among a variety of models including Customized Employment, Pathways to Success Customized Employment, Individual Placement and Support, and traditional Supported Employment. These options add to the service options currently available from Community Rehabilitation Program providers.  (Page 222) Title IV

USOR continues to maintain high quality standards for vendors providing SE services. USOR requires vendors to receive training approved by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) in order to work 1-1 with clients. Vendors must also receive 10 CEUs per year in order to receive continuing education and remain current in best practices. In addition, vendors providing Customized Employment services must receive training in CE as well as participate in the Technical Assistance component to training. USOR and the Division of People with Disabilities have provided opportunities for Community Rehabilitation Programs to receive training in Customized Employment. USOR participates in fidelity reviews for the Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model, which assesses partnerships with VR as well as quality services provided to clients. (Page 224) Title IV

In addition, USOR is a partner in the “School to Work” pilots which utilize a Customized Employment approach to assist students transitioning from secondary educational institutions to competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation. The “School to Work” pilots have expanded from 3 initial sites to 5 in 2017-2018 school year. USOR has liaisons assigned to every Local Education Agency so that counselors can connect students with services both internally and through information and referral to community resources. (Page 224) Title IV

USOR also partners with extended support agencies to train and set expectations for employment specialists in customized employment, discovery, and Individualized Placement Services (IPS). These services have been proven to meet the needs of persons with most significant disabilities (MSDs) who may need additional services and long-term supports in order to be successfully employed. (Page 226) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~• USOR has partnered with the Utah State Board of Education, DWS Workforce Development Division and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities to implement “School to Work” pilots in 5 different school districts in Utah. The “School to Work” pilot teams utilize the Customized Employment process to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school or post high school. Teams work collaboratively to serve students and blend/braid funding so that students can access services needed to become employed and independent. (Page 31) Title I

Utah’s core partners are funding activities to implement the state strategies. The activities will be aligned across core programs. Core partners are committed to:

• Utilizing a braided funding model to leverage existing resources in providing services for common customers. These efforts will be ongoing including referrals and client interventions at any point of entry (DWS, Vocational Rehabilitation or Adult Education), refinement of career pathways to meet the needs through stronger engagement with employers, high demand industry and post-secondary and training institutions with a focus on high risk clients. Outcomes will be reported to the Operations Committee and SWDB annually. (Page 59) Title I

USOR launched a school-to-work project, through ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP),?designed to braid? funding, access partner agency supports, and provide a pathway for students with the most significant disabilities to competitive, integrated employment.? USOR is partnering with SAMHSA and Local Mental Health Authorities/DSAMH to provide and expand supported employment services for youth and adults with severe and persistent mental illness, specifically with the IPS model. (Page 204) Title IV

USOR expanded services to Students and Youth with Disabilities through development of fee-for service options for Pre-Employment Transition Services and contracts, increasing VR Counselor connections with schools, and leveraging partnerships with other agencies. By leveraging existing staff resources and increasing coordination with partner agencies, VR successfully expanded outreach services and connected more students and youth to VR services. Training was provided to service provider and partner agencies resulting in new fee for service options and six contract Pre-ETS providers. USOR has expanded Supported Employment service delivery options by increasing the variety of placement methods available to meet individual client’s needs. The increase in models allows VR Counselors and client to select among a variety of models including Customized Employment, Pathways to Success Customized Employment, Individual Placement and Support, and traditional Supported Employment. These options add to the service options currently available from Community Rehabilitation Program providers. (Page 222) Title IV

The VR Counselor is required to maintain communication with the Supported Employment (SE) team at least every three months. The SE team includes the VR counselor, customer, family members, extended services agency representative (i.e., support coordinator, mental-health worker, etc.), teacher (if a student), employment specialist or employer. The team will coordinate services by braiding funding to ensure the client has the support needed to be successful on the job. Once the client reaches an 80/20 level of support or 24 months (whichever comes first) and the team agrees, services and funding will be transferred to the identified extended services agency for long-term SE.

For youth and students with disabilities who qualify and need supported employment services, the transition to the extended services agency will occur when the client has graduated or aged out of the school system. The adult services agencies will continue to partner, braid funding and coordinate the transition of responsibility as appropriate. (Page 227) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Through the SWDC committee work, Utah will explore and identify ways to build stronger connections between core partner counselors and post-secondary career resource counselors/professions, including Disability Resource Centers (DRC), to ensure customers have access to all services the partners offer. (Page 68) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~USOR maintains cooperative agreements with the local school districts and public charter schools who serve secondary education students. The cooperative agreements include provisions for consultation, technical assistance, professional development, VR referrals and eligibility, and individualized goals of the local teams. USOR has assigned Transition Counselors to each local school district and charter school. The counselors meet with special educators and administrators, provide outreach to students and parents, provide VR Welcome Sessions to students, provide Job Readiness Workshops to students, attend IEP meetings, as well as cover all referrals and questions from that school.  (Page 175) Title IV

USOR and USBE agree to collaborate on financial responsibility of services, within the guidelines of the Rehabilitation Act and IDEA. Both agencies will respect the resources set forth by policies and procedures that guide each agency’s services. When a student with a disability is both in school and has an IPE with VR, the cost of services necessary for both education and for the student to become employed, will be negotiated between the LEA representative and the VR Counselor, pending any necessary approval through LEA administration and USOR chain of command. At any time during the transition process, comparable benefits or additional agency representatives will be included in the IEP/IPE transition team as an additional resource for financial responsibility. Agreements on shared cost of required services for the student/client, will be in writing in the IEP and IPE, to ensure collaboration and understanding of agency involvement. (Page 176) Title IV

Students and youth with disabilities are invited to participate in career preparation workshops and job fairs. The Business Relations Teams work with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors to provide school transition specialists and teachers with preparation packets. The material provides information on how to dress for success, interviewing, resume building, and appropriate behavior when meeting with business partners. Students can attend workshops on topics such as, “Working in Government Professions, State and Federal Hiring Initiatives,” “Employer Panel,” “How to Dress on a Dime and Interview Success,” and “Social Security and Working.” The job fairs provide students an opportunity to meet with hiring specialists to discuss employment opportunities. (Page 180) Title IV

USOR Transition Services provides a variety of services to assist transition aged youth in obtaining paid work experiences. Through the provision of Work Based Training, Summer Work Experiences, Supported Job Based Training/Supported Employment, and other Community Rehabilitation Program services, VR coordinates with employers on an individualized basis to meet both the client’s and employer’s needs. (Page 180) Title IV

Information was gathered through the Utah State Office of Education concerning the number of youth and students with disabilities in the State of Utah. There are approximately 74,000 students ages 3 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an Individualized Education Program (IEP). This number does not reflect the number of students who may have a disability that is classified under a 504 Plan, Individualized Health Plan, or unidentified disability such as mental health or substance abuse. For purposes of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, there are approximately 20,000 students with a disability ages 14 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an IEP, also not reflecting students with disabilities who do not have an IEP. These numbers only reflect the approximate number of students with a disability who are the age of applying for and receiving services from VR while still under IDEA (ages 14 through 21). This does not reflect the number of students with disabilities who have dropped out, received diplomas, aged out of the school system, or are up to 24 years of age and no longer tied to the school system. The number of students and youth with disabilities across the State of Utah justifies a great need for transition services from Vocational Rehabilitation. (Pages 193-194) Title IV

Effective when all required approvals are in place and when management deems necessary, USOR will close all categories and place all eligible individuals not in plan on a waiting list. USOR will also place all subsequent applicants who are determined eligible for VR services on the waiting list. USOR will only provide services to eligible individuals who currently have an IPE and for whom services have been initiated. As resources become available individuals will be taken off of the waiting list in chronological order based on priority category and application date. Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (MSD) will be the first category served. (Page 202) Title IV

o Strategy 1.3 (B): Increase outreach and collaboration with schools, i.e., special education, school administration, school counselors and 504 coordinators
Activity B.1: Increase counselor collaborative partnerships in schools through liaison meetings, IEP meetings, agency fairs, job readiness workshops, etc.
Activity B.2: Amend and maintain USOR/USOE Interagency Agreements at both the state and local levels to be more descriptive and comprehensive about the expectations on both sides
Activity B.3: Identify and develop programs serving students with disabilities to provide pre-employment transition services
USOR has increased presence in Local Education Agencies and many district offices have increased the number of school liaisons out of need. Counselors attend IEP meetings, 504 meetings, agency fairs, and facilitate job readiness workshops in the schools. (Page 208) Title IV

USOR has a dedicated Transition Coordinator who has responsibilities such as improving the quality and consistency of transition services from USOR counselors to students and improving collaboration and coordination. USOR created policies and procedures for specific services for transition students with disabilities. Each district office maintains specific counselors as liaisons with local public and private schools, and specific Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) are kept with each school and school district. VR counselors service individual students by meeting with their IEP teams and in specific VR meetings with students and their parents. Also, VR is expanding provision of Job-Readiness Workshops to schools in their local areas. The Job-Readiness Workshops cover aspects of self-discovery, job-readiness, job-seeking and job-keeping skills. (Page 220) Title IV

Since 2016, USOR has engaged in the following innovation and expansion projects and activities: (1) Funding of the USOR Transition and Supported Employment Coordinator to increase the provision of VR services to youth with disabilities, specifically those with the most significant disabilities and expansion of transition and pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities (2) Development and Implementation of six (6) Pre-Employment Transition Services contracts to serve eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities (3) School to Work Customized Employment Project with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and three local school districts to develop competitive, integrated, and meaningful employment for students with developmental disabilities, specifically students who are at-risk of entering into sheltered work settings at sub-minimum wages once exiting high school and (4) Collaboration with Source America to increase Customized Employment services in rural and underserved areas. (5) In addition, USOR provides annual funding support for operation of the Utah State Independent Living Council. (6) Administrative support and direct expenses for operation of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) were also provided by USOR. These funding arrangements are consistent with 34 CFR 361.35. (Page 225) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Utah’s strategies take into account its economic, workforce, workforce development, education and training activities and analysis provided in the section above. Utah’s Unified Plan includes strategies to achieve its vision and goals. The strategies are flexible to accommodate the state’s economic, workforce, and workforce development, education and training activities and analysis provided in Section (a). The plan includes specific strategies to address the needs of populations described in Section (a). The foundation of Utah’s plan is built upon utilizing data, partnerships, and its resources to implement strategies that support operations to provide services to individuals and employers. Utah is committed to changing and/or adjusting its strategies as needed to meet the state’s workforce needs. Utah’s SWDB will establish standing committees to ensure Utah’s goals and vision are met. These include Youth, Apprenticeships, Services to Individuals with Disabilities, Career Pathways, and Operations. (Page 46) Title I

As Utah has been implementing its Unified plan, it has continued to provide assistance to SWDB members and committees by providing a strong structure and basis for the SWDB to function within. In addition to Guiding Principles, Statutory Requirements, application processes, etc. the SWBD has the opportunity to:
Implement innovative strategies by focusing on employer engagement, strengthening core programs, dissemination of best practices, and promoting effective use of technology to enhance service delivery.
Establish and maintain standing committees. There are two required committees including the Youth Services Committee and the Services to Individuals with Disabilities. Utah has added a Career Pathways Committee, an Operations Committee, and an Apprenticeship Committee. (Page 53) Title I

Partners will coordinate activities and resources to provide comprehensive, high-quality, customer-centered services, including supportive services, to employers to meet their current and projected workforce needs. The activities will conform to the statutory requirements of each program.
The Operations Committee will coordinate with the Service to Individuals with Disabilities Committee, Career Pathways Committee and Apprenticeships Committee to create recommendations for aligning DWS, USOR, and Adult Education and other required partner services for employers. (Page 63) Title I

Career Pathways Committee• There are many career pathway activities being carried out around the state. The Career Pathway Committee will meet with partners from around the state gathering information and ideas on how these groups can align, share resources, and collaborate. They will make recommendations, that include the Six Key Elements of Career Pathways described in the Career Pathway Toolkit and requirements of WIOA section 101(d)(3)(B), (D) to the SWDB regarding how the SWDB can best support a collaborative state career pathway system. Utah’s sector strategies are aligned with GOED’s industry clusters. They are incorporated throughout Utah’s plan. Utah will refer to the definitions of “career pathway” in WIOA section 3(7) and “industry sector or occupation section 3(23) of WIOA. (Page 102) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Page 108-109) Title I

USOR has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing Vocational Rehabilitation services and OJT and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act. USOR determines whether for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit organizations. USOR has established fee-for-service agreements with private, non-profit entities providing vocational rehabilitation services throughout Utah in accordance with the Unified State Plan. USOR maintains vendor relationships with other agencies providing Job Preparation and Placement (JPP), Supported Job Based Training (SJBT) and Support Employment (SE) service that include a fee-for-service agreement and participation in job coach training activities. USOR continues to identify and make arrangements, where appropriate, to expand the availability of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) offering supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of the state plan. (Page 177) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Partners will coordinate activities and resources to provide comprehensive, high-quality, customer-centered services, including supportive services, to employers to meet their current and projected workforce needs. The activities will conform to the statutory requirements of each program. The Operations Committee will coordinate with the Service to Individuals with Disabilities Committee, Career Pathways Committee and Apprenticeships Committee to create recommendations for aligning DWS, USOR, and Adult Education and other required partner services for employers. (Page 63) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Pages 108-109) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer/ Business

~~USOR has initiatives to partner with employers to identify competitive, integrated employment and career exploration opportunities that facilitate the provision of VR and Transition Services. These initiatives are primarily carried out through the USOR Business Relations and Choose to Work (CTW) Programs. The Business Relations Team was established in 2005 to strengthen the connection between employers and individuals with disabilities through a combination of outreach efforts, disability awareness training, consultation services, job fairs and workshops, business networking activities and job posting networks. The Business Relations Team:

Assists with the recruitment and referral of qualified individuals with disabilities to meet workforce demands. Through a partnership with DWS, a customized option to recruit qualified applicants with disabilities was created for job vacancies by using the key word: PWDNET. Employers are able to utilize this keyword on UWORKS allowing keyword searches by job seekers, advocates, and Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. Employers can also send emails to “pwdnetjobs@utah.gov” with a complete job description and the job opening. These job posting are shared statewide with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor and Employment Specialists.

Utilizes the Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP), https://tapability.org/, which is led by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and The National Employment Team (NET) in partnership with disABLEDperson, Inc. TAP includes both a national talent pool of VR clients looking for employment and a job posting system for employers looking to hire individuals with disabilities.

Conduct semi-annual Employer Workshops on Hiring and Retaining Individuals with Disabilities and Career Preparation and Job Fairs. The Workshop offers Business Partners an opportunity to learn more about disability, accommodations and other disability and employment issues. The Job Fair is a targeted fair for individuals with disabilities in which PWDNET (People With Disabilities Network) business partners participate. These events provide opportunities for business to connect with job-ready individuals with disabilities, and individuals with disabilities to explore careers. The job fairs and workshops also offer opportunities for internships and mentor experiences. (Page 178) Title IV

The Choose to Work (CTW) Program: USOR’s other primary initiative for working with employers to identify competitive integrated employment opportunities and career exploration for individuals with disabilities is CTW. This is a partnership between the USOR and WDD that is designed to ensure all individuals with disabilities have equal access to workforce investment activities available to assist them in preparing for and obtaining employment through coordinated service delivery.

The core services of the CTW program are job development and job placement. Job development includes interfacing with employers for the purpose of marketing a specific job seeker to the employer, or to inform and educate the employer regarding hiring individuals from a talented pool of job seekers with disabilities. Job placement is focused on service delivery to assist a specific individual in locating job openings, preparing for the application process, and following through with the application for employment.

CTW specialists coordinate with the Business Relations Team to organize and engage in employer workshops to increase awareness regarding the hiring and job retention of individuals with disabilities. The Specialists are active participants in local area Chambers of Commerce and sit on local and community boards in order to facilitate the provision of Vocational Rehabilitation services leading to an employment outcome. CTW Specialists are actively engaged with the DWS Workforce Development Specialists as well as USOR Business Relations Team and affiliates to identify integrated employment opportunities for job seekers with disabilities. (Page 179) Title IV

USOR utilizes the Business Relations and CTW Programs to coordinate with employers in support of transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities. Staff meet with employers to identify and/or develop internships, on-the-job trainings, mentoring experiences and temporary work experiences for students and youth with disabilities.
Students and youth with disabilities are invited to participate in career preparation workshops and job fairs. The Business Relations Teams work with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors to provide school transition specialists and teachers with preparation packets. The material provides information on how to dress for success, interviewing, resume building, and appropriate behavior when meeting with business partners. Students can attend workshops on topics such as, “Working in Government Professions, State and Federal Hiring Initiatives,” “Employer Panel,” “How to Dress on a Dime and Interview Success,” and “Social Security and Working.” The job fairs provide students an opportunity to meet with hiring specialists to discuss employment opportunities. (Page 180) Title IV

• Goal 3.3: Improve coordination between USOR and employers to benefit clients in obtaining competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities
o Strategy 3.3 (A): Expand outreach efforts to employers to ensure USOR better meets their needs while improving opportunities for VR clients
  Activity A.1: Utilize existing relationships with the Governor’s Committee for Employment of People with Disabilities, Choose to Work (CTW) and DWS to identify employer needs provide opportunities for VR Counselors to connect with community employers
  Activity A.2: Utilize VR Business Relations Team and CTW to provide training and information to employers on the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities
  Activity A.3: Provide staff training on opportunities for developing and coordinating On-the-Job Training, work-based training, internships and apprenticeships to better service client and employer needs. (Page 217) Title IV

Provide business services through the American Job Center network and support a local workforce development system that meets the needs of businesses in the local area. Applicable one-stop partners develop, offer, and deliver quality business services that assist businesses and industry sectors in overcoming the challenges of recruiting, retaining, and developing talent for the area economy. America Job Center staff must: Have a clear understanding of industry skill needs Identify appropriate strategies for assisting employers, and coordinate business services activities across partner programs as appropriate Incorporate an integrated and aligned business services strategy among partners to present a unified voice for American Job Centers in its communication with employers.

Make labor exchange activities and labor market information available to employers. Local areas must establish and develop relationships and networks with large and small employers and their intermediaries. Local areas must develop, convene, or implement industry or sector partnerships. (Pages 249-250) Title IV

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~USOR continues to update and renew it’s Interagency Agreement with the Utah State Board of Education to include descriptions of the expectations of USOR and USBE and to incorporate changes in the partnership as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), specifically in reference to pre-employment transition services and WIOA Section 511: Limitations of Use of Subminimum Wage. Once the Interagency Agreement is finalized, USOR and LEAs will begin to develop goals for their local level agreements. (Page 208) Title IV

Strategy 1.5 (A): Increase outreach to individuals currently employed but making subminimum wages, youth at risk of entering sheltered work or segregated day programs at the time of secondary school exit, individuals at risk of being segregated in any type of subminimum wage entity, individuals leaving sheltered work and day-program settings, individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, etc.

Activity A.1: Identify sheltered work and day programs across the State of Utah that provide services to persons with disabilities

Activity A.2: Provide outreach and information to individuals who are interested in pursuing competitive integrated employment

Activity A.3: Expand opportunities for customized employment and discovery services to expand competitive integrated employment for these individuals.

USOR has provided career counseling and information and referral services as outlined in WIOA Section 511 to individuals who are currently employed in subminimum wage settings. Approximately 1300 people were met with and provided career counseling and information referral throughout the year. Meetings were also held with the employers holding 14C certificates to discuss the law and options that they had moving forward to comply with the law.

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation and has partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities and the Utah State Board of Education (and LEAs) in “school to work pilots” in 5 sites to increase competitive, integrated outcomes for students with disabilities who would normally be slated to enter a day program (non integrated setting) or subminimum wage employment setting upon graduation from high school. Community Rehabilitation Programs and USOR staff who are involved in these pilots have had the opportunity to receive training on Customized Employment. (Pages 209-210) Title IV

Strategy 1.5 (B): Increase outreach to sheltered work and day programs across the State of Utah who currently provide segregated settings with subminimum wage options for persons with disabilities

Activity B.1: Provide outreach and information regarding competitive integrated employment and vocational rehabilitation services to partner agencies that provide segregated settings with subminimum wage options for persons with disabilities

Activity B.2: Partner with agencies like Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and State Office of Education (USOE) to provide training and professional development opportunities to community rehabilitation programs in order to provide community-based services and competitive integrated employment outcomes for the clients they serve. (Page 210) Title IV

USOR has provided information briefings to various agencies and subminimum wage employers throughout Utah including the Utah Association of Community Services, Utah State Board of Education, and the Utah State Rehabilitation Council. USOR has leveraged its partnership with DSPD and the USBE to provide collaborative information sessions to stakeholders in the community.
USOR’s 511 Coordinator provided information regarding competitive and integrated employment to agencies and employers who have been, or currently involved in subminimum wage employment. During the presentation, USOR representatives provide options for future services that the agencies and employers should consider when making changes to existing models, in order to comply with WIOA Section 511. (Page 211) Title IV

Strategy 2.4 (A): Align policies and procedures for supported employment with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule and Utah’s Employment First Legislation

Activity A.1: USOR will provide an agency representative on strategic planning committees with agencies involved in current laws and legislation regarding persons with the most significant disabilities and decreasing acceptance of subminimum wages

Agency representative was assigned by USOR to oversee and participate in all meetings and provided services required and related to decreasing acceptance of subminimum wage jobs (WIOA 511). Career Counseling and Information Referral was provided to approximately 1300 individuals who mostly were currently in a subminimum wage position, and others who were applying for such a position. USOR representative attended meetings with other State Agencies, employers and parents to discuss the law and provide options for those individuals who were looking for an option of competitive and integrated employment. USOR and DSPD, the agency responsible for Medicaid and Medicare Services to individuals with disabilities, coordinated training of providers about the settings rule and Utah’s Employment First Legislation. USOR and DSPD coordinate policies and procedures to ensure seamless supported employment services from referral to extended supports. (Page 216) Title IV

Goal 3.4: Provide improved services to persons with disabilities who are experiencing segregated employment, subminimum wages, or sheltered work and day-program supports in order to increase competitive integrated employment 

o Strategy 3.4 (A): USOR will provide training to staff regarding supported employment, customized employment and discovery, behavior intervention strategies, etc.

Activity A.1: USOR will provide specific training on cognitive and development disabilities as well as any other population who are most at risk for experiencing subminimum wages and sheltered work. (Page 217) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

As Utah develops a method to evaluate customer satisfaction, existing customer feedback mechanisms will be used, and continuous improvement will take into consideration the indicators of performance. Accessibility for individuals with disabilities will be evaluated, and restraints will be addressed as they arise. (Page 88) Title I

Utah’s one-stop service delivery system complies with provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials for individuals with disabilities. DWS’s risk manager works in coordination with State Risk Management to conduct on-site reviews of DWS’s employment centers and administrative offices. These reviews are conducted to ensure physical accessibility for DWS customers as well as employees. Reviews are conducted every three years. The Americans with Disabilities Act Checklist for Existing Facilities on the Achievable Barrier Removal Survey was used for the most recent Risk Management review. However, Risk Management is currently working with DWS and other state agencies in revising the tool. Additionally, the DWS equal opportunity officer conducts statewide employment center reviews using portions of the Section 188 checklist to ensure programmatic accessibility for DWS customers. (Page 98) Title I

USOR updated their website to improve access and accessibility to information on services available through the VR Program and the Division of Services of the Blind and Visually Impaired. In addition, new marketing and outreach materials are available in electronic and braille formats. (Page 212) Title IV

• All core and required partner staff working in the one-stop center will receive training to learn about all of the required WIOA programs, including the referral and accessibility processes • All core and required partners that provide online information and/or services will ensure their websites are 508 compliant and meet the WIOA accessibility requirements (Page 254) Title IV

One-stop centers and one-stop delivery systems are certified for effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility, and continuous improvement. The State Workforce Development Board (SWDB) in consultation with chief elected officials, must review and update the criteria every two years as part of the review and modification of State Plans pursuant to 34 CFR § 463.135. One-stop centers are certified by the SWDB every two years. Each one-stop center must receive a “Pass” for each requirement listed below to be recommended for SWDB certification. If the one-stop center receives a “Fail,” it will have 60 days to submit a plan to the State Workforce Development Board (SWDB) describing how they will remediate the problem. The SWDB has 60 days to approve the one-stop center’s remediation plan or request changes to the plan. (Pages 259-260) Title IV

Vets

Veterans receive Priority of Service (POS) as they transition from the military or any time they seek employment services from DWS to gain or improve their employment status. Veteran Employment Services supports veterans in their reintegration process as they leave the military and rejoin the civilian workforce. The Job for Veteran State Grant (JVSG), as funded by the U.S. Department of Labor/Veteran Employment and Training Services (USDOL/VETS), provides intensive services for veterans that have significant barriers to employment. DWS is also looking at strategies to reduce the duration of veterans on the unemployment rolls and to help veterans on state-provided Medicaid seek VA medical benefits. Accelerated Credentialing to Employment (ACE) helps veterans, National Guard members, reservists and spouses gain licenses and certifications for employment. (Page 33) Title I

 Utah will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act. Currently, to ensure the provision of priority of service, all employment center employees are trained to screen and identify potential covered persons. The question “Have you or a spouse ever served in the U.S. military?” is asked of every job seeker upon initial contact. If the job seeker responds in the affirmative, the job seeker is given DWS Publication 07-107 which provides an overview of the services for which they receive priority and a description of the application for those services. DWS monitors its priority of services for veterans by visiting a required percentage of one stop offices to ensure priority of service is being provided to veterans and their eligible spouses. DWS is audited by the U.S. Department of Labor, Veterans Education and Training Services (USDOL/VETS) annually. In addition to onsite visits, the USDOL/VETS have a “mystery shopper” visit the one-stop centers to verify that priority of service is provided to veterans and their eligible spouses. (Page 96) Title I

Complete a job-match request, which will result in the DWS job-matching system automatically placing all qualified covered persons at the top of an employer’s applicant list. This means that the covered person receives referrals to open job announcements over non-covered persons. Recognizing the need for additional methods of identifying potential covered persons for priority of service, DWS requires all employment center staff to wear a magnetic badge on their clothing asking the question “Have you or a spouse ever served in the U.S. military?” Additionally, Publication 07-107 is available and distributed in the job connection areas of every employment center, the question “Have you or a spouse ever served in the U.S. military?” is displayed as part of a looping presentation on a television in the job connection areas of all employment centers, and small desktop posters are displayed at every intake counter in the employment centers. This provides job seekers with multiple opportunities to self-identify their covered person status or to share the information about priority of service to family members, friends or neighbors. If the veteran is determined to have a significant barrier to employment, they are referred to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). An electronic 360 referral is sent to the appropriate DVOP. (Page 97) Title I

DWS uses a no-wrong-door approach, as noted above, that includes services available in the community that targeted veterans can use to enhance their job search. Native American job seekers in Utah have access to DWS services. Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists are assigned to each of the employment centers nearest to Native American reservations and have developed relationships with tribal leadership to ensure tribal member veterans are provided with intensive services as well as priority of service. (Page 97) Title I

Goal 4.1: Increase outreach and services to veterans with disabilities 

Strategy 4.1: Improve coordination of services between USOR and the Veterans Affairs (VA) to more effectively serve veterans with disabilities

Activity A.1: Review and revise current Cooperative Agreement between USOR and the Veterans Affairs

Activity A.2: Assign local liaisons to interface between USOR districts and local VA offices Activity A.3: Coordinate services between USOR and the VA by inviting VA representatives to visit local VR offices and offer USOR staff trainings (Page 218) Title IV

Mental Health

~~USOR has established a policy chapter based on the provision of Supported Employment Services. The policy is a hybrid of milestone outcome payments and hourly rates to meet the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities. This policy chapter defines extended support agencies who qualify to provide supported employment supports as a partner with VR. These agencies include Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), Division of Services for Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) as well as local mental health agencies, employers, private organizations, natural supports and incentives offered through Social Security or Medicaid. USOR continues to identify and partner with other supported employment entities to provide clients with informed choices, options, and qualified service providers to meet their unique needs. These efforts are coordinated by the USOR Supported Employment Coordinator. USOR has cooperative agreements with local school districts, community rehabilitation programs, and DSPD to provide Supported Employment services to individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities, including youth. Additional cooperative agreements that will extend supports for disadvantaged populations such as mental health and youth are being developed. USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation which makes employment the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized and/or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. (Pages 177-178) Title I

USOR and the Utah Department of Human Services, Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) have a longstanding partnership and collaborative relationship. There is currently a formal Partnership Agreement being finalized between the two agencies which will further enhance the communication and cooperation between USOR and DSAMH. This Partnership Agreement’s goals are for both agencies to better meet the needs of clients with substance abuse and mental health disabilities and to ensure the successful completion of their vocational goals leading to gainful employment. (Page 181) Title I

Information was gathered through the Utah State Office of Education concerning the number of youth and students with disabilities in the State of Utah. There are approximately 74,000 students ages 3 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an Individualized Education Program (IEP). This number does not reflect the number of students who may have a disability that is classified under a 504 Plan, Individualized Health Plan, or unidentified disability such as mental health or substance abuse. For purposes of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, there are approximately 20,000 students with a disability ages 14 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an IEP, also not reflecting students with disabilities who do not have an IEP. These numbers only reflect the approximate number of students with a disability who are the age of applying for and receiving services from VR while still under IDEA (ages 14 through 21). This does not reflect the number of students with disabilities who have dropped out, received diplomas, aged out of the school system, or are up to 24 years of age and no longer tied to the school system. The number of students and youth with disabilities across the State of Utah justifies a great need for transition services from Vocational Rehabilitation. (Pages 193-194) Title IV

USOR reserves SE funds for clients who have been determined most significantly disabled and who have secured an extended support agency for long-term SE support. USOR has partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) to provide and transfer funding and supports for mutual clients. Though these are the primary agencies that USOR partners with for SE, there are other individual supports that may qualify as an extended support agency as provided for in USOR policy. (Page 203) Title IV

USOR is partnering with SAMHSA and Local Mental Health Authorities/DSAMH to provide and expand supported employment services for youth and adults with severe and persistent mental illness, specifically with the IPS model.? ?Through Customized Employment/Supported Employment, USOR is also providing services and supports for individuals with most significant disabilities in sheltered workshops earning sub-minimum wages, who want to participate in integrated and competitive employment and have access the community. ?USOR continues to develop training for internal staff and external service providers through the Supported Employment Coordinator position and a collaborative partnership with DSPD and DSAMH. (Page 204) Title IV

Activity A.4: Provide targeted outreach efforts to youth in custody, homeless youth, youth in foster care, youth with mental health and co-occurring disorders, etc.

USOR created a transition liaison list which educators and families can access on the USOR website to help connect with their VR Counselor liaison. USOR increased the number of counselors assigned to schools across the state by training additional VR Counselors to provide transition services. This redistribution allows VR Counselors to allot more attention and scheduling availability to each school. USOR has added resources to the Transition page on the USOR website; links to the job readiness workshop material, a link to services for students who are potentially eligible, and the transition liaison list. USOR developed a rack card to help market the Job Readiness Workshops transition counselors perform in the schools.

USOR has assigned counselor liaisons to Juvenile Justice Services, Volunteers of America Youth, Department of Child and Family Services, and Local Mental Health Authorities to coordinate services for these populations. Most of the USOR district offices have increased the number of VR Counselors who are participating in IEP/504 meetings and providing Job Readiness Workshops in the LEAs. (Page 207) Title IV

USOR evaluated it’s current providers and use of life skills as a stand alone service and found it has expanded from use of CRP’s to include a few mental health clinics, and secondary schools. USOR is interested in increasing the availability of life skills to clients with mental health issues and students and will continue to outreach efforts to add new providers. (Page 215) Title IV

USOR partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Utah State Board of Education, Utah Department of Mental Health, and Community Rehabilitation Programs to increase life skills training options and coordinate goals for competitive integrated employment opportunities. Life Skills training is available as a stand alone service and in conjunction with a variety of services offered through VR, DSPD, and Mental Health facilities. USOR has successfully added life skills training options from community and private mental health providers. USOR’s coordination with other agencies ensures that life skills are available through all stages of the employment preparation process. This partnership has also been instrumental to USOR’s efforts to promote competitive integrated employment options for individuals who are newly seeking employment under the HBCS settings rule, Utah’s Employment First Initiative, and Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act. Coordinating efforts has allowed USOR to participate in demonstration and pilot projects that increase resources and capacity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 223) Title IV

USOR coordinates services with agencies with mutual goals of competitive, integrated employment and who provide extended services such as the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) to provide a smooth transition from short-term funding through VR to extended services. USOR is committed to providing on the job supports for individuals until they reach less than 20 percent intervention from a job coach or until they reach 24 months in employment. USOR has provided training to internal staff and to partner agencies to help enforce policies and best practices. (Page 224) Title IV

Scope: SE services are provided with Title VI, Part B funds on a fee-for-service basis (based on achievement of milestones) by SE service providers, including functional assessment of clients to perform in supported employment (supplemental to the assessment conducted by the counselor for purposes of establishing eligibility with Title I funds); life-skills training, job development, job analysis and client job matching; training by an employment specialist in job skills and behavioral expectations at the job site; training and support away from the job to ensure work performance; family support; and support to the employer to ensure client job retention. The same scope of services is provided by the extended service agency. Target populations in supported employment include persons with the most significant disabilities who qualify for ongoing support from the Division of Services for Persons with Disabilities (DSPD) or the Division of Mental Health (DMH), or individuals who have ongoing support available from other sources, including private, Social Security and/or natural supports. (Page 226) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
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Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities Annual Report 2016 - 05/01/2017

“This report aims to illustrate the number of people who utilize the services provided by the [Division of Services for People with Disabilities], describe the services being used, provide accountability to the citizens of Utah, and highlight the historical and current need for these services as well as the initiatives to improve services for people with disabilities across the State of Utah.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Papa John’s Pizza To Pay $125,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 01/26/2017

“The owners of a Farmington, Utah Papa John's Pizza will pay $125,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the EEOC announced today.

According to EEOC's lawsuit, Papa John's discriminated against Scott Bonn, who has an intellectual disability, Down syndrome. EEOC alleged that Papa John's employed Bonn successfully at its Farmington location for more than five months and allowed an independently employed and insured job coach to assist him. EEOC further charged that after an operating partner visited the Farmington location and observed Bonn working with the assistance of his job coach, the operating partner ordered Papa John's local management to fire Bonn.”

Systems
  • Other

Utah State Office of Rehabilitation Services to Students with Disabilities Policy - 01/05/2017

“Transition services shall be provided to eligible Students and Youth with disabilities to facilitate the transition from educational settings in high school to VR services oriented toward an employment outcome consistent with the student/youth’s primary employment factors. Individuals meeting the definition of Student with a Disability, both eligible and potentially eligible for VR services, may access Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS). Services for eligible Students and Youth are governed under standard IPE’s as outlined below. Pre-ETS for Students Potentially Eligible are governed under sections 25.7 and 25.8.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Utah Partnerships in Employment - 11/28/2016

“ACL’s Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

Utah’s Division of Services for People with Disabilities received a grant for its School to Work Interagency Transition Initiative.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Utah State Office of Rehabilitation Transition Client Service Memorandum 2016-11: Transition and Pre-employment Transition Services - 11/07/2016

“The purpose of this Client Service Memo is to establish the definitions and procedures for working with Students with Disabilities, Youth with Disabilities, Pre-Employment Transition Services, and Transition Services”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Section 53A-24-106.5 Utah Code - Employment first emphasis on the provision of services. - 10/01/2016

Pertaining to the State System of Public Education. “When providing services to a person with a disability under this chapter, the office shall, within funds appropriated by the Legislature and in accordance with the requirements of federal and state law, give priority to providing services that assist the person in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment that enables the person to: purchase goods and services; establish self-sufficiency; and exercise economic control of the person's life.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Transition Plan for the Move of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation to the Department of Workforce Services - 09/21/2016

“The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) will transition to the Department of Workforce Services (DWS) effective October 1, 2016….With the transition, USOR services will be overseen by DWS, which has similar goals in helping individuals of all circumstances overcome barriers. DWS manages several divisions with distinct purposes that support specialized services for individuals and families. In addition to supporting gainful employment and providing eligibility services, DWS helps parents with childcare needs, provides funding for low-income housing, assists refugees resettling in Utah, manages labor market data and offers career counseling for veterans.

As USOR transitions to DWS, it will move over as its own division. DWS recognizes that USOR clients need individual, specialized care and that USOR’s unique service delivery model contributes to its success. Therefore, there is no intent to change it at this time. Throughout the transition and beyond, DWS and USOR will work together to ensure customers and clients on both sides will continue to receive high-quality service.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Office of Rehabilitation Service Relocation Bill - 03/25/2016

The bill moves Utah State Office of Rehabilitation from the State Board of Education to the Department of Workforce Services; modifies provisions related to the Governor's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, including that the governor appoint certain members of the committee.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HB 325 Office of Rehabilitation Services Amendments - 03/25/2016

“This bill modifies the State Office of Rehabilitation Act and related provisions.”   “Section 16. Section 35A-13-203, which is renumbered from Section 53A-24-106.5 is  renumbered and amended to read:   564 35A-13-203. Employment first emphasis on the provision of  services. 566  (1) When providing services to [a person] an individual with a disability under this  chapter, the office shall, within funds appropriated by the Legislature and in accordance with the requirements of federal and state law, give priority to providing services that assist the [person] individual in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor, Administration: Rescinding Prior Executive Orders, Utah Exec. Order No. 2016-1 - 01/29/2016

“Executive Order issued March 28, 1978, by Governor Matheson, establishing the "Governor's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped" created to promote and to encourage employment of disabled individualist and vocational, economic, and social opportunities. This order is rescinded because Utah's 2012 Employment First statute, Utah Code 62A-5-103.3, fulfills the same purpose”

Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Section 105.2 UT Employment first emphasis on the provision of services.

Pertaining to the Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health. “When providing services to a person with a disability under this chapter, the division shall… give priority to providing services that assist the person in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment that enables the person to: purchase goods and services; establish self-sufficiency; and exercise economic control of the recipient's life.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Section 103.3 UT Employment first emphasis on the provision of services.

Pertaining to the Utah Services for People with Disabilities. “When providing services to a person with a disability under this chapter, the division shall… give priority to providing services that assist the person in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment that enables the person to: purchase goods and services; purchase goods and services; [and] exercise economic control of the person's life.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Governor, Administration: Rescinding Prior Executive Orders, Utah Exec. Order No. 2016-1 - 01/29/2016

“Executive Order issued March 28, 1978, by Governor Matheson, establishing the "Governor's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped" created to promote and to encourage employment of disabled individualist and vocational, economic, and social opportunities. This order is rescinded because Utah's 2012 Employment First statute, Utah Code 62A-5-103.3, fulfills the same purpose”


Utah Executive Order (Model Employer for People with Disabilities) - 10/12/2007

Governor Jon M. Huntsman Jr., declares that, “Utah state government will strive to become the model employer of qualified people with disabilities…”

“Some programmatic components [of the executive order] include, a promotional outreach campaign to recruit qualified people with disabilities, specific programs within executive branch state agencies to recruit qualified people with disabilities, and a Task Force consisting of representatives of the Utah Department of Human Resource Management, the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation, The Governor's Committee for Employment of People with Disabilities, the Department of Workforce Services, and the Division of Risk Management… [Agencies are] charged with reviewing and proposing additional strategies to put Utah state government on the cutting edge of employing qualified people with disabilities...”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 21 - 22 of 22

Utah State Board of Education Special Education Rules

Transition services is a set of activities that is “designed to be within a results-oriented process, is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student with a disability to facilitate the student’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Utah “Employment First Strategic Plan”

“Our Mission: to ensure services offered by DSPD emphasize, promote, and support competitive, integrated and community-based employment for people with disabilities.” The “Strategic Issues” include, stakeholder education, financing and contracting methods, services and service innovation, and performance measurement.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Utah Employment First Partnership

The Utah Employment First Partnership is a commitment among the Utah Department of Work Force Services (DWS), the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), and the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) to improve state government services focused on persons with disabilities achieving competitive, integrated and community based employment.

The mission of the partnership is to, “To ensure state government services currently offered by the partners emphasize and support competitive, integrated and community based employment”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Transforming Lives Through Employment: SAMHSA’s Supported Employment Grant Program (SEP) - 06/29/2018

The purpose of the Supported Employment Program is "to enhance state and community capacity to provide and expand evidence-based SEPs (such as the Individual Placement and Support [IPS] model) to adults with serious mental illnesses, including persons with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders." 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Utah Partnerships in Employment - 11/28/2016

“ACL’s Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

Utah’s Division of Services for People with Disabilities received a grant for its School to Work Interagency Transition Initiative.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Utah Supported Employment Transformation Project - 09/01/2014

“The Supported Employment Transformation Project (SETP) uses the Individual Placement and Support evidence-based, supported employment model. A primary component of this project includes forming a multi-agency coordinating committee that will develop and implement a collaborative, sustainable funding initiative to expand and maintain robust, supported employment services in Utah. The project provides supported employment services to adults with serious mental illness and co-occurring substance use disorders. Two local mental health authorities across urban and rural communities coordinate these services.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

ASPIRE Utah - 09/01/2013

“ASPIRE is a study for youth ages 14 – 16 who receive SSI (Supplemental Security Income).  When you enroll, you and your family will get information to further education and employment.  Half of the youth and families who enroll will be given added services and supports. The ASPIRE team will assist youth and families to find and use services in their communities.  The purpose of the ASPIRE study is to compare the services and supports to find what works best for youth and families.

ASPIRE is a six state project, including Utah.  ASPIRE Utah is a project of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation.  250 Utah youth will be recruited and enrolled.  125 will participate in Usual Services.  125 will participate in ASPIRE Services.  The purpose of the ASPIRE study is to compare the services and supports to find what works best for youth and families.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Utah Benefit Offset National Demonstration (BOND)/ SSDI ‘1 for 2’ Project - 12/18/2009

“The goal of Utah’s pilot was to recruit 500 individuals who receive SSDI benefits only (not in combination with SSI) to be part of the pilot project. Participants were recruited from among SSDI-only beneficiaries who had recently been involved in one of several employment support programs in Utah. Recruitment sources for pilot participants included: The Utah Benefits Planning Assistance and Outreach (BPAO) program, the Medicaid Disability program, the public Vocational Rehabilitation program, and selected employment programs administered by two community mental health agencies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities Customized Employment Initiative

“The Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities & Griffin-Hammis Associates is sponsoring a six-session year-long training series resulting in an optional National Certification in Community Employment Services through the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE). The project is working closely with both Covenant Employment Services and Rise, Inc.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

TURN Supported Work

~~“TURN Supported Employment services assists individuals with disabilities seeking employment opportunities which are compatible with their unique individual  skill-set, and areas of interest. TURN works with our clients to obtain valuable employment skills that easily transfer to relevant work experience with employers offering supported employment opportunities. “

 

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Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Customized Employment - 12/09/2014

“Customized employment is a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both. It is based on an individualized match between the strengths, conditions, and interests of a job candidate and the identified business needs of an employer. Customized Employment utilizes an individualized approach to employment planning and job development — one person at a time . . . one employer at a time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Moving in a New Direction - 12/07/2014

An Executive Director of a facility based day program and sheltered workshop in Utah discusses how the Lane v. Kitzhabersettlement, Olmstead, and CMS directives will impact his organization. The Executive Director says that the work his organization has done is "group work and is performed in a segregated environment…(and) does not reflect the individual desires and interactions with non-disabled peers outside of our centers that the law is not requiring. Customized Employment is stated as the new goal although it is recognized that "some individuals may not ever find successful employment in an integrated setting...but...the opportunity to at least try can and should be considered successful."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Employment/Daytime Activities

This website describes various options for students with disabilities transitioning out of school and provides links to numerous relevant resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

After High School Options

This website serves as a post-high school transition guide for students with disabilities and their families.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment First in Utah & Customized Employment: "One Person at a Time."

A PowerPoint on Utah's Employment First Efforts focusing on Strategic Planning (Employment First Taskforce) and Capacity Building (Customized Employment Training). It contains an explanation of Utah's Employment First Priority (House Bill 240), stating the fundamental importance of work as a part of personal identity and being a citizen of the United States; the false premise of the reasons frequently given as to way people with disabilities can't/shouldn't work. It also has a brief overview of Customized Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Papa John’s Pizza To Pay $125,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 01/26/2017

“The owners of a Farmington, Utah Papa John's Pizza will pay $125,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the EEOC announced today.

According to EEOC's lawsuit, Papa John's discriminated against Scott Bonn, who has an intellectual disability, Down syndrome. EEOC alleged that Papa John's employed Bonn successfully at its Farmington location for more than five months and allowed an independently employed and insured job coach to assist him. EEOC further charged that after an operating partner visited the Farmington location and observed Bonn working with the assistance of his job coach, the operating partner ordered Papa John's local management to fire Bonn.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

Utah Aging Waiver (For Individuals Age 65 or Older)

~~"This Utah Medicaid Waiver for Individuals Age 65 or Older, also known as a Medicaid Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, or the Aging Waiver, is designed to assist older individuals with elevated levels of care needs. It provides services that prolong independent living and prevent premature or unnecessary placement in nursing facilities. Compared to many state HCBS waivers, Utah's waiver offers a wide range of services beyond just personal care or companionship. For example, support is provided for medical equipment and any home modifications to increase independence. Support is offered for personal emergency response services, medication reminder systems, caregiver respite, and adult day care.

The Aging Waiver program allows for consumer direction of personal care services. Via this service model, participants can hire friends and relatives, with the exception of spouses and legal guardians, to provide personal assistance. This includes assistance with daily living activities, such as bathing, dressing, preparing meals, and light housecleaning. While waiver participants can hire, train, and manage their care provider, the financial aspects of being an employer are handled by a Fiscal Management Agency through this waiver program."""

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Utah Acquired Brain Injury Waiver

This waiver is designed to provide services statewide to help people with an acquired brain injury to remain in their homes or other community based settings. Individuals are able to live as independently as possible with supportive services provided through this waiver.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Utah 1915(c) HCBS Waivers

Utah Has Eight Medicaid 1915(c) HCBS Waivers: Acquired Brain Injury Waiver; the Aging Waiver (For Individuals Age 65 or Older); Community Supports Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities or Other Related Conditions; Medicaid Autism Waiver; New Choices Waiver; Physical Disabilities Waiver; and the Waiver for Technology Dependent Children.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

"Industry" is the motto of the Beehive State, and it's easy to see why Utah is "Still the Right Place" for individuals with disabilities to find competitive, integrated employment opportunities and socioeconomic advancement through Employment First.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Utah’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.88%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,161,105
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.81%
Change from
2017 to 2018
155,329
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.56%
Change from
2017 to 2018
72,186
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.56%
Change from
2017 to 2018
46.47%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.3%
Change from
2017 to 2018
79.90%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 3,051,217 3,101,833 3,161,105
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 159,024 150,964 155,329
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 74,767 74,754 72,186
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,287,144 1,331,953 1,361,619
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 47.02% 49.52% 46.47%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.93% 79.66% 79.90%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.40% 3.20% 3.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 15.60% 13.20% 13.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 9.60% 9.30% 8.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 152,163 149,134 147,515
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 146,902 147,430 152,952
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 269,121 265,100 265,814
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 3,891 2,936 4,232
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 28,937 30,446 29,496
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,540 4,319 4,758
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 3,980 3,346 5,155
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,589 1,912 2,685
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 7,287 8,107 7,419
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,657 10,844 10,404

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,730 2,811 2,998
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 9.40% 9.50% 10.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 47,560 46,926 46,048

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,483 6,348 6,474
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 10,601 10,063 9,900
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 28,754 25,662 25,116
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.50% 24.70% 25.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 4.30% 3.70%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 2.20% 2.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 0.10% 0.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 9.40% 11.40% 10.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 11 821 713
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 35 426 409
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 37 10 114
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,753 2,196 1,920

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 21,669 20,275 16,922
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.07 0.08 0.08

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 1,080 2 2,358
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 327 797 966
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 30.00% 33.00% 41.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.27 26.60 32.24

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,986
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 58 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 141 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 443 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,003 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,934 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 16 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 25.50% 23.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,975 3,421 3,551
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 70,883 71,139 70,742
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 40 43 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 94 92 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $5,108,000 $6,378,000 $6,985,575
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $33,462,000 $38,575,000 $42,466,312
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 23.00% 28.00% 26.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,689 2,600 2,724
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 27.10 33.10 30.23

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.45% 61.57% 63.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.37% 10.68% 10.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.49% 2.61% 2.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 92.41% 92.07% 88.40%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 19.35% 20.74% 20.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 64.63% 66.82% 68.77%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 79.46% 82.63% 84.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 45.28% 46.08% 48.53%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 694,868
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 936
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 2,404
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 183,093
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 185,496
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 20
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 137
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 157
AbilityOne wages (products). $17,389
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,417,562

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 2 3
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 14 13 14
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 17 16 18
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 5 3 4
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,327 1,004 1,294
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 182 177
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,332 1,189 1,475

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~The Utah Employment First Partnership is a shared commitment among the Utah Department of Workforce Services (DWS), the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) to improve state-government services focused on persons with disabilities, helping them to achieve competitive, integrated and community-based employment. Utah’s Employment First Initiative supports workforce development. It expects, encourages, provides, creates and rewards integrated employment in the workforce. It is the first and preferred outcome for working-age youth and adults with disabilities at minimum wage or higher. This program focuses on individuals with complex and significant disabilities for whom job placement in the past has been limited or traditionally has not occurred. (Page 33) Title I

USOR has developed and maintains cooperative agreements where necessary with federal and state agencies not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system. USOR maintains cooperative agreements with DWS, Utah State Board of Education (USBE), Utah Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Utah Department of Community and Culture (UDCC), and GOED. As required by Utah State legislation USOR has developed a MOU and coordinated plan with DWS and DSPD (Utah’s DD agency) to carry out services related to employment for persons with significant disabilities. Additional agreements exist relevant to the "Employment First" initiatives in Utah. USOR also maintains cooperative agreements with all local public education school districts, the Veterans Administration (VA), local mental health organizations, and other entities involved in workforce development services including shared projects with the Department of Health (DOH). In addition, USOR participates in the statewide workforce development system through participation on the State Workforce Development Board. (Page 173) Title I

USOR has cooperative agreements with local school districts, community rehabilitation programs, and DSPD to provide Supported Employment services to individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities, including youth. Additional cooperative agreements that will extend supports for disadvantaged populations such as mental health and youth are being developed. USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation which makes employment the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized and/or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. (Page 177-178) Title I

USOR maintains a long standing cooperative agreement with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), which is the state agency responsible for providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. These funds are ongoing and available to provide long term services for individuals who have utilized VR supports, are on the DSPD wait list, and need long term supported employment services. USOR is also partnered with DSPD in Employment First legislation, which makes employment the first and preferred option of individuals with disabilities, including those with developmental disabilities. (Page 181) Title I

Through a cooperative relationship between USOR and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), supported employment services have been expanded to a targeted population through the provision of long-term funding from the Utah State Legislature. These funds are designated to support individuals who have previously been on a waiting list for DSPD SE funding. The USOR Supported Employment Coordinator will collaborate with CRPs and DSPD to ensure compliance with Employment First Legislation. (Page 194) Title IV

USOR launched a school-to-work project, through ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP),?designed to braid? funding, access partner agency supports, and provide a pathway for students with the most significant disabilities to competitive, integrated employment. (Page 204) Title IV

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation and has partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities and the Utah State Board of Education (and LEAs) in “school to work pilots” in 5 sites to increase competitive, integrated outcomes for students with disabilities who would normally be slated to enter a day program (non integrated setting) or subminimum wage employment setting upon graduation from high school. Community Rehabilitation Programs and USOR staff who are involved in these pilots have had the opportunity to receive training on Customized Employment. (Page 210) Title IV

Barriers to engaging all individuals with disabilities in competitive, integrated employment has been changing attitudes and beliefs about disability and work. Outreach efforts are underway to educate parents, educators, and other community providers about the benefits of competitive integrated employment. To this end, USOR has developed an informational flyer about the Settings Rule, Employment First Initiative, and Section 511. These information flyers will be used to educate the community and will be disseminated widely. (Page 210) Title IV

• Goal 2.4: Increase collaboration and coordination with partner community agencies whose goals, services and laws align with providing competitive integrated employment and career opportunities for persons with disabilities
o Strategy 2.4 (A): Align policies and procedures for supported employment with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule and Utah’s Employment First Legislation (Pages 215-216) Title IV

Utah applied for and were awarded Employment First State Leadership and Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) resources from the Office of Disability and Employment Policy (ODEP) in 2015. The Transition and Supported Employment Coordinator was the co-lead/coordinator from 2015-2017 and therefore USOR was involved in the decision-making and implementation of the technical assistance provided by ODEP. EFSLMP resources afforded Utah the opportunity to assist agencies who provide HCBS medicaid waiver funding to receive technical assistance in becoming more community based. As a result, some of the agencies developed (or expanded on ) employment units within their agencies and became vendors with USOR to provide SE and SJBT milestones to assist clients in accessing CIE. Utah also received resources from ODEP to implement School to Work Pilots which utilized a team approach with USOR, DWS/WDD, DSPD, LEAs, and CRP partners to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school/post high school. Although some providers received technical assistance to make the shift to more integrated settings, some have not made steps to follow through with meeting goals. (Page 216) Title IV

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation to increase access and eliminate disparities in access to state VR Services and Supported Employment. Employment is the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post-high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD waiting list through the provision of long-term funding from the Utah State Legislature. This partnership is a key initiative to eliminate systemic barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities. In addition, USOR continues seek out opportunities to support individuals with disabilities in competitive integrated employment. Additionally, USOR believes alignment with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule will increase opportunities for competitive integrated employment opportunities. USOR will provide outreach and opportunities for individuals experiencing sheltered work or segregated day programs and sub-minimum wages to access VR services in order increase competitive integrated employment. (Pages 221-222) Title IV

USOR partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Utah State Board of Education, Utah Department of Mental Health, and Community Rehabilitation Programs to increase life skills training options and coordinate goals for competitive integrated employment opportunities. Life Skills training is available as a stand alone service and in conjunction with a variety of services offered through VR, DSPD, and Mental Health facilities. USOR has successfully added life skills training options from community and private mental health providers. USOR’s coordination with other agencies ensures that life skills are available through all stages of the employment preparation process. This partnership has also been instrumental to USOR’s efforts to promote competitive integrated employment options for individuals who are newly seeking employment under the HBCS settings rule, Utah’s Employment First Initiative, and Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act. Coordinating efforts has allowed USOR to participate in demonstration and pilot projects that increase resources and capacity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 223) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~• USOR has partnered with the Utah State Board of Education, DWS Workforce Development Division and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities to implement “School to Work” pilots in 5 different school districts in Utah. The “School to Work” pilot teams utilize the Customized Employment process to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school or post high school. Teams work collaboratively to serve students and blend/braid funding so that students can access services needed to become employed and independent. (Page 31) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Pages 108-109) Title I

The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) has set a goal to serve 200 individuals with Title VI funds through supported employment services during FFY 2017. During FFY 2014, USOR served 208 individuals eligible for supported employment and 180 in FFY 2015. During FFY 2015, 61 individuals eligible for supported employment services were closed as successfully employed in competitive and integrated settings. The implementation of the Order of Selection had an impact on USOR’s ability to serve all clients, including those eligible for Supported Employment (SE). As USOR has opened the Priority Category 1: Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (MSD), USOR anticipates it will be able to increase the number of individuals receiving Title VI SE funding under Individualized Plan for Employments (IPEs). In addition, Goal 1.2 listed in this Unified Plan is specifically designed to continue to assess and improve the provision of SE and Customized Employment services provided in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). (Page 203) Title IV

As laws, agencies, and federal guidance change, USOR is committed to amending and updating policies to provide SE supports to both adults and youth as appropriate. USOR has been expanding upon and developing resources for three supported employment pathways (Individual Placement and Support, Customized Employment, and Traditional Supported Employment) which lead to long term placement services through partnership with DSPD, USOE, DSAMH, and DWS. USOR continues to partner with UATT/UCAT to increase student access to any necessary and appropriate assistive technology needed for success. (Page 204) Title I

USOR has engaged several committees in addition to resources from WINTAC to review and revise service delivery models for Supported Employment (SE), Customized Employment (CE) and Supported Job Based Training (SJBT). In addition, USOR is participating in several pilot projects to expand and improve SE and CE services in partnership with extended service providers. These pilot projects have extended the original completion date for this strategy but have proved invaluable to CE and SE expansion and innovation. (Page 206) Title IV

o Strategy 3.4 (B): USOR will update policies and procedures to provide supported employment and customized employment to clients in order to assist them in leaving segregated employment settings and gaining competitive integrated employment in their community. Activity B.1: USOR will update policies chapters, as needed, to better align with providing the necessary supports and services that persons with the most significant disabilities will need, to prevent segregated employment and subminimum wages. (Page 218) Title IV

USOR created a milestone payment program to streamline services and outcomes from Community Resource Providers (CRPs). USOR created a position for a statewide coordinator for Supported Employment and Customized Employment services who helps to oversee CRP activities. Additionally, USOR has a CRP committee that meets regularly and a CRP policy manual to provide guidance and consistency in services. The results of these efforts have been a significant increase in the total number of CRPs offering services to VR customers across the state. USOR is exploring options for assisting in the establishment of transition-focused CRP services through competitive state bidding. (Page 220) Title IV

USOR expanded services to Students and Youth with Disabilities through development of fee-for service options for Pre-Employment Transition Services and contracts, increasing VR Counselor connections with schools, and leveraging partnerships with other agencies. By leveraging existing staff resources and increasing coordination with partner agencies, VR successfully expanded outreach services and connected more students and youth to VR services. Training was provided to service provider and partner agencies resulting in new fee for service options and six contract Pre-ETS providers. USOR has expanded Supported Employment service delivery options by increasing the variety of placement methods available to meet individual client’s needs. The increase in models allows VR Counselors and client to select among a variety of models including Customized Employment, Pathways to Success Customized Employment, Individual Placement and Support, and traditional Supported Employment. These options add to the service options currently available from Community Rehabilitation Program providers.  (Page 222) Title IV

USOR continues to maintain high quality standards for vendors providing SE services. USOR requires vendors to receive training approved by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) in order to work 1-1 with clients. Vendors must also receive 10 CEUs per year in order to receive continuing education and remain current in best practices. In addition, vendors providing Customized Employment services must receive training in CE as well as participate in the Technical Assistance component to training. USOR and the Division of People with Disabilities have provided opportunities for Community Rehabilitation Programs to receive training in Customized Employment. USOR participates in fidelity reviews for the Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model, which assesses partnerships with VR as well as quality services provided to clients. (Page 224) Title IV

In addition, USOR is a partner in the “School to Work” pilots which utilize a Customized Employment approach to assist students transitioning from secondary educational institutions to competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation. The “School to Work” pilots have expanded from 3 initial sites to 5 in 2017-2018 school year. USOR has liaisons assigned to every Local Education Agency so that counselors can connect students with services both internally and through information and referral to community resources. (Page 224) Title IV

USOR also partners with extended support agencies to train and set expectations for employment specialists in customized employment, discovery, and Individualized Placement Services (IPS). These services have been proven to meet the needs of persons with most significant disabilities (MSDs) who may need additional services and long-term supports in order to be successfully employed. (Page 226) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~• USOR has partnered with the Utah State Board of Education, DWS Workforce Development Division and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities to implement “School to Work” pilots in 5 different school districts in Utah. The “School to Work” pilot teams utilize the Customized Employment process to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school or post high school. Teams work collaboratively to serve students and blend/braid funding so that students can access services needed to become employed and independent. (Page 31) Title I

Utah’s core partners are funding activities to implement the state strategies. The activities will be aligned across core programs. Core partners are committed to:

• Utilizing a braided funding model to leverage existing resources in providing services for common customers. These efforts will be ongoing including referrals and client interventions at any point of entry (DWS, Vocational Rehabilitation or Adult Education), refinement of career pathways to meet the needs through stronger engagement with employers, high demand industry and post-secondary and training institutions with a focus on high risk clients. Outcomes will be reported to the Operations Committee and SWDB annually. (Page 59) Title I

USOR launched a school-to-work project, through ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP),?designed to braid? funding, access partner agency supports, and provide a pathway for students with the most significant disabilities to competitive, integrated employment.? USOR is partnering with SAMHSA and Local Mental Health Authorities/DSAMH to provide and expand supported employment services for youth and adults with severe and persistent mental illness, specifically with the IPS model. (Page 204) Title IV

USOR expanded services to Students and Youth with Disabilities through development of fee-for service options for Pre-Employment Transition Services and contracts, increasing VR Counselor connections with schools, and leveraging partnerships with other agencies. By leveraging existing staff resources and increasing coordination with partner agencies, VR successfully expanded outreach services and connected more students and youth to VR services. Training was provided to service provider and partner agencies resulting in new fee for service options and six contract Pre-ETS providers. USOR has expanded Supported Employment service delivery options by increasing the variety of placement methods available to meet individual client’s needs. The increase in models allows VR Counselors and client to select among a variety of models including Customized Employment, Pathways to Success Customized Employment, Individual Placement and Support, and traditional Supported Employment. These options add to the service options currently available from Community Rehabilitation Program providers. (Page 222) Title IV

The VR Counselor is required to maintain communication with the Supported Employment (SE) team at least every three months. The SE team includes the VR counselor, customer, family members, extended services agency representative (i.e., support coordinator, mental-health worker, etc.), teacher (if a student), employment specialist or employer. The team will coordinate services by braiding funding to ensure the client has the support needed to be successful on the job. Once the client reaches an 80/20 level of support or 24 months (whichever comes first) and the team agrees, services and funding will be transferred to the identified extended services agency for long-term SE.

For youth and students with disabilities who qualify and need supported employment services, the transition to the extended services agency will occur when the client has graduated or aged out of the school system. The adult services agencies will continue to partner, braid funding and coordinate the transition of responsibility as appropriate. (Page 227) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Through the SWDC committee work, Utah will explore and identify ways to build stronger connections between core partner counselors and post-secondary career resource counselors/professions, including Disability Resource Centers (DRC), to ensure customers have access to all services the partners offer. (Page 68) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~USOR maintains cooperative agreements with the local school districts and public charter schools who serve secondary education students. The cooperative agreements include provisions for consultation, technical assistance, professional development, VR referrals and eligibility, and individualized goals of the local teams. USOR has assigned Transition Counselors to each local school district and charter school. The counselors meet with special educators and administrators, provide outreach to students and parents, provide VR Welcome Sessions to students, provide Job Readiness Workshops to students, attend IEP meetings, as well as cover all referrals and questions from that school.  (Page 175) Title IV

USOR and USBE agree to collaborate on financial responsibility of services, within the guidelines of the Rehabilitation Act and IDEA. Both agencies will respect the resources set forth by policies and procedures that guide each agency’s services. When a student with a disability is both in school and has an IPE with VR, the cost of services necessary for both education and for the student to become employed, will be negotiated between the LEA representative and the VR Counselor, pending any necessary approval through LEA administration and USOR chain of command. At any time during the transition process, comparable benefits or additional agency representatives will be included in the IEP/IPE transition team as an additional resource for financial responsibility. Agreements on shared cost of required services for the student/client, will be in writing in the IEP and IPE, to ensure collaboration and understanding of agency involvement. (Page 176) Title IV

Students and youth with disabilities are invited to participate in career preparation workshops and job fairs. The Business Relations Teams work with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors to provide school transition specialists and teachers with preparation packets. The material provides information on how to dress for success, interviewing, resume building, and appropriate behavior when meeting with business partners. Students can attend workshops on topics such as, “Working in Government Professions, State and Federal Hiring Initiatives,” “Employer Panel,” “How to Dress on a Dime and Interview Success,” and “Social Security and Working.” The job fairs provide students an opportunity to meet with hiring specialists to discuss employment opportunities. (Page 180) Title IV

USOR Transition Services provides a variety of services to assist transition aged youth in obtaining paid work experiences. Through the provision of Work Based Training, Summer Work Experiences, Supported Job Based Training/Supported Employment, and other Community Rehabilitation Program services, VR coordinates with employers on an individualized basis to meet both the client’s and employer’s needs. (Page 180) Title IV

Information was gathered through the Utah State Office of Education concerning the number of youth and students with disabilities in the State of Utah. There are approximately 74,000 students ages 3 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an Individualized Education Program (IEP). This number does not reflect the number of students who may have a disability that is classified under a 504 Plan, Individualized Health Plan, or unidentified disability such as mental health or substance abuse. For purposes of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, there are approximately 20,000 students with a disability ages 14 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an IEP, also not reflecting students with disabilities who do not have an IEP. These numbers only reflect the approximate number of students with a disability who are the age of applying for and receiving services from VR while still under IDEA (ages 14 through 21). This does not reflect the number of students with disabilities who have dropped out, received diplomas, aged out of the school system, or are up to 24 years of age and no longer tied to the school system. The number of students and youth with disabilities across the State of Utah justifies a great need for transition services from Vocational Rehabilitation. (Pages 193-194) Title IV

Effective when all required approvals are in place and when management deems necessary, USOR will close all categories and place all eligible individuals not in plan on a waiting list. USOR will also place all subsequent applicants who are determined eligible for VR services on the waiting list. USOR will only provide services to eligible individuals who currently have an IPE and for whom services have been initiated. As resources become available individuals will be taken off of the waiting list in chronological order based on priority category and application date. Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (MSD) will be the first category served. (Page 202) Title IV

o Strategy 1.3 (B): Increase outreach and collaboration with schools, i.e., special education, school administration, school counselors and 504 coordinators
Activity B.1: Increase counselor collaborative partnerships in schools through liaison meetings, IEP meetings, agency fairs, job readiness workshops, etc.
Activity B.2: Amend and maintain USOR/USOE Interagency Agreements at both the state and local levels to be more descriptive and comprehensive about the expectations on both sides
Activity B.3: Identify and develop programs serving students with disabilities to provide pre-employment transition services
USOR has increased presence in Local Education Agencies and many district offices have increased the number of school liaisons out of need. Counselors attend IEP meetings, 504 meetings, agency fairs, and facilitate job readiness workshops in the schools. (Page 208) Title IV

USOR has a dedicated Transition Coordinator who has responsibilities such as improving the quality and consistency of transition services from USOR counselors to students and improving collaboration and coordination. USOR created policies and procedures for specific services for transition students with disabilities. Each district office maintains specific counselors as liaisons with local public and private schools, and specific Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) are kept with each school and school district. VR counselors service individual students by meeting with their IEP teams and in specific VR meetings with students and their parents. Also, VR is expanding provision of Job-Readiness Workshops to schools in their local areas. The Job-Readiness Workshops cover aspects of self-discovery, job-readiness, job-seeking and job-keeping skills. (Page 220) Title IV

Since 2016, USOR has engaged in the following innovation and expansion projects and activities: (1) Funding of the USOR Transition and Supported Employment Coordinator to increase the provision of VR services to youth with disabilities, specifically those with the most significant disabilities and expansion of transition and pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities (2) Development and Implementation of six (6) Pre-Employment Transition Services contracts to serve eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities (3) School to Work Customized Employment Project with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and three local school districts to develop competitive, integrated, and meaningful employment for students with developmental disabilities, specifically students who are at-risk of entering into sheltered work settings at sub-minimum wages once exiting high school and (4) Collaboration with Source America to increase Customized Employment services in rural and underserved areas. (5) In addition, USOR provides annual funding support for operation of the Utah State Independent Living Council. (6) Administrative support and direct expenses for operation of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) were also provided by USOR. These funding arrangements are consistent with 34 CFR 361.35. (Page 225) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Utah’s strategies take into account its economic, workforce, workforce development, education and training activities and analysis provided in the section above. Utah’s Unified Plan includes strategies to achieve its vision and goals. The strategies are flexible to accommodate the state’s economic, workforce, and workforce development, education and training activities and analysis provided in Section (a). The plan includes specific strategies to address the needs of populations described in Section (a). The foundation of Utah’s plan is built upon utilizing data, partnerships, and its resources to implement strategies that support operations to provide services to individuals and employers. Utah is committed to changing and/or adjusting its strategies as needed to meet the state’s workforce needs. Utah’s SWDB will establish standing committees to ensure Utah’s goals and vision are met. These include Youth, Apprenticeships, Services to Individuals with Disabilities, Career Pathways, and Operations. (Page 46) Title I

As Utah has been implementing its Unified plan, it has continued to provide assistance to SWDB members and committees by providing a strong structure and basis for the SWDB to function within. In addition to Guiding Principles, Statutory Requirements, application processes, etc. the SWBD has the opportunity to:
Implement innovative strategies by focusing on employer engagement, strengthening core programs, dissemination of best practices, and promoting effective use of technology to enhance service delivery.
Establish and maintain standing committees. There are two required committees including the Youth Services Committee and the Services to Individuals with Disabilities. Utah has added a Career Pathways Committee, an Operations Committee, and an Apprenticeship Committee. (Page 53) Title I

Partners will coordinate activities and resources to provide comprehensive, high-quality, customer-centered services, including supportive services, to employers to meet their current and projected workforce needs. The activities will conform to the statutory requirements of each program.
The Operations Committee will coordinate with the Service to Individuals with Disabilities Committee, Career Pathways Committee and Apprenticeships Committee to create recommendations for aligning DWS, USOR, and Adult Education and other required partner services for employers. (Page 63) Title I

Career Pathways Committee• There are many career pathway activities being carried out around the state. The Career Pathway Committee will meet with partners from around the state gathering information and ideas on how these groups can align, share resources, and collaborate. They will make recommendations, that include the Six Key Elements of Career Pathways described in the Career Pathway Toolkit and requirements of WIOA section 101(d)(3)(B), (D) to the SWDB regarding how the SWDB can best support a collaborative state career pathway system. Utah’s sector strategies are aligned with GOED’s industry clusters. They are incorporated throughout Utah’s plan. Utah will refer to the definitions of “career pathway” in WIOA section 3(7) and “industry sector or occupation section 3(23) of WIOA. (Page 102) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Page 108-109) Title I

USOR has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing Vocational Rehabilitation services and OJT and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act. USOR determines whether for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit organizations. USOR has established fee-for-service agreements with private, non-profit entities providing vocational rehabilitation services throughout Utah in accordance with the Unified State Plan. USOR maintains vendor relationships with other agencies providing Job Preparation and Placement (JPP), Supported Job Based Training (SJBT) and Support Employment (SE) service that include a fee-for-service agreement and participation in job coach training activities. USOR continues to identify and make arrangements, where appropriate, to expand the availability of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) offering supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of the state plan. (Page 177) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Partners will coordinate activities and resources to provide comprehensive, high-quality, customer-centered services, including supportive services, to employers to meet their current and projected workforce needs. The activities will conform to the statutory requirements of each program. The Operations Committee will coordinate with the Service to Individuals with Disabilities Committee, Career Pathways Committee and Apprenticeships Committee to create recommendations for aligning DWS, USOR, and Adult Education and other required partner services for employers. (Page 63) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Pages 108-109) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer/ Business

~~USOR has initiatives to partner with employers to identify competitive, integrated employment and career exploration opportunities that facilitate the provision of VR and Transition Services. These initiatives are primarily carried out through the USOR Business Relations and Choose to Work (CTW) Programs. The Business Relations Team was established in 2005 to strengthen the connection between employers and individuals with disabilities through a combination of outreach efforts, disability awareness training, consultation services, job fairs and workshops, business networking activities and job posting networks. The Business Relations Team:

Assists with the recruitment and referral of qualified individuals with disabilities to meet workforce demands. Through a partnership with DWS, a customized option to recruit qualified applicants with disabilities was created for job vacancies by using the key word: PWDNET. Employers are able to utilize this keyword on UWORKS allowing keyword searches by job seekers, advocates, and Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. Employers can also send emails to “pwdnetjobs@utah.gov” with a complete job description and the job opening. These job posting are shared statewide with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor and Employment Specialists.

Utilizes the Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP), https://tapability.org/, which is led by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and The National Employment Team (NET) in partnership with disABLEDperson, Inc. TAP includes both a national talent pool of VR clients looking for employment and a job posting system for employers looking to hire individuals with disabilities.

Conduct semi-annual Employer Workshops on Hiring and Retaining Individuals with Disabilities and Career Preparation and Job Fairs. The Workshop offers Business Partners an opportunity to learn more about disability, accommodations and other disability and employment issues. The Job Fair is a targeted fair for individuals with disabilities in which PWDNET (People With Disabilities Network) business partners participate. These events provide opportunities for business to connect with job-ready individuals with disabilities, and individuals with disabilities to explore careers. The job fairs and workshops also offer opportunities for internships and mentor experiences. (Page 178) Title IV

The Choose to Work (CTW) Program: USOR’s other primary initiative for working with employers to identify competitive integrated employment opportunities and career exploration for individuals with disabilities is CTW. This is a partnership between the USOR and WDD that is designed to ensure all individuals with disabilities have equal access to workforce investment activities available to assist them in preparing for and obtaining employment through coordinated service delivery.

The core services of the CTW program are job development and job placement. Job development includes interfacing with employers for the purpose of marketing a specific job seeker to the employer, or to inform and educate the employer regarding hiring individuals from a talented pool of job seekers with disabilities. Job placement is focused on service delivery to assist a specific individual in locating job openings, preparing for the application process, and following through with the application for employment.

CTW specialists coordinate with the Business Relations Team to organize and engage in employer workshops to increase awareness regarding the hiring and job retention of individuals with disabilities. The Specialists are active participants in local area Chambers of Commerce and sit on local and community boards in order to facilitate the provision of Vocational Rehabilitation services leading to an employment outcome. CTW Specialists are actively engaged with the DWS Workforce Development Specialists as well as USOR Business Relations Team and affiliates to identify integrated employment opportunities for job seekers with disabilities. (Page 179) Title IV

USOR utilizes the Business Relations and CTW Programs to coordinate with employers in support of transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities. Staff meet with employers to identify and/or develop internships, on-the-job trainings, mentoring experiences and temporary work experiences for students and youth with disabilities.
Students and youth with disabilities are invited to participate in career preparation workshops and job fairs. The Business Relations Teams work with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors to provide school transition specialists and teachers with preparation packets. The material provides information on how to dress for success, interviewing, resume building, and appropriate behavior when meeting with business partners. Students can attend workshops on topics such as, “Working in Government Professions, State and Federal Hiring Initiatives,” “Employer Panel,” “How to Dress on a Dime and Interview Success,” and “Social Security and Working.” The job fairs provide students an opportunity to meet with hiring specialists to discuss employment opportunities. (Page 180) Title IV

• Goal 3.3: Improve coordination between USOR and employers to benefit clients in obtaining competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities
o Strategy 3.3 (A): Expand outreach efforts to employers to ensure USOR better meets their needs while improving opportunities for VR clients
  Activity A.1: Utilize existing relationships with the Governor’s Committee for Employment of People with Disabilities, Choose to Work (CTW) and DWS to identify employer needs provide opportunities for VR Counselors to connect with community employers
  Activity A.2: Utilize VR Business Relations Team and CTW to provide training and information to employers on the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities
  Activity A.3: Provide staff training on opportunities for developing and coordinating On-the-Job Training, work-based training, internships and apprenticeships to better service client and employer needs. (Page 217) Title IV

Provide business services through the American Job Center network and support a local workforce development system that meets the needs of businesses in the local area. Applicable one-stop partners develop, offer, and deliver quality business services that assist businesses and industry sectors in overcoming the challenges of recruiting, retaining, and developing talent for the area economy. America Job Center staff must: Have a clear understanding of industry skill needs Identify appropriate strategies for assisting employers, and coordinate business services activities across partner programs as appropriate Incorporate an integrated and aligned business services strategy among partners to present a unified voice for American Job Centers in its communication with employers.

Make labor exchange activities and labor market information available to employers. Local areas must establish and develop relationships and networks with large and small employers and their intermediaries. Local areas must develop, convene, or implement industry or sector partnerships. (Pages 249-250) Title IV

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~USOR continues to update and renew it’s Interagency Agreement with the Utah State Board of Education to include descriptions of the expectations of USOR and USBE and to incorporate changes in the partnership as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), specifically in reference to pre-employment transition services and WIOA Section 511: Limitations of Use of Subminimum Wage. Once the Interagency Agreement is finalized, USOR and LEAs will begin to develop goals for their local level agreements. (Page 208) Title IV

Strategy 1.5 (A): Increase outreach to individuals currently employed but making subminimum wages, youth at risk of entering sheltered work or segregated day programs at the time of secondary school exit, individuals at risk of being segregated in any type of subminimum wage entity, individuals leaving sheltered work and day-program settings, individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, etc.

Activity A.1: Identify sheltered work and day programs across the State of Utah that provide services to persons with disabilities

Activity A.2: Provide outreach and information to individuals who are interested in pursuing competitive integrated employment

Activity A.3: Expand opportunities for customized employment and discovery services to expand competitive integrated employment for these individuals.

USOR has provided career counseling and information and referral services as outlined in WIOA Section 511 to individuals who are currently employed in subminimum wage settings. Approximately 1300 people were met with and provided career counseling and information referral throughout the year. Meetings were also held with the employers holding 14C certificates to discuss the law and options that they had moving forward to comply with the law.

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation and has partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities and the Utah State Board of Education (and LEAs) in “school to work pilots” in 5 sites to increase competitive, integrated outcomes for students with disabilities who would normally be slated to enter a day program (non integrated setting) or subminimum wage employment setting upon graduation from high school. Community Rehabilitation Programs and USOR staff who are involved in these pilots have had the opportunity to receive training on Customized Employment. (Pages 209-210) Title IV

Strategy 1.5 (B): Increase outreach to sheltered work and day programs across the State of Utah who currently provide segregated settings with subminimum wage options for persons with disabilities

Activity B.1: Provide outreach and information regarding competitive integrated employment and vocational rehabilitation services to partner agencies that provide segregated settings with subminimum wage options for persons with disabilities

Activity B.2: Partner with agencies like Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and State Office of Education (USOE) to provide training and professional development opportunities to community rehabilitation programs in order to provide community-based services and competitive integrated employment outcomes for the clients they serve. (Page 210) Title IV

USOR has provided information briefings to various agencies and subminimum wage employers throughout Utah including the Utah Association of Community Services, Utah State Board of Education, and the Utah State Rehabilitation Council. USOR has leveraged its partnership with DSPD and the USBE to provide collaborative information sessions to stakeholders in the community.
USOR’s 511 Coordinator provided information regarding competitive and integrated employment to agencies and employers who have been, or currently involved in subminimum wage employment. During the presentation, USOR representatives provide options for future services that the agencies and employers should consider when making changes to existing models, in order to comply with WIOA Section 511. (Page 211) Title IV

Strategy 2.4 (A): Align policies and procedures for supported employment with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule and Utah’s Employment First Legislation

Activity A.1: USOR will provide an agency representative on strategic planning committees with agencies involved in current laws and legislation regarding persons with the most significant disabilities and decreasing acceptance of subminimum wages

Agency representative was assigned by USOR to oversee and participate in all meetings and provided services required and related to decreasing acceptance of subminimum wage jobs (WIOA 511). Career Counseling and Information Referral was provided to approximately 1300 individuals who mostly were currently in a subminimum wage position, and others who were applying for such a position. USOR representative attended meetings with other State Agencies, employers and parents to discuss the law and provide options for those individuals who were looking for an option of competitive and integrated employment. USOR and DSPD, the agency responsible for Medicaid and Medicare Services to individuals with disabilities, coordinated training of providers about the settings rule and Utah’s Employment First Legislation. USOR and DSPD coordinate policies and procedures to ensure seamless supported employment services from referral to extended supports. (Page 216) Title IV

Goal 3.4: Provide improved services to persons with disabilities who are experiencing segregated employment, subminimum wages, or sheltered work and day-program supports in order to increase competitive integrated employment 

o Strategy 3.4 (A): USOR will provide training to staff regarding supported employment, customized employment and discovery, behavior intervention strategies, etc.

Activity A.1: USOR will provide specific training on cognitive and development disabilities as well as any other population who are most at risk for experiencing subminimum wages and sheltered work. (Page 217) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

As Utah develops a method to evaluate customer satisfaction, existing customer feedback mechanisms will be used, and continuous improvement will take into consideration the indicators of performance. Accessibility for individuals with disabilities will be evaluated, and restraints will be addressed as they arise. (Page 88) Title I

Utah’s one-stop service delivery system complies with provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials for individuals with disabilities. DWS’s risk manager works in coordination with State Risk Management to conduct on-site reviews of DWS’s employment centers and administrative offices. These reviews are conducted to ensure physical accessibility for DWS customers as well as employees. Reviews are conducted every three years. The Americans with Disabilities Act Checklist for Existing Facilities on the Achievable Barrier Removal Survey was used for the most recent Risk Management review. However, Risk Management is currently working with DWS and other state agencies in revising the tool. Additionally, the DWS equal opportunity officer conducts statewide employment center reviews using portions of the Section 188 checklist to ensure programmatic accessibility for DWS customers. (Page 98) Title I

USOR updated their website to improve access and accessibility to information on services available through the VR Program and the Division of Services of the Blind and Visually Impaired. In addition, new marketing and outreach materials are available in electronic and braille formats. (Page 212) Title IV

• All core and required partner staff working in the one-stop center will receive training to learn about all of the required WIOA programs, including the referral and accessibility processes • All core and required partners that provide online information and/or services will ensure their websites are 508 compliant and meet the WIOA accessibility requirements (Page 254) Title IV

One-stop centers and one-stop delivery systems are certified for effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility, and continuous improvement. The State Workforce Development Board (SWDB) in consultation with chief elected officials, must review and update the criteria every two years as part of the review and modification of State Plans pursuant to 34 CFR § 463.135. One-stop centers are certified by the SWDB every two years. Each one-stop center must receive a “Pass” for each requirement listed below to be recommended for SWDB certification. If the one-stop center receives a “Fail,” it will have 60 days to submit a plan to the State Workforce Development Board (SWDB) describing how they will remediate the problem. The SWDB has 60 days to approve the one-stop center’s remediation plan or request changes to the plan. (Pages 259-260) Title IV

Vets

Veterans receive Priority of Service (POS) as they transition from the military or any time they seek employment services from DWS to gain or improve their employment status. Veteran Employment Services supports veterans in their reintegration process as they leave the military and rejoin the civilian workforce. The Job for Veteran State Grant (JVSG), as funded by the U.S. Department of Labor/Veteran Employment and Training Services (USDOL/VETS), provides intensive services for veterans that have significant barriers to employment. DWS is also looking at strategies to reduce the duration of veterans on the unemployment rolls and to help veterans on state-provided Medicaid seek VA medical benefits. Accelerated Credentialing to Employment (ACE) helps veterans, National Guard members, reservists and spouses gain licenses and certifications for employment. (Page 33) Title I

 Utah will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act. Currently, to ensure the provision of priority of service, all employment center employees are trained to screen and identify potential covered persons. The question “Have you or a spouse ever served in the U.S. military?” is asked of every job seeker upon initial contact. If the job seeker responds in the affirmative, the job seeker is given DWS Publication 07-107 which provides an overview of the services for which they receive priority and a description of the application for those services. DWS monitors its priority of services for veterans by visiting a required percentage of one stop offices to ensure priority of service is being provided to veterans and their eligible spouses. DWS is audited by the U.S. Department of Labor, Veterans Education and Training Services (USDOL/VETS) annually. In addition to onsite visits, the USDOL/VETS have a “mystery shopper” visit the one-stop centers to verify that priority of service is provided to veterans and their eligible spouses. (Page 96) Title I

Complete a job-match request, which will result in the DWS job-matching system automatically placing all qualified covered persons at the top of an employer’s applicant list. This means that the covered person receives referrals to open job announcements over non-covered persons. Recognizing the need for additional methods of identifying potential covered persons for priority of service, DWS requires all employment center staff to wear a magnetic badge on their clothing asking the question “Have you or a spouse ever served in the U.S. military?” Additionally, Publication 07-107 is available and distributed in the job connection areas of every employment center, the question “Have you or a spouse ever served in the U.S. military?” is displayed as part of a looping presentation on a television in the job connection areas of all employment centers, and small desktop posters are displayed at every intake counter in the employment centers. This provides job seekers with multiple opportunities to self-identify their covered person status or to share the information about priority of service to family members, friends or neighbors. If the veteran is determined to have a significant barrier to employment, they are referred to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). An electronic 360 referral is sent to the appropriate DVOP. (Page 97) Title I

DWS uses a no-wrong-door approach, as noted above, that includes services available in the community that targeted veterans can use to enhance their job search. Native American job seekers in Utah have access to DWS services. Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists are assigned to each of the employment centers nearest to Native American reservations and have developed relationships with tribal leadership to ensure tribal member veterans are provided with intensive services as well as priority of service. (Page 97) Title I

Goal 4.1: Increase outreach and services to veterans with disabilities 

Strategy 4.1: Improve coordination of services between USOR and the Veterans Affairs (VA) to more effectively serve veterans with disabilities

Activity A.1: Review and revise current Cooperative Agreement between USOR and the Veterans Affairs

Activity A.2: Assign local liaisons to interface between USOR districts and local VA offices Activity A.3: Coordinate services between USOR and the VA by inviting VA representatives to visit local VR offices and offer USOR staff trainings (Page 218) Title IV

Mental Health

~~USOR has established a policy chapter based on the provision of Supported Employment Services. The policy is a hybrid of milestone outcome payments and hourly rates to meet the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities. This policy chapter defines extended support agencies who qualify to provide supported employment supports as a partner with VR. These agencies include Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), Division of Services for Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) as well as local mental health agencies, employers, private organizations, natural supports and incentives offered through Social Security or Medicaid. USOR continues to identify and partner with other supported employment entities to provide clients with informed choices, options, and qualified service providers to meet their unique needs. These efforts are coordinated by the USOR Supported Employment Coordinator. USOR has cooperative agreements with local school districts, community rehabilitation programs, and DSPD to provide Supported Employment services to individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities, including youth. Additional cooperative agreements that will extend supports for disadvantaged populations such as mental health and youth are being developed. USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation which makes employment the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized and/or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. (Pages 177-178) Title I

USOR and the Utah Department of Human Services, Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) have a longstanding partnership and collaborative relationship. There is currently a formal Partnership Agreement being finalized between the two agencies which will further enhance the communication and cooperation between USOR and DSAMH. This Partnership Agreement’s goals are for both agencies to better meet the needs of clients with substance abuse and mental health disabilities and to ensure the successful completion of their vocational goals leading to gainful employment. (Page 181) Title I

Information was gathered through the Utah State Office of Education concerning the number of youth and students with disabilities in the State of Utah. There are approximately 74,000 students ages 3 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an Individualized Education Program (IEP). This number does not reflect the number of students who may have a disability that is classified under a 504 Plan, Individualized Health Plan, or unidentified disability such as mental health or substance abuse. For purposes of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, there are approximately 20,000 students with a disability ages 14 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an IEP, also not reflecting students with disabilities who do not have an IEP. These numbers only reflect the approximate number of students with a disability who are the age of applying for and receiving services from VR while still under IDEA (ages 14 through 21). This does not reflect the number of students with disabilities who have dropped out, received diplomas, aged out of the school system, or are up to 24 years of age and no longer tied to the school system. The number of students and youth with disabilities across the State of Utah justifies a great need for transition services from Vocational Rehabilitation. (Pages 193-194) Title IV

USOR reserves SE funds for clients who have been determined most significantly disabled and who have secured an extended support agency for long-term SE support. USOR has partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) to provide and transfer funding and supports for mutual clients. Though these are the primary agencies that USOR partners with for SE, there are other individual supports that may qualify as an extended support agency as provided for in USOR policy. (Page 203) Title IV

USOR is partnering with SAMHSA and Local Mental Health Authorities/DSAMH to provide and expand supported employment services for youth and adults with severe and persistent mental illness, specifically with the IPS model.? ?Through Customized Employment/Supported Employment, USOR is also providing services and supports for individuals with most significant disabilities in sheltered workshops earning sub-minimum wages, who want to participate in integrated and competitive employment and have access the community. ?USOR continues to develop training for internal staff and external service providers through the Supported Employment Coordinator position and a collaborative partnership with DSPD and DSAMH. (Page 204) Title IV

Activity A.4: Provide targeted outreach efforts to youth in custody, homeless youth, youth in foster care, youth with mental health and co-occurring disorders, etc.

USOR created a transition liaison list which educators and families can access on the USOR website to help connect with their VR Counselor liaison. USOR increased the number of counselors assigned to schools across the state by training additional VR Counselors to provide transition services. This redistribution allows VR Counselors to allot more attention and scheduling availability to each school. USOR has added resources to the Transition page on the USOR website; links to the job readiness workshop material, a link to services for students who are potentially eligible, and the transition liaison list. USOR developed a rack card to help market the Job Readiness Workshops transition counselors perform in the schools.

USOR has assigned counselor liaisons to Juvenile Justice Services, Volunteers of America Youth, Department of Child and Family Services, and Local Mental Health Authorities to coordinate services for these populations. Most of the USOR district offices have increased the number of VR Counselors who are participating in IEP/504 meetings and providing Job Readiness Workshops in the LEAs. (Page 207) Title IV

USOR evaluated it’s current providers and use of life skills as a stand alone service and found it has expanded from use of CRP’s to include a few mental health clinics, and secondary schools. USOR is interested in increasing the availability of life skills to clients with mental health issues and students and will continue to outreach efforts to add new providers. (Page 215) Title IV

USOR partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Utah State Board of Education, Utah Department of Mental Health, and Community Rehabilitation Programs to increase life skills training options and coordinate goals for competitive integrated employment opportunities. Life Skills training is available as a stand alone service and in conjunction with a variety of services offered through VR, DSPD, and Mental Health facilities. USOR has successfully added life skills training options from community and private mental health providers. USOR’s coordination with other agencies ensures that life skills are available through all stages of the employment preparation process. This partnership has also been instrumental to USOR’s efforts to promote competitive integrated employment options for individuals who are newly seeking employment under the HBCS settings rule, Utah’s Employment First Initiative, and Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act. Coordinating efforts has allowed USOR to participate in demonstration and pilot projects that increase resources and capacity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 223) Title IV

USOR coordinates services with agencies with mutual goals of competitive, integrated employment and who provide extended services such as the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) to provide a smooth transition from short-term funding through VR to extended services. USOR is committed to providing on the job supports for individuals until they reach less than 20 percent intervention from a job coach or until they reach 24 months in employment. USOR has provided training to internal staff and to partner agencies to help enforce policies and best practices. (Page 224) Title IV

Scope: SE services are provided with Title VI, Part B funds on a fee-for-service basis (based on achievement of milestones) by SE service providers, including functional assessment of clients to perform in supported employment (supplemental to the assessment conducted by the counselor for purposes of establishing eligibility with Title I funds); life-skills training, job development, job analysis and client job matching; training by an employment specialist in job skills and behavioral expectations at the job site; training and support away from the job to ensure work performance; family support; and support to the employer to ensure client job retention. The same scope of services is provided by the extended service agency. Target populations in supported employment include persons with the most significant disabilities who qualify for ongoing support from the Division of Services for Persons with Disabilities (DSPD) or the Division of Mental Health (DMH), or individuals who have ongoing support available from other sources, including private, Social Security and/or natural supports. (Page 226) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

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Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities Annual Report 2016 - 05/01/2017

“This report aims to illustrate the number of people who utilize the services provided by the [Division of Services for People with Disabilities], describe the services being used, provide accountability to the citizens of Utah, and highlight the historical and current need for these services as well as the initiatives to improve services for people with disabilities across the State of Utah.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Papa John’s Pizza To Pay $125,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 01/26/2017

“The owners of a Farmington, Utah Papa John's Pizza will pay $125,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the EEOC announced today.

According to EEOC's lawsuit, Papa John's discriminated against Scott Bonn, who has an intellectual disability, Down syndrome. EEOC alleged that Papa John's employed Bonn successfully at its Farmington location for more than five months and allowed an independently employed and insured job coach to assist him. EEOC further charged that after an operating partner visited the Farmington location and observed Bonn working with the assistance of his job coach, the operating partner ordered Papa John's local management to fire Bonn.”

Systems
  • Other

Utah State Office of Rehabilitation Services to Students with Disabilities Policy - 01/05/2017

“Transition services shall be provided to eligible Students and Youth with disabilities to facilitate the transition from educational settings in high school to VR services oriented toward an employment outcome consistent with the student/youth’s primary employment factors. Individuals meeting the definition of Student with a Disability, both eligible and potentially eligible for VR services, may access Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS). Services for eligible Students and Youth are governed under standard IPE’s as outlined below. Pre-ETS for Students Potentially Eligible are governed under sections 25.7 and 25.8.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Utah Partnerships in Employment - 11/28/2016

“ACL’s Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

Utah’s Division of Services for People with Disabilities received a grant for its School to Work Interagency Transition Initiative.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Utah State Office of Rehabilitation Transition Client Service Memorandum 2016-11: Transition and Pre-employment Transition Services - 11/07/2016

“The purpose of this Client Service Memo is to establish the definitions and procedures for working with Students with Disabilities, Youth with Disabilities, Pre-Employment Transition Services, and Transition Services”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Section 53A-24-106.5 Utah Code - Employment first emphasis on the provision of services. - 10/01/2016

Pertaining to the State System of Public Education. “When providing services to a person with a disability under this chapter, the office shall, within funds appropriated by the Legislature and in accordance with the requirements of federal and state law, give priority to providing services that assist the person in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment that enables the person to: purchase goods and services; establish self-sufficiency; and exercise economic control of the person's life.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Transition Plan for the Move of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation to the Department of Workforce Services - 09/21/2016

“The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) will transition to the Department of Workforce Services (DWS) effective October 1, 2016….With the transition, USOR services will be overseen by DWS, which has similar goals in helping individuals of all circumstances overcome barriers. DWS manages several divisions with distinct purposes that support specialized services for individuals and families. In addition to supporting gainful employment and providing eligibility services, DWS helps parents with childcare needs, provides funding for low-income housing, assists refugees resettling in Utah, manages labor market data and offers career counseling for veterans.

As USOR transitions to DWS, it will move over as its own division. DWS recognizes that USOR clients need individual, specialized care and that USOR’s unique service delivery model contributes to its success. Therefore, there is no intent to change it at this time. Throughout the transition and beyond, DWS and USOR will work together to ensure customers and clients on both sides will continue to receive high-quality service.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Office of Rehabilitation Service Relocation Bill - 03/25/2016

The bill moves Utah State Office of Rehabilitation from the State Board of Education to the Department of Workforce Services; modifies provisions related to the Governor's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, including that the governor appoint certain members of the committee.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HB 325 Office of Rehabilitation Services Amendments - 03/25/2016

“This bill modifies the State Office of Rehabilitation Act and related provisions.”   “Section 16. Section 35A-13-203, which is renumbered from Section 53A-24-106.5 is  renumbered and amended to read:   564 35A-13-203. Employment first emphasis on the provision of  services. 566  (1) When providing services to [a person] an individual with a disability under this  chapter, the office shall, within funds appropriated by the Legislature and in accordance with the requirements of federal and state law, give priority to providing services that assist the [person] individual in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor, Administration: Rescinding Prior Executive Orders, Utah Exec. Order No. 2016-1 - 01/29/2016

“Executive Order issued March 28, 1978, by Governor Matheson, establishing the "Governor's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped" created to promote and to encourage employment of disabled individualist and vocational, economic, and social opportunities. This order is rescinded because Utah's 2012 Employment First statute, Utah Code 62A-5-103.3, fulfills the same purpose”

Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Section 105.2 UT Employment first emphasis on the provision of services.

Pertaining to the Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health. “When providing services to a person with a disability under this chapter, the division shall… give priority to providing services that assist the person in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment that enables the person to: purchase goods and services; establish self-sufficiency; and exercise economic control of the recipient's life.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Section 103.3 UT Employment first emphasis on the provision of services.

Pertaining to the Utah Services for People with Disabilities. “When providing services to a person with a disability under this chapter, the division shall… give priority to providing services that assist the person in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment that enables the person to: purchase goods and services; purchase goods and services; [and] exercise economic control of the person's life.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Governor, Administration: Rescinding Prior Executive Orders, Utah Exec. Order No. 2016-1 - 01/29/2016

“Executive Order issued March 28, 1978, by Governor Matheson, establishing the "Governor's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped" created to promote and to encourage employment of disabled individualist and vocational, economic, and social opportunities. This order is rescinded because Utah's 2012 Employment First statute, Utah Code 62A-5-103.3, fulfills the same purpose”


Utah Executive Order (Model Employer for People with Disabilities) - 10/12/2007

Governor Jon M. Huntsman Jr., declares that, “Utah state government will strive to become the model employer of qualified people with disabilities…”

“Some programmatic components [of the executive order] include, a promotional outreach campaign to recruit qualified people with disabilities, specific programs within executive branch state agencies to recruit qualified people with disabilities, and a Task Force consisting of representatives of the Utah Department of Human Resource Management, the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation, The Governor's Committee for Employment of People with Disabilities, the Department of Workforce Services, and the Division of Risk Management… [Agencies are] charged with reviewing and proposing additional strategies to put Utah state government on the cutting edge of employing qualified people with disabilities...”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 21 - 22 of 22

Utah State Board of Education Special Education Rules

Transition services is a set of activities that is “designed to be within a results-oriented process, is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student with a disability to facilitate the student’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Utah “Employment First Strategic Plan”

“Our Mission: to ensure services offered by DSPD emphasize, promote, and support competitive, integrated and community-based employment for people with disabilities.” The “Strategic Issues” include, stakeholder education, financing and contracting methods, services and service innovation, and performance measurement.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Utah Employment First Partnership

The Utah Employment First Partnership is a commitment among the Utah Department of Work Force Services (DWS), the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), and the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) to improve state government services focused on persons with disabilities achieving competitive, integrated and community based employment.

The mission of the partnership is to, “To ensure state government services currently offered by the partners emphasize and support competitive, integrated and community based employment”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Transforming Lives Through Employment: SAMHSA’s Supported Employment Grant Program (SEP) - 06/29/2018

The purpose of the Supported Employment Program is "to enhance state and community capacity to provide and expand evidence-based SEPs (such as the Individual Placement and Support [IPS] model) to adults with serious mental illnesses, including persons with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders." 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Utah Partnerships in Employment - 11/28/2016

“ACL’s Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

Utah’s Division of Services for People with Disabilities received a grant for its School to Work Interagency Transition Initiative.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Utah Supported Employment Transformation Project - 09/01/2014

“The Supported Employment Transformation Project (SETP) uses the Individual Placement and Support evidence-based, supported employment model. A primary component of this project includes forming a multi-agency coordinating committee that will develop and implement a collaborative, sustainable funding initiative to expand and maintain robust, supported employment services in Utah. The project provides supported employment services to adults with serious mental illness and co-occurring substance use disorders. Two local mental health authorities across urban and rural communities coordinate these services.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

ASPIRE Utah - 09/01/2013

“ASPIRE is a study for youth ages 14 – 16 who receive SSI (Supplemental Security Income).  When you enroll, you and your family will get information to further education and employment.  Half of the youth and families who enroll will be given added services and supports. The ASPIRE team will assist youth and families to find and use services in their communities.  The purpose of the ASPIRE study is to compare the services and supports to find what works best for youth and families.

ASPIRE is a six state project, including Utah.  ASPIRE Utah is a project of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation.  250 Utah youth will be recruited and enrolled.  125 will participate in Usual Services.  125 will participate in ASPIRE Services.  The purpose of the ASPIRE study is to compare the services and supports to find what works best for youth and families.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Utah Benefit Offset National Demonstration (BOND)/ SSDI ‘1 for 2’ Project - 12/18/2009

“The goal of Utah’s pilot was to recruit 500 individuals who receive SSDI benefits only (not in combination with SSI) to be part of the pilot project. Participants were recruited from among SSDI-only beneficiaries who had recently been involved in one of several employment support programs in Utah. Recruitment sources for pilot participants included: The Utah Benefits Planning Assistance and Outreach (BPAO) program, the Medicaid Disability program, the public Vocational Rehabilitation program, and selected employment programs administered by two community mental health agencies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities Customized Employment Initiative

“The Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities & Griffin-Hammis Associates is sponsoring a six-session year-long training series resulting in an optional National Certification in Community Employment Services through the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE). The project is working closely with both Covenant Employment Services and Rise, Inc.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

TURN Supported Work

~~“TURN Supported Employment services assists individuals with disabilities seeking employment opportunities which are compatible with their unique individual  skill-set, and areas of interest. TURN works with our clients to obtain valuable employment skills that easily transfer to relevant work experience with employers offering supported employment opportunities. “

 

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Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Customized Employment - 12/09/2014

“Customized employment is a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both. It is based on an individualized match between the strengths, conditions, and interests of a job candidate and the identified business needs of an employer. Customized Employment utilizes an individualized approach to employment planning and job development — one person at a time . . . one employer at a time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Moving in a New Direction - 12/07/2014

An Executive Director of a facility based day program and sheltered workshop in Utah discusses how the Lane v. Kitzhabersettlement, Olmstead, and CMS directives will impact his organization. The Executive Director says that the work his organization has done is "group work and is performed in a segregated environment…(and) does not reflect the individual desires and interactions with non-disabled peers outside of our centers that the law is not requiring. Customized Employment is stated as the new goal although it is recognized that "some individuals may not ever find successful employment in an integrated setting...but...the opportunity to at least try can and should be considered successful."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Employment/Daytime Activities

This website describes various options for students with disabilities transitioning out of school and provides links to numerous relevant resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

After High School Options

This website serves as a post-high school transition guide for students with disabilities and their families.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment First in Utah & Customized Employment: "One Person at a Time."

A PowerPoint on Utah's Employment First Efforts focusing on Strategic Planning (Employment First Taskforce) and Capacity Building (Customized Employment Training). It contains an explanation of Utah's Employment First Priority (House Bill 240), stating the fundamental importance of work as a part of personal identity and being a citizen of the United States; the false premise of the reasons frequently given as to way people with disabilities can't/shouldn't work. It also has a brief overview of Customized Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Papa John’s Pizza To Pay $125,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 01/26/2017

“The owners of a Farmington, Utah Papa John's Pizza will pay $125,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the EEOC announced today.

According to EEOC's lawsuit, Papa John's discriminated against Scott Bonn, who has an intellectual disability, Down syndrome. EEOC alleged that Papa John's employed Bonn successfully at its Farmington location for more than five months and allowed an independently employed and insured job coach to assist him. EEOC further charged that after an operating partner visited the Farmington location and observed Bonn working with the assistance of his job coach, the operating partner ordered Papa John's local management to fire Bonn.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

Utah Aging Waiver (For Individuals Age 65 or Older)

~~"This Utah Medicaid Waiver for Individuals Age 65 or Older, also known as a Medicaid Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, or the Aging Waiver, is designed to assist older individuals with elevated levels of care needs. It provides services that prolong independent living and prevent premature or unnecessary placement in nursing facilities. Compared to many state HCBS waivers, Utah's waiver offers a wide range of services beyond just personal care or companionship. For example, support is provided for medical equipment and any home modifications to increase independence. Support is offered for personal emergency response services, medication reminder systems, caregiver respite, and adult day care.

The Aging Waiver program allows for consumer direction of personal care services. Via this service model, participants can hire friends and relatives, with the exception of spouses and legal guardians, to provide personal assistance. This includes assistance with daily living activities, such as bathing, dressing, preparing meals, and light housecleaning. While waiver participants can hire, train, and manage their care provider, the financial aspects of being an employer are handled by a Fiscal Management Agency through this waiver program."""

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Utah Acquired Brain Injury Waiver

This waiver is designed to provide services statewide to help people with an acquired brain injury to remain in their homes or other community based settings. Individuals are able to live as independently as possible with supportive services provided through this waiver.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Utah 1915(c) HCBS Waivers

Utah Has Eight Medicaid 1915(c) HCBS Waivers: Acquired Brain Injury Waiver; the Aging Waiver (For Individuals Age 65 or Older); Community Supports Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities or Other Related Conditions; Medicaid Autism Waiver; New Choices Waiver; Physical Disabilities Waiver; and the Waiver for Technology Dependent Children.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

"Industry" is the motto of the Beehive State, and it's easy to see why Utah is "Still the Right Place" for individuals with disabilities to find competitive, integrated employment opportunities and socioeconomic advancement through Employment First.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Utah’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.88%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,161,105
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.81%
Change from
2017 to 2018
155,329
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.56%
Change from
2017 to 2018
72,186
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.56%
Change from
2017 to 2018
46.47%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.3%
Change from
2017 to 2018
79.90%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 3,051,217 3,101,833 3,161,105
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 159,024 150,964 155,329
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 74,767 74,754 72,186
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,287,144 1,331,953 1,361,619
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 47.02% 49.52% 46.47%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.93% 79.66% 79.90%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.40% 3.20% 3.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 15.60% 13.20% 13.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 9.60% 9.30% 8.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 152,163 149,134 147,515
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 146,902 147,430 152,952
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 269,121 265,100 265,814
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 3,891 2,936 4,232
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 28,937 30,446 29,496
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,540 4,319 4,758
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 3,980 3,346 5,155
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,589 1,912 2,685
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 7,287 8,107 7,419
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,657 10,844 10,404

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,730 2,811 2,998
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 9.40% 9.50% 10.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 47,560 46,926 46,048

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,483 6,348 6,474
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 10,601 10,063 9,900
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 28,754 25,662 25,116
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.50% 24.70% 25.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 4.30% 3.70%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 2.20% 2.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 0.10% 0.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 9.40% 11.40% 10.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 11 821 713
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 35 426 409
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 37 10 114
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,753 2,196 1,920

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 21,669 20,275 16,922
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.07 0.08 0.08

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 1,080 2 2,358
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 327 797 966
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 30.00% 33.00% 41.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.27 26.60 32.24

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,986
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 58 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 141 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 443 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,003 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,934 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 16 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 25.50% 23.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,975 3,421 3,551
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 70,883 71,139 70,742
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 40 43 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 94 92 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $5,108,000 $6,378,000 $6,985,575
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $33,462,000 $38,575,000 $42,466,312
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 23.00% 28.00% 26.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,689 2,600 2,724
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 27.10 33.10 30.23

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.45% 61.57% 63.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.37% 10.68% 10.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.49% 2.61% 2.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 92.41% 92.07% 88.40%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 19.35% 20.74% 20.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 64.63% 66.82% 68.77%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 79.46% 82.63% 84.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 45.28% 46.08% 48.53%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 694,868
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 936
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 2,404
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 183,093
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 185,496
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 20
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 137
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 157
AbilityOne wages (products). $17,389
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,417,562

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 2 3
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 14 13 14
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 17 16 18
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 5 3 4
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,327 1,004 1,294
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 182 177
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,332 1,189 1,475

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~The Utah Employment First Partnership is a shared commitment among the Utah Department of Workforce Services (DWS), the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) to improve state-government services focused on persons with disabilities, helping them to achieve competitive, integrated and community-based employment. Utah’s Employment First Initiative supports workforce development. It expects, encourages, provides, creates and rewards integrated employment in the workforce. It is the first and preferred outcome for working-age youth and adults with disabilities at minimum wage or higher. This program focuses on individuals with complex and significant disabilities for whom job placement in the past has been limited or traditionally has not occurred. (Page 33) Title I

USOR has developed and maintains cooperative agreements where necessary with federal and state agencies not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system. USOR maintains cooperative agreements with DWS, Utah State Board of Education (USBE), Utah Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Utah Department of Community and Culture (UDCC), and GOED. As required by Utah State legislation USOR has developed a MOU and coordinated plan with DWS and DSPD (Utah’s DD agency) to carry out services related to employment for persons with significant disabilities. Additional agreements exist relevant to the "Employment First" initiatives in Utah. USOR also maintains cooperative agreements with all local public education school districts, the Veterans Administration (VA), local mental health organizations, and other entities involved in workforce development services including shared projects with the Department of Health (DOH). In addition, USOR participates in the statewide workforce development system through participation on the State Workforce Development Board. (Page 173) Title I

USOR has cooperative agreements with local school districts, community rehabilitation programs, and DSPD to provide Supported Employment services to individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities, including youth. Additional cooperative agreements that will extend supports for disadvantaged populations such as mental health and youth are being developed. USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation which makes employment the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized and/or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. (Page 177-178) Title I

USOR maintains a long standing cooperative agreement with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), which is the state agency responsible for providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. These funds are ongoing and available to provide long term services for individuals who have utilized VR supports, are on the DSPD wait list, and need long term supported employment services. USOR is also partnered with DSPD in Employment First legislation, which makes employment the first and preferred option of individuals with disabilities, including those with developmental disabilities. (Page 181) Title I

Through a cooperative relationship between USOR and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), supported employment services have been expanded to a targeted population through the provision of long-term funding from the Utah State Legislature. These funds are designated to support individuals who have previously been on a waiting list for DSPD SE funding. The USOR Supported Employment Coordinator will collaborate with CRPs and DSPD to ensure compliance with Employment First Legislation. (Page 194) Title IV

USOR launched a school-to-work project, through ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP),?designed to braid? funding, access partner agency supports, and provide a pathway for students with the most significant disabilities to competitive, integrated employment. (Page 204) Title IV

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation and has partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities and the Utah State Board of Education (and LEAs) in “school to work pilots” in 5 sites to increase competitive, integrated outcomes for students with disabilities who would normally be slated to enter a day program (non integrated setting) or subminimum wage employment setting upon graduation from high school. Community Rehabilitation Programs and USOR staff who are involved in these pilots have had the opportunity to receive training on Customized Employment. (Page 210) Title IV

Barriers to engaging all individuals with disabilities in competitive, integrated employment has been changing attitudes and beliefs about disability and work. Outreach efforts are underway to educate parents, educators, and other community providers about the benefits of competitive integrated employment. To this end, USOR has developed an informational flyer about the Settings Rule, Employment First Initiative, and Section 511. These information flyers will be used to educate the community and will be disseminated widely. (Page 210) Title IV

• Goal 2.4: Increase collaboration and coordination with partner community agencies whose goals, services and laws align with providing competitive integrated employment and career opportunities for persons with disabilities
o Strategy 2.4 (A): Align policies and procedures for supported employment with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule and Utah’s Employment First Legislation (Pages 215-216) Title IV

Utah applied for and were awarded Employment First State Leadership and Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) resources from the Office of Disability and Employment Policy (ODEP) in 2015. The Transition and Supported Employment Coordinator was the co-lead/coordinator from 2015-2017 and therefore USOR was involved in the decision-making and implementation of the technical assistance provided by ODEP. EFSLMP resources afforded Utah the opportunity to assist agencies who provide HCBS medicaid waiver funding to receive technical assistance in becoming more community based. As a result, some of the agencies developed (or expanded on ) employment units within their agencies and became vendors with USOR to provide SE and SJBT milestones to assist clients in accessing CIE. Utah also received resources from ODEP to implement School to Work Pilots which utilized a team approach with USOR, DWS/WDD, DSPD, LEAs, and CRP partners to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school/post high school. Although some providers received technical assistance to make the shift to more integrated settings, some have not made steps to follow through with meeting goals. (Page 216) Title IV

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation to increase access and eliminate disparities in access to state VR Services and Supported Employment. Employment is the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post-high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD waiting list through the provision of long-term funding from the Utah State Legislature. This partnership is a key initiative to eliminate systemic barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities. In addition, USOR continues seek out opportunities to support individuals with disabilities in competitive integrated employment. Additionally, USOR believes alignment with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule will increase opportunities for competitive integrated employment opportunities. USOR will provide outreach and opportunities for individuals experiencing sheltered work or segregated day programs and sub-minimum wages to access VR services in order increase competitive integrated employment. (Pages 221-222) Title IV

USOR partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Utah State Board of Education, Utah Department of Mental Health, and Community Rehabilitation Programs to increase life skills training options and coordinate goals for competitive integrated employment opportunities. Life Skills training is available as a stand alone service and in conjunction with a variety of services offered through VR, DSPD, and Mental Health facilities. USOR has successfully added life skills training options from community and private mental health providers. USOR’s coordination with other agencies ensures that life skills are available through all stages of the employment preparation process. This partnership has also been instrumental to USOR’s efforts to promote competitive integrated employment options for individuals who are newly seeking employment under the HBCS settings rule, Utah’s Employment First Initiative, and Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act. Coordinating efforts has allowed USOR to participate in demonstration and pilot projects that increase resources and capacity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 223) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~• USOR has partnered with the Utah State Board of Education, DWS Workforce Development Division and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities to implement “School to Work” pilots in 5 different school districts in Utah. The “School to Work” pilot teams utilize the Customized Employment process to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school or post high school. Teams work collaboratively to serve students and blend/braid funding so that students can access services needed to become employed and independent. (Page 31) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Pages 108-109) Title I

The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) has set a goal to serve 200 individuals with Title VI funds through supported employment services during FFY 2017. During FFY 2014, USOR served 208 individuals eligible for supported employment and 180 in FFY 2015. During FFY 2015, 61 individuals eligible for supported employment services were closed as successfully employed in competitive and integrated settings. The implementation of the Order of Selection had an impact on USOR’s ability to serve all clients, including those eligible for Supported Employment (SE). As USOR has opened the Priority Category 1: Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (MSD), USOR anticipates it will be able to increase the number of individuals receiving Title VI SE funding under Individualized Plan for Employments (IPEs). In addition, Goal 1.2 listed in this Unified Plan is specifically designed to continue to assess and improve the provision of SE and Customized Employment services provided in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). (Page 203) Title IV

As laws, agencies, and federal guidance change, USOR is committed to amending and updating policies to provide SE supports to both adults and youth as appropriate. USOR has been expanding upon and developing resources for three supported employment pathways (Individual Placement and Support, Customized Employment, and Traditional Supported Employment) which lead to long term placement services through partnership with DSPD, USOE, DSAMH, and DWS. USOR continues to partner with UATT/UCAT to increase student access to any necessary and appropriate assistive technology needed for success. (Page 204) Title I

USOR has engaged several committees in addition to resources from WINTAC to review and revise service delivery models for Supported Employment (SE), Customized Employment (CE) and Supported Job Based Training (SJBT). In addition, USOR is participating in several pilot projects to expand and improve SE and CE services in partnership with extended service providers. These pilot projects have extended the original completion date for this strategy but have proved invaluable to CE and SE expansion and innovation. (Page 206) Title IV

o Strategy 3.4 (B): USOR will update policies and procedures to provide supported employment and customized employment to clients in order to assist them in leaving segregated employment settings and gaining competitive integrated employment in their community. Activity B.1: USOR will update policies chapters, as needed, to better align with providing the necessary supports and services that persons with the most significant disabilities will need, to prevent segregated employment and subminimum wages. (Page 218) Title IV

USOR created a milestone payment program to streamline services and outcomes from Community Resource Providers (CRPs). USOR created a position for a statewide coordinator for Supported Employment and Customized Employment services who helps to oversee CRP activities. Additionally, USOR has a CRP committee that meets regularly and a CRP policy manual to provide guidance and consistency in services. The results of these efforts have been a significant increase in the total number of CRPs offering services to VR customers across the state. USOR is exploring options for assisting in the establishment of transition-focused CRP services through competitive state bidding. (Page 220) Title IV

USOR expanded services to Students and Youth with Disabilities through development of fee-for service options for Pre-Employment Transition Services and contracts, increasing VR Counselor connections with schools, and leveraging partnerships with other agencies. By leveraging existing staff resources and increasing coordination with partner agencies, VR successfully expanded outreach services and connected more students and youth to VR services. Training was provided to service provider and partner agencies resulting in new fee for service options and six contract Pre-ETS providers. USOR has expanded Supported Employment service delivery options by increasing the variety of placement methods available to meet individual client’s needs. The increase in models allows VR Counselors and client to select among a variety of models including Customized Employment, Pathways to Success Customized Employment, Individual Placement and Support, and traditional Supported Employment. These options add to the service options currently available from Community Rehabilitation Program providers.  (Page 222) Title IV

USOR continues to maintain high quality standards for vendors providing SE services. USOR requires vendors to receive training approved by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) in order to work 1-1 with clients. Vendors must also receive 10 CEUs per year in order to receive continuing education and remain current in best practices. In addition, vendors providing Customized Employment services must receive training in CE as well as participate in the Technical Assistance component to training. USOR and the Division of People with Disabilities have provided opportunities for Community Rehabilitation Programs to receive training in Customized Employment. USOR participates in fidelity reviews for the Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model, which assesses partnerships with VR as well as quality services provided to clients. (Page 224) Title IV

In addition, USOR is a partner in the “School to Work” pilots which utilize a Customized Employment approach to assist students transitioning from secondary educational institutions to competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation. The “School to Work” pilots have expanded from 3 initial sites to 5 in 2017-2018 school year. USOR has liaisons assigned to every Local Education Agency so that counselors can connect students with services both internally and through information and referral to community resources. (Page 224) Title IV

USOR also partners with extended support agencies to train and set expectations for employment specialists in customized employment, discovery, and Individualized Placement Services (IPS). These services have been proven to meet the needs of persons with most significant disabilities (MSDs) who may need additional services and long-term supports in order to be successfully employed. (Page 226) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~• USOR has partnered with the Utah State Board of Education, DWS Workforce Development Division and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities to implement “School to Work” pilots in 5 different school districts in Utah. The “School to Work” pilot teams utilize the Customized Employment process to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school or post high school. Teams work collaboratively to serve students and blend/braid funding so that students can access services needed to become employed and independent. (Page 31) Title I

Utah’s core partners are funding activities to implement the state strategies. The activities will be aligned across core programs. Core partners are committed to:

• Utilizing a braided funding model to leverage existing resources in providing services for common customers. These efforts will be ongoing including referrals and client interventions at any point of entry (DWS, Vocational Rehabilitation or Adult Education), refinement of career pathways to meet the needs through stronger engagement with employers, high demand industry and post-secondary and training institutions with a focus on high risk clients. Outcomes will be reported to the Operations Committee and SWDB annually. (Page 59) Title I

USOR launched a school-to-work project, through ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP),?designed to braid? funding, access partner agency supports, and provide a pathway for students with the most significant disabilities to competitive, integrated employment.? USOR is partnering with SAMHSA and Local Mental Health Authorities/DSAMH to provide and expand supported employment services for youth and adults with severe and persistent mental illness, specifically with the IPS model. (Page 204) Title IV

USOR expanded services to Students and Youth with Disabilities through development of fee-for service options for Pre-Employment Transition Services and contracts, increasing VR Counselor connections with schools, and leveraging partnerships with other agencies. By leveraging existing staff resources and increasing coordination with partner agencies, VR successfully expanded outreach services and connected more students and youth to VR services. Training was provided to service provider and partner agencies resulting in new fee for service options and six contract Pre-ETS providers. USOR has expanded Supported Employment service delivery options by increasing the variety of placement methods available to meet individual client’s needs. The increase in models allows VR Counselors and client to select among a variety of models including Customized Employment, Pathways to Success Customized Employment, Individual Placement and Support, and traditional Supported Employment. These options add to the service options currently available from Community Rehabilitation Program providers. (Page 222) Title IV

The VR Counselor is required to maintain communication with the Supported Employment (SE) team at least every three months. The SE team includes the VR counselor, customer, family members, extended services agency representative (i.e., support coordinator, mental-health worker, etc.), teacher (if a student), employment specialist or employer. The team will coordinate services by braiding funding to ensure the client has the support needed to be successful on the job. Once the client reaches an 80/20 level of support or 24 months (whichever comes first) and the team agrees, services and funding will be transferred to the identified extended services agency for long-term SE.

For youth and students with disabilities who qualify and need supported employment services, the transition to the extended services agency will occur when the client has graduated or aged out of the school system. The adult services agencies will continue to partner, braid funding and coordinate the transition of responsibility as appropriate. (Page 227) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Through the SWDC committee work, Utah will explore and identify ways to build stronger connections between core partner counselors and post-secondary career resource counselors/professions, including Disability Resource Centers (DRC), to ensure customers have access to all services the partners offer. (Page 68) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~USOR maintains cooperative agreements with the local school districts and public charter schools who serve secondary education students. The cooperative agreements include provisions for consultation, technical assistance, professional development, VR referrals and eligibility, and individualized goals of the local teams. USOR has assigned Transition Counselors to each local school district and charter school. The counselors meet with special educators and administrators, provide outreach to students and parents, provide VR Welcome Sessions to students, provide Job Readiness Workshops to students, attend IEP meetings, as well as cover all referrals and questions from that school.  (Page 175) Title IV

USOR and USBE agree to collaborate on financial responsibility of services, within the guidelines of the Rehabilitation Act and IDEA. Both agencies will respect the resources set forth by policies and procedures that guide each agency’s services. When a student with a disability is both in school and has an IPE with VR, the cost of services necessary for both education and for the student to become employed, will be negotiated between the LEA representative and the VR Counselor, pending any necessary approval through LEA administration and USOR chain of command. At any time during the transition process, comparable benefits or additional agency representatives will be included in the IEP/IPE transition team as an additional resource for financial responsibility. Agreements on shared cost of required services for the student/client, will be in writing in the IEP and IPE, to ensure collaboration and understanding of agency involvement. (Page 176) Title IV

Students and youth with disabilities are invited to participate in career preparation workshops and job fairs. The Business Relations Teams work with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors to provide school transition specialists and teachers with preparation packets. The material provides information on how to dress for success, interviewing, resume building, and appropriate behavior when meeting with business partners. Students can attend workshops on topics such as, “Working in Government Professions, State and Federal Hiring Initiatives,” “Employer Panel,” “How to Dress on a Dime and Interview Success,” and “Social Security and Working.” The job fairs provide students an opportunity to meet with hiring specialists to discuss employment opportunities. (Page 180) Title IV

USOR Transition Services provides a variety of services to assist transition aged youth in obtaining paid work experiences. Through the provision of Work Based Training, Summer Work Experiences, Supported Job Based Training/Supported Employment, and other Community Rehabilitation Program services, VR coordinates with employers on an individualized basis to meet both the client’s and employer’s needs. (Page 180) Title IV

Information was gathered through the Utah State Office of Education concerning the number of youth and students with disabilities in the State of Utah. There are approximately 74,000 students ages 3 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an Individualized Education Program (IEP). This number does not reflect the number of students who may have a disability that is classified under a 504 Plan, Individualized Health Plan, or unidentified disability such as mental health or substance abuse. For purposes of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, there are approximately 20,000 students with a disability ages 14 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an IEP, also not reflecting students with disabilities who do not have an IEP. These numbers only reflect the approximate number of students with a disability who are the age of applying for and receiving services from VR while still under IDEA (ages 14 through 21). This does not reflect the number of students with disabilities who have dropped out, received diplomas, aged out of the school system, or are up to 24 years of age and no longer tied to the school system. The number of students and youth with disabilities across the State of Utah justifies a great need for transition services from Vocational Rehabilitation. (Pages 193-194) Title IV

Effective when all required approvals are in place and when management deems necessary, USOR will close all categories and place all eligible individuals not in plan on a waiting list. USOR will also place all subsequent applicants who are determined eligible for VR services on the waiting list. USOR will only provide services to eligible individuals who currently have an IPE and for whom services have been initiated. As resources become available individuals will be taken off of the waiting list in chronological order based on priority category and application date. Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (MSD) will be the first category served. (Page 202) Title IV

o Strategy 1.3 (B): Increase outreach and collaboration with schools, i.e., special education, school administration, school counselors and 504 coordinators
Activity B.1: Increase counselor collaborative partnerships in schools through liaison meetings, IEP meetings, agency fairs, job readiness workshops, etc.
Activity B.2: Amend and maintain USOR/USOE Interagency Agreements at both the state and local levels to be more descriptive and comprehensive about the expectations on both sides
Activity B.3: Identify and develop programs serving students with disabilities to provide pre-employment transition services
USOR has increased presence in Local Education Agencies and many district offices have increased the number of school liaisons out of need. Counselors attend IEP meetings, 504 meetings, agency fairs, and facilitate job readiness workshops in the schools. (Page 208) Title IV

USOR has a dedicated Transition Coordinator who has responsibilities such as improving the quality and consistency of transition services from USOR counselors to students and improving collaboration and coordination. USOR created policies and procedures for specific services for transition students with disabilities. Each district office maintains specific counselors as liaisons with local public and private schools, and specific Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) are kept with each school and school district. VR counselors service individual students by meeting with their IEP teams and in specific VR meetings with students and their parents. Also, VR is expanding provision of Job-Readiness Workshops to schools in their local areas. The Job-Readiness Workshops cover aspects of self-discovery, job-readiness, job-seeking and job-keeping skills. (Page 220) Title IV

Since 2016, USOR has engaged in the following innovation and expansion projects and activities: (1) Funding of the USOR Transition and Supported Employment Coordinator to increase the provision of VR services to youth with disabilities, specifically those with the most significant disabilities and expansion of transition and pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities (2) Development and Implementation of six (6) Pre-Employment Transition Services contracts to serve eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities (3) School to Work Customized Employment Project with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and three local school districts to develop competitive, integrated, and meaningful employment for students with developmental disabilities, specifically students who are at-risk of entering into sheltered work settings at sub-minimum wages once exiting high school and (4) Collaboration with Source America to increase Customized Employment services in rural and underserved areas. (5) In addition, USOR provides annual funding support for operation of the Utah State Independent Living Council. (6) Administrative support and direct expenses for operation of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) were also provided by USOR. These funding arrangements are consistent with 34 CFR 361.35. (Page 225) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Utah’s strategies take into account its economic, workforce, workforce development, education and training activities and analysis provided in the section above. Utah’s Unified Plan includes strategies to achieve its vision and goals. The strategies are flexible to accommodate the state’s economic, workforce, and workforce development, education and training activities and analysis provided in Section (a). The plan includes specific strategies to address the needs of populations described in Section (a). The foundation of Utah’s plan is built upon utilizing data, partnerships, and its resources to implement strategies that support operations to provide services to individuals and employers. Utah is committed to changing and/or adjusting its strategies as needed to meet the state’s workforce needs. Utah’s SWDB will establish standing committees to ensure Utah’s goals and vision are met. These include Youth, Apprenticeships, Services to Individuals with Disabilities, Career Pathways, and Operations. (Page 46) Title I

As Utah has been implementing its Unified plan, it has continued to provide assistance to SWDB members and committees by providing a strong structure and basis for the SWDB to function within. In addition to Guiding Principles, Statutory Requirements, application processes, etc. the SWBD has the opportunity to:
Implement innovative strategies by focusing on employer engagement, strengthening core programs, dissemination of best practices, and promoting effective use of technology to enhance service delivery.
Establish and maintain standing committees. There are two required committees including the Youth Services Committee and the Services to Individuals with Disabilities. Utah has added a Career Pathways Committee, an Operations Committee, and an Apprenticeship Committee. (Page 53) Title I

Partners will coordinate activities and resources to provide comprehensive, high-quality, customer-centered services, including supportive services, to employers to meet their current and projected workforce needs. The activities will conform to the statutory requirements of each program.
The Operations Committee will coordinate with the Service to Individuals with Disabilities Committee, Career Pathways Committee and Apprenticeships Committee to create recommendations for aligning DWS, USOR, and Adult Education and other required partner services for employers. (Page 63) Title I

Career Pathways Committee• There are many career pathway activities being carried out around the state. The Career Pathway Committee will meet with partners from around the state gathering information and ideas on how these groups can align, share resources, and collaborate. They will make recommendations, that include the Six Key Elements of Career Pathways described in the Career Pathway Toolkit and requirements of WIOA section 101(d)(3)(B), (D) to the SWDB regarding how the SWDB can best support a collaborative state career pathway system. Utah’s sector strategies are aligned with GOED’s industry clusters. They are incorporated throughout Utah’s plan. Utah will refer to the definitions of “career pathway” in WIOA section 3(7) and “industry sector or occupation section 3(23) of WIOA. (Page 102) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Page 108-109) Title I

USOR has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing Vocational Rehabilitation services and OJT and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act. USOR determines whether for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit organizations. USOR has established fee-for-service agreements with private, non-profit entities providing vocational rehabilitation services throughout Utah in accordance with the Unified State Plan. USOR maintains vendor relationships with other agencies providing Job Preparation and Placement (JPP), Supported Job Based Training (SJBT) and Support Employment (SE) service that include a fee-for-service agreement and participation in job coach training activities. USOR continues to identify and make arrangements, where appropriate, to expand the availability of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) offering supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of the state plan. (Page 177) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Partners will coordinate activities and resources to provide comprehensive, high-quality, customer-centered services, including supportive services, to employers to meet their current and projected workforce needs. The activities will conform to the statutory requirements of each program. The Operations Committee will coordinate with the Service to Individuals with Disabilities Committee, Career Pathways Committee and Apprenticeships Committee to create recommendations for aligning DWS, USOR, and Adult Education and other required partner services for employers. (Page 63) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Pages 108-109) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer/ Business

~~USOR has initiatives to partner with employers to identify competitive, integrated employment and career exploration opportunities that facilitate the provision of VR and Transition Services. These initiatives are primarily carried out through the USOR Business Relations and Choose to Work (CTW) Programs. The Business Relations Team was established in 2005 to strengthen the connection between employers and individuals with disabilities through a combination of outreach efforts, disability awareness training, consultation services, job fairs and workshops, business networking activities and job posting networks. The Business Relations Team:

Assists with the recruitment and referral of qualified individuals with disabilities to meet workforce demands. Through a partnership with DWS, a customized option to recruit qualified applicants with disabilities was created for job vacancies by using the key word: PWDNET. Employers are able to utilize this keyword on UWORKS allowing keyword searches by job seekers, advocates, and Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. Employers can also send emails to “pwdnetjobs@utah.gov” with a complete job description and the job opening. These job posting are shared statewide with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor and Employment Specialists.

Utilizes the Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP), https://tapability.org/, which is led by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and The National Employment Team (NET) in partnership with disABLEDperson, Inc. TAP includes both a national talent pool of VR clients looking for employment and a job posting system for employers looking to hire individuals with disabilities.

Conduct semi-annual Employer Workshops on Hiring and Retaining Individuals with Disabilities and Career Preparation and Job Fairs. The Workshop offers Business Partners an opportunity to learn more about disability, accommodations and other disability and employment issues. The Job Fair is a targeted fair for individuals with disabilities in which PWDNET (People With Disabilities Network) business partners participate. These events provide opportunities for business to connect with job-ready individuals with disabilities, and individuals with disabilities to explore careers. The job fairs and workshops also offer opportunities for internships and mentor experiences. (Page 178) Title IV

The Choose to Work (CTW) Program: USOR’s other primary initiative for working with employers to identify competitive integrated employment opportunities and career exploration for individuals with disabilities is CTW. This is a partnership between the USOR and WDD that is designed to ensure all individuals with disabilities have equal access to workforce investment activities available to assist them in preparing for and obtaining employment through coordinated service delivery.

The core services of the CTW program are job development and job placement. Job development includes interfacing with employers for the purpose of marketing a specific job seeker to the employer, or to inform and educate the employer regarding hiring individuals from a talented pool of job seekers with disabilities. Job placement is focused on service delivery to assist a specific individual in locating job openings, preparing for the application process, and following through with the application for employment.

CTW specialists coordinate with the Business Relations Team to organize and engage in employer workshops to increase awareness regarding the hiring and job retention of individuals with disabilities. The Specialists are active participants in local area Chambers of Commerce and sit on local and community boards in order to facilitate the provision of Vocational Rehabilitation services leading to an employment outcome. CTW Specialists are actively engaged with the DWS Workforce Development Specialists as well as USOR Business Relations Team and affiliates to identify integrated employment opportunities for job seekers with disabilities. (Page 179) Title IV

USOR utilizes the Business Relations and CTW Programs to coordinate with employers in support of transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities. Staff meet with employers to identify and/or develop internships, on-the-job trainings, mentoring experiences and temporary work experiences for students and youth with disabilities.
Students and youth with disabilities are invited to participate in career preparation workshops and job fairs. The Business Relations Teams work with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors to provide school transition specialists and teachers with preparation packets. The material provides information on how to dress for success, interviewing, resume building, and appropriate behavior when meeting with business partners. Students can attend workshops on topics such as, “Working in Government Professions, State and Federal Hiring Initiatives,” “Employer Panel,” “How to Dress on a Dime and Interview Success,” and “Social Security and Working.” The job fairs provide students an opportunity to meet with hiring specialists to discuss employment opportunities. (Page 180) Title IV

• Goal 3.3: Improve coordination between USOR and employers to benefit clients in obtaining competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities
o Strategy 3.3 (A): Expand outreach efforts to employers to ensure USOR better meets their needs while improving opportunities for VR clients
  Activity A.1: Utilize existing relationships with the Governor’s Committee for Employment of People with Disabilities, Choose to Work (CTW) and DWS to identify employer needs provide opportunities for VR Counselors to connect with community employers
  Activity A.2: Utilize VR Business Relations Team and CTW to provide training and information to employers on the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities
  Activity A.3: Provide staff training on opportunities for developing and coordinating On-the-Job Training, work-based training, internships and apprenticeships to better service client and employer needs. (Page 217) Title IV

Provide business services through the American Job Center network and support a local workforce development system that meets the needs of businesses in the local area. Applicable one-stop partners develop, offer, and deliver quality business services that assist businesses and industry sectors in overcoming the challenges of recruiting, retaining, and developing talent for the area economy. America Job Center staff must: Have a clear understanding of industry skill needs Identify appropriate strategies for assisting employers, and coordinate business services activities across partner programs as appropriate Incorporate an integrated and aligned business services strategy among partners to present a unified voice for American Job Centers in its communication with employers.

Make labor exchange activities and labor market information available to employers. Local areas must establish and develop relationships and networks with large and small employers and their intermediaries. Local areas must develop, convene, or implement industry or sector partnerships. (Pages 249-250) Title IV

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~USOR continues to update and renew it’s Interagency Agreement with the Utah State Board of Education to include descriptions of the expectations of USOR and USBE and to incorporate changes in the partnership as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), specifically in reference to pre-employment transition services and WIOA Section 511: Limitations of Use of Subminimum Wage. Once the Interagency Agreement is finalized, USOR and LEAs will begin to develop goals for their local level agreements. (Page 208) Title IV

Strategy 1.5 (A): Increase outreach to individuals currently employed but making subminimum wages, youth at risk of entering sheltered work or segregated day programs at the time of secondary school exit, individuals at risk of being segregated in any type of subminimum wage entity, individuals leaving sheltered work and day-program settings, individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, etc.

Activity A.1: Identify sheltered work and day programs across the State of Utah that provide services to persons with disabilities

Activity A.2: Provide outreach and information to individuals who are interested in pursuing competitive integrated employment

Activity A.3: Expand opportunities for customized employment and discovery services to expand competitive integrated employment for these individuals.

USOR has provided career counseling and information and referral services as outlined in WIOA Section 511 to individuals who are currently employed in subminimum wage settings. Approximately 1300 people were met with and provided career counseling and information referral throughout the year. Meetings were also held with the employers holding 14C certificates to discuss the law and options that they had moving forward to comply with the law.

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation and has partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities and the Utah State Board of Education (and LEAs) in “school to work pilots” in 5 sites to increase competitive, integrated outcomes for students with disabilities who would normally be slated to enter a day program (non integrated setting) or subminimum wage employment setting upon graduation from high school. Community Rehabilitation Programs and USOR staff who are involved in these pilots have had the opportunity to receive training on Customized Employment. (Pages 209-210) Title IV

Strategy 1.5 (B): Increase outreach to sheltered work and day programs across the State of Utah who currently provide segregated settings with subminimum wage options for persons with disabilities

Activity B.1: Provide outreach and information regarding competitive integrated employment and vocational rehabilitation services to partner agencies that provide segregated settings with subminimum wage options for persons with disabilities

Activity B.2: Partner with agencies like Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and State Office of Education (USOE) to provide training and professional development opportunities to community rehabilitation programs in order to provide community-based services and competitive integrated employment outcomes for the clients they serve. (Page 210) Title IV

USOR has provided information briefings to various agencies and subminimum wage employers throughout Utah including the Utah Association of Community Services, Utah State Board of Education, and the Utah State Rehabilitation Council. USOR has leveraged its partnership with DSPD and the USBE to provide collaborative information sessions to stakeholders in the community.
USOR’s 511 Coordinator provided information regarding competitive and integrated employment to agencies and employers who have been, or currently involved in subminimum wage employment. During the presentation, USOR representatives provide options for future services that the agencies and employers should consider when making changes to existing models, in order to comply with WIOA Section 511. (Page 211) Title IV

Strategy 2.4 (A): Align policies and procedures for supported employment with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule and Utah’s Employment First Legislation

Activity A.1: USOR will provide an agency representative on strategic planning committees with agencies involved in current laws and legislation regarding persons with the most significant disabilities and decreasing acceptance of subminimum wages

Agency representative was assigned by USOR to oversee and participate in all meetings and provided services required and related to decreasing acceptance of subminimum wage jobs (WIOA 511). Career Counseling and Information Referral was provided to approximately 1300 individuals who mostly were currently in a subminimum wage position, and others who were applying for such a position. USOR representative attended meetings with other State Agencies, employers and parents to discuss the law and provide options for those individuals who were looking for an option of competitive and integrated employment. USOR and DSPD, the agency responsible for Medicaid and Medicare Services to individuals with disabilities, coordinated training of providers about the settings rule and Utah’s Employment First Legislation. USOR and DSPD coordinate policies and procedures to ensure seamless supported employment services from referral to extended supports. (Page 216) Title IV

Goal 3.4: Provide improved services to persons with disabilities who are experiencing segregated employment, subminimum wages, or sheltered work and day-program supports in order to increase competitive integrated employment 

o Strategy 3.4 (A): USOR will provide training to staff regarding supported employment, customized employment and discovery, behavior intervention strategies, etc.

Activity A.1: USOR will provide specific training on cognitive and development disabilities as well as any other population who are most at risk for experiencing subminimum wages and sheltered work. (Page 217) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

As Utah develops a method to evaluate customer satisfaction, existing customer feedback mechanisms will be used, and continuous improvement will take into consideration the indicators of performance. Accessibility for individuals with disabilities will be evaluated, and restraints will be addressed as they arise. (Page 88) Title I

Utah’s one-stop service delivery system complies with provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials for individuals with disabilities. DWS’s risk manager works in coordination with State Risk Management to conduct on-site reviews of DWS’s employment centers and administrative offices. These reviews are conducted to ensure physical accessibility for DWS customers as well as employees. Reviews are conducted every three years. The Americans with Disabilities Act Checklist for Existing Facilities on the Achievable Barrier Removal Survey was used for the most recent Risk Management review. However, Risk Management is currently working with DWS and other state agencies in revising the tool. Additionally, the DWS equal opportunity officer conducts statewide employment center reviews using portions of the Section 188 checklist to ensure programmatic accessibility for DWS customers. (Page 98) Title I

USOR updated their website to improve access and accessibility to information on services available through the VR Program and the Division of Services of the Blind and Visually Impaired. In addition, new marketing and outreach materials are available in electronic and braille formats. (Page 212) Title IV

• All core and required partner staff working in the one-stop center will receive training to learn about all of the required WIOA programs, including the referral and accessibility processes • All core and required partners that provide online information and/or services will ensure their websites are 508 compliant and meet the WIOA accessibility requirements (Page 254) Title IV

One-stop centers and one-stop delivery systems are certified for effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility, and continuous improvement. The State Workforce Development Board (SWDB) in consultation with chief elected officials, must review and update the criteria every two years as part of the review and modification of State Plans pursuant to 34 CFR § 463.135. One-stop centers are certified by the SWDB every two years. Each one-stop center must receive a “Pass” for each requirement listed below to be recommended for SWDB certification. If the one-stop center receives a “Fail,” it will have 60 days to submit a plan to the State Workforce Development Board (SWDB) describing how they will remediate the problem. The SWDB has 60 days to approve the one-stop center’s remediation plan or request changes to the plan. (Pages 259-260) Title IV

Vets

Veterans receive Priority of Service (POS) as they transition from the military or any time they seek employment services from DWS to gain or improve their employment status. Veteran Employment Services supports veterans in their reintegration process as they leave the military and rejoin the civilian workforce. The Job for Veteran State Grant (JVSG), as funded by the U.S. Department of Labor/Veteran Employment and Training Services (USDOL/VETS), provides intensive services for veterans that have significant barriers to employment. DWS is also looking at strategies to reduce the duration of veterans on the unemployment rolls and to help veterans on state-provided Medicaid seek VA medical benefits. Accelerated Credentialing to Employment (ACE) helps veterans, National Guard members, reservists and spouses gain licenses and certifications for employment. (Page 33) Title I

 Utah will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act. Currently, to ensure the provision of priority of service, all employment center employees are trained to screen and identify potential covered persons. The question “Have you or a spouse ever served in the U.S. military?” is asked of every job seeker upon initial contact. If the job seeker responds in the affirmative, the job seeker is given DWS Publication 07-107 which provides an overview of the services for which they receive priority and a description of the application for those services. DWS monitors its priority of services for veterans by visiting a required percentage of one stop offices to ensure priority of service is being provided to veterans and their eligible spouses. DWS is audited by the U.S. Department of Labor, Veterans Education and Training Services (USDOL/VETS) annually. In addition to onsite visits, the USDOL/VETS have a “mystery shopper” visit the one-stop centers to verify that priority of service is provided to veterans and their eligible spouses. (Page 96) Title I

Complete a job-match request, which will result in the DWS job-matching system automatically placing all qualified covered persons at the top of an employer’s applicant list. This means that the covered person receives referrals to open job announcements over non-covered persons. Recognizing the need for additional methods of identifying potential covered persons for priority of service, DWS requires all employment center staff to wear a magnetic badge on their clothing asking the question “Have you or a spouse ever served in the U.S. military?” Additionally, Publication 07-107 is available and distributed in the job connection areas of every employment center, the question “Have you or a spouse ever served in the U.S. military?” is displayed as part of a looping presentation on a television in the job connection areas of all employment centers, and small desktop posters are displayed at every intake counter in the employment centers. This provides job seekers with multiple opportunities to self-identify their covered person status or to share the information about priority of service to family members, friends or neighbors. If the veteran is determined to have a significant barrier to employment, they are referred to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). An electronic 360 referral is sent to the appropriate DVOP. (Page 97) Title I

DWS uses a no-wrong-door approach, as noted above, that includes services available in the community that targeted veterans can use to enhance their job search. Native American job seekers in Utah have access to DWS services. Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists are assigned to each of the employment centers nearest to Native American reservations and have developed relationships with tribal leadership to ensure tribal member veterans are provided with intensive services as well as priority of service. (Page 97) Title I

Goal 4.1: Increase outreach and services to veterans with disabilities 

Strategy 4.1: Improve coordination of services between USOR and the Veterans Affairs (VA) to more effectively serve veterans with disabilities

Activity A.1: Review and revise current Cooperative Agreement between USOR and the Veterans Affairs

Activity A.2: Assign local liaisons to interface between USOR districts and local VA offices Activity A.3: Coordinate services between USOR and the VA by inviting VA representatives to visit local VR offices and offer USOR staff trainings (Page 218) Title IV

Mental Health

~~USOR has established a policy chapter based on the provision of Supported Employment Services. The policy is a hybrid of milestone outcome payments and hourly rates to meet the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities. This policy chapter defines extended support agencies who qualify to provide supported employment supports as a partner with VR. These agencies include Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), Division of Services for Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) as well as local mental health agencies, employers, private organizations, natural supports and incentives offered through Social Security or Medicaid. USOR continues to identify and partner with other supported employment entities to provide clients with informed choices, options, and qualified service providers to meet their unique needs. These efforts are coordinated by the USOR Supported Employment Coordinator. USOR has cooperative agreements with local school districts, community rehabilitation programs, and DSPD to provide Supported Employment services to individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities, including youth. Additional cooperative agreements that will extend supports for disadvantaged populations such as mental health and youth are being developed. USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation which makes employment the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized and/or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. (Pages 177-178) Title I

USOR and the Utah Department of Human Services, Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) have a longstanding partnership and collaborative relationship. There is currently a formal Partnership Agreement being finalized between the two agencies which will further enhance the communication and cooperation between USOR and DSAMH. This Partnership Agreement’s goals are for both agencies to better meet the needs of clients with substance abuse and mental health disabilities and to ensure the successful completion of their vocational goals leading to gainful employment. (Page 181) Title I

Information was gathered through the Utah State Office of Education concerning the number of youth and students with disabilities in the State of Utah. There are approximately 74,000 students ages 3 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an Individualized Education Program (IEP). This number does not reflect the number of students who may have a disability that is classified under a 504 Plan, Individualized Health Plan, or unidentified disability such as mental health or substance abuse. For purposes of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, there are approximately 20,000 students with a disability ages 14 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an IEP, also not reflecting students with disabilities who do not have an IEP. These numbers only reflect the approximate number of students with a disability who are the age of applying for and receiving services from VR while still under IDEA (ages 14 through 21). This does not reflect the number of students with disabilities who have dropped out, received diplomas, aged out of the school system, or are up to 24 years of age and no longer tied to the school system. The number of students and youth with disabilities across the State of Utah justifies a great need for transition services from Vocational Rehabilitation. (Pages 193-194) Title IV

USOR reserves SE funds for clients who have been determined most significantly disabled and who have secured an extended support agency for long-term SE support. USOR has partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) to provide and transfer funding and supports for mutual clients. Though these are the primary agencies that USOR partners with for SE, there are other individual supports that may qualify as an extended support agency as provided for in USOR policy. (Page 203) Title IV

USOR is partnering with SAMHSA and Local Mental Health Authorities/DSAMH to provide and expand supported employment services for youth and adults with severe and persistent mental illness, specifically with the IPS model.? ?Through Customized Employment/Supported Employment, USOR is also providing services and supports for individuals with most significant disabilities in sheltered workshops earning sub-minimum wages, who want to participate in integrated and competitive employment and have access the community. ?USOR continues to develop training for internal staff and external service providers through the Supported Employment Coordinator position and a collaborative partnership with DSPD and DSAMH. (Page 204) Title IV

Activity A.4: Provide targeted outreach efforts to youth in custody, homeless youth, youth in foster care, youth with mental health and co-occurring disorders, etc.

USOR created a transition liaison list which educators and families can access on the USOR website to help connect with their VR Counselor liaison. USOR increased the number of counselors assigned to schools across the state by training additional VR Counselors to provide transition services. This redistribution allows VR Counselors to allot more attention and scheduling availability to each school. USOR has added resources to the Transition page on the USOR website; links to the job readiness workshop material, a link to services for students who are potentially eligible, and the transition liaison list. USOR developed a rack card to help market the Job Readiness Workshops transition counselors perform in the schools.

USOR has assigned counselor liaisons to Juvenile Justice Services, Volunteers of America Youth, Department of Child and Family Services, and Local Mental Health Authorities to coordinate services for these populations. Most of the USOR district offices have increased the number of VR Counselors who are participating in IEP/504 meetings and providing Job Readiness Workshops in the LEAs. (Page 207) Title IV

USOR evaluated it’s current providers and use of life skills as a stand alone service and found it has expanded from use of CRP’s to include a few mental health clinics, and secondary schools. USOR is interested in increasing the availability of life skills to clients with mental health issues and students and will continue to outreach efforts to add new providers. (Page 215) Title IV

USOR partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Utah State Board of Education, Utah Department of Mental Health, and Community Rehabilitation Programs to increase life skills training options and coordinate goals for competitive integrated employment opportunities. Life Skills training is available as a stand alone service and in conjunction with a variety of services offered through VR, DSPD, and Mental Health facilities. USOR has successfully added life skills training options from community and private mental health providers. USOR’s coordination with other agencies ensures that life skills are available through all stages of the employment preparation process. This partnership has also been instrumental to USOR’s efforts to promote competitive integrated employment options for individuals who are newly seeking employment under the HBCS settings rule, Utah’s Employment First Initiative, and Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act. Coordinating efforts has allowed USOR to participate in demonstration and pilot projects that increase resources and capacity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 223) Title IV

USOR coordinates services with agencies with mutual goals of competitive, integrated employment and who provide extended services such as the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) to provide a smooth transition from short-term funding through VR to extended services. USOR is committed to providing on the job supports for individuals until they reach less than 20 percent intervention from a job coach or until they reach 24 months in employment. USOR has provided training to internal staff and to partner agencies to help enforce policies and best practices. (Page 224) Title IV

Scope: SE services are provided with Title VI, Part B funds on a fee-for-service basis (based on achievement of milestones) by SE service providers, including functional assessment of clients to perform in supported employment (supplemental to the assessment conducted by the counselor for purposes of establishing eligibility with Title I funds); life-skills training, job development, job analysis and client job matching; training by an employment specialist in job skills and behavioral expectations at the job site; training and support away from the job to ensure work performance; family support; and support to the employer to ensure client job retention. The same scope of services is provided by the extended service agency. Target populations in supported employment include persons with the most significant disabilities who qualify for ongoing support from the Division of Services for Persons with Disabilities (DSPD) or the Division of Mental Health (DMH), or individuals who have ongoing support available from other sources, including private, Social Security and/or natural supports. (Page 226) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 21 - 30 of 63

Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities Annual Report 2016 - 05/01/2017

“This report aims to illustrate the number of people who utilize the services provided by the [Division of Services for People with Disabilities], describe the services being used, provide accountability to the citizens of Utah, and highlight the historical and current need for these services as well as the initiatives to improve services for people with disabilities across the State of Utah.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Papa John’s Pizza To Pay $125,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 01/26/2017

“The owners of a Farmington, Utah Papa John's Pizza will pay $125,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the EEOC announced today.

According to EEOC's lawsuit, Papa John's discriminated against Scott Bonn, who has an intellectual disability, Down syndrome. EEOC alleged that Papa John's employed Bonn successfully at its Farmington location for more than five months and allowed an independently employed and insured job coach to assist him. EEOC further charged that after an operating partner visited the Farmington location and observed Bonn working with the assistance of his job coach, the operating partner ordered Papa John's local management to fire Bonn.”

Systems
  • Other

Utah State Office of Rehabilitation Services to Students with Disabilities Policy - 01/05/2017

“Transition services shall be provided to eligible Students and Youth with disabilities to facilitate the transition from educational settings in high school to VR services oriented toward an employment outcome consistent with the student/youth’s primary employment factors. Individuals meeting the definition of Student with a Disability, both eligible and potentially eligible for VR services, may access Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS). Services for eligible Students and Youth are governed under standard IPE’s as outlined below. Pre-ETS for Students Potentially Eligible are governed under sections 25.7 and 25.8.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Utah Partnerships in Employment - 11/28/2016

“ACL’s Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

Utah’s Division of Services for People with Disabilities received a grant for its School to Work Interagency Transition Initiative.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Utah State Office of Rehabilitation Transition Client Service Memorandum 2016-11: Transition and Pre-employment Transition Services - 11/07/2016

“The purpose of this Client Service Memo is to establish the definitions and procedures for working with Students with Disabilities, Youth with Disabilities, Pre-Employment Transition Services, and Transition Services”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Section 53A-24-106.5 Utah Code - Employment first emphasis on the provision of services. - 10/01/2016

Pertaining to the State System of Public Education. “When providing services to a person with a disability under this chapter, the office shall, within funds appropriated by the Legislature and in accordance with the requirements of federal and state law, give priority to providing services that assist the person in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment that enables the person to: purchase goods and services; establish self-sufficiency; and exercise economic control of the person's life.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Transition Plan for the Move of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation to the Department of Workforce Services - 09/21/2016

“The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) will transition to the Department of Workforce Services (DWS) effective October 1, 2016….With the transition, USOR services will be overseen by DWS, which has similar goals in helping individuals of all circumstances overcome barriers. DWS manages several divisions with distinct purposes that support specialized services for individuals and families. In addition to supporting gainful employment and providing eligibility services, DWS helps parents with childcare needs, provides funding for low-income housing, assists refugees resettling in Utah, manages labor market data and offers career counseling for veterans.

As USOR transitions to DWS, it will move over as its own division. DWS recognizes that USOR clients need individual, specialized care and that USOR’s unique service delivery model contributes to its success. Therefore, there is no intent to change it at this time. Throughout the transition and beyond, DWS and USOR will work together to ensure customers and clients on both sides will continue to receive high-quality service.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Office of Rehabilitation Service Relocation Bill - 03/25/2016

The bill moves Utah State Office of Rehabilitation from the State Board of Education to the Department of Workforce Services; modifies provisions related to the Governor's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, including that the governor appoint certain members of the committee.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HB 325 Office of Rehabilitation Services Amendments - 03/25/2016

“This bill modifies the State Office of Rehabilitation Act and related provisions.”   “Section 16. Section 35A-13-203, which is renumbered from Section 53A-24-106.5 is  renumbered and amended to read:   564 35A-13-203. Employment first emphasis on the provision of  services. 566  (1) When providing services to [a person] an individual with a disability under this  chapter, the office shall, within funds appropriated by the Legislature and in accordance with the requirements of federal and state law, give priority to providing services that assist the [person] individual in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor, Administration: Rescinding Prior Executive Orders, Utah Exec. Order No. 2016-1 - 01/29/2016

“Executive Order issued March 28, 1978, by Governor Matheson, establishing the "Governor's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped" created to promote and to encourage employment of disabled individualist and vocational, economic, and social opportunities. This order is rescinded because Utah's 2012 Employment First statute, Utah Code 62A-5-103.3, fulfills the same purpose”

Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Section 105.2 UT Employment first emphasis on the provision of services.

Pertaining to the Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health. “When providing services to a person with a disability under this chapter, the division shall… give priority to providing services that assist the person in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment that enables the person to: purchase goods and services; establish self-sufficiency; and exercise economic control of the recipient's life.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Section 103.3 UT Employment first emphasis on the provision of services.

Pertaining to the Utah Services for People with Disabilities. “When providing services to a person with a disability under this chapter, the division shall… give priority to providing services that assist the person in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment that enables the person to: purchase goods and services; purchase goods and services; [and] exercise economic control of the person's life.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Governor, Administration: Rescinding Prior Executive Orders, Utah Exec. Order No. 2016-1 - 01/29/2016

“Executive Order issued March 28, 1978, by Governor Matheson, establishing the "Governor's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped" created to promote and to encourage employment of disabled individualist and vocational, economic, and social opportunities. This order is rescinded because Utah's 2012 Employment First statute, Utah Code 62A-5-103.3, fulfills the same purpose”


Utah Executive Order (Model Employer for People with Disabilities) - 10/12/2007

Governor Jon M. Huntsman Jr., declares that, “Utah state government will strive to become the model employer of qualified people with disabilities…”

“Some programmatic components [of the executive order] include, a promotional outreach campaign to recruit qualified people with disabilities, specific programs within executive branch state agencies to recruit qualified people with disabilities, and a Task Force consisting of representatives of the Utah Department of Human Resource Management, the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation, The Governor's Committee for Employment of People with Disabilities, the Department of Workforce Services, and the Division of Risk Management… [Agencies are] charged with reviewing and proposing additional strategies to put Utah state government on the cutting edge of employing qualified people with disabilities...”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 21 - 22 of 22

Utah State Board of Education Special Education Rules

Transition services is a set of activities that is “designed to be within a results-oriented process, is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student with a disability to facilitate the student’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Utah “Employment First Strategic Plan”

“Our Mission: to ensure services offered by DSPD emphasize, promote, and support competitive, integrated and community-based employment for people with disabilities.” The “Strategic Issues” include, stakeholder education, financing and contracting methods, services and service innovation, and performance measurement.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Utah Employment First Partnership

The Utah Employment First Partnership is a commitment among the Utah Department of Work Force Services (DWS), the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), and the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) to improve state government services focused on persons with disabilities achieving competitive, integrated and community based employment.

The mission of the partnership is to, “To ensure state government services currently offered by the partners emphasize and support competitive, integrated and community based employment”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Transforming Lives Through Employment: SAMHSA’s Supported Employment Grant Program (SEP) - 06/29/2018

The purpose of the Supported Employment Program is "to enhance state and community capacity to provide and expand evidence-based SEPs (such as the Individual Placement and Support [IPS] model) to adults with serious mental illnesses, including persons with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders." 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Utah Partnerships in Employment - 11/28/2016

“ACL’s Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

Utah’s Division of Services for People with Disabilities received a grant for its School to Work Interagency Transition Initiative.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Utah Supported Employment Transformation Project - 09/01/2014

“The Supported Employment Transformation Project (SETP) uses the Individual Placement and Support evidence-based, supported employment model. A primary component of this project includes forming a multi-agency coordinating committee that will develop and implement a collaborative, sustainable funding initiative to expand and maintain robust, supported employment services in Utah. The project provides supported employment services to adults with serious mental illness and co-occurring substance use disorders. Two local mental health authorities across urban and rural communities coordinate these services.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

ASPIRE Utah - 09/01/2013

“ASPIRE is a study for youth ages 14 – 16 who receive SSI (Supplemental Security Income).  When you enroll, you and your family will get information to further education and employment.  Half of the youth and families who enroll will be given added services and supports. The ASPIRE team will assist youth and families to find and use services in their communities.  The purpose of the ASPIRE study is to compare the services and supports to find what works best for youth and families.

ASPIRE is a six state project, including Utah.  ASPIRE Utah is a project of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation.  250 Utah youth will be recruited and enrolled.  125 will participate in Usual Services.  125 will participate in ASPIRE Services.  The purpose of the ASPIRE study is to compare the services and supports to find what works best for youth and families.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Utah Benefit Offset National Demonstration (BOND)/ SSDI ‘1 for 2’ Project - 12/18/2009

“The goal of Utah’s pilot was to recruit 500 individuals who receive SSDI benefits only (not in combination with SSI) to be part of the pilot project. Participants were recruited from among SSDI-only beneficiaries who had recently been involved in one of several employment support programs in Utah. Recruitment sources for pilot participants included: The Utah Benefits Planning Assistance and Outreach (BPAO) program, the Medicaid Disability program, the public Vocational Rehabilitation program, and selected employment programs administered by two community mental health agencies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities Customized Employment Initiative

“The Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities & Griffin-Hammis Associates is sponsoring a six-session year-long training series resulting in an optional National Certification in Community Employment Services through the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE). The project is working closely with both Covenant Employment Services and Rise, Inc.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

TURN Supported Work

~~“TURN Supported Employment services assists individuals with disabilities seeking employment opportunities which are compatible with their unique individual  skill-set, and areas of interest. TURN works with our clients to obtain valuable employment skills that easily transfer to relevant work experience with employers offering supported employment opportunities. “

 

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Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Customized Employment - 12/09/2014

“Customized employment is a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both. It is based on an individualized match between the strengths, conditions, and interests of a job candidate and the identified business needs of an employer. Customized Employment utilizes an individualized approach to employment planning and job development — one person at a time . . . one employer at a time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Moving in a New Direction - 12/07/2014

An Executive Director of a facility based day program and sheltered workshop in Utah discusses how the Lane v. Kitzhabersettlement, Olmstead, and CMS directives will impact his organization. The Executive Director says that the work his organization has done is "group work and is performed in a segregated environment…(and) does not reflect the individual desires and interactions with non-disabled peers outside of our centers that the law is not requiring. Customized Employment is stated as the new goal although it is recognized that "some individuals may not ever find successful employment in an integrated setting...but...the opportunity to at least try can and should be considered successful."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Employment/Daytime Activities

This website describes various options for students with disabilities transitioning out of school and provides links to numerous relevant resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

After High School Options

This website serves as a post-high school transition guide for students with disabilities and their families.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment First in Utah & Customized Employment: "One Person at a Time."

A PowerPoint on Utah's Employment First Efforts focusing on Strategic Planning (Employment First Taskforce) and Capacity Building (Customized Employment Training). It contains an explanation of Utah's Employment First Priority (House Bill 240), stating the fundamental importance of work as a part of personal identity and being a citizen of the United States; the false premise of the reasons frequently given as to way people with disabilities can't/shouldn't work. It also has a brief overview of Customized Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Papa John’s Pizza To Pay $125,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 01/26/2017

“The owners of a Farmington, Utah Papa John's Pizza will pay $125,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the EEOC announced today.

According to EEOC's lawsuit, Papa John's discriminated against Scott Bonn, who has an intellectual disability, Down syndrome. EEOC alleged that Papa John's employed Bonn successfully at its Farmington location for more than five months and allowed an independently employed and insured job coach to assist him. EEOC further charged that after an operating partner visited the Farmington location and observed Bonn working with the assistance of his job coach, the operating partner ordered Papa John's local management to fire Bonn.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

Utah Aging Waiver (For Individuals Age 65 or Older)

~~"This Utah Medicaid Waiver for Individuals Age 65 or Older, also known as a Medicaid Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, or the Aging Waiver, is designed to assist older individuals with elevated levels of care needs. It provides services that prolong independent living and prevent premature or unnecessary placement in nursing facilities. Compared to many state HCBS waivers, Utah's waiver offers a wide range of services beyond just personal care or companionship. For example, support is provided for medical equipment and any home modifications to increase independence. Support is offered for personal emergency response services, medication reminder systems, caregiver respite, and adult day care.

The Aging Waiver program allows for consumer direction of personal care services. Via this service model, participants can hire friends and relatives, with the exception of spouses and legal guardians, to provide personal assistance. This includes assistance with daily living activities, such as bathing, dressing, preparing meals, and light housecleaning. While waiver participants can hire, train, and manage their care provider, the financial aspects of being an employer are handled by a Fiscal Management Agency through this waiver program."""

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Utah Acquired Brain Injury Waiver

This waiver is designed to provide services statewide to help people with an acquired brain injury to remain in their homes or other community based settings. Individuals are able to live as independently as possible with supportive services provided through this waiver.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Utah 1915(c) HCBS Waivers

Utah Has Eight Medicaid 1915(c) HCBS Waivers: Acquired Brain Injury Waiver; the Aging Waiver (For Individuals Age 65 or Older); Community Supports Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities or Other Related Conditions; Medicaid Autism Waiver; New Choices Waiver; Physical Disabilities Waiver; and the Waiver for Technology Dependent Children.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

"Industry" is the motto of the Beehive State, and it's easy to see why Utah is "Still the Right Place" for individuals with disabilities to find competitive, integrated employment opportunities and socioeconomic advancement through Employment First.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Utah’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.88%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,161,105
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.81%
Change from
2017 to 2018
155,329
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.56%
Change from
2017 to 2018
72,186
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.56%
Change from
2017 to 2018
46.47%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.3%
Change from
2017 to 2018
79.90%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 3,161,105
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 155,329
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 72,186
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,361,619
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 46.47%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.90%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 13.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 147,515
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 152,952
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 265,814
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 4,232
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 29,496
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,758
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 5,155
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,685
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 7,419
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 10,404

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,998
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 10.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 46,048

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,474
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 9,900
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 25,116
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 25.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.70%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 10.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 713
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 409
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 114
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,920

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 16,922
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.08

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,358
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 966
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 41.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 32.24

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,551
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 70,742
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $6,985,575
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $42,466,312
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 26.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,724
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 30.23

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.40%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 20.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 68.77%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 84.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 48.53%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 694,868
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 936
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 2,404
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 183,093
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 185,496
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 20
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 137
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 157
AbilityOne wages (products). $17,389
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,417,562

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 14
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 18
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 4
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,294
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 177
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,475

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~The Utah Employment First Partnership is a shared commitment among the Utah Department of Workforce Services (DWS), the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) to improve state-government services focused on persons with disabilities, helping them to achieve competitive, integrated and community-based employment. Utah’s Employment First Initiative supports workforce development. It expects, encourages, provides, creates and rewards integrated employment in the workforce. It is the first and preferred outcome for working-age youth and adults with disabilities at minimum wage or higher. This program focuses on individuals with complex and significant disabilities for whom job placement in the past has been limited or traditionally has not occurred. (Page 33) Title I

USOR has developed and maintains cooperative agreements where necessary with federal and state agencies not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system. USOR maintains cooperative agreements with DWS, Utah State Board of Education (USBE), Utah Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Utah Department of Community and Culture (UDCC), and GOED. As required by Utah State legislation USOR has developed a MOU and coordinated plan with DWS and DSPD (Utah’s DD agency) to carry out services related to employment for persons with significant disabilities. Additional agreements exist relevant to the "Employment First" initiatives in Utah. USOR also maintains cooperative agreements with all local public education school districts, the Veterans Administration (VA), local mental health organizations, and other entities involved in workforce development services including shared projects with the Department of Health (DOH). In addition, USOR participates in the statewide workforce development system through participation on the State Workforce Development Board. (Page 173) Title I

USOR has cooperative agreements with local school districts, community rehabilitation programs, and DSPD to provide Supported Employment services to individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities, including youth. Additional cooperative agreements that will extend supports for disadvantaged populations such as mental health and youth are being developed. USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation which makes employment the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized and/or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. (Page 177-178) Title I

USOR maintains a long standing cooperative agreement with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), which is the state agency responsible for providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. These funds are ongoing and available to provide long term services for individuals who have utilized VR supports, are on the DSPD wait list, and need long term supported employment services. USOR is also partnered with DSPD in Employment First legislation, which makes employment the first and preferred option of individuals with disabilities, including those with developmental disabilities. (Page 181) Title I

Through a cooperative relationship between USOR and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), supported employment services have been expanded to a targeted population through the provision of long-term funding from the Utah State Legislature. These funds are designated to support individuals who have previously been on a waiting list for DSPD SE funding. The USOR Supported Employment Coordinator will collaborate with CRPs and DSPD to ensure compliance with Employment First Legislation. (Page 194) Title IV

USOR launched a school-to-work project, through ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP),?designed to braid? funding, access partner agency supports, and provide a pathway for students with the most significant disabilities to competitive, integrated employment. (Page 204) Title IV

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation and has partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities and the Utah State Board of Education (and LEAs) in “school to work pilots” in 5 sites to increase competitive, integrated outcomes for students with disabilities who would normally be slated to enter a day program (non integrated setting) or subminimum wage employment setting upon graduation from high school. Community Rehabilitation Programs and USOR staff who are involved in these pilots have had the opportunity to receive training on Customized Employment. (Page 210) Title IV

Barriers to engaging all individuals with disabilities in competitive, integrated employment has been changing attitudes and beliefs about disability and work. Outreach efforts are underway to educate parents, educators, and other community providers about the benefits of competitive integrated employment. To this end, USOR has developed an informational flyer about the Settings Rule, Employment First Initiative, and Section 511. These information flyers will be used to educate the community and will be disseminated widely. (Page 210) Title IV

• Goal 2.4: Increase collaboration and coordination with partner community agencies whose goals, services and laws align with providing competitive integrated employment and career opportunities for persons with disabilities
o Strategy 2.4 (A): Align policies and procedures for supported employment with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule and Utah’s Employment First Legislation (Pages 215-216) Title IV

Utah applied for and were awarded Employment First State Leadership and Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) resources from the Office of Disability and Employment Policy (ODEP) in 2015. The Transition and Supported Employment Coordinator was the co-lead/coordinator from 2015-2017 and therefore USOR was involved in the decision-making and implementation of the technical assistance provided by ODEP. EFSLMP resources afforded Utah the opportunity to assist agencies who provide HCBS medicaid waiver funding to receive technical assistance in becoming more community based. As a result, some of the agencies developed (or expanded on ) employment units within their agencies and became vendors with USOR to provide SE and SJBT milestones to assist clients in accessing CIE. Utah also received resources from ODEP to implement School to Work Pilots which utilized a team approach with USOR, DWS/WDD, DSPD, LEAs, and CRP partners to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school/post high school. Although some providers received technical assistance to make the shift to more integrated settings, some have not made steps to follow through with meeting goals. (Page 216) Title IV

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation to increase access and eliminate disparities in access to state VR Services and Supported Employment. Employment is the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post-high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD waiting list through the provision of long-term funding from the Utah State Legislature. This partnership is a key initiative to eliminate systemic barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities. In addition, USOR continues seek out opportunities to support individuals with disabilities in competitive integrated employment. Additionally, USOR believes alignment with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule will increase opportunities for competitive integrated employment opportunities. USOR will provide outreach and opportunities for individuals experiencing sheltered work or segregated day programs and sub-minimum wages to access VR services in order increase competitive integrated employment. (Pages 221-222) Title IV

USOR partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Utah State Board of Education, Utah Department of Mental Health, and Community Rehabilitation Programs to increase life skills training options and coordinate goals for competitive integrated employment opportunities. Life Skills training is available as a stand alone service and in conjunction with a variety of services offered through VR, DSPD, and Mental Health facilities. USOR has successfully added life skills training options from community and private mental health providers. USOR’s coordination with other agencies ensures that life skills are available through all stages of the employment preparation process. This partnership has also been instrumental to USOR’s efforts to promote competitive integrated employment options for individuals who are newly seeking employment under the HBCS settings rule, Utah’s Employment First Initiative, and Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act. Coordinating efforts has allowed USOR to participate in demonstration and pilot projects that increase resources and capacity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 223) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~• USOR has partnered with the Utah State Board of Education, DWS Workforce Development Division and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities to implement “School to Work” pilots in 5 different school districts in Utah. The “School to Work” pilot teams utilize the Customized Employment process to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school or post high school. Teams work collaboratively to serve students and blend/braid funding so that students can access services needed to become employed and independent. (Page 31) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Pages 108-109) Title I

The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) has set a goal to serve 200 individuals with Title VI funds through supported employment services during FFY 2017. During FFY 2014, USOR served 208 individuals eligible for supported employment and 180 in FFY 2015. During FFY 2015, 61 individuals eligible for supported employment services were closed as successfully employed in competitive and integrated settings. The implementation of the Order of Selection had an impact on USOR’s ability to serve all clients, including those eligible for Supported Employment (SE). As USOR has opened the Priority Category 1: Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (MSD), USOR anticipates it will be able to increase the number of individuals receiving Title VI SE funding under Individualized Plan for Employments (IPEs). In addition, Goal 1.2 listed in this Unified Plan is specifically designed to continue to assess and improve the provision of SE and Customized Employment services provided in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). (Page 203) Title IV

As laws, agencies, and federal guidance change, USOR is committed to amending and updating policies to provide SE supports to both adults and youth as appropriate. USOR has been expanding upon and developing resources for three supported employment pathways (Individual Placement and Support, Customized Employment, and Traditional Supported Employment) which lead to long term placement services through partnership with DSPD, USOE, DSAMH, and DWS. USOR continues to partner with UATT/UCAT to increase student access to any necessary and appropriate assistive technology needed for success. (Page 204) Title I

USOR has engaged several committees in addition to resources from WINTAC to review and revise service delivery models for Supported Employment (SE), Customized Employment (CE) and Supported Job Based Training (SJBT). In addition, USOR is participating in several pilot projects to expand and improve SE and CE services in partnership with extended service providers. These pilot projects have extended the original completion date for this strategy but have proved invaluable to CE and SE expansion and innovation. (Page 206) Title IV

o Strategy 3.4 (B): USOR will update policies and procedures to provide supported employment and customized employment to clients in order to assist them in leaving segregated employment settings and gaining competitive integrated employment in their community. Activity B.1: USOR will update policies chapters, as needed, to better align with providing the necessary supports and services that persons with the most significant disabilities will need, to prevent segregated employment and subminimum wages. (Page 218) Title IV

USOR created a milestone payment program to streamline services and outcomes from Community Resource Providers (CRPs). USOR created a position for a statewide coordinator for Supported Employment and Customized Employment services who helps to oversee CRP activities. Additionally, USOR has a CRP committee that meets regularly and a CRP policy manual to provide guidance and consistency in services. The results of these efforts have been a significant increase in the total number of CRPs offering services to VR customers across the state. USOR is exploring options for assisting in the establishment of transition-focused CRP services through competitive state bidding. (Page 220) Title IV

USOR expanded services to Students and Youth with Disabilities through development of fee-for service options for Pre-Employment Transition Services and contracts, increasing VR Counselor connections with schools, and leveraging partnerships with other agencies. By leveraging existing staff resources and increasing coordination with partner agencies, VR successfully expanded outreach services and connected more students and youth to VR services. Training was provided to service provider and partner agencies resulting in new fee for service options and six contract Pre-ETS providers. USOR has expanded Supported Employment service delivery options by increasing the variety of placement methods available to meet individual client’s needs. The increase in models allows VR Counselors and client to select among a variety of models including Customized Employment, Pathways to Success Customized Employment, Individual Placement and Support, and traditional Supported Employment. These options add to the service options currently available from Community Rehabilitation Program providers.  (Page 222) Title IV

USOR continues to maintain high quality standards for vendors providing SE services. USOR requires vendors to receive training approved by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) in order to work 1-1 with clients. Vendors must also receive 10 CEUs per year in order to receive continuing education and remain current in best practices. In addition, vendors providing Customized Employment services must receive training in CE as well as participate in the Technical Assistance component to training. USOR and the Division of People with Disabilities have provided opportunities for Community Rehabilitation Programs to receive training in Customized Employment. USOR participates in fidelity reviews for the Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model, which assesses partnerships with VR as well as quality services provided to clients. (Page 224) Title IV

In addition, USOR is a partner in the “School to Work” pilots which utilize a Customized Employment approach to assist students transitioning from secondary educational institutions to competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation. The “School to Work” pilots have expanded from 3 initial sites to 5 in 2017-2018 school year. USOR has liaisons assigned to every Local Education Agency so that counselors can connect students with services both internally and through information and referral to community resources. (Page 224) Title IV

USOR also partners with extended support agencies to train and set expectations for employment specialists in customized employment, discovery, and Individualized Placement Services (IPS). These services have been proven to meet the needs of persons with most significant disabilities (MSDs) who may need additional services and long-term supports in order to be successfully employed. (Page 226) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~• USOR has partnered with the Utah State Board of Education, DWS Workforce Development Division and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities to implement “School to Work” pilots in 5 different school districts in Utah. The “School to Work” pilot teams utilize the Customized Employment process to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school or post high school. Teams work collaboratively to serve students and blend/braid funding so that students can access services needed to become employed and independent. (Page 31) Title I

Utah’s core partners are funding activities to implement the state strategies. The activities will be aligned across core programs. Core partners are committed to:

• Utilizing a braided funding model to leverage existing resources in providing services for common customers. These efforts will be ongoing including referrals and client interventions at any point of entry (DWS, Vocational Rehabilitation or Adult Education), refinement of career pathways to meet the needs through stronger engagement with employers, high demand industry and post-secondary and training institutions with a focus on high risk clients. Outcomes will be reported to the Operations Committee and SWDB annually. (Page 59) Title I

USOR launched a school-to-work project, through ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP),?designed to braid? funding, access partner agency supports, and provide a pathway for students with the most significant disabilities to competitive, integrated employment.? USOR is partnering with SAMHSA and Local Mental Health Authorities/DSAMH to provide and expand supported employment services for youth and adults with severe and persistent mental illness, specifically with the IPS model. (Page 204) Title IV

USOR expanded services to Students and Youth with Disabilities through development of fee-for service options for Pre-Employment Transition Services and contracts, increasing VR Counselor connections with schools, and leveraging partnerships with other agencies. By leveraging existing staff resources and increasing coordination with partner agencies, VR successfully expanded outreach services and connected more students and youth to VR services. Training was provided to service provider and partner agencies resulting in new fee for service options and six contract Pre-ETS providers. USOR has expanded Supported Employment service delivery options by increasing the variety of placement methods available to meet individual client’s needs. The increase in models allows VR Counselors and client to select among a variety of models including Customized Employment, Pathways to Success Customized Employment, Individual Placement and Support, and traditional Supported Employment. These options add to the service options currently available from Community Rehabilitation Program providers. (Page 222) Title IV

The VR Counselor is required to maintain communication with the Supported Employment (SE) team at least every three months. The SE team includes the VR counselor, customer, family members, extended services agency representative (i.e., support coordinator, mental-health worker, etc.), teacher (if a student), employment specialist or employer. The team will coordinate services by braiding funding to ensure the client has the support needed to be successful on the job. Once the client reaches an 80/20 level of support or 24 months (whichever comes first) and the team agrees, services and funding will be transferred to the identified extended services agency for long-term SE.

For youth and students with disabilities who qualify and need supported employment services, the transition to the extended services agency will occur when the client has graduated or aged out of the school system. The adult services agencies will continue to partner, braid funding and coordinate the transition of responsibility as appropriate. (Page 227) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Through the SWDC committee work, Utah will explore and identify ways to build stronger connections between core partner counselors and post-secondary career resource counselors/professions, including Disability Resource Centers (DRC), to ensure customers have access to all services the partners offer. (Page 68) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~USOR maintains cooperative agreements with the local school districts and public charter schools who serve secondary education students. The cooperative agreements include provisions for consultation, technical assistance, professional development, VR referrals and eligibility, and individualized goals of the local teams. USOR has assigned Transition Counselors to each local school district and charter school. The counselors meet with special educators and administrators, provide outreach to students and parents, provide VR Welcome Sessions to students, provide Job Readiness Workshops to students, attend IEP meetings, as well as cover all referrals and questions from that school.  (Page 175) Title IV

USOR and USBE agree to collaborate on financial responsibility of services, within the guidelines of the Rehabilitation Act and IDEA. Both agencies will respect the resources set forth by policies and procedures that guide each agency’s services. When a student with a disability is both in school and has an IPE with VR, the cost of services necessary for both education and for the student to become employed, will be negotiated between the LEA representative and the VR Counselor, pending any necessary approval through LEA administration and USOR chain of command. At any time during the transition process, comparable benefits or additional agency representatives will be included in the IEP/IPE transition team as an additional resource for financial responsibility. Agreements on shared cost of required services for the student/client, will be in writing in the IEP and IPE, to ensure collaboration and understanding of agency involvement. (Page 176) Title IV

Students and youth with disabilities are invited to participate in career preparation workshops and job fairs. The Business Relations Teams work with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors to provide school transition specialists and teachers with preparation packets. The material provides information on how to dress for success, interviewing, resume building, and appropriate behavior when meeting with business partners. Students can attend workshops on topics such as, “Working in Government Professions, State and Federal Hiring Initiatives,” “Employer Panel,” “How to Dress on a Dime and Interview Success,” and “Social Security and Working.” The job fairs provide students an opportunity to meet with hiring specialists to discuss employment opportunities. (Page 180) Title IV

USOR Transition Services provides a variety of services to assist transition aged youth in obtaining paid work experiences. Through the provision of Work Based Training, Summer Work Experiences, Supported Job Based Training/Supported Employment, and other Community Rehabilitation Program services, VR coordinates with employers on an individualized basis to meet both the client’s and employer’s needs. (Page 180) Title IV

Information was gathered through the Utah State Office of Education concerning the number of youth and students with disabilities in the State of Utah. There are approximately 74,000 students ages 3 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an Individualized Education Program (IEP). This number does not reflect the number of students who may have a disability that is classified under a 504 Plan, Individualized Health Plan, or unidentified disability such as mental health or substance abuse. For purposes of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, there are approximately 20,000 students with a disability ages 14 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an IEP, also not reflecting students with disabilities who do not have an IEP. These numbers only reflect the approximate number of students with a disability who are the age of applying for and receiving services from VR while still under IDEA (ages 14 through 21). This does not reflect the number of students with disabilities who have dropped out, received diplomas, aged out of the school system, or are up to 24 years of age and no longer tied to the school system. The number of students and youth with disabilities across the State of Utah justifies a great need for transition services from Vocational Rehabilitation. (Pages 193-194) Title IV

Effective when all required approvals are in place and when management deems necessary, USOR will close all categories and place all eligible individuals not in plan on a waiting list. USOR will also place all subsequent applicants who are determined eligible for VR services on the waiting list. USOR will only provide services to eligible individuals who currently have an IPE and for whom services have been initiated. As resources become available individuals will be taken off of the waiting list in chronological order based on priority category and application date. Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (MSD) will be the first category served. (Page 202) Title IV

o Strategy 1.3 (B): Increase outreach and collaboration with schools, i.e., special education, school administration, school counselors and 504 coordinators
Activity B.1: Increase counselor collaborative partnerships in schools through liaison meetings, IEP meetings, agency fairs, job readiness workshops, etc.
Activity B.2: Amend and maintain USOR/USOE Interagency Agreements at both the state and local levels to be more descriptive and comprehensive about the expectations on both sides
Activity B.3: Identify and develop programs serving students with disabilities to provide pre-employment transition services
USOR has increased presence in Local Education Agencies and many district offices have increased the number of school liaisons out of need. Counselors attend IEP meetings, 504 meetings, agency fairs, and facilitate job readiness workshops in the schools. (Page 208) Title IV

USOR has a dedicated Transition Coordinator who has responsibilities such as improving the quality and consistency of transition services from USOR counselors to students and improving collaboration and coordination. USOR created policies and procedures for specific services for transition students with disabilities. Each district office maintains specific counselors as liaisons with local public and private schools, and specific Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) are kept with each school and school district. VR counselors service individual students by meeting with their IEP teams and in specific VR meetings with students and their parents. Also, VR is expanding provision of Job-Readiness Workshops to schools in their local areas. The Job-Readiness Workshops cover aspects of self-discovery, job-readiness, job-seeking and job-keeping skills. (Page 220) Title IV

Since 2016, USOR has engaged in the following innovation and expansion projects and activities: (1) Funding of the USOR Transition and Supported Employment Coordinator to increase the provision of VR services to youth with disabilities, specifically those with the most significant disabilities and expansion of transition and pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities (2) Development and Implementation of six (6) Pre-Employment Transition Services contracts to serve eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities (3) School to Work Customized Employment Project with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and three local school districts to develop competitive, integrated, and meaningful employment for students with developmental disabilities, specifically students who are at-risk of entering into sheltered work settings at sub-minimum wages once exiting high school and (4) Collaboration with Source America to increase Customized Employment services in rural and underserved areas. (5) In addition, USOR provides annual funding support for operation of the Utah State Independent Living Council. (6) Administrative support and direct expenses for operation of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) were also provided by USOR. These funding arrangements are consistent with 34 CFR 361.35. (Page 225) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Utah’s strategies take into account its economic, workforce, workforce development, education and training activities and analysis provided in the section above. Utah’s Unified Plan includes strategies to achieve its vision and goals. The strategies are flexible to accommodate the state’s economic, workforce, and workforce development, education and training activities and analysis provided in Section (a). The plan includes specific strategies to address the needs of populations described in Section (a). The foundation of Utah’s plan is built upon utilizing data, partnerships, and its resources to implement strategies that support operations to provide services to individuals and employers. Utah is committed to changing and/or adjusting its strategies as needed to meet the state’s workforce needs. Utah’s SWDB will establish standing committees to ensure Utah’s goals and vision are met. These include Youth, Apprenticeships, Services to Individuals with Disabilities, Career Pathways, and Operations. (Page 46) Title I

As Utah has been implementing its Unified plan, it has continued to provide assistance to SWDB members and committees by providing a strong structure and basis for the SWDB to function within. In addition to Guiding Principles, Statutory Requirements, application processes, etc. the SWBD has the opportunity to:
Implement innovative strategies by focusing on employer engagement, strengthening core programs, dissemination of best practices, and promoting effective use of technology to enhance service delivery.
Establish and maintain standing committees. There are two required committees including the Youth Services Committee and the Services to Individuals with Disabilities. Utah has added a Career Pathways Committee, an Operations Committee, and an Apprenticeship Committee. (Page 53) Title I

Partners will coordinate activities and resources to provide comprehensive, high-quality, customer-centered services, including supportive services, to employers to meet their current and projected workforce needs. The activities will conform to the statutory requirements of each program.
The Operations Committee will coordinate with the Service to Individuals with Disabilities Committee, Career Pathways Committee and Apprenticeships Committee to create recommendations for aligning DWS, USOR, and Adult Education and other required partner services for employers. (Page 63) Title I

Career Pathways Committee• There are many career pathway activities being carried out around the state. The Career Pathway Committee will meet with partners from around the state gathering information and ideas on how these groups can align, share resources, and collaborate. They will make recommendations, that include the Six Key Elements of Career Pathways described in the Career Pathway Toolkit and requirements of WIOA section 101(d)(3)(B), (D) to the SWDB regarding how the SWDB can best support a collaborative state career pathway system. Utah’s sector strategies are aligned with GOED’s industry clusters. They are incorporated throughout Utah’s plan. Utah will refer to the definitions of “career pathway” in WIOA section 3(7) and “industry sector or occupation section 3(23) of WIOA. (Page 102) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Page 108-109) Title I

USOR has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing Vocational Rehabilitation services and OJT and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act. USOR determines whether for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit organizations. USOR has established fee-for-service agreements with private, non-profit entities providing vocational rehabilitation services throughout Utah in accordance with the Unified State Plan. USOR maintains vendor relationships with other agencies providing Job Preparation and Placement (JPP), Supported Job Based Training (SJBT) and Support Employment (SE) service that include a fee-for-service agreement and participation in job coach training activities. USOR continues to identify and make arrangements, where appropriate, to expand the availability of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) offering supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of the state plan. (Page 177) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Partners will coordinate activities and resources to provide comprehensive, high-quality, customer-centered services, including supportive services, to employers to meet their current and projected workforce needs. The activities will conform to the statutory requirements of each program. The Operations Committee will coordinate with the Service to Individuals with Disabilities Committee, Career Pathways Committee and Apprenticeships Committee to create recommendations for aligning DWS, USOR, and Adult Education and other required partner services for employers. (Page 63) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Pages 108-109) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer/ Business

~~USOR has initiatives to partner with employers to identify competitive, integrated employment and career exploration opportunities that facilitate the provision of VR and Transition Services. These initiatives are primarily carried out through the USOR Business Relations and Choose to Work (CTW) Programs. The Business Relations Team was established in 2005 to strengthen the connection between employers and individuals with disabilities through a combination of outreach efforts, disability awareness training, consultation services, job fairs and workshops, business networking activities and job posting networks. The Business Relations Team:

Assists with the recruitment and referral of qualified individuals with disabilities to meet workforce demands. Through a partnership with DWS, a customized option to recruit qualified applicants with disabilities was created for job vacancies by using the key word: PWDNET. Employers are able to utilize this keyword on UWORKS allowing keyword searches by job seekers, advocates, and Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. Employers can also send emails to “pwdnetjobs@utah.gov” with a complete job description and the job opening. These job posting are shared statewide with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor and Employment Specialists.

Utilizes the Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP), https://tapability.org/, which is led by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and The National Employment Team (NET) in partnership with disABLEDperson, Inc. TAP includes both a national talent pool of VR clients looking for employment and a job posting system for employers looking to hire individuals with disabilities.

Conduct semi-annual Employer Workshops on Hiring and Retaining Individuals with Disabilities and Career Preparation and Job Fairs. The Workshop offers Business Partners an opportunity to learn more about disability, accommodations and other disability and employment issues. The Job Fair is a targeted fair for individuals with disabilities in which PWDNET (People With Disabilities Network) business partners participate. These events provide opportunities for business to connect with job-ready individuals with disabilities, and individuals with disabilities to explore careers. The job fairs and workshops also offer opportunities for internships and mentor experiences. (Page 178) Title IV

The Choose to Work (CTW) Program: USOR’s other primary initiative for working with employers to identify competitive integrated employment opportunities and career exploration for individuals with disabilities is CTW. This is a partnership between the USOR and WDD that is designed to ensure all individuals with disabilities have equal access to workforce investment activities available to assist them in preparing for and obtaining employment through coordinated service delivery.

The core services of the CTW program are job development and job placement. Job development includes interfacing with employers for the purpose of marketing a specific job seeker to the employer, or to inform and educate the employer regarding hiring individuals from a talented pool of job seekers with disabilities. Job placement is focused on service delivery to assist a specific individual in locating job openings, preparing for the application process, and following through with the application for employment.

CTW specialists coordinate with the Business Relations Team to organize and engage in employer workshops to increase awareness regarding the hiring and job retention of individuals with disabilities. The Specialists are active participants in local area Chambers of Commerce and sit on local and community boards in order to facilitate the provision of Vocational Rehabilitation services leading to an employment outcome. CTW Specialists are actively engaged with the DWS Workforce Development Specialists as well as USOR Business Relations Team and affiliates to identify integrated employment opportunities for job seekers with disabilities. (Page 179) Title IV

USOR utilizes the Business Relations and CTW Programs to coordinate with employers in support of transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities. Staff meet with employers to identify and/or develop internships, on-the-job trainings, mentoring experiences and temporary work experiences for students and youth with disabilities.
Students and youth with disabilities are invited to participate in career preparation workshops and job fairs. The Business Relations Teams work with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors to provide school transition specialists and teachers with preparation packets. The material provides information on how to dress for success, interviewing, resume building, and appropriate behavior when meeting with business partners. Students can attend workshops on topics such as, “Working in Government Professions, State and Federal Hiring Initiatives,” “Employer Panel,” “How to Dress on a Dime and Interview Success,” and “Social Security and Working.” The job fairs provide students an opportunity to meet with hiring specialists to discuss employment opportunities. (Page 180) Title IV

• Goal 3.3: Improve coordination between USOR and employers to benefit clients in obtaining competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities
o Strategy 3.3 (A): Expand outreach efforts to employers to ensure USOR better meets their needs while improving opportunities for VR clients
  Activity A.1: Utilize existing relationships with the Governor’s Committee for Employment of People with Disabilities, Choose to Work (CTW) and DWS to identify employer needs provide opportunities for VR Counselors to connect with community employers
  Activity A.2: Utilize VR Business Relations Team and CTW to provide training and information to employers on the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities
  Activity A.3: Provide staff training on opportunities for developing and coordinating On-the-Job Training, work-based training, internships and apprenticeships to better service client and employer needs. (Page 217) Title IV

Provide business services through the American Job Center network and support a local workforce development system that meets the needs of businesses in the local area. Applicable one-stop partners develop, offer, and deliver quality business services that assist businesses and industry sectors in overcoming the challenges of recruiting, retaining, and developing talent for the area economy. America Job Center staff must: Have a clear understanding of industry skill needs Identify appropriate strategies for assisting employers, and coordinate business services activities across partner programs as appropriate Incorporate an integrated and aligned business services strategy among partners to present a unified voice for American Job Centers in its communication with employers.

Make labor exchange activities and labor market information available to employers. Local areas must establish and develop relationships and networks with large and small employers and their intermediaries. Local areas must develop, convene, or implement industry or sector partnerships. (Pages 249-250) Title IV

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~USOR continues to update and renew it’s Interagency Agreement with the Utah State Board of Education to include descriptions of the expectations of USOR and USBE and to incorporate changes in the partnership as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), specifically in reference to pre-employment transition services and WIOA Section 511: Limitations of Use of Subminimum Wage. Once the Interagency Agreement is finalized, USOR and LEAs will begin to develop goals for their local level agreements. (Page 208) Title IV

Strategy 1.5 (A): Increase outreach to individuals currently employed but making subminimum wages, youth at risk of entering sheltered work or segregated day programs at the time of secondary school exit, individuals at risk of being segregated in any type of subminimum wage entity, individuals leaving sheltered work and day-program settings, individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, etc.

Activity A.1: Identify sheltered work and day programs across the State of Utah that provide services to persons with disabilities

Activity A.2: Provide outreach and information to individuals who are interested in pursuing competitive integrated employment

Activity A.3: Expand opportunities for customized employment and discovery services to expand competitive integrated employment for these individuals.

USOR has provided career counseling and information and referral services as outlined in WIOA Section 511 to individuals who are currently employed in subminimum wage settings. Approximately 1300 people were met with and provided career counseling and information referral throughout the year. Meetings were also held with the employers holding 14C certificates to discuss the law and options that they had moving forward to comply with the law.

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation and has partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities and the Utah State Board of Education (and LEAs) in “school to work pilots” in 5 sites to increase competitive, integrated outcomes for students with disabilities who would normally be slated to enter a day program (non integrated setting) or subminimum wage employment setting upon graduation from high school. Community Rehabilitation Programs and USOR staff who are involved in these pilots have had the opportunity to receive training on Customized Employment. (Pages 209-210) Title IV

Strategy 1.5 (B): Increase outreach to sheltered work and day programs across the State of Utah who currently provide segregated settings with subminimum wage options for persons with disabilities

Activity B.1: Provide outreach and information regarding competitive integrated employment and vocational rehabilitation services to partner agencies that provide segregated settings with subminimum wage options for persons with disabilities

Activity B.2: Partner with agencies like Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and State Office of Education (USOE) to provide training and professional development opportunities to community rehabilitation programs in order to provide community-based services and competitive integrated employment outcomes for the clients they serve. (Page 210) Title IV

USOR has provided information briefings to various agencies and subminimum wage employers throughout Utah including the Utah Association of Community Services, Utah State Board of Education, and the Utah State Rehabilitation Council. USOR has leveraged its partnership with DSPD and the USBE to provide collaborative information sessions to stakeholders in the community.
USOR’s 511 Coordinator provided information regarding competitive and integrated employment to agencies and employers who have been, or currently involved in subminimum wage employment. During the presentation, USOR representatives provide options for future services that the agencies and employers should consider when making changes to existing models, in order to comply with WIOA Section 511. (Page 211) Title IV

Strategy 2.4 (A): Align policies and procedures for supported employment with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule and Utah’s Employment First Legislation

Activity A.1: USOR will provide an agency representative on strategic planning committees with agencies involved in current laws and legislation regarding persons with the most significant disabilities and decreasing acceptance of subminimum wages

Agency representative was assigned by USOR to oversee and participate in all meetings and provided services required and related to decreasing acceptance of subminimum wage jobs (WIOA 511). Career Counseling and Information Referral was provided to approximately 1300 individuals who mostly were currently in a subminimum wage position, and others who were applying for such a position. USOR representative attended meetings with other State Agencies, employers and parents to discuss the law and provide options for those individuals who were looking for an option of competitive and integrated employment. USOR and DSPD, the agency responsible for Medicaid and Medicare Services to individuals with disabilities, coordinated training of providers about the settings rule and Utah’s Employment First Legislation. USOR and DSPD coordinate policies and procedures to ensure seamless supported employment services from referral to extended supports. (Page 216) Title IV

Goal 3.4: Provide improved services to persons with disabilities who are experiencing segregated employment, subminimum wages, or sheltered work and day-program supports in order to increase competitive integrated employment 

o Strategy 3.4 (A): USOR will provide training to staff regarding supported employment, customized employment and discovery, behavior intervention strategies, etc.

Activity A.1: USOR will provide specific training on cognitive and development disabilities as well as any other population who are most at risk for experiencing subminimum wages and sheltered work. (Page 217) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

As Utah develops a method to evaluate customer satisfaction, existing customer feedback mechanisms will be used, and continuous improvement will take into consideration the indicators of performance. Accessibility for individuals with disabilities will be evaluated, and restraints will be addressed as they arise. (Page 88) Title I

Utah’s one-stop service delivery system complies with provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology and materials for individuals with disabilities. DWS’s risk manager works in coordination with State Risk Management to conduct on-site reviews of DWS’s employment centers and administrative offices. These reviews are conducted to ensure physical accessibility for DWS customers as well as employees. Reviews are conducted every three years. The Americans with Disabilities Act Checklist for Existing Facilities on the Achievable Barrier Removal Survey was used for the most recent Risk Management review. However, Risk Management is currently working with DWS and other state agencies in revising the tool. Additionally, the DWS equal opportunity officer conducts statewide employment center reviews using portions of the Section 188 checklist to ensure programmatic accessibility for DWS customers. (Page 98) Title I

USOR updated their website to improve access and accessibility to information on services available through the VR Program and the Division of Services of the Blind and Visually Impaired. In addition, new marketing and outreach materials are available in electronic and braille formats. (Page 212) Title IV

• All core and required partner staff working in the one-stop center will receive training to learn about all of the required WIOA programs, including the referral and accessibility processes • All core and required partners that provide online information and/or services will ensure their websites are 508 compliant and meet the WIOA accessibility requirements (Page 254) Title IV

One-stop centers and one-stop delivery systems are certified for effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility, and continuous improvement. The State Workforce Development Board (SWDB) in consultation with chief elected officials, must review and update the criteria every two years as part of the review and modification of State Plans pursuant to 34 CFR § 463.135. One-stop centers are certified by the SWDB every two years. Each one-stop center must receive a “Pass” for each requirement listed below to be recommended for SWDB certification. If the one-stop center receives a “Fail,” it will have 60 days to submit a plan to the State Workforce Development Board (SWDB) describing how they will remediate the problem. The SWDB has 60 days to approve the one-stop center’s remediation plan or request changes to the plan. (Pages 259-260) Title IV

Vets

Veterans receive Priority of Service (POS) as they transition from the military or any time they seek employment services from DWS to gain or improve their employment status. Veteran Employment Services supports veterans in their reintegration process as they leave the military and rejoin the civilian workforce. The Job for Veteran State Grant (JVSG), as funded by the U.S. Department of Labor/Veteran Employment and Training Services (USDOL/VETS), provides intensive services for veterans that have significant barriers to employment. DWS is also looking at strategies to reduce the duration of veterans on the unemployment rolls and to help veterans on state-provided Medicaid seek VA medical benefits. Accelerated Credentialing to Employment (ACE) helps veterans, National Guard members, reservists and spouses gain licenses and certifications for employment. (Page 33) Title I

 Utah will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act. Currently, to ensure the provision of priority of service, all employment center employees are trained to screen and identify potential covered persons. The question “Have you or a spouse ever served in the U.S. military?” is asked of every job seeker upon initial contact. If the job seeker responds in the affirmative, the job seeker is given DWS Publication 07-107 which provides an overview of the services for which they receive priority and a description of the application for those services. DWS monitors its priority of services for veterans by visiting a required percentage of one stop offices to ensure priority of service is being provided to veterans and their eligible spouses. DWS is audited by the U.S. Department of Labor, Veterans Education and Training Services (USDOL/VETS) annually. In addition to onsite visits, the USDOL/VETS have a “mystery shopper” visit the one-stop centers to verify that priority of service is provided to veterans and their eligible spouses. (Page 96) Title I

Complete a job-match request, which will result in the DWS job-matching system automatically placing all qualified covered persons at the top of an employer’s applicant list. This means that the covered person receives referrals to open job announcements over non-covered persons. Recognizing the need for additional methods of identifying potential covered persons for priority of service, DWS requires all employment center staff to wear a magnetic badge on their clothing asking the question “Have you or a spouse ever served in the U.S. military?” Additionally, Publication 07-107 is available and distributed in the job connection areas of every employment center, the question “Have you or a spouse ever served in the U.S. military?” is displayed as part of a looping presentation on a television in the job connection areas of all employment centers, and small desktop posters are displayed at every intake counter in the employment centers. This provides job seekers with multiple opportunities to self-identify their covered person status or to share the information about priority of service to family members, friends or neighbors. If the veteran is determined to have a significant barrier to employment, they are referred to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP). An electronic 360 referral is sent to the appropriate DVOP. (Page 97) Title I

DWS uses a no-wrong-door approach, as noted above, that includes services available in the community that targeted veterans can use to enhance their job search. Native American job seekers in Utah have access to DWS services. Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists are assigned to each of the employment centers nearest to Native American reservations and have developed relationships with tribal leadership to ensure tribal member veterans are provided with intensive services as well as priority of service. (Page 97) Title I

Goal 4.1: Increase outreach and services to veterans with disabilities 

Strategy 4.1: Improve coordination of services between USOR and the Veterans Affairs (VA) to more effectively serve veterans with disabilities

Activity A.1: Review and revise current Cooperative Agreement between USOR and the Veterans Affairs

Activity A.2: Assign local liaisons to interface between USOR districts and local VA offices Activity A.3: Coordinate services between USOR and the VA by inviting VA representatives to visit local VR offices and offer USOR staff trainings (Page 218) Title IV

Mental Health

~~USOR has established a policy chapter based on the provision of Supported Employment Services. The policy is a hybrid of milestone outcome payments and hourly rates to meet the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities. This policy chapter defines extended support agencies who qualify to provide supported employment supports as a partner with VR. These agencies include Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), Division of Services for Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) as well as local mental health agencies, employers, private organizations, natural supports and incentives offered through Social Security or Medicaid. USOR continues to identify and partner with other supported employment entities to provide clients with informed choices, options, and qualified service providers to meet their unique needs. These efforts are coordinated by the USOR Supported Employment Coordinator. USOR has cooperative agreements with local school districts, community rehabilitation programs, and DSPD to provide Supported Employment services to individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities, including youth. Additional cooperative agreements that will extend supports for disadvantaged populations such as mental health and youth are being developed. USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation which makes employment the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized and/or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. (Pages 177-178) Title I

USOR and the Utah Department of Human Services, Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) have a longstanding partnership and collaborative relationship. There is currently a formal Partnership Agreement being finalized between the two agencies which will further enhance the communication and cooperation between USOR and DSAMH. This Partnership Agreement’s goals are for both agencies to better meet the needs of clients with substance abuse and mental health disabilities and to ensure the successful completion of their vocational goals leading to gainful employment. (Page 181) Title I

Information was gathered through the Utah State Office of Education concerning the number of youth and students with disabilities in the State of Utah. There are approximately 74,000 students ages 3 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an Individualized Education Program (IEP). This number does not reflect the number of students who may have a disability that is classified under a 504 Plan, Individualized Health Plan, or unidentified disability such as mental health or substance abuse. For purposes of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, there are approximately 20,000 students with a disability ages 14 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an IEP, also not reflecting students with disabilities who do not have an IEP. These numbers only reflect the approximate number of students with a disability who are the age of applying for and receiving services from VR while still under IDEA (ages 14 through 21). This does not reflect the number of students with disabilities who have dropped out, received diplomas, aged out of the school system, or are up to 24 years of age and no longer tied to the school system. The number of students and youth with disabilities across the State of Utah justifies a great need for transition services from Vocational Rehabilitation. (Pages 193-194) Title IV

USOR reserves SE funds for clients who have been determined most significantly disabled and who have secured an extended support agency for long-term SE support. USOR has partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) to provide and transfer funding and supports for mutual clients. Though these are the primary agencies that USOR partners with for SE, there are other individual supports that may qualify as an extended support agency as provided for in USOR policy. (Page 203) Title IV

USOR is partnering with SAMHSA and Local Mental Health Authorities/DSAMH to provide and expand supported employment services for youth and adults with severe and persistent mental illness, specifically with the IPS model.? ?Through Customized Employment/Supported Employment, USOR is also providing services and supports for individuals with most significant disabilities in sheltered workshops earning sub-minimum wages, who want to participate in integrated and competitive employment and have access the community. ?USOR continues to develop training for internal staff and external service providers through the Supported Employment Coordinator position and a collaborative partnership with DSPD and DSAMH. (Page 204) Title IV

Activity A.4: Provide targeted outreach efforts to youth in custody, homeless youth, youth in foster care, youth with mental health and co-occurring disorders, etc.

USOR created a transition liaison list which educators and families can access on the USOR website to help connect with their VR Counselor liaison. USOR increased the number of counselors assigned to schools across the state by training additional VR Counselors to provide transition services. This redistribution allows VR Counselors to allot more attention and scheduling availability to each school. USOR has added resources to the Transition page on the USOR website; links to the job readiness workshop material, a link to services for students who are potentially eligible, and the transition liaison list. USOR developed a rack card to help market the Job Readiness Workshops transition counselors perform in the schools.

USOR has assigned counselor liaisons to Juvenile Justice Services, Volunteers of America Youth, Department of Child and Family Services, and Local Mental Health Authorities to coordinate services for these populations. Most of the USOR district offices have increased the number of VR Counselors who are participating in IEP/504 meetings and providing Job Readiness Workshops in the LEAs. (Page 207) Title IV

USOR evaluated it’s current providers and use of life skills as a stand alone service and found it has expanded from use of CRP’s to include a few mental health clinics, and secondary schools. USOR is interested in increasing the availability of life skills to clients with mental health issues and students and will continue to outreach efforts to add new providers. (Page 215) Title IV

USOR partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Utah State Board of Education, Utah Department of Mental Health, and Community Rehabilitation Programs to increase life skills training options and coordinate goals for competitive integrated employment opportunities. Life Skills training is available as a stand alone service and in conjunction with a variety of services offered through VR, DSPD, and Mental Health facilities. USOR has successfully added life skills training options from community and private mental health providers. USOR’s coordination with other agencies ensures that life skills are available through all stages of the employment preparation process. This partnership has also been instrumental to USOR’s efforts to promote competitive integrated employment options for individuals who are newly seeking employment under the HBCS settings rule, Utah’s Employment First Initiative, and Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act. Coordinating efforts has allowed USOR to participate in demonstration and pilot projects that increase resources and capacity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 223) Title IV

USOR coordinates services with agencies with mutual goals of competitive, integrated employment and who provide extended services such as the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) to provide a smooth transition from short-term funding through VR to extended services. USOR is committed to providing on the job supports for individuals until they reach less than 20 percent intervention from a job coach or until they reach 24 months in employment. USOR has provided training to internal staff and to partner agencies to help enforce policies and best practices. (Page 224) Title IV

Scope: SE services are provided with Title VI, Part B funds on a fee-for-service basis (based on achievement of milestones) by SE service providers, including functional assessment of clients to perform in supported employment (supplemental to the assessment conducted by the counselor for purposes of establishing eligibility with Title I funds); life-skills training, job development, job analysis and client job matching; training by an employment specialist in job skills and behavioral expectations at the job site; training and support away from the job to ensure work performance; family support; and support to the employer to ensure client job retention. The same scope of services is provided by the extended service agency. Target populations in supported employment include persons with the most significant disabilities who qualify for ongoing support from the Division of Services for Persons with Disabilities (DSPD) or the Division of Mental Health (DMH), or individuals who have ongoing support available from other sources, including private, Social Security and/or natural supports. (Page 226) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 21 - 30 of 63

Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities Annual Report 2016 - 05/01/2017

“This report aims to illustrate the number of people who utilize the services provided by the [Division of Services for People with Disabilities], describe the services being used, provide accountability to the citizens of Utah, and highlight the historical and current need for these services as well as the initiatives to improve services for people with disabilities across the State of Utah.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Papa John’s Pizza To Pay $125,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 01/26/2017

“The owners of a Farmington, Utah Papa John's Pizza will pay $125,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the EEOC announced today.

According to EEOC's lawsuit, Papa John's discriminated against Scott Bonn, who has an intellectual disability, Down syndrome. EEOC alleged that Papa John's employed Bonn successfully at its Farmington location for more than five months and allowed an independently employed and insured job coach to assist him. EEOC further charged that after an operating partner visited the Farmington location and observed Bonn working with the assistance of his job coach, the operating partner ordered Papa John's local management to fire Bonn.”

Systems
  • Other

Utah State Office of Rehabilitation Services to Students with Disabilities Policy - 01/05/2017

“Transition services shall be provided to eligible Students and Youth with disabilities to facilitate the transition from educational settings in high school to VR services oriented toward an employment outcome consistent with the student/youth’s primary employment factors. Individuals meeting the definition of Student with a Disability, both eligible and potentially eligible for VR services, may access Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS). Services for eligible Students and Youth are governed under standard IPE’s as outlined below. Pre-ETS for Students Potentially Eligible are governed under sections 25.7 and 25.8.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Utah Partnerships in Employment - 11/28/2016

“ACL’s Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

Utah’s Division of Services for People with Disabilities received a grant for its School to Work Interagency Transition Initiative.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Utah State Office of Rehabilitation Transition Client Service Memorandum 2016-11: Transition and Pre-employment Transition Services - 11/07/2016

“The purpose of this Client Service Memo is to establish the definitions and procedures for working with Students with Disabilities, Youth with Disabilities, Pre-Employment Transition Services, and Transition Services”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Section 53A-24-106.5 Utah Code - Employment first emphasis on the provision of services. - 10/01/2016

Pertaining to the State System of Public Education. “When providing services to a person with a disability under this chapter, the office shall, within funds appropriated by the Legislature and in accordance with the requirements of federal and state law, give priority to providing services that assist the person in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment that enables the person to: purchase goods and services; establish self-sufficiency; and exercise economic control of the person's life.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Transition Plan for the Move of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation to the Department of Workforce Services - 09/21/2016

“The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) will transition to the Department of Workforce Services (DWS) effective October 1, 2016….With the transition, USOR services will be overseen by DWS, which has similar goals in helping individuals of all circumstances overcome barriers. DWS manages several divisions with distinct purposes that support specialized services for individuals and families. In addition to supporting gainful employment and providing eligibility services, DWS helps parents with childcare needs, provides funding for low-income housing, assists refugees resettling in Utah, manages labor market data and offers career counseling for veterans.

As USOR transitions to DWS, it will move over as its own division. DWS recognizes that USOR clients need individual, specialized care and that USOR’s unique service delivery model contributes to its success. Therefore, there is no intent to change it at this time. Throughout the transition and beyond, DWS and USOR will work together to ensure customers and clients on both sides will continue to receive high-quality service.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Office of Rehabilitation Service Relocation Bill - 03/25/2016

The bill moves Utah State Office of Rehabilitation from the State Board of Education to the Department of Workforce Services; modifies provisions related to the Governor's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, including that the governor appoint certain members of the committee.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

HB 325 Office of Rehabilitation Services Amendments - 03/25/2016

“This bill modifies the State Office of Rehabilitation Act and related provisions.”   “Section 16. Section 35A-13-203, which is renumbered from Section 53A-24-106.5 is  renumbered and amended to read:   564 35A-13-203. Employment first emphasis on the provision of  services. 566  (1) When providing services to [a person] an individual with a disability under this  chapter, the office shall, within funds appropriated by the Legislature and in accordance with the requirements of federal and state law, give priority to providing services that assist the [person] individual in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Governor, Administration: Rescinding Prior Executive Orders, Utah Exec. Order No. 2016-1 - 01/29/2016

“Executive Order issued March 28, 1978, by Governor Matheson, establishing the "Governor's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped" created to promote and to encourage employment of disabled individualist and vocational, economic, and social opportunities. This order is rescinded because Utah's 2012 Employment First statute, Utah Code 62A-5-103.3, fulfills the same purpose”

Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Section 105.2 UT Employment first emphasis on the provision of services.

Pertaining to the Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health. “When providing services to a person with a disability under this chapter, the division shall… give priority to providing services that assist the person in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment that enables the person to: purchase goods and services; establish self-sufficiency; and exercise economic control of the recipient's life.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Section 103.3 UT Employment first emphasis on the provision of services.

Pertaining to the Utah Services for People with Disabilities. “When providing services to a person with a disability under this chapter, the division shall… give priority to providing services that assist the person in obtaining and retaining meaningful and gainful employment that enables the person to: purchase goods and services; purchase goods and services; [and] exercise economic control of the person's life.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Governor, Administration: Rescinding Prior Executive Orders, Utah Exec. Order No. 2016-1 - 01/29/2016

“Executive Order issued March 28, 1978, by Governor Matheson, establishing the "Governor's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped" created to promote and to encourage employment of disabled individualist and vocational, economic, and social opportunities. This order is rescinded because Utah's 2012 Employment First statute, Utah Code 62A-5-103.3, fulfills the same purpose”


Utah Executive Order (Model Employer for People with Disabilities) - 10/12/2007

Governor Jon M. Huntsman Jr., declares that, “Utah state government will strive to become the model employer of qualified people with disabilities…”

“Some programmatic components [of the executive order] include, a promotional outreach campaign to recruit qualified people with disabilities, specific programs within executive branch state agencies to recruit qualified people with disabilities, and a Task Force consisting of representatives of the Utah Department of Human Resource Management, the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation, The Governor's Committee for Employment of People with Disabilities, the Department of Workforce Services, and the Division of Risk Management… [Agencies are] charged with reviewing and proposing additional strategies to put Utah state government on the cutting edge of employing qualified people with disabilities...”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 21 - 22 of 22

Utah State Board of Education Special Education Rules

Transition services is a set of activities that is “designed to be within a results-oriented process, is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the student with a disability to facilitate the student’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Utah “Employment First Strategic Plan”

“Our Mission: to ensure services offered by DSPD emphasize, promote, and support competitive, integrated and community-based employment for people with disabilities.” The “Strategic Issues” include, stakeholder education, financing and contracting methods, services and service innovation, and performance measurement.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Utah Employment First Partnership

The Utah Employment First Partnership is a commitment among the Utah Department of Work Force Services (DWS), the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), and the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) to improve state government services focused on persons with disabilities achieving competitive, integrated and community based employment.

The mission of the partnership is to, “To ensure state government services currently offered by the partners emphasize and support competitive, integrated and community based employment”.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Transforming Lives Through Employment: SAMHSA’s Supported Employment Grant Program (SEP) - 06/29/2018

The purpose of the Supported Employment Program is "to enhance state and community capacity to provide and expand evidence-based SEPs (such as the Individual Placement and Support [IPS] model) to adults with serious mental illnesses, including persons with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders." 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Utah Partnerships in Employment - 11/28/2016

“ACL’s Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

Utah’s Division of Services for People with Disabilities received a grant for its School to Work Interagency Transition Initiative.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Utah Supported Employment Transformation Project - 09/01/2014

“The Supported Employment Transformation Project (SETP) uses the Individual Placement and Support evidence-based, supported employment model. A primary component of this project includes forming a multi-agency coordinating committee that will develop and implement a collaborative, sustainable funding initiative to expand and maintain robust, supported employment services in Utah. The project provides supported employment services to adults with serious mental illness and co-occurring substance use disorders. Two local mental health authorities across urban and rural communities coordinate these services.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

ASPIRE Utah - 09/01/2013

“ASPIRE is a study for youth ages 14 – 16 who receive SSI (Supplemental Security Income).  When you enroll, you and your family will get information to further education and employment.  Half of the youth and families who enroll will be given added services and supports. The ASPIRE team will assist youth and families to find and use services in their communities.  The purpose of the ASPIRE study is to compare the services and supports to find what works best for youth and families.

ASPIRE is a six state project, including Utah.  ASPIRE Utah is a project of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation.  250 Utah youth will be recruited and enrolled.  125 will participate in Usual Services.  125 will participate in ASPIRE Services.  The purpose of the ASPIRE study is to compare the services and supports to find what works best for youth and families.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Utah Benefit Offset National Demonstration (BOND)/ SSDI ‘1 for 2’ Project - 12/18/2009

“The goal of Utah’s pilot was to recruit 500 individuals who receive SSDI benefits only (not in combination with SSI) to be part of the pilot project. Participants were recruited from among SSDI-only beneficiaries who had recently been involved in one of several employment support programs in Utah. Recruitment sources for pilot participants included: The Utah Benefits Planning Assistance and Outreach (BPAO) program, the Medicaid Disability program, the public Vocational Rehabilitation program, and selected employment programs administered by two community mental health agencies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities Customized Employment Initiative

“The Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities & Griffin-Hammis Associates is sponsoring a six-session year-long training series resulting in an optional National Certification in Community Employment Services through the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE). The project is working closely with both Covenant Employment Services and Rise, Inc.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

TURN Supported Work

~~“TURN Supported Employment services assists individuals with disabilities seeking employment opportunities which are compatible with their unique individual  skill-set, and areas of interest. TURN works with our clients to obtain valuable employment skills that easily transfer to relevant work experience with employers offering supported employment opportunities. “

 

.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Customized Employment - 12/09/2014

“Customized employment is a flexible process designed to personalize the employment relationship between a job candidate and an employer in a way that meets the needs of both. It is based on an individualized match between the strengths, conditions, and interests of a job candidate and the identified business needs of an employer. Customized Employment utilizes an individualized approach to employment planning and job development — one person at a time . . . one employer at a time.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Moving in a New Direction - 12/07/2014

An Executive Director of a facility based day program and sheltered workshop in Utah discusses how the Lane v. Kitzhabersettlement, Olmstead, and CMS directives will impact his organization. The Executive Director says that the work his organization has done is "group work and is performed in a segregated environment…(and) does not reflect the individual desires and interactions with non-disabled peers outside of our centers that the law is not requiring. Customized Employment is stated as the new goal although it is recognized that "some individuals may not ever find successful employment in an integrated setting...but...the opportunity to at least try can and should be considered successful."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Employment/Daytime Activities

This website describes various options for students with disabilities transitioning out of school and provides links to numerous relevant resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

After High School Options

This website serves as a post-high school transition guide for students with disabilities and their families.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment First in Utah & Customized Employment: "One Person at a Time."

A PowerPoint on Utah's Employment First Efforts focusing on Strategic Planning (Employment First Taskforce) and Capacity Building (Customized Employment Training). It contains an explanation of Utah's Employment First Priority (House Bill 240), stating the fundamental importance of work as a part of personal identity and being a citizen of the United States; the false premise of the reasons frequently given as to way people with disabilities can't/shouldn't work. It also has a brief overview of Customized Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Papa John’s Pizza To Pay $125,000 To Settle EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 01/26/2017

“The owners of a Farmington, Utah Papa John's Pizza will pay $125,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the EEOC announced today.

According to EEOC's lawsuit, Papa John's discriminated against Scott Bonn, who has an intellectual disability, Down syndrome. EEOC alleged that Papa John's employed Bonn successfully at its Farmington location for more than five months and allowed an independently employed and insured job coach to assist him. EEOC further charged that after an operating partner visited the Farmington location and observed Bonn working with the assistance of his job coach, the operating partner ordered Papa John's local management to fire Bonn.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

Utah Aging Waiver (For Individuals Age 65 or Older)

~~"This Utah Medicaid Waiver for Individuals Age 65 or Older, also known as a Medicaid Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, or the Aging Waiver, is designed to assist older individuals with elevated levels of care needs. It provides services that prolong independent living and prevent premature or unnecessary placement in nursing facilities. Compared to many state HCBS waivers, Utah's waiver offers a wide range of services beyond just personal care or companionship. For example, support is provided for medical equipment and any home modifications to increase independence. Support is offered for personal emergency response services, medication reminder systems, caregiver respite, and adult day care.

The Aging Waiver program allows for consumer direction of personal care services. Via this service model, participants can hire friends and relatives, with the exception of spouses and legal guardians, to provide personal assistance. This includes assistance with daily living activities, such as bathing, dressing, preparing meals, and light housecleaning. While waiver participants can hire, train, and manage their care provider, the financial aspects of being an employer are handled by a Fiscal Management Agency through this waiver program."""

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Utah Acquired Brain Injury Waiver

This waiver is designed to provide services statewide to help people with an acquired brain injury to remain in their homes or other community based settings. Individuals are able to live as independently as possible with supportive services provided through this waiver.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Utah 1915(c) HCBS Waivers

Utah Has Eight Medicaid 1915(c) HCBS Waivers: Acquired Brain Injury Waiver; the Aging Waiver (For Individuals Age 65 or Older); Community Supports Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities or Other Related Conditions; Medicaid Autism Waiver; New Choices Waiver; Physical Disabilities Waiver; and the Waiver for Technology Dependent Children.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

"Industry" is the motto of the Beehive State, and it's easy to see why Utah is "Still the Right Place" for individuals with disabilities to find competitive, integrated employment opportunities and socioeconomic advancement through Employment First.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Utah’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.88%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,161,105
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.81%
Change from
2017 to 2018
155,329
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.56%
Change from
2017 to 2018
72,186
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-6.56%
Change from
2017 to 2018
46.47%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.3%
Change from
2017 to 2018
79.90%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 3,161,105
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 155,329
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 72,186
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,361,619
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 46.47%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 79.90%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 13.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 147,515
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 152,952
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 265,814
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 4,232
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 29,496
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,758
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 5,155
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,685
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 7,419
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 10,404

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,998
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 10.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 46,048

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 6,474
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 9,900
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 25,116
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 25.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.70%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 10.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 713
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 409
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 114
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 1,920

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 16,922
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.08

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,358
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 966
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 41.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 32.24

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,551
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 70,742
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $6,985,575
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $42,466,312
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 26.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,724
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 30.23

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.47%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.26%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.63%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.40%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 20.24%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 68.77%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 84.32%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 48.53%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 694,868
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 936
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 2,404
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 183,093
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 185,496
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 20
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 137
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 157
AbilityOne wages (products). $17,389
AbilityOne wages (services). $2,417,562

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 14
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 18
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 4
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,294
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 177
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,475

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~The Utah Employment First Partnership is a shared commitment among the Utah Department of Workforce Services (DWS), the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) to improve state-government services focused on persons with disabilities, helping them to achieve competitive, integrated and community-based employment. Utah’s Employment First Initiative supports workforce development. It expects, encourages, provides, creates and rewards integrated employment in the workforce. It is the first and preferred outcome for working-age youth and adults with disabilities at minimum wage or higher. This program focuses on individuals with complex and significant disabilities for whom job placement in the past has been limited or traditionally has not occurred. (Page 33) Title I

USOR has developed and maintains cooperative agreements where necessary with federal and state agencies not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system. USOR maintains cooperative agreements with DWS, Utah State Board of Education (USBE), Utah Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Utah Department of Community and Culture (UDCC), and GOED. As required by Utah State legislation USOR has developed a MOU and coordinated plan with DWS and DSPD (Utah’s DD agency) to carry out services related to employment for persons with significant disabilities. Additional agreements exist relevant to the "Employment First" initiatives in Utah. USOR also maintains cooperative agreements with all local public education school districts, the Veterans Administration (VA), local mental health organizations, and other entities involved in workforce development services including shared projects with the Department of Health (DOH). In addition, USOR participates in the statewide workforce development system through participation on the State Workforce Development Board. (Page 173) Title I

USOR has cooperative agreements with local school districts, community rehabilitation programs, and DSPD to provide Supported Employment services to individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities, including youth. Additional cooperative agreements that will extend supports for disadvantaged populations such as mental health and youth are being developed. USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation which makes employment the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized and/or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. (Page 177-178) Title I

USOR maintains a long standing cooperative agreement with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), which is the state agency responsible for providing services for individuals with developmental disabilities. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD wait list through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. These funds are ongoing and available to provide long term services for individuals who have utilized VR supports, are on the DSPD wait list, and need long term supported employment services. USOR is also partnered with DSPD in Employment First legislation, which makes employment the first and preferred option of individuals with disabilities, including those with developmental disabilities. (Page 181) Title I

Through a cooperative relationship between USOR and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), supported employment services have been expanded to a targeted population through the provision of long-term funding from the Utah State Legislature. These funds are designated to support individuals who have previously been on a waiting list for DSPD SE funding. The USOR Supported Employment Coordinator will collaborate with CRPs and DSPD to ensure compliance with Employment First Legislation. (Page 194) Title IV

USOR launched a school-to-work project, through ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP),?designed to braid? funding, access partner agency supports, and provide a pathway for students with the most significant disabilities to competitive, integrated employment. (Page 204) Title IV

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation and has partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities and the Utah State Board of Education (and LEAs) in “school to work pilots” in 5 sites to increase competitive, integrated outcomes for students with disabilities who would normally be slated to enter a day program (non integrated setting) or subminimum wage employment setting upon graduation from high school. Community Rehabilitation Programs and USOR staff who are involved in these pilots have had the opportunity to receive training on Customized Employment. (Page 210) Title IV

Barriers to engaging all individuals with disabilities in competitive, integrated employment has been changing attitudes and beliefs about disability and work. Outreach efforts are underway to educate parents, educators, and other community providers about the benefits of competitive integrated employment. To this end, USOR has developed an informational flyer about the Settings Rule, Employment First Initiative, and Section 511. These information flyers will be used to educate the community and will be disseminated widely. (Page 210) Title IV

• Goal 2.4: Increase collaboration and coordination with partner community agencies whose goals, services and laws align with providing competitive integrated employment and career opportunities for persons with disabilities
o Strategy 2.4 (A): Align policies and procedures for supported employment with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule and Utah’s Employment First Legislation (Pages 215-216) Title IV

Utah applied for and were awarded Employment First State Leadership and Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) resources from the Office of Disability and Employment Policy (ODEP) in 2015. The Transition and Supported Employment Coordinator was the co-lead/coordinator from 2015-2017 and therefore USOR was involved in the decision-making and implementation of the technical assistance provided by ODEP. EFSLMP resources afforded Utah the opportunity to assist agencies who provide HCBS medicaid waiver funding to receive technical assistance in becoming more community based. As a result, some of the agencies developed (or expanded on ) employment units within their agencies and became vendors with USOR to provide SE and SJBT milestones to assist clients in accessing CIE. Utah also received resources from ODEP to implement School to Work Pilots which utilized a team approach with USOR, DWS/WDD, DSPD, LEAs, and CRP partners to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school/post high school. Although some providers received technical assistance to make the shift to more integrated settings, some have not made steps to follow through with meeting goals. (Page 216) Title IV

USOR is a partner in Employment First legislation to increase access and eliminate disparities in access to state VR Services and Supported Employment. Employment is the first and preferred option for individuals with disabilities. USOR partners with DSPD to ensure that supports are in place for individuals with intellectual disabilities, youth in post-high programs, and all individuals who are MSD and need customized or supported employment supports. USOR and DSPD collaborate to provide supported employment services to individuals on the DSPD waiting list through the provision of long-term funding from the Utah State Legislature. This partnership is a key initiative to eliminate systemic barriers to employment for individuals with disabilities. In addition, USOR continues seek out opportunities to support individuals with disabilities in competitive integrated employment. Additionally, USOR believes alignment with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’s new Home- and Community-Based Services (HCBS) settings rule will increase opportunities for competitive integrated employment opportunities. USOR will provide outreach and opportunities for individuals experiencing sheltered work or segregated day programs and sub-minimum wages to access VR services in order increase competitive integrated employment. (Pages 221-222) Title IV

USOR partnered with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Utah State Board of Education, Utah Department of Mental Health, and Community Rehabilitation Programs to increase life skills training options and coordinate goals for competitive integrated employment opportunities. Life Skills training is available as a stand alone service and in conjunction with a variety of services offered through VR, DSPD, and Mental Health facilities. USOR has successfully added life skills training options from community and private mental health providers. USOR’s coordination with other agencies ensures that life skills are available through all stages of the employment preparation process. This partnership has also been instrumental to USOR’s efforts to promote competitive integrated employment options for individuals who are newly seeking employment under the HBCS settings rule, Utah’s Employment First Initiative, and Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act. Coordinating efforts has allowed USOR to participate in demonstration and pilot projects that increase resources and capacity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 223) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~• USOR has partnered with the Utah State Board of Education, DWS Workforce Development Division and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities to implement “School to Work” pilots in 5 different school districts in Utah. The “School to Work” pilot teams utilize the Customized Employment process to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school or post high school. Teams work collaboratively to serve students and blend/braid funding so that students can access services needed to become employed and independent. (Page 31) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Pages 108-109) Title I

The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) has set a goal to serve 200 individuals with Title VI funds through supported employment services during FFY 2017. During FFY 2014, USOR served 208 individuals eligible for supported employment and 180 in FFY 2015. During FFY 2015, 61 individuals eligible for supported employment services were closed as successfully employed in competitive and integrated settings. The implementation of the Order of Selection had an impact on USOR’s ability to serve all clients, including those eligible for Supported Employment (SE). As USOR has opened the Priority Category 1: Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (MSD), USOR anticipates it will be able to increase the number of individuals receiving Title VI SE funding under Individualized Plan for Employments (IPEs). In addition, Goal 1.2 listed in this Unified Plan is specifically designed to continue to assess and improve the provision of SE and Customized Employment services provided in collaboration with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). (Page 203) Title IV

As laws, agencies, and federal guidance change, USOR is committed to amending and updating policies to provide SE supports to both adults and youth as appropriate. USOR has been expanding upon and developing resources for three supported employment pathways (Individual Placement and Support, Customized Employment, and Traditional Supported Employment) which lead to long term placement services through partnership with DSPD, USOE, DSAMH, and DWS. USOR continues to partner with UATT/UCAT to increase student access to any necessary and appropriate assistive technology needed for success. (Page 204) Title I

USOR has engaged several committees in addition to resources from WINTAC to review and revise service delivery models for Supported Employment (SE), Customized Employment (CE) and Supported Job Based Training (SJBT). In addition, USOR is participating in several pilot projects to expand and improve SE and CE services in partnership with extended service providers. These pilot projects have extended the original completion date for this strategy but have proved invaluable to CE and SE expansion and innovation. (Page 206) Title IV

o Strategy 3.4 (B): USOR will update policies and procedures to provide supported employment and customized employment to clients in order to assist them in leaving segregated employment settings and gaining competitive integrated employment in their community. Activity B.1: USOR will update policies chapters, as needed, to better align with providing the necessary supports and services that persons with the most significant disabilities will need, to prevent segregated employment and subminimum wages. (Page 218) Title IV

USOR created a milestone payment program to streamline services and outcomes from Community Resource Providers (CRPs). USOR created a position for a statewide coordinator for Supported Employment and Customized Employment services who helps to oversee CRP activities. Additionally, USOR has a CRP committee that meets regularly and a CRP policy manual to provide guidance and consistency in services. The results of these efforts have been a significant increase in the total number of CRPs offering services to VR customers across the state. USOR is exploring options for assisting in the establishment of transition-focused CRP services through competitive state bidding. (Page 220) Title IV

USOR expanded services to Students and Youth with Disabilities through development of fee-for service options for Pre-Employment Transition Services and contracts, increasing VR Counselor connections with schools, and leveraging partnerships with other agencies. By leveraging existing staff resources and increasing coordination with partner agencies, VR successfully expanded outreach services and connected more students and youth to VR services. Training was provided to service provider and partner agencies resulting in new fee for service options and six contract Pre-ETS providers. USOR has expanded Supported Employment service delivery options by increasing the variety of placement methods available to meet individual client’s needs. The increase in models allows VR Counselors and client to select among a variety of models including Customized Employment, Pathways to Success Customized Employment, Individual Placement and Support, and traditional Supported Employment. These options add to the service options currently available from Community Rehabilitation Program providers.  (Page 222) Title IV

USOR continues to maintain high quality standards for vendors providing SE services. USOR requires vendors to receive training approved by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) in order to work 1-1 with clients. Vendors must also receive 10 CEUs per year in order to receive continuing education and remain current in best practices. In addition, vendors providing Customized Employment services must receive training in CE as well as participate in the Technical Assistance component to training. USOR and the Division of People with Disabilities have provided opportunities for Community Rehabilitation Programs to receive training in Customized Employment. USOR participates in fidelity reviews for the Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) model, which assesses partnerships with VR as well as quality services provided to clients. (Page 224) Title IV

In addition, USOR is a partner in the “School to Work” pilots which utilize a Customized Employment approach to assist students transitioning from secondary educational institutions to competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation. The “School to Work” pilots have expanded from 3 initial sites to 5 in 2017-2018 school year. USOR has liaisons assigned to every Local Education Agency so that counselors can connect students with services both internally and through information and referral to community resources. (Page 224) Title IV

USOR also partners with extended support agencies to train and set expectations for employment specialists in customized employment, discovery, and Individualized Placement Services (IPS). These services have been proven to meet the needs of persons with most significant disabilities (MSDs) who may need additional services and long-term supports in order to be successfully employed. (Page 226) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~• USOR has partnered with the Utah State Board of Education, DWS Workforce Development Division and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities to implement “School to Work” pilots in 5 different school districts in Utah. The “School to Work” pilot teams utilize the Customized Employment process to assist students with disabilities with competitive, integrated employment prior to graduation from high school or post high school. Teams work collaboratively to serve students and blend/braid funding so that students can access services needed to become employed and independent. (Page 31) Title I

Utah’s core partners are funding activities to implement the state strategies. The activities will be aligned across core programs. Core partners are committed to:

• Utilizing a braided funding model to leverage existing resources in providing services for common customers. These efforts will be ongoing including referrals and client interventions at any point of entry (DWS, Vocational Rehabilitation or Adult Education), refinement of career pathways to meet the needs through stronger engagement with employers, high demand industry and post-secondary and training institutions with a focus on high risk clients. Outcomes will be reported to the Operations Committee and SWDB annually. (Page 59) Title I

USOR launched a school-to-work project, through ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP),?designed to braid? funding, access partner agency supports, and provide a pathway for students with the most significant disabilities to competitive, integrated employment.? USOR is partnering with SAMHSA and Local Mental Health Authorities/DSAMH to provide and expand supported employment services for youth and adults with severe and persistent mental illness, specifically with the IPS model. (Page 204) Title IV

USOR expanded services to Students and Youth with Disabilities through development of fee-for service options for Pre-Employment Transition Services and contracts, increasing VR Counselor connections with schools, and leveraging partnerships with other agencies. By leveraging existing staff resources and increasing coordination with partner agencies, VR successfully expanded outreach services and connected more students and youth to VR services. Training was provided to service provider and partner agencies resulting in new fee for service options and six contract Pre-ETS providers. USOR has expanded Supported Employment service delivery options by increasing the variety of placement methods available to meet individual client’s needs. The increase in models allows VR Counselors and client to select among a variety of models including Customized Employment, Pathways to Success Customized Employment, Individual Placement and Support, and traditional Supported Employment. These options add to the service options currently available from Community Rehabilitation Program providers. (Page 222) Title IV

The VR Counselor is required to maintain communication with the Supported Employment (SE) team at least every three months. The SE team includes the VR counselor, customer, family members, extended services agency representative (i.e., support coordinator, mental-health worker, etc.), teacher (if a student), employment specialist or employer. The team will coordinate services by braiding funding to ensure the client has the support needed to be successful on the job. Once the client reaches an 80/20 level of support or 24 months (whichever comes first) and the team agrees, services and funding will be transferred to the identified extended services agency for long-term SE.

For youth and students with disabilities who qualify and need supported employment services, the transition to the extended services agency will occur when the client has graduated or aged out of the school system. The adult services agencies will continue to partner, braid funding and coordinate the transition of responsibility as appropriate. (Page 227) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Through the SWDC committee work, Utah will explore and identify ways to build stronger connections between core partner counselors and post-secondary career resource counselors/professions, including Disability Resource Centers (DRC), to ensure customers have access to all services the partners offer. (Page 68) Title I

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~USOR maintains cooperative agreements with the local school districts and public charter schools who serve secondary education students. The cooperative agreements include provisions for consultation, technical assistance, professional development, VR referrals and eligibility, and individualized goals of the local teams. USOR has assigned Transition Counselors to each local school district and charter school. The counselors meet with special educators and administrators, provide outreach to students and parents, provide VR Welcome Sessions to students, provide Job Readiness Workshops to students, attend IEP meetings, as well as cover all referrals and questions from that school.  (Page 175) Title IV

USOR and USBE agree to collaborate on financial responsibility of services, within the guidelines of the Rehabilitation Act and IDEA. Both agencies will respect the resources set forth by policies and procedures that guide each agency’s services. When a student with a disability is both in school and has an IPE with VR, the cost of services necessary for both education and for the student to become employed, will be negotiated between the LEA representative and the VR Counselor, pending any necessary approval through LEA administration and USOR chain of command. At any time during the transition process, comparable benefits or additional agency representatives will be included in the IEP/IPE transition team as an additional resource for financial responsibility. Agreements on shared cost of required services for the student/client, will be in writing in the IEP and IPE, to ensure collaboration and understanding of agency involvement. (Page 176) Title IV

Students and youth with disabilities are invited to participate in career preparation workshops and job fairs. The Business Relations Teams work with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors to provide school transition specialists and teachers with preparation packets. The material provides information on how to dress for success, interviewing, resume building, and appropriate behavior when meeting with business partners. Students can attend workshops on topics such as, “Working in Government Professions, State and Federal Hiring Initiatives,” “Employer Panel,” “How to Dress on a Dime and Interview Success,” and “Social Security and Working.” The job fairs provide students an opportunity to meet with hiring specialists to discuss employment opportunities. (Page 180) Title IV

USOR Transition Services provides a variety of services to assist transition aged youth in obtaining paid work experiences. Through the provision of Work Based Training, Summer Work Experiences, Supported Job Based Training/Supported Employment, and other Community Rehabilitation Program services, VR coordinates with employers on an individualized basis to meet both the client’s and employer’s needs. (Page 180) Title IV

Information was gathered through the Utah State Office of Education concerning the number of youth and students with disabilities in the State of Utah. There are approximately 74,000 students ages 3 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an Individualized Education Program (IEP). This number does not reflect the number of students who may have a disability that is classified under a 504 Plan, Individualized Health Plan, or unidentified disability such as mental health or substance abuse. For purposes of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, there are approximately 20,000 students with a disability ages 14 through 21 who are receiving services under IDEA through an IEP, also not reflecting students with disabilities who do not have an IEP. These numbers only reflect the approximate number of students with a disability who are the age of applying for and receiving services from VR while still under IDEA (ages 14 through 21). This does not reflect the number of students with disabilities who have dropped out, received diplomas, aged out of the school system, or are up to 24 years of age and no longer tied to the school system. The number of students and youth with disabilities across the State of Utah justifies a great need for transition services from Vocational Rehabilitation. (Pages 193-194) Title IV

Effective when all required approvals are in place and when management deems necessary, USOR will close all categories and place all eligible individuals not in plan on a waiting list. USOR will also place all subsequent applicants who are determined eligible for VR services on the waiting list. USOR will only provide services to eligible individuals who currently have an IPE and for whom services have been initiated. As resources become available individuals will be taken off of the waiting list in chronological order based on priority category and application date. Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (MSD) will be the first category served. (Page 202) Title IV

o Strategy 1.3 (B): Increase outreach and collaboration with schools, i.e., special education, school administration, school counselors and 504 coordinators
Activity B.1: Increase counselor collaborative partnerships in schools through liaison meetings, IEP meetings, agency fairs, job readiness workshops, etc.
Activity B.2: Amend and maintain USOR/USOE Interagency Agreements at both the state and local levels to be more descriptive and comprehensive about the expectations on both sides
Activity B.3: Identify and develop programs serving students with disabilities to provide pre-employment transition services
USOR has increased presence in Local Education Agencies and many district offices have increased the number of school liaisons out of need. Counselors attend IEP meetings, 504 meetings, agency fairs, and facilitate job readiness workshops in the schools. (Page 208) Title IV

USOR has a dedicated Transition Coordinator who has responsibilities such as improving the quality and consistency of transition services from USOR counselors to students and improving collaboration and coordination. USOR created policies and procedures for specific services for transition students with disabilities. Each district office maintains specific counselors as liaisons with local public and private schools, and specific Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) are kept with each school and school district. VR counselors service individual students by meeting with their IEP teams and in specific VR meetings with students and their parents. Also, VR is expanding provision of Job-Readiness Workshops to schools in their local areas. The Job-Readiness Workshops cover aspects of self-discovery, job-readiness, job-seeking and job-keeping skills. (Page 220) Title IV

Since 2016, USOR has engaged in the following innovation and expansion projects and activities: (1) Funding of the USOR Transition and Supported Employment Coordinator to increase the provision of VR services to youth with disabilities, specifically those with the most significant disabilities and expansion of transition and pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities (2) Development and Implementation of six (6) Pre-Employment Transition Services contracts to serve eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities (3) School to Work Customized Employment Project with the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD) and three local school districts to develop competitive, integrated, and meaningful employment for students with developmental disabilities, specifically students who are at-risk of entering into sheltered work settings at sub-minimum wages once exiting high school and (4) Collaboration with Source America to increase Customized Employment services in rural and underserved areas. (5) In addition, USOR provides annual funding support for operation of the Utah State Independent Living Council. (6) Administrative support and direct expenses for operation of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) were also provided by USOR. These funding arrangements are consistent with 34 CFR 361.35. (Page 225) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Utah’s strategies take into account its economic, workforce, workforce development, education and training activities and analysis provided in the section above. Utah’s Unified Plan includes strategies to achieve its vision and goals. The strategies are flexible to accommodate the state’s economic, workforce, and workforce development, education and training activities and analysis provided in Section (a). The plan includes specific strategies to address the needs of populations described in Section (a). The foundation of Utah’s plan is built upon utilizing data, partnerships, and its resources to implement strategies that support operations to provide services to individuals and employers. Utah is committed to changing and/or adjusting its strategies as needed to meet the state’s workforce needs. Utah’s SWDB will establish standing committees to ensure Utah’s goals and vision are met. These include Youth, Apprenticeships, Services to Individuals with Disabilities, Career Pathways, and Operations. (Page 46) Title I

As Utah has been implementing its Unified plan, it has continued to provide assistance to SWDB members and committees by providing a strong structure and basis for the SWDB to function within. In addition to Guiding Principles, Statutory Requirements, application processes, etc. the SWBD has the opportunity to:
Implement innovative strategies by focusing on employer engagement, strengthening core programs, dissemination of best practices, and promoting effective use of technology to enhance service delivery.
Establish and maintain standing committees. There are two required committees including the Youth Services Committee and the Services to Individuals with Disabilities. Utah has added a Career Pathways Committee, an Operations Committee, and an Apprenticeship Committee. (Page 53) Title I

Partners will coordinate activities and resources to provide comprehensive, high-quality, customer-centered services, including supportive services, to employers to meet their current and projected workforce needs. The activities will conform to the statutory requirements of each program.
The Operations Committee will coordinate with the Service to Individuals with Disabilities Committee, Career Pathways Committee and Apprenticeships Committee to create recommendations for aligning DWS, USOR, and Adult Education and other required partner services for employers. (Page 63) Title I

Career Pathways Committee• There are many career pathway activities being carried out around the state. The Career Pathway Committee will meet with partners from around the state gathering information and ideas on how these groups can align, share resources, and collaborate. They will make recommendations, that include the Six Key Elements of Career Pathways described in the Career Pathway Toolkit and requirements of WIOA section 101(d)(3)(B), (D) to the SWDB regarding how the SWDB can best support a collaborative state career pathway system. Utah’s sector strategies are aligned with GOED’s industry clusters. They are incorporated throughout Utah’s plan. Utah will refer to the definitions of “career pathway” in WIOA section 3(7) and “industry sector or occupation section 3(23) of WIOA. (Page 102) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Page 108-109) Title I

USOR has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing Vocational Rehabilitation services and OJT and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act. USOR determines whether for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit organizations. USOR has established fee-for-service agreements with private, non-profit entities providing vocational rehabilitation services throughout Utah in accordance with the Unified State Plan. USOR maintains vendor relationships with other agencies providing Job Preparation and Placement (JPP), Supported Job Based Training (SJBT) and Support Employment (SE) service that include a fee-for-service agreement and participation in job coach training activities. USOR continues to identify and make arrangements, where appropriate, to expand the availability of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) offering supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of the state plan. (Page 177) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Partners will coordinate activities and resources to provide comprehensive, high-quality, customer-centered services, including supportive services, to employers to meet their current and projected workforce needs. The activities will conform to the statutory requirements of each program. The Operations Committee will coordinate with the Service to Individuals with Disabilities Committee, Career Pathways Committee and Apprenticeships Committee to create recommendations for aligning DWS, USOR, and Adult Education and other required partner services for employers. (Page 63) Title I

USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. Examples include OJT, work-based trainings, apprenticeships, internships, temporary work experiences, Supported Employment (SE), Supported Job-Based Training (SJBT) and Customized Employment. This allows individuals and counselors to customize a unique set of services for each individual. USOR partners with other agencies, including employers, the DWS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD). USOR has formed an oversight committee for Community Resource Provider (CRP) services that meets quarterly to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBT, and approval of service providers. USOR also has an established process for CRP approvals and reviews to ensure quality services are provided to clients and employers. (Pages 108-109) Title I

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Employer/ Business

~~USOR has initiatives to partner with employers to identify competitive, integrated employment and career exploration opportunities that facilitate the provision of VR and Transition Services. These initiatives are primarily carried out through the USOR Business Relations and Choose to Work (CTW) Programs. The Business Relations Team was established in 2005 to strengthen the connection between employers and individuals with disabilities through a combination of outreach efforts, disability awareness training, consultation services, job fairs and workshops, business networking activities and job posting networks. The Business Relations Team:

Assists with the recruitment and referral of qualified individuals with disabilities to meet workforce demands. Through a partnership with DWS, a customized option to recruit qualified applicants with disabilities was created for job vacancies by using the key word: PWDNET. Employers are able to utilize this keyword on UWORKS allowing keyword searches by job seekers, advocates, and Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. Employers can also send emails to “pwdnetjobs@utah.gov” with a complete job description and the job opening. These job posting are shared statewide with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor and Employment Specialists.

Utilizes the Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP), https://tapability.org/, which is led by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and The National Employment Team (NET) in partnership with disABLEDperson, Inc. TAP includes both a national talent pool of VR clients looking for employment and a job posting system for employers looking to hire individuals with disabilities.

Conduct semi-annual Employer Workshops on Hiring and Retaining Individuals with Disabilities and Career Preparation and Job Fairs. The Workshop offers Business Partners an opportunity to learn more about disability, accommodations and other disability and employment issues. The Job Fair is a targeted fair for individuals with disabilities in which PWDNET (People With Disabilities Network) business partners participate. These events provide opportunities for business to connect with job-ready individuals with disabilities, and individuals with disabilities to explore careers. The job fairs and workshops also offer opportunities for internships and mentor experiences. (Page 178) Title IV

The Choose to Work (CTW) Program: USOR’s other primary initiative for working with employers to identify competitive integrated employment opportunities and career exploration for individuals with disabilities is CTW. This is a partnership between the USOR and WDD that is designed to ensure all individuals with disabilities have equal access to workforce investment activities available to assist them in preparing for and obtaining employment through coordinated service delivery.

The core services of the CTW program are job development and job placement. Job development includes interfacing with employers for the purpose of marketing a specific job seeker to the employer, or to inform and educate the employer regarding hiring individuals from a talented pool of job seekers with disabilities. Job placement is focused on service delivery to assist a specific individual in locating job openings, preparing for the application process, and following through with the application for employment.

CTW specialists coordinate with the Business Relations Team to organize and engage in employer workshops to increase awareness regarding the hiring and job retention of individuals with disabilities. The Specialists are active participants in local area Chambers of Commerce and sit on local and community boards in order to facilitate the provision of Vocational Rehabilitation services leading to an employment outcome. CTW Specialists are actively engaged with the DWS Workforce Development Specialists as well as USOR Business Relations Team and affiliates to identify integrated employment opportunities for job seekers with disabilities. (Page 179) Title IV

USOR utilizes the Business Relations and CTW Programs to coordinate with employers in support of transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities. Staff meet with employers to identify and/or develop internships, on-the-job trainings, mentoring experiences and temporary work experiences for students and youth with disabilities.
Students and youth with disabilities are invited to participate in career preparation workshops and job fairs. The Business Relations Teams work with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors to provide school transition specialists and teachers with preparation packets. The material provides information on how to dress for success, interviewing, resume building, and appropriate behavior when meeting with business partners. Students can attend workshops on topics such as, “Working in Government Professions, State and Federal Hiring Initiatives,” “Employer Panel,” “How to Dress on a Dime and Interview Success,” and “Social Security and Working.” The job fairs provide students an opportunity to meet with hiring specialists to discuss employment opportunities. (Page 180) Title IV

• Goal 3.3: Improve coordination between USOR and employers to benefit clients in obtaining competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities
o Strategy 3.3 (A): Expand outreach efforts to employers to ensure USOR better meets their needs while improving opportunities for VR clients
  Activity A.1: Utilize existing relationships with the Governor’s Committee for Employment of People with Disabilities, Choose to Work (CTW) and DWS to identify employer needs provide opportunities for VR Counselors to connect with community employers
  Activity A.2: Utilize VR Business Relations Team and CTW to provide training and information to employers on the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities
  Activity A.3: Provide staff training on opportunities for developing and coordinating On-the-Job Training, work-based training, internships and apprenticeships to better service client and employer needs. (Page 217) Title IV

Provide business services through the American Job Center network and support a local workforce development system that meets the needs of businesses in the local area. Applicable one-stop partners develop, offer, and deliver quality business services that assist businesses and industry sectors in overcoming the challenges of recruiting, retaining, and developing talent for the area economy. America Job Center staff must: Have a clear understanding of industry skill needs Identify appropriate strategies for assisting employers, and coordinate business services activities across partner programs as appropriate Incorporate an integrated and aligned business services strategy among partners to present a unified voice for American Job Centers in its communication with employers.

Make labor exchange activities and labor market information available to employers. Local areas must establish and develop relationships and networks with large and small employers and their intermediaries. Local areas must develop, convene, or implement industry or sector partnerships. (Pages 249-250) Title IV

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

511

~~USOR continues to update and renew it’s Interagency Agreement with the Utah State Board of Education to include descriptions of the expectations of USOR and USBE and to incorporate changes in the partnership as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), specifically in reference to pre-employment transition services and WIOA Section 511: Limitations of Use of Subminimum Wage. Once the Interagency Agreement is finalized, USOR and LEAs will begin to develop goals for their local level agreements. (Page 208) Title IV

Strategy 1.5 (A): Increase outreach to individuals currently employed but making subminimum wages, youth at risk of entering sheltered work or segregated day programs at the time of secondary school exit, individuals at risk of being segregated in any type of subminimum wage entity, individuals leaving sheltered work and day-program settings, individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, etc.

Activity A.1: Identify sheltered work and day programs across the State of Utah that provide services to persons with disabilities

Activity A.2: Provide outreach and information to individuals who are interested in pursuing competitive integrated employment

Activity A.3: Expand opportunities for customized employment and discovery services to expand competitive integrated employment for these individuals.

USOR has provided career counseling and information and referral services as outlined in WIOA Section 511 to individuals who are currently employed in subminimum wage settings. Approximately 1300 people were met with and provided career counseling and information referral throughout the year. Meetings were also held with the employers holding 14C certificates