Washington

States - Big Screen

In the Evergreen State of Washington, individuals with disabilities are thriving in the "Home of Bigfoot and Big Imaginations" through clever innovations in promoting Universal Design in the workplace for all workers.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington State’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.52%
Change from
2014 to 2015
7,170,351
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
483,334
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.49%
Change from
2014 to 2015
177,921
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-2.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
36.81%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.54%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.40%

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 6,971,406 7,061,530 7,170,351
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 482,279 488,620 483,334
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 175,620 184,137 177,921
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,881,865 2,959,067 3,022,973
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 36.41% 37.69% 36.81%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.72% 75.99% 76.40%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.00% 6.20% 5.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.50% 20.80% 19.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.10% 12.10% 11.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 455,951 452,486 459,384
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 438,558 454,931 449,434
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 738,042 749,436 745,794
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 35,277 31,381 31,690
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 62,724 64,739 71,971
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 15,801 15,522 16,929
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 43,953 45,545 41,361
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,617 4,692 5,376
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 42,022 42,003 42,733
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 16,797 18,838 24,935

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 5,546 5,832 6,537
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.10% 4.30% 4.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 177,421 179,192 179,674

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,710 7,229 13,815
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 16,449 19,201 31,120
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 66,061 68,072 93,235
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 8.60% 10.60% 14.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 12,765 9,476 7,168
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 111 118 114
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 79 80 78
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 71.00% 68.00% 68.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.15 1.15 1.09

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,778
4,634
4,832
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 39 36 38
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 401 419 489
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,184 1,069 1,033
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,663 1,713 1,780
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,412 1,339 1,436
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 79 58 56
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 26.60% 29.70% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 4,050 4,063
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 276,661 279,875
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 152 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 403 443 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $42,330,000 $45,072,000 $50,806,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $4,338,000 $4,384,000 $3,194,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $35,000 $33,000 $22,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $2,875,000 $3,824,000 $3,581,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 87.00% 86.00% 86.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 719 961 1,045
Number of people served in facility based work. 748 679 475
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 9 9 8
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 105.20 101.80 102.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 52.40% 52.57% 53.49%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.20% 13.22% 13.27%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.83% 0.81% 0.84%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.10% 92.11% 95.79%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 25.00% 23.74% 22.30%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 47.60% 52.11% 53.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 65.70% 65.13% 67.38%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 22.60% 28.37% 30.91%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,496,068
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,522
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 167,758
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,680,068
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,847,826
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 156
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,511
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,667
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,885,131
AbilityOne wages (services). $27,786,395

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 30 30 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 4 4 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 35 35 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,751 1,684 718
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 278 278 74
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,030 1,963 792

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

Collaborate with disability and employment partners to sponsor events that focus on disability recruitment, hiring and retention issues such as mentoring, disability awareness, reasonable accommodation, customized employment, transportation, independent living, benefits issues, etc. 

  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR collaborated with the Community Networks Program (a statewide consortium of local organizations) to fund over 50 local projects and events focusing on disability recruitment, hiring and retention, including events focusing on the employment of students and youth with disabilities.
  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR collaborated with the Community Networks Program (a statewide consortium of local organizations) to fund over 50 local projects and events focusing on disability recruitment, hiring and retention, including events focusing on the employment of students and youth with disabilities. 

Goal Three Priority 

Bring together employers, DSHS/DVR staff and other workforce partners on a regular basis at the local level to update trends in the job market and maintain a good understanding of employer needs, so that customers are given useful guidance and current information.

  • Evaluation: This activity occurred sporadically in some locales but was not implemented on a statewide basis due to staff turnover in the statewide DSHS/DVR Business Services Manager position. The position was responsible for facilitating this priority and became vacant during FFY 2015. It took time to recruit and hire a new incumbent; during this period it was not possible to fully implement this priority. 

Goal Three Priority 

Support the DSHS/DVR Business Services Team in developing ongoing employer relationships and providing job placement assistance to customers, including participation in the nationwide employer network sponsored by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation.

  • Evaluation: The statewide DSHS/DVR Business Services Manager position became vacant and was re-hired during FFY 2015. The new Business Services Manager is reinvigorating the team and providing extensive support to develop ongoing business relationships. 

Goal Three Priority 

Serve on local WorkSource Business Service Teams to market DSHS/DVR job seekers to employers. (Page 312)

Braiding/Blending Resources

In pursuit of the goal of more seamless and fully-integrated career, training and follow up services to UI claimants and other unemployed individuals, a number of WDCs in the state have voluntarily convened with the Employment Security Department and state Workforce Board to explore Integrated Service Delivery (ISD) models. All areas envision greater collaboration and coordination while local conditions may favor piloting a substantially integrated and simultaneous enrollment model in other areas encompassing all programs customers are eligible for such as Title 1, Title III, Trade Act and targeted population programs. One hallmark of ISD, as envisioned by the ISD consortium, is building upon functional teams. Function as the primary organizing principle—in contrast to focusing on separate programs and partner organizations—indicates major components of the one-stops such as business services; front-end activities like Resource Room, triage, and workshops; community outreach and marketing; Rapid Response; job training etc. ISD also promises to better leverage staff and administrative resources for leaner, more productive one-stop field operations. Functional teams will continually examine changing customer needs, fill gaps and enhance services, and address apparent and unnecessary duplication of services and processes. Another aspect of ISD in Washington State is extending co-enrollment or possibly simultaneous enrollment for current and future jobseekers accessing WorkSource Services. As envisioned in Washington State co/simultaneous enrollment into multiple programs is the braiding or directing of program resources to provide appropriate services when needed as efficiently as possible. ISD partners will continue working through the technical issues around ISD mainly for WIOA Title 1 Adult and Dislocated Worker programs, Wagner-Peyser, Trade Act, Jobs for Veterans State Grant, and WorkFirst (TANF Job Search).  (Page 196) 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Local and State Advisory Groups on Barrier Solutions 

WIOA allows local area boards to establish standing committees to work on issues specifically faced by individuals with disabilities, including Section 188 and ADA compliance. Washington’s workforce system has embraced a more expansive goal of improving access for populations with a wide variety of barriers to access, including economic barriers, geographic barriers, physical barriers, language and cultural barriers, low–level education and skills barriers, and behavioral health barriers. To build consensus on a coordinated and sustained effort to remove these access barriers, a standing Workforce Board committee on accessibility issues is being created.

The Workforce Board’s advisory committee on barrier solutions will be informed by local advisory committees that evaluate accessibility issues at the community level and will help local boards prioritize projects and track progress toward improved customer service for those populations. The state standing committee will additionally serve as a forum for sharing best practices and strategies to improve access and advocate for resources and policy development that will improve services for all populations with barriers. (Page 66)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. 

System–wide Commitment to Improving Accessibility for All Participants 

Fundamental to the Workforce Board’s vision for the workforce system is the concept of universal accessibility: Washington’s workforce system must be prepared and able to serve jobseekers from all kinds of backgrounds, who face a variety of barriers. Universal accessibility encompasses both physical accessibility of all facilities, as well as programmatic accessibility—taking into account customers’ particular access needs. Integration of service delivery and better coordination among workforce system partners will allow services and delivery approaches to be customized to particular access needs.

WIOA has provided new energy across Washington’s workforce system to address and remove barriers to access so that a greater number of Washingtonians will be able to connect with a career pathway and a living–wage job. Advances in personal computing and telecommunications technology have made the Internet and person–to–person connectivity a feature of many people’s daily lives. WIOA acknowledges these improvements by opening the door to “virtual” service delivery—bringing services each participant needs to their doorstep, or kitchen table.

Recognizing that barrier removal is a project that requires sustained effort over time, the Workforce Board started work on establishing its first standing advisory committee to lead a statewide effort on removing barriers to access throughout the system. The standing advisory committee, described below, is expected to work with local advisory committees on accessibility issues, starting an ongoing conversation between local workforce system practitioners and state–level policymakers. In this way, the committee will be able to systematically identify and address access barriers. (Page 161)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

In accordance with section 8(b) in the Wagner–Peyser Act, local comprehensive centers and affiliates have assigned disability specialists. The ES staff serving in this role receive training on serving individuals with disabilities and on accessible computer work stations. Also, they are often involved in local efforts to enhance employment and training access for individuals with disabilities. When there are special grants such as the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), core program staff will be equipped to direct referrals for assessment and program services.

In cooperation with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Department of Services for the Blind, ESD will support ongoing efforts to expand accessibility for blind individuals who, as a population, infrequently use one stops. One stops and the WorkSourceWA.com website will be ADA section 508/Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) compatible. Local one stops will accommodate blind, deaf and other individuals with disabilities. Such strategies as having a sign language interpreter scheduled to come in for accommodating those who are deaf will continue. Blind individuals can be served in any of the large variety of one stop workshops by staff offering to go over written handouts on an individual basis, or simply offering to email materials that could be made accessible by the individual’s own text–to–voice software.

Some centers have co–located vocational rehabilitation counselors with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation in the Department of Social and Health Services. Co–location of VR staff increases referrals from Wagner–Peyser and other co–located staff and vice versa. Coordination between core and other programs is better so that persons with disabilities can get more help to compete for and enjoy high quality employment through acquiring the necessary skills while receiving any necessary supports. Under WIOA Title IV, VR staff outreach to disabled youth graduating from the K–12 system will encourage more young people to pursue assistance from WorkSource to begin career pathways toward self–support through viable avenues. Many ES–staffed one stops have taken the initiative to invite high school teachers of students on IEPs to make field trips fostering a sense of comfort in approaching WorkSource.(Page 107)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment
  • Identify and encourage local pilot programs that use technology to facilitate and improve integrated service delivery for customers, including programs designed to improve access to the system. 

In addition, soon after the passage of WIOA, Governor Jay Inslee directed the Workforce Board to work with the system’s stakeholders to shape Washington’s strategic plan toward three goals to maximize the workforce system’s impact: 

  1. Help more people find and keep jobs that lead to economic self–sufficiency, with a focus on disadvantaged populations.
  2. Close skill gaps for employers, with a focus on in–demand industry sectors and occupations, including through apprenticeships.
  3. Work together as a single, seamless team to make this happen. 

These three goals will inform the larger system and guide any changes. Below are ways the system is evolving to better serve all populations through enhanced accessibility. 

Universal access across the workforce system (Page 62)

In conclusion, a truly accessible workforce system that makes full use of technology, will implement secure, wireless Internet access in public areas of all comprehensive One–Stop centers in Washington by 2020. The system will also include state–level advisory committees during the first two years of the plan, with annual progress reports on One–Stop center accessibility at the local level. Finally, the local pilot programs that use technology to facilitate and improve integrated service delivery for all customers will be identified and encouraged. (Page 67)

Washington is already known as a leader in business engagement. The state piloted Industry Skill Panels, which bring together employers, educators, and community leaders to address common skill gaps and training needs. Skill Panels, in turn, were instrumental in establishing Centers of Excellence, which serve as statewide resources to address the needs of a specific industry sector—from aerospace to allied health. Housed within the state’s community and technical college system, Centers of Excellence provide fast and flexible education and training programs that respond directly to the needs of industry. (Page 51)

Expanding wireless Internet connectivity at one–stop centers could pay off particularly for the blind and low–vision community. One local area in Washington is piloting a “paperless” one–stop experience facilitated by secure wireless access at its WorkSource center. All education and training information, including pamphlets and documents, are digitized in a standard format and stored online. WorkSource center staff members receive regular training on how to digitize materials. People who are blind or low–vision who visit a one–stop center can navigate to those digitally archived materials using their own accessibility devices. Digitally archived materials are also accessible to jobseekers with mobility, transportation, and/or childcare responsibilities that may prevent them from accessing a WorkSource center. Expanding wireless Internet connectivity at one–stop centers could pay off particularly for the blind and low–vision community. One local area in Washington is piloting a “paperless” one–stop experience facilitated by secure wireless access at its WorkSource center. All education and training information, including pamphlets and documents, are digitized in a standard format and stored online. WorkSource center staff members receive regular training on how to digitize materials. People who are blind or low–vision who visit a one–stop center can navigate to those digitally archived materials using their own accessibility devices. Digitally archived materials are also accessible to jobseekers with mobility, transportation, and/or childcare responsibilities that may prevent them from accessing a WorkSource center. (Page 64)

Virtual Service Delivery 

With WIOA, education and training services are no longer required to be administered in person. The availability of online, real–time, hybrid (blended online and face to face), and open source course materials warrants close system collaboration. Beyond simply providing access, the system must help customers gain the skills to effectively use these new technological tools. Some tools have become increasingly common in just a few short years. Video conferencing technology, for example, is widely available and less expensive than in years past. Reducing or eliminating the need for customers to travel and physically access a one–stop center will remove accessibility barriers for many Washingtonians. Services offered virtually via computer, tablet, or smartphone empower people with mobility challenges, or anyone preferring to access information remotely. These tools allow them to begin progressing down a career pathway on their terms and at a time and location more convenient to them. Virtual service delivery helps customers with childcare or transportation barriers make progress toward a better future. A parent can hop online when the kids are asleep and gain access to services, or a family who lacks a car can avoid making several bus transfers to reach a one–stop center––if the center is reachable by bus at all. Many rural Washingtonians live hours away from the nearest comprehensive one–stop center. Accessing these services at home just makes sense. Even rural customers without reliable Internet connections still benefit from virtual service delivery—library systems statewide have expressed interest in partnering with the workforce system to create “remote connection sites” strategically located around Washington. (Page 65)

In many aspects ES operations is well–positioned to expand its partnership with the Department of Labor and Industries injured worker Return–to–Work efforts. A pilot project at WorkSource Everett, one of the state’s busiest one–stops, has been very successful in helping injured and recovered workers find suitable employment.

Washington State Department of Social and Health Services received a 3–year $22 million federal grant from the Department of Agriculture to help elevate Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to self–reliance. Resources to Initiate Successful Employment (RISE) will involve many community–based organizations and colleges who will serve SNAP recipients who are homeless, veterans, those with limited English proficiency, the long–term unemployed and non–custodial parents with access to skill building and job search assistance.

Funded providers use key elements of I-BEST programs, e.g. contextualization, team teaching, enhanced students services, and articulated college and career pathways, to increase the speed at which students master basic and ELA skills at federal levels 1, 2 and 3. On Ramp options include, but are not limited to: programs focused on career clusters; partnership efforts between colleges and community-based organizations and local workforce development councils (WIBs); I-BEST at Work projects that partner providers, employers and WIBs; Project I-DEA (Integrated Digital English Acceleration), a three-year pilot program with support from the Gates Foundation that will transform ELA instruction using a flipped classroom model and 50% online instruction. (Page 222)

In 1-3 quarters, On Ramp students acquire the skills needed to transition to basic skills education classes at federal levels 4-6 and/or Professional/Technical or Academic I-BEST pathways. (Page 222)

Students in correctional education programs have access to the same quality programs as offered on our community college campuses. In 2011–12, the Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I–BEST) model was piloted in the Specialty Baking program at Clallam Bay Corrections Center. Currently four I–BEST programs are up and running in correctional facilities. In addition to I–BEST, Washington’s correction education programs offer the same programming as traditional Basic Education for Adults and workforce training programs in the community and technical college system. Washington state currently has two two–year degree programs operating on private funds at two institutions. Programming in correctional facilities include: Adult Basic Education; Vocational programming; English Language Acquisition; High school diploma and equivalency; Limited AA degree programs; Offender Change programs; and Re–entry services. (Page 226)

Beginning July 1, 2017, WIOA Section 243 funds will only be allocated to providers with a clear description of how funding and civics instruction will be used in combination with Integrated Education and Training as defined in WIOA Section 203(11):

“ ‘Integrated Education and Training’.—The term integrated education and training means a service approach that provides adult education and training concurrently and contextually with workforce preparation activities and workforce training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster for the purpose of educational and career advancement.” 

IEL Civics Programs that meet the requirements of Section 243 funds have been established, piloted, and implemented across the system. Full implementation of integrated employment and training activities include: state-approved I–BEST programs that co-enroll ELA students in college-level, career technical certificate and degree programs in high demand career fields; I–BEST at Work programming which enroll ELA incumbent workers in career specific coursework to upskill students in basic, employability, civic, and workplace skills in order for them to advance in their place of employment. In the I-BEST at Work model, the teaching team is made up of a basic skills instructor and a trainer from the worksite and classes are held at the place of employment; on-ramps to I-BEST programs where all instruction is contextualized and delivered concurrently with training in a specific occupation or occupational cluster like allied health; and staffing to provide navigational support specifically to IEL Civics students enrolled in IEL Civics eligible programs described above. These integrated education and training models of instruction are required in order to be awarded IEL Civics funding. Training and/or technical support are made available to all providers on an on-going basis for each of these integrated instructional models. (Page 228)

Assistance in the use of technology, including for staff training, to eligible providers, especially the use of technology to improve system efficiencies

  • To enhance system efficiencies, Washington conducts trainings through the Blackboard Collaborate system and also offers training to assist staff in the use of Collaborate.
  • SBCTC also offers training in the online management system, CANVAS for faculty and staff wanting to enhance instruction with technology in the classroom.
  • A major focus in the next two years is on increasing instruction in problem solving in technology rich environments. Initiatives currently under way that support this work include:
    • Project I-DEA (Integrated Digital English Acceleration),
    • a three-year pilot program with support from the Gates Foundation that will transform ELA instruction using a flipped classroom model and 50% online instruction 
  • System-wide training on implementing the flipped classroom model significantly increasing access to online learning opportunities. (Page 232)
  • Assistance in the use of technology, including for staff training, to eligible providers, especially the use of technology to improve system efficiencies
  • To enhance system efficiencies, Washington conducts trainings through the Blackboard Collaborate system and also offers training to assist staff in the use of Collaborate.
  • SBCTC also offers training in the online management system, CANVAS for faculty and staff wanting to enhance instruction with technology in the classroom.
  • A major focus in the next two years is on increasing instruction in problem solving in technology rich environments. Initiatives currently under way that support this work include:
    • Project I-DEA (Integrated Digital English Acceleration),
    • a three-year pilot program with support from the Gates Foundation that will transform ELA instruction using a flipped classroom model and 50% online instruction
  • System-wide training on implementing the flipped classroom model significantly increasing access to online learning opportunities. (Page 234)
  • DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR-CD contracts with each county.
  • DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH have signed a memorandum of collaboration that establishes methods for Medicaid outpatient behavioral health services to be provided as extended services for joint DSHS/DVR supported employment customers.
  • DBHR-MH has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model.
  • DSHS/DVR is participating with DBHR-MH in conducting a pilot project at two locations that is designed to integrate the Individual Placement Support (IPS) model of supported employment with DSHS/DVR supported employment services.
  • DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 250)
  • Establish interagency transition councils in each Educational Service District that include local DSHS/DVR and educational staff and community partners.
  • Develop pilot transition projects in each Educational Service District.
  • Develop and provide individual online education portfolios that provide updated educational and employment progress for students.
  • Provide training and technical assistance to DSHS/DVR staff, teachers, and community partners.
  • Provide gap analysis and outcome data regarding coordinated services between DSHS/DVR and local education agencies.
  • Partner with education and community partners to present a yearly statewide transition conference, beginning in 2017, that is focused on services to all students with disabilities. (Page 256)

DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR-CD contracts with each county. 

  • DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH have signed a memorandum of collaboration that establishes methods for Medicaid outpatient behavioral health services to be provided as extended services for joint DSHS/DVR supported employment customers.
  • DBHR-MH has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model.
  • DSHS/DVR is participating with DBHR-MH in conducting a pilot project at two locations that is designed to integrate the Individual Placement Support (IPS) model of supported employment with DSHS/DVR supported employment services.
  • DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 267)
Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement
  • Occupational skills training with priority for those that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials aligned with in–demand sectors or occupations
  • Education offered concurrently with or in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or cluster
  • Leadership development opportunities, including community service and peer–centered activities that promote responsibility and positive social and civic behaviors
  • Supportive services
  • Adult mentoring for the period of participation and for not less than 12 months following participation
  • Follow–up services for not less than 12 months (includes all allowable youth services and activities)
  • Comprehensive guidance and counseling, which may include drug and alcohol abuse and referral
  • Financial literacy education
  • Entrepreneurial skills training (Page 75)
Benefits

2. Increase Business Engagement with a Clearly Defined Workforce Value Stream: Only 8 percent of Washington businesses utilize the public workforce system. This stark fact underscores the limited interaction between businesses and workforce development service providers at all levels. Businesses need simple paths to the workforce system and a better understanding of the benefits, whether it’s filling open positions with qualified applicants from WorkSource, shaping training programs to ensure workers have industry–specific skills, or partnering with higher education. In addition, once businesses and industries are engaged—be it through sector strategies or recruitment services—the workforce system must build and sustain these partnership (Page 38)

The Social Security and entitlements (Federal, State and Veterans) can be very complex and difficult to understand and navigate. Many individuals decide not to work or work fewer hours based upon the misperceptions that they will lose their benefits (medical and financial) if they go to work. As such we are in the process of developing partnership efforts with the Washington State Benefits Planner Networks, The Maximus Ticket to Work WIPA program, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and others in an effort to provide individuals with access to these resources. This is in addition to the Affordable Care Act and the Healthcare for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) or Medicaid Buy In program. (Page103)

Blind, low vision and deaf blind users of the workforce system have typically been left unserved in the good work of the state’s sector industry strategies. In addressing the business needs for identifying and developing targeted training to fill workforce gap needs in the key sector industries, Washington State’s workforce system has a stellar reputation, but those with visual disability have not typically benefited from the programs, apprenticeships and opportunities. (Page 128)

The goal is to develop more formal agreements between the State and National Grantees in order to expand upon the strengths, capabilities and resources of the individual grantees. These formal partnerships and working agreements will be of benefit not just to the SCSEP provider organizations, but also for the benefit of the spectrum of Workforce employment and education programs.

The State Program Manager has approached DOL about implementing changes to the Grantee contracting to process in order to achieve greater collaboration and cohesion for the SCSEP program within the State of Washington. Beyond the DOL contracting process the state manager is exploring the development of MOUs between the State and the National grantees in order to create cohesion of the program; develop formal agreements with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation; potentially data sharing agreements with State entities; accessing the DSHS and or WDC Ticket to Work EN network for reimbursement for the services provided by the grantees (with the exception of Goodwill Industries which already is a EN). (Page 132)

The Workforce Board coordinates 16 workforce programs (Title I, Title II, Title III, and Title IV WIOA Programs; Postsecondary Professional Technical Education, Worker Retraining Program, Job Skills Program, Customized Training Program, Secondary Career and Technical Education Programs, Training Benefits Program, Apprenticeships, Perkins Act programs, and the Private Vocational Schools Act), administered by seven agencies. We measure the performance of programs accounting for about 95 percent of federal and state dollars spent on our workforce system––or roughly $780 million per year. (Page 138)

Additional Programs under the State’s Workforce Development Plan: Secondary and Postsecondary Career and Technical Education, Job Skills Program, Customized Training Program, Worker Retraining Program, Training Benefits Program, Apprenticeship, Private Vocational Schools (Page 169)

Washington’s local boards routinely activate the rapid response teams when a TAA petition is filed. That approach is directed by state WIOA Title I Policy 5603 https://esd.wa.gov/WIOA/WIOA-Title-I-Policy-5603 (Rapid Response for WIOA and TAA). Washington’s State Employment Security Department (the State Workforce Agency) also engages local boards after TAA petitions are filed to determine if “gap” funding in the form of Rapid Response Additional Assistance is needed to serve dislocated workers attached to events for which TAA petitions have been filed between the time those event occur and such time as the events are certified by the U.S. Department of Labor. This approach is enshrined in WIOA Title I Policy 5604 https://esd.wa.gov/WIOA/WIOA-Title-I-Policy-5604 (Rapid Response Additional Assistance).

Washington has a comprehensive policy and procedures for determining training provider eligibility as articulated in state WIOA Title I Policy 5611, Revision 1 https://esd.wa.gov/WIOA/WIOA-Title-I-Policy-5611-Revision-1 (Governor’s Procedures for Determining Training Program Eligibility). The state’s Eligible Training Provider List is managed by the State Workforce Development Board and is widely employed by the state and federally-funded training programs in Washington as a consumer report tool. In addition to WIOA Title I, other programs that have policies requiring the use of the state’s Eligible Training Provider List to identify qualified training providers includes the state’s Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program, Unemployment Insurance-related Training Benefits program, and Worker Retraining, Job Skills, and Customized Training programs under the public community and technical college system.( Page 181)

In PY14 Washington State Employment Security Department took a major step in reorganizing divisions and responsibilities as the state’s administrative entity for WIA programs. Formerly siloed WIA policy functions were reassigned and placed in the UI Division to form the new Employment System Policy and Integrity Operations directorate including Employment Systems Administration and Policy). This bold change is providing new mutual learning and leadership opportunities across both the UI division and the Workforce Career Development Division (WCDD) operating Wagner-Peyser, UI Reemployment and RESEA, TAA and WorkFirst (TANF Job Search) at the state level. Embedding WIOA policy administration within the UI division well-positions the State for a more coordinated policy nexus around Wagner-Peyser, WIOA Title 1-B, inclusive of UI benefits and reemployment functions. (Page 193)

This research-based program was named a Bright Idea by Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government in 2011 and has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as the most significant innovation in the last 20 years. According to a December, 2012 report by the Community College Research Center, I-BEST programs provide benefits that justify additional costs.

Research conducted separately by the Community College Research Center and the Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board found that I-BEST students outperform similar students enrolled in traditional basic skills programs. I-BEST students are: 3 times more likely to earn college credits; 9 times more likely to earn a workforce credential; Employed at double the hours per week (35 hours versus 15 hours); Earning an average of $2,310 more per year than similar adults who did not receive basic skills training; and more than 3,000 Washington students are enrolled in I-BEST programs annually. (Page 221)

The WSRC recommends that DVR address the need for additional resources for benefits planning and assistive technology services required in WIOA. Within WIOA, benefits planning and assistive technology services are emphasized. The agency needs to create a plan to address these required services. (Page 244)

DSHS/DVR and WDVA have procedures for referring DSHS/DVR customers with military service to WDVA to determine eligibility for any state or federal Veterans’ benefits. This collaboration has increased the use of Veterans’ benefits as comparable services for DSHS/DVR customers who are veterans with disabilities. ( Page 249)

The Health Care Authority (HCA) administers Medicaid services to all DSHS/DVR customer recipients. DSHS/DVR and HCA closely coordinate to assure that individuals receive medical and behavioral health services necessary to achieve their employment goals. In addition, DSHS/DVR is working to develop a cooperative agreement with HCA, DBHR, and DDA that describes how Title 19 services under the State Medicaid Plan, including community-based waiver programs, will be utilized to develop and support integrated, community-based employment opportunities for customers.

HCA also administers Health Care for Workers with Disabilities (HWD), a Medicaid buy-in program. DSHS/DVR coordinates with HWD to assist qualified individuals in continuing to receive medical benefits after they become employed. (Page 251)

CLOSED REHABILITATED SURVEY RESPONSES 

A majority of closed rehabilitated respondents answered with strong agreement or agreement to all satisfaction survey responses.

Over 90.0% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with:

  • DVR treated me with courtesy and respect. (93.94%)
  • Overall, DVR helped me. (91.50%)
  • I was given enough information to understand how DVR could help me with employment. (91.09%)
  • I chose where to get services in my DVR plan. (90.91%)
  • DVR answered my questions. (90.63%)
  • DVR explained what services were available to help me. (90.35%)
  • DVR listened to me. (90.20%) 

80.0% - 90.0% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with: 

  • DVR does good work. (89.76%)
  • I chose my own job goal. (88.26%)
  • I like the work I do. (88.07%)
  • I use my skills and abilities that are most important to me in my job. (86.0%)
  • DVR understood my problems the problems I faced in getting and keeping a job. (84.11%)
  • Overall, I am satisfied with my job. (83.77%)
  • I received services in my DVR employment plan quickly enough. (81.77%)
  • DVR returned my phone calls quickly. (80.50%)

50.0% - 80.0% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with: 

  • DVR gave me information about other programs that could help me. (74.45%)
  • If I had complaints or concerns about services, I was satisfied with how DVR responded. (71.81%)
  • My pay is enough for my basic needs. (68.95%)
  • I am satisfied with my benefits (medical, dental, etc.). (59.87%) ( Page 279)

Goal one reflects DSHS/DVR’s focus on providing high-quality services that result in high-quality employment outcomes. Based on 2014 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) findings and stakeholder input, these priorities emphasize the importance of supporting customers in high-quality employment which offers the pay and benefits that support financial independence. ( Page 291)

Provide Pre-employment Transition Services designed to facilitate job exploration and other services such as counseling and self-advocacy training in the early stages of the school to work transition. 

  • Broaden the population of individuals with disabilities served by DSHS/DVR through outreach which increases the representation of underserved or unserved populations, specifically emphasizing outreach to Washington’s Hispanic and Latino communities.
  • Target outreach, education, and marketing to individuals with disabilities who are currently employed to retain or advance, previous customers who may be unemployed and are seeking employment, students nearing completion of academic programs, individuals who have exhausted Unemployment Insurance benefits, and other underserved populations.
  • Utilize contracted translation and interpreter services, including American Sign Language services, to improve accessible and quality services to customers with limited English proficiency or who are Deaf or hard of hearing. (Page 297)
  • Increase use of Post–Employment Services to support customers in maintaining, regaining, or advancing in employment through better communicating these services and their benefits.
  • Provide training and technical assistance to businesses on best practices for recruiting and retaining employees with disabilities ( Page 302)

Outreach, education, and marketing efforts will be targeted to individuals with disabilities who are: already working to retain or progress in employment, previous DSHS/DVR customers who may have lost employment and want to become reemployed, college students nearing completion of their academic programs, individuals who have exhausted their Unemployment Insurance benefits, and other groups who are identified as underserved. 

  • Evaluation: Outreach plans were developed and implemented by local DSHS/DVR offices to reach these targeted populations. Overall, the success of these plans was mixed and continued emphasis is being placed on reaching these underserved populations. Efforts to coordinate outreach with the Employment Security Department and LWDBs proved to be more challenging than anticipated and will be a focus of improvement throughout development and implementation of this Combined State Plan. (Page 305)

Increase DSHS/DVR’s ability to assist customers to achieve higher wage jobs with health benefits. 

  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR conducted Lean A3 events to identify ways to encourage more customers to pursue higher wage jobs with benefits. This produced specific recommendations that have been incorporated in to DSHS/DVR Counselor practices (e.g. assisting customers to conduct more substantive labor market research before choosing an employment goal, encouraging customers to consider employment goals beyond the entry-level, and providing customers with better information about training opportunities that lead to higher wage jobs). (Page 306)

Provide more timely and thorough Benefits Planning to customers who receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) so they can make better informed choices about the types of jobs they seek and amount of hours they will work. 

  • Evaluation: All DSHS/DVR counselors have been trained to provide Benefits Planning to their customers who receive SSI. In addition, four DSHS/DVR Benefits Specialists provide Benefits Planning to customers who receive SSDI or both SSDI/SSI. Plans are underway to hire 12 Benefits Technicians who will provide additional Benefits Planning capacity statewide. (Page 306)

Improve and expand services to enhance earnings, employee benefits and career advancement for customers, including individuals served through supported employment. 

  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR conducted Lean A3 events to identify ways to encourage more customers to pursue higher wage jobs with benefits. This produced specific recommendations that have been incorporated in to DSHS/DVR counselor practices (e.g. assisting customers to conduct more substantive labor market research before choosing an employment goal, encouraging customers to consider employment goals beyond the entry-level, and providing customers with better information about training opportunities that lead to higher wage jobs). (Page 307-312) 

Statewide Assessment (j): The SRC commends DSB for conducting good demographic data analysis under this section. The SRC also suggests that DSB consider conducting analysis of individuals who are blind with co–occurring disabilities compared with the general population. This would emphasize the extent to which services that meet the needs of these specific populations are needed in order for these individuals to achieve employment outcomes and related benefits at the same rate as other VR participants and as the general population. ( Page 335)

Diligent efforts by DSB staff have facilitated long–term services through state benefits, natural supports, employers and self–pay. DSB continues to promote the use of Ticket to Work as a potential income source for developmental disability (DD), mental health (MH), and traumatic brain injury (TBI) service providers to provide long–term support services to our customers after exit from the VR program. The DSB continues to work with employers and other natural supports to identify funding for long–term support services. (Page 348)

  • DSB will facilitate a coordinated effort to engage Business Leadership Network (BLN) businesses with our collaborative efforts on behalf of the WIOA system, job seekers and transition youth to support mutual success and benefits.
  • DSB will develop appropriate internal business engagement strategies that will assist the agency in scaling to the statewide and local business engagement efforts. (Page 351)

The RSA r–911 data provides strong evidence that DSB places emphasis on careers that provide living wages and benefits, within a competitive and integrated context. The agency wants to maintain and build on this excellence in quality of services and outcomes.

Demographic data compiled from the agency and compared to general Washington state demographics through tools such as the American Community Survey highlights underserved communities for agency programs. (368)

For the year 2014, Social Security Administration estimates for Social Security disability recipients in Washington State show that approximately 16.3% of all residents with a disability receive SSI/SSDI benefits.

For FFY2015, 20.4% of all participants served through the agency’s VR program were recipients of Social Security benefits.

Of those individuals who exited with an employment outcome and had listed public assistance as their primary support at application, 75% instead were able to list earnings from their work as primary support at exit. We serve a higher proportion of individuals on SSI/SSDI, and fewer DSB participants require those benefits upon exiting the program.

What we know about DSB from the Comprehensive Needs Assessment data:

RSA and performance data: 

  • DSB customer base is predominantly made up of individuals who have either significant or most significant disabilities
  • Strengths of the agency can be seen in quality of employment outcomes – high percentage competitive and integrated; high average hourly and weekly wages; high number hours worked per week; high number of participants meeting Substantial Gainful Activity; diversity of career outcomes and individualized vocational goals; strong supports for higher education and adaptive technology within the vocational plan. (Page 371)

Under the Combined State Plan, the DSB expects the new relationship among core group and partner programs to genuinely address the development of pathways for access that allow blind, low vision and deaf blind individuals to also engage in the workforce activities that enhance and increase their opportunities towards the State’s strategy of High Skills/High Wages. This access to workforce activities is currently aspirational, as our agency blind participants have been largely denied access to the benefits of the greater workforce system since the 1998 WIA implementation. Future success of equal participation in these workforce activities will depend on the WIOA partners’ active awareness and belief that individuals who are blind are viable participants within the workforce, and that the DSB is a valuable collaborator among workforce partners. Access and navigation issues must be addressed with highest priority among all partner programs. (Page 383)

The DSB will consistently offer information as to the benefits of making access an organizational essential priority, and provide supports to get partner organizations and businesses on the path towards accessibility. (Page 338)

Washington State currently estimates 104,809 ABAWDs statewide, with 22,231 in non-exempt areas. After applying the maximum number of 15% exemptions (278 clients receiving the exemption for 12 months), 21,953 are considered at-risk for losing SNAP benefits due to having no personal or geographical exemptions. The ABAWDs in the two ABAWD Counties without the waiver are typically among the lowest income individuals, who also face some of the highest barriers such as homelessness and undiagnosed mental/physical health conditions. DSHS will attempt to assist at-risk ABAWDs by providing all available resources directly to clients, as well as providing education to other community agencies that ABAWDs may access. (Page 448)

C.F.R. §273.7(f), will not apply for noncompliance. The amount of hours to be worked will be negotiated between the household and the operating agency, though not to exceed the limits provided under 7 C.F.R. §273.7(m)(5)(ii). In addition, all protections provided under 7 C.F.R. §273.7(m)(6)(i) shall continue to apply. Those State agencies and political subdivisions choosing to operate such a program shall indicate in their workfare plan how their staffing will adapt to anticipated and unanticipated levels of participation for each Federal fiscal year covered by the Combined Plan under WIOA. FNS will not approve plans which do not show that the benefits of the workfare program, in terms of hours worked by participants and reduced SNAP allotments due to successful job attainment, are expected to exceed the costs of such a program. In addition, if FNS finds that an approved voluntary program does not meet this criterion, FNS reserves the right to withdraw approval.* * 7 CFR § 273.7(m)(8) WA State will not be using this option. (Page 454)

(E) COMPARABLE WORKFARE 

The State agency or political subdivision must provide a description of its program, including a methodology for ensuring compliance with 7 C.F.R §273.7(m)(9)(ii) for each Federal fiscal year covered by the Combined Plan under WIOA.* *7 CFR § 273.7(m)(9)

Washington State’s Workfare program is under development but will follow the Comparable Workfare format in that ABAWDs who are at risk of losing their SNAP benefits will be allowed to count volunteer workfare hours to regain or retain eligibility.

DSHS provides a Workfare component in FFY 2017. DSHS has contact with at least 50 non-profit agencies to provide voluntary positions that comply with Workfare provisions. The State will consider the minimum Workfare requirement for ABAWDs choosing the Workfare option to be the SNAP monthly benefit amount divided by The Washington State Minimum wage of $9.47 per hour. Workfare will comply with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) minimum wage laws. (Page 455)

(A) HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG 

To improve veterans services, LVERs and DVOPs will support improvements in their AJCs and communities where: 

  • LVERs work with all AJC staff to identify and increase skill development opportunities designed to generate pathways to long-term high-wage employment for veterans who can qualify for support such as unemployment benefits while in training, the GI Bill, etc.;
  • DVOPs articulate training programs to Veterans with SBEs, for alignment with military experience in order to expedite advanced placement whenever possible;
  • LVERs build bridges to apprenticeship providers and advocate for placement based upon the merits veterans bring from their prior training and experience; and (Page 459)
  • Planning and participating in job and career fairs. The LVERs routinely host or partner in employment events focused on the hiring of veterans. These include specialized hiring events, such as a June 2014 one for Federal contractors that was attended by more than 70 employers with current job openings. At hiring events, the LVERs collect contact data and conduct outreach to promote One-Stop services and DVOP referral, where appropriate.
  • Conducting employer outreach. LVERs reach out to local employers to promote the hiring of veterans, explaining the practical advantages to hiring veterans, as well as the benefits, such as Work Opportunity Tax Credit and potential for funded OJTs.
  • Partnering with employers to conduct job searches and workshops. Washington State’s LVERs conduct job search workshops and establish job search groups/job clubs in conjunction with the needs of local employers. This has proven beneficial to both providing employers a better appreciation for the challenges faced by veterans in transitioning to civilian employment. This practice will be implemented statewide in this program period. (Page 460)
  • Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans. LVERs reach out to Federal contractors using Labor Exchange job listings, Federal contractor listings, VetCentral listings, company web-sites, and other places where employers may post job announcements. ESD has engaged with OFCCP to provide valuable information on Federal contractor participation in the state employment system. Additionally, LVERs work directly with contractors to advise them on the benefits and process for locating and hiring veterans into their workforces. Recently, the state program coordinator spoke at an event hosted by OFCCP to educate Federal contractors on utilizing the One-Stop system for veteran recruitment. We will continue this focus, with the future LVER position being hired to Central Office.
  • Working with other One-Stop staff to assist in development of the service delivery strategies for veterans and educating partner staff with employment initiatives and programs for veterans. Statewide, LVERs are providing training to AJC staff on serving veterans, which will be critical in promoting the new culture, where an anticipated 70% of veterans are being served by non-JVSG staff. The LVERs are using and promoting completion of the recently released online NVTI course for front line staff serving veterans. (Page 470)

One good example of successful partnering takes place in King County, the state’s most populated area. DVOPs collaborate with the King County Veterans Program, which is funded by a Veterans and Human Services Levy through 2017. This partnership, which includes a plethora of community and veterans services organizations, provides low-income, homeless, disabled and at-risk veterans with emergency financial assistance, housing, employment guidance, benefits counseling and health referrals. (Page 467)

The Social Security and entitlements (Federal, State and Veterans) can be very complex and difficult to understand and navigate. Many individuals decide not to work or work fewer hours based upon the misperceptions that they will lose their benefits (medical and financial) if they go to work. As such we are in the process of developing partnership efforts with the Washington State Benefits Planner Networks, The Maximus Ticket to Work WIPA program, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and others in an effort to provide individuals with access to these resources. This is in addition to the Affordable Care Act and the Healthcare for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) or Medicaid Buy In program. (Page 512)

At this point in time it is uncertain how many individuals may be enrolled /co–enrolled with DVR services. One of DVR’s goals on its newly developed State Plan is to increase access to services for those individuals with disabilities (on SSDI) who have a work history but became unemployed and exhausted their unemployment benefits. Based upon the Washington State ESD data approximately 5,000 individuals are identified in this category in the state of Washington. We will strive to work with DVR leadership and local staff to support these individuals engaging with DVR. Additionally this could be an additional source of revenue for the SCSEP programs if they were to become Community Rehabilitation Programs able to contract to provide these services. (Page 514)

School to Work Transition
  • Facilitate the development of programs for school–to–work transition that combine classroom education and on–the–job training, including entrepreneurial education and training, in industries and occupations without a significant number of apprenticeship programs;
  • Include in the planning requirements for local workforce investment boards a requirement that the local workforce investment boards specify how entrepreneurial training is to be offered through the one–stop system required under the workforce investment act, P.L. 105–220, or its successor;
  • Encourage and assess progress for the equitable representation of racial and ethnic minorities, women, and people with disabilities among the students, teachers, and administrators of the state training system. Equitable, for this purpose, shall mean substantially proportional to their percentage of the state population in the geographic area served. This function of the board shall in no way lessen more stringent state or federal requirements for representation of racial and ethnic minorities, women, and people with disabilities; (Page142)
  • Increase outreach to students in traditionally unserved and underserved populations that include tribal youth, justice-involved youth, homeless youth, and students and youth receiving foster care. Outreach activities include media, opportunities for participation in group-based PETS activities, individual outreach at schools, DSHS/DVR relationship building and coordination with education officials, presentations and career fairs for students, youth, families, schools, and community partners.
  • Solicit proposals for Project Search development, and became a funding partner with current Project Search programs in Washington State that serve students with disabilities.
  • Strengthen DSHS/DVR participation in current School-to-Work programs statewide by providing increased training and technical assistance for School-to-Work partners, including earlier DVR input into assessment and employment planning for students.
  • Contract with Centers for Independent Living to enhance and expand core independent living services, focusing on youth with significant disabilities. In addition to core services, Centers for Independent Living have been focusing on outreach to increase services in unserved or underserved geographic areas. Additional outreach efforts include targeted disability groups, minority groups, and urban or rural populations with the focus on youth with significant disabilities and 504 plans. The goal is to create a safe environment in which youth feel comfortable and confident when talking to allies. This goal will be accomplished by enhancing youth understanding of the Independent Living philosophy, successful self-advocacy, and how engage with legislators about disability issues.  (Page 257)

Provide Pre-employment Transition Services designed to facilitate job exploration and other services such as counseling and self-advocacy training in the early stages of the school to work transition. 

  • Broaden the population of individuals with disabilities served by DSHS/DVR through outreach which increases the representation of underserved or unserved populations, specifically emphasizing outreach to Washington’s Hispanic and Latino communities.
  • Target outreach, education, and marketing to individuals with disabilities who are currently employed to retain or advance, previous customers who may be unemployed and are seeking employment, students nearing completion of academic programs, individuals who have exhausted Unemployment Insurance benefits, and other underserved populations.
  • Utilize contracted translation and interpreter services, including American Sign Language services, to improve accessible and quality services to customers with limited English proficiency or who are Deaf or hard of hearing. (Page 297)
Data Collection

No specific disability related information found.

Small business/Entrepreneurship
  • Customized Training Program (State Board for Community and Technical Colleges): A training institution delivers dedicated customized employee training as requested by the business. The level of customization ranges from existing training curriculum delivered at the job site to fully customized training curriculum developed exclusively for the business.
  • Higher Education (Community and Technical Colleges, Four–year Colleges and Universities, Private Career Schools): Education and training, customized training, incumbent worker training, certification, apprenticeship related supplemental instruction (RSI), education and career counseling, small business resources.
  • Job Skills Program (State Board for Community and Technical Colleges): Prospective and current employees of a business receiving a Job Skills Program (JSP) grant are eligible for training. Eligible businesses and industries include private firms and institutions, groups, or associations concerned with commerce, trade, manufacturing, or service provisions. Public or nonprofit hospitals are also eligible.
  • Title I Youth, Adult and Dislocated Worker programs (Various state and local service providers): Workforce development workshops, assessment and career guidance, resources for worker training, on–the–job training, support services. (Page 28)

To a change in vision. Another aspect is the ability to fulfill business recruitment needs through connecting the business with the talents of job–ready and skilled agency participants, and to offer the ability to create individualized and low–risk opportunities for the business so that a participant might best showcase their ability and potential value to the workplace. The DSB will provide guidance on issues of disability in the workplace, including education around the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) Act; information on how to benefit from federal and local incentives for hiring of individuals with disabilities, and offer supports to the business for successfully meeting required mandates for hiring of individuals with disabilities. The DSB will offer workplace accommodation recommendations and supports, and education and guidance on making the workplace a disability–friendly and inclusive environment. The DSB will connect business to disability–related resources, training and/or education available in the community at large. The DSB will engage business in identifying supply chain needs, and will assist in establishing entrepreneurs and small businesses that might best fulfill that supply chain need. ( Page 84)

A DSB–offered array of services for business includes many components. One component is to increase awareness among business of the agency’s range of services, in order to provide an easy pathway for business to retain a talented employee whose work performance may be impacted due to a change in vision. Another aspect is the ability to fulfill business recruitment needs through connecting the business with the talents of job–ready and skilled agency participants, and to offer the ability to create individualized and low–risk opportunities for the business so that a participant might best showcase their ability and potential value to the workplace. The DSB will provide guidance on issues of disability in the workplace, including education around the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) Act; information on how to benefit from federal and local incentives for hiring of individuals with disabilities, and offer supports to the business for successfully meeting required mandates for hiring of individuals with disabilities. The DSB will offer workplace accommodation recommendations and supports, and education and guidance on making the workplace a disability–friendly and inclusive environment. The DSB will connect business to disability–related resources, training and/or education available in the community at large. The DSB will engage business in identifying supply chain needs, and will assist in establishing entrepreneurs and small businesses that might best fulfill that supply chain need. (Page 119)

The DSB and its Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act partners are the key players in Washington State economic strategy for workforce development, and the DSB encourages and supports science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) employment goals and vocational and academic training for all eligible participants who have aptitude and interest, and look to collaborate with the Washington School for the Blind and other partners to develop workshops and programs that will encourage interest in STEM activities at a young age.

The DSB will continue to identify eligible participants with aptitude for entrepreneurialism, and continue to support start–up opportunities of small business as an important means for blind, low vision and/or deaf blind individuals to join in on the key Washington State economic development strategy of encouraging small business. Blind business owners often become employers themselves, helping drive the state’s workforce engine. (Page 130)

The DSB will engage business in identifying supply chain needs, and will assist in establishing entrepreneurs and small businesses that might best fulfill that supply chain need.

Due to the small size of the DSB customer base and agency staffing in comparison to other workforce partner programs, the agency and its eligible participants will benefit from the broader infrastructure that state plan partners develop and nurture towards increased business engagement. The DSB alone cannot fully provide the amount of skilled talent business requires, and the DSB as a separate entity cannot efficiently engage business statewide.

The DSB will rely on active inclusion of its staff in the One–Stop Business Services Teams, and depend on the accessibility of workforce programs for agency participants, in order to meet the broader engagement of business in a manner that works best for business – through a seamless single point of contact. DSB counselors develop relationships with local business partners, and will guide those relationships (as applicable) into the greater workforce system in order to best fulfill the business needs. (Page 385)

Career Pathways

I–BEST Programs 

Professional Technical I–BEST co–enrolls students in adult basic education and college credit–bearing career pathways that lead to living wage jobs. I–BEST accelerates students down their career pathway, by contextualizing and team teaching the language, math, and other foundational skills needed to succeed in their professional–technical program. I–BEST students are nine times more likely to earn a workforce credential than students in traditional basic education programs.

Professional Technical Expansion I–BEST allows students to move further and faster down their career pathway by putting English and math courses in context, as needed for longer–term certificate and degree programs. This allows students to skip developmental education and earn their college or terminal–level English and math credits through contextualization and team teaching.

Academic I–BEST co–enrolls students in adult basic education and Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA) courses for students intending to earn a transfer degree. Through Academic I–BEST, adult education students can accelerate their progress down a transfer career pathway and reduce or eliminate time spent in developmental education. (Page 50)

Integrated Service Delivery Summary and Goals 

In conclusion, a truly integrated service delivery system holds promise for Washington’s workforce by helping people reach their goals no matter their barriers, their background, or where they entered the system. Doing this effectively calls for increasing the number of navigators in the state’s WorkSource system, eliminating redundant assessments, and helping more customers define career pathways that help them achieve portable skills, higher education levels, industry credentials, and satisfying, living–wage careers. 

Engaging Business for Better Results 

When Washington’s workforce system effectively engages with business, it’s a win–win situation for workers, and for employers. By working closely with firms to determine their talent challenges and by implementing effective solutions, the workforce system helps both businesses and workers prosper. (Page 51)

Job order listings and applicant referrals through WorkSourceWA.com, the Monster–based  job matching system to provide a deeper pool of talent for employers to recruit

  • Employer Needs Assessment
  • Unemployment Insurance Access
  • Access to Facilities
  • Translation Services
  • Developing and delivering innovative workforce investment services and strategies for area employers, e.g., career pathways, skills upgrading, skill standard development and certification for recognized postsecondary credential or other employer use, apprenticeship, and other effective initiatives for meeting the workforce investment needs of area employers and workers
  • Assistance in managing reductions in force in coordination with rapid response activities and with strategies for the aversion of layoffs, and the delivery of employment and training activities to address risk factors
  • Assisting employers with accessing local, state, and federal tax credits, including Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) certification
  • Local Veterans Employment Representatives outreach to businesses to veterans to employers interested in attracting qualified veterans
  • Recruiting and initial screening for participation in WIOA special projects to train for demand occupations, OJTs or customized training
  • Increasing rapid response and pursuing National Dislocated Worker Grant funding to serve dislocated workers (Page 79)

Some centers have co–located vocational rehabilitation counselors with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation in the Department of Social and Health Services. Co–location of VR staff increases referrals from Wagner–Peyser and other co–located staff and vice versa. Coordination between core and other programs is better so that persons with disabilities can get more help to compete for and enjoy high quality employment through acquiring the necessary skills while receiving any necessary supports. Under WIOA Title IV, VR staff outreach to disabled youth graduating from the K–12 system will encourage more young people to pursue assistance from WorkSource to begin career pathways toward self–support through viable avenues. Many ES–staffed one stops have taken the initiative to invite high school teachers of students on IEPs to make field trips fostering a sense of comfort in approaching WorkSource. (Page 107)

  • Developing and delivering innovative workforce investment services and strategies for area employers, e.g., career pathways, skills upgrading, skill standard development and certification for recognized postsecondary credentials or other employer use, apprenticeship, and other effective initiatives for meeting the workforce investment needs of area employers and workers
  • Assistance in managing reductions in force in coordination with rapid response activities and with strategies for the aversion of layoffs, and the delivery of employment and training activities to address risk factors. (Page 115)

DSHS TANF (WorkFirst) and SNAP Employment and Training (Basic Food Employment and Training–BFET) strategies support access to post–secondary credentials through contracting and partnering with the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges. This partnership includes all 34 community and technical colleges.

TANF: Through TANF (WorkFirst), participants have access to a continuum of educational opportunities to include Basic Education for Adults and Vocational education. Washington’s innovative post–secondary educational opportunities are structured around career pathways with stackable certificates allowing students to earn college credits leading to industry recognized certifications and degrees. DSHS supports participant access to these programs through referral, tuition payment, coordinated case management, supportive services, and childcare. In addition, the TANF/WorkFirst program actively supports and promotes the use of the Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I–BEST) program, allowing low skilled (literacy and numeracy) adults or those without a high school diploma or equivalent to enter a college–level, credit bearing, career pathways program and bolster basic skills through team–taught, integrated instruction contextualized to the vocational education career pathway. (Page 126)

  • Labor exchange services (job search and placement, info on in–demand industries and occupations, info on non–traditional employment for current and future jobseekers; recruitment and other business services for employers)

Streamlining customer intake means taking targeted information from a participant on day one to place them in a program, or mixture of programs, that will—at a minimum—meet their immediate needs. New participants, particularly individuals with barriers to employment, should experience connection and the feeling of momentum or forward movement beginning on the first day. Finding the right program fit can occur in subsequent visits, but the customer should not be bombarded with duplicative requests for information or skills assessments. Staff must be “Navigators” who help people design individual career pathways and then assist them in finding an economically self–sustaining route forward. Partners will need to work together differently, including at points of transition (hand–offs) between organizations, the points of co–servicing (participant receiving multiple services from multiple organizations at the same time), and in the way they manage funding and services braided across organizations. (Page 136)

6.   Whether the activities are built on a strong foundation of research and effective educational practice;

7.   Whether the activities effectively employ advances in technology, as appropriate, including the use of computers and blended learning resources;

8.   Whether the activities provide learning in real life, college and career contexts to ensure that an individual has the skills needed to compete in the workplace and exercise the rights and responsibilities of citizenship;

9.   Whether the activities are staffed by well-trained instructors, counselors, and administrators;

10.  Whether the activities coordinate with other available resources in the community, such as establishing strong links with elementary and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies;

11.  Whether the activities offer flexible schedules and support services (such as child care and transportation) as needed to enable all students, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;

12.  Whether the activities maintain a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report participant outcomes and to monitor program performance against the eligible agency performance measures; and

13. Whether the local communities have a demonstrated need for additional English literacy programs. In addition, to ensure that providers meet the WIOA requirements, proposals will be evaluated by teams from SBCTC on their ability to:

  • Implement and scale effective college and career pathways that accelerate student completion and foster economic growth
  • Guide and support transformational instructional practices that accelerate student completion to diplomas, high school equivalency, certificates, the Tipping Point, and AA/BA degrees leading to family wage jobs. Plans must include:
    • Implementing the CCR Standards in all programming;
    • Integrating employability skills training and instruction in all courses at all levels;
    • Beginning implementation of integrated employment and training activities such as I BEST into all EL Civics instruction to be fully implemented by July 1, 2016;
    • Expanding the teaching of speaking and listening into all levels of both ABE and ELA programming; and
    • Integrating problem solving in technology rich environments at all levels of instruction. (Page 150)

The department’s overall strategy for providing reemployment services to UI and other unemployed individuals encompasses a number of mandatory and optional program partnerships. Under WIA, partnerships evolved and are expected to expand even more with WIOA with an expectation of more seamless service delivery. More integrated service delivery should ideally result in developing an intake process that eliminates redundant assessments and streamlines the customer experience. ESD is leading with local Workforce Development Councils. Other entities with specialized programs serving parents on TANF, Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs), MSFWs, homeless, ex-offenders, veterans, dislocated workers, persons with disabilities, and the long-term unemployed when included should increase the number of participants who have defined career pathways and who gain portable skills. All will be better informed and served as Integrated Service Delivery advances. (Page 197)

Guide and support transformational instructional practices that accelerate student completion to diplomas, high school equivalency, certificates, the Tipping Point, and AA/BA degrees leading to family wage jobs;

Plans must include: Implementing the CCR Standards in all programming; Integrating employability skills training and instruction in all courses at all levels; Beginning implementation of integrated employment and training activities such as I-BEST into all IEL/Civics instruction to be fully implemented by July 1, 2016; Integrated reading strategies instruction at all levels in all courses; Expanding the teaching of speaking and listening into all levels of both ABE and ELA programming; and Integrating problem solving in technology-rich environments at all levels of instruction;

Support one-stop centers through in-kind services/funding; Support alignment of workforce investment, education, and economic development; Improve labor market relevance; Improve the structure of service delivery; Increase prosperity; employment, retention, earnings, and the attainment of recognized postsecondary credentials. (Page 213)

Funded providers use key elements of I-BEST programs, e.g. contextualization, team teaching, enhanced students services, and articulated college and career pathways, to increase the speed at which students master basic and ELA skills at federal levels 1, 2 and 3. On Ramp options include, but are not limited to: programs focused on career clusters; partnership efforts between colleges and community-based organizations and local workforce development councils (WIBs); I-BEST at Work projects that partner providers, employers and WIBs; Project I-DEA (Integrated Digital English Acceleration), a three-year pilot program with support from the Gates Foundation that will transform ELA instruction using a flipped classroom model and 50% online instruction.

In 1-3 quarters, On Ramp students acquire the skills needed to transition to basic skills education classes at federal levels 4-6 and/or Professional/Technical or Academic I-BEST pathways. (Page 222)

Washington state’s combined plan will address the activities that will be undertaken to meet the requirements of Section 233 of WIOA to promote transitions from adult education to postsecondary education and training through career pathways. Under the new combined plan, all Basic Education for Adults providers will use funds made available under section 222(a)(2) for the adult education and literacy required WIOA activities including the four new required national leadership activities to develop or enhance the adult education system across the state. All funded providers will be required to detail the process that will be used to collaborate with all stakeholders and align Basic Education for Adults programming in their 2015-2016 extension and 2017-2022 competitive grant plans with all partners named in the combined state plan. Eligible providers will provide services in alignment with local plans detailing how they will promote concurrent enrollment with Title I programs and activities in order to meet the state adjusted levels of performance and collect data to report on performance indicators. In addition, all providers will describe how they will fulfill one-stop responsibilities in their region. As members of local Workforce Development Boards, local providers will participate in ongoing plan development and implementation of WIOA. The following transition activities are underway in Washington to meet the four newly required state leadership activities requirements of WIOA: following activities have been completed or are underway in support:

  • The Washington State Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board (WTECB) has established a highly inclusive committee structure to identify key areas of work and implementation planning. Basic Education for Adults is represented on each of the committees with local providers being engaged as needed. The committees are:
    • Steering Committee: members include WTECB, Business, Labor, all core programs, Chief Local Elected Officials (CLEO), TANF, and the SBCTC. This committee’s work includes creating the WIOA vision and goals, state and local plan development, state policies and guidance to facilitate integrated services development, funding formula guidance, One Stop certification and evaluation criteria, oversight of work plans and timelines, facilitation of communication state-to-state, local-to-state, local-to-local, and among WIOA implementation committees, and state legislative issues.
    • Committee for Sector Strategies to Close Skill Gaps in the Workplace: members include WTECB, Educational Service Districts (ESD), Business, Labor, all core programs, Washington Workforce Association (WWA), Commerce, CLEO, SBCTC, and the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI).This committee’s work includes regional designation and governance, data analysis, local workforce development council designations, local board configuration, and sector strategy and industry engagement.
    • Committee for Performance Accountability and Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) Committee: members include WTECB, BEdA, DVR, Department of Services for the Blind (DSB) (Page 230)

The BEdA office works closely with the Council for Basic Skills (CBS) to determine areas in which programs need professional development in curriculum and instruction, policy and procedures, and implementation of new programming including reading strategies, IEL Civics program implementation, College and Career Readiness Standards, employability skills, and comprehensive guided pathways. The SBCTC agency also works across the various departments (WorkForce, Developmental Education, Research, Academic Transfer, Student Services, and eLearning) to determine and develop various professional development opportunities that are implemented to move targeted WIOA statewide initiatives forward. During the assessment of individual trainings participants are identify areas of further professional development needs. Once the need has been determined, SBCTC employs a variety of resources to develop and deliver the trainings. National organization such as LINCs and College and Career Readiness and Success Center at American Institute for Research (AIR); CLASP; and SBCTC’s Assessment, Teaching and Learning (ATL) Unit; Student Success Center, Guided Career Pathways Initiative , and eLearning departments. All State Leadership activities align with the required and permissible activities in SEC. 223.a.1 and 2 of WIOA. Federal leadership dollars are granted to providers in support of professional and program development initiatives that include: 

  • Team teacher training for all programming (ABE, ELA, HS 21+, On-Ramp to I-BEST, IEL Civics, and I-BEST) to support career pathways integrated employment and training activities;
  • Contextualized instruction training centered on the CCR Standards, integrated employability skills, and reading strategies;
  • Technology in flipped classroom instruction to integrate technology and employability skills development at all levels;
  • LINCS Adult Numeracy Training to integrate math instruction into ELA pathways and to increase numeracy instructional skills of faculty in order to meet the College and Career Readiness Standard, the new NRS Level descriptors, and to increase outcomes across the system in mathematics;
  • Innovation in IEL Civics supporting the development of co-enrolled integrated employment and training activities (I-BEST) as well as math at all levels;
  • Reading Apprenticeship Training to prepare students for college-level instruction; and
  • Contextualized integrated employability skills training. (Page 231)

Unlike traditional approaches in which students must learn English before pursuing job-training, I-DEA teaches English in tandem with college and career skills. This program has a highly intensive, quarterly staff training and implementation component in addition to on-going program support from SBCTC. I-DEA will be fully implemented in all programs by June 2016. 

  • Reading Apprenticeship training and implementation, which will continue in Washington State as a strategic instructional model throughout Adult Basic Education and college programming, incorporating the essential components of reading specific to adult learners’ needs.
  • LINCS Adult Numeracy Training, which will be conducted throughout 2014-15 in support of mathematics instruction for increased rigor of programing in order to prepare students for college and career pathways.
  • Technology and the flipped classroom model training which will begin in 2015 to enhance faculty skills in the use of instructional technology for distance education and student skill development in solving problems in technology rich environments. (Page 232)

2.   The provision of technical assistance to eligible providers of adult education and literacy activities receiving funds under this title, include:

  • The development and dissemination of instructional and programmatic practices based on the most rigorous or scientifically valid research available and appropriate, in reading, writing, speaking, mathematics, English language acquisition programs, distance education, and staff training. Current initiatives include:
    • Washington’s adoption in October of 2014 of the College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards as the basis for all instruction. 2014-17 will focus on training to transition from the Washington State Adult Learning Standards to CCR Standards with full implementation in 2017 with system wide professional development provided.
    • Integrated Digital English Acceleration (I-DEA), which is a hybrid instructional model based on the flipped classroom, providing problem solving activities in technology rich environments. Each student is provided with a laptop computer and 24/7 access to learning. Curriculum including language acquisition, rights and responsibilities of citizens and workforce training is thus available around the clock for ELA levels 1-3. Unlike traditional approaches in which students must learn English before pursuing job-training, I-DEA teaches English in tandem with college and career skills. This program has a highly intensive, quarterly staff training and implementation component in addition to on-going program support from SBCTC. I-DEA will be fully implemented in all programs by June 2016.
    • Reading Apprenticeship training and implementation, which will continue in Washington State as a strategic instructional model throughout Adult Basic Education and college programming, incorporating the essential components of reading specific to adult learners’ needs.
    • LINCS Adult Numeracy Training, which will be conducted throughout 2014-15 in support of mathematics instruction for increased rigor of programing in order to prepare students for college and career pathways.
    • Technology and the flipped classroom model training which will begin in 2015 to enhance faculty skills in the use of instructional technology for distance education and student skill development in solving problems in technology rich environments. (Page 234)

JR provides rehabilitative services to justice-involved youth. DSHS/DVR and JR have a cooperative agreement to jointly serve JR youth who are eligible for Pre-employment Transition Services and other DSHS/DVR services. Through coordinated services, JR youth with disabilities will receive services supporting community re-entry along career pathways. (Page 250)

  • Engage in the development and implementation of coordinated business engagement, industry sector strategies, and career pathways programs.
  • Utilize DSHS/DVR Business Specialists to assist with the recruitment and referral of qualified job seekers with disabilities to meet businesses’ demands.
  • Lead coordinated LWDB engagement of federal contractors and subcontractors, linking these contractors to skilled job seekers with disabilities.
  • Increase visibility through a methodical outreach and marketing plan which includes participation in local boards of commerce, membership in professional organizations, representation at career and recruitment fairs, and the provision of training services.
  • Support and expand innovative partnerships, such as Microsoft’s Specialisterne Project, which partners DSHS/DVR and Washington’s businesses to promote the hiring of individuals with disabilities in high–skill and high–demand occupations. (Page 264)
  • Leverage the labor market exchange, labor market research tools, and industry sector strategies to ensure that customers’ vocational goals are aligned with in–demand occupations to the greatest extent possible.
  • Integrate and align DSHS/DVR services and career pathways programs.
  • Increase use of Post–Employment Services to support customers in maintaining, regaining, or advancing in employment through better communicating these services and their benefits.
  • Provide training and technical assistance to businesses on best practices for recruiting and retaining employees with disabilities.
  • Support apprenticeships, paid internships, and on–the–job training opportunities to enhance customers’ employability, in partnership with LWDBs and the business community.
  • Utilize the results of the new comprehensive vocational assessment to evaluate customers’ skills, abilities, interests, as well as potential barriers to successful participation in, or completion of, training programs.
  • Complete required meetings at the end of every post–secondary term to review grades, progress, and support needs of customers participating in associate’s, baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral programs. (Page 302)

DSHS/DVR has identified Goal One, Priority Two strategies and activities to specifically target equitable access for unserved and underserved populations. The activities include, but are not limited to: enhanced outreach to students with disabilities in partnership with OSPI, the Center for Change in Transition Services, and local education agencies; targeted outreach to Washingtonians with disabilities who identify as Hispanic or Latino; and new business partnerships which provide career pathways for highly skilled adults living with an autism spectrum disorder in Washington’s technology industry. When served, these populations will experience equitable access to services and resources, including Supported Employment services, needed to achieve competitive employment outcomes within integrated settings. (Page 303)

This will also be the challenge of the WIOA partners and business development segments of the WorkSource system. It will be critical for the business development aspects to be marketing not only for the Youth in Transition, the younger workforce towards the Sector strategies professional sectors, but for those within the disadvantaged, disabilities and SCSEP communities for positions that may not necessarily be Career Pathways for all involved in the Work Force system. (Page 509)

The transition from WIA to WIOA will have significant impacts to how the different employment programs operationalize and provide services. SCSEP program staff and representatives are becoming familiar with the changes and how this may impact the SCSEP program(s). The State SCSEP Manager has been involved with the Washington State Auditor’s Office as they review all of the state and federally funded programs operating in the state of Washington that are involved with WIA/WIOA. Additionally the State SCSEP Manager has been invited to participate in two of the four State Key areas of Work and Potential WIOA Implementation Committees. The two committees being: The Performance Accountability and ETPL Committee and the Education and Career Pathways through Integrated Service Delivery Models. In addition there are significant changes to the Rehabilitation Services Act that are impacting how DVR provides services; There are also many changes through the Center for Medicaid Services (CMS), the Administration for Community Living that have positive ramifications for enhancing employment services. An additional partner in this process is the Office for Disabilities and Employment Policy at the Federal and local levels. (Page 511)

Employment Networks
  • DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR-CD contracts with each county.
  • DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH have signed a memorandum of collaboration that establishes methods for Medicaid outpatient behavioral health services to be provided as extended services for joint DSHS/DVR supported employment customers.
  • DBHR-MH has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model.
  • DSHS/DVR is participating with DBHR-MH in conducting a pilot project at two locations that is designed to integrate the Individual Placement Support (IPS) model of supported employment with DSHS/DVR supported employment services.
  • DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 250)

DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR-CD contracts with each county. 

  • DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH have signed a memorandum of collaboration that establishes methods for Medicaid outpatient behavioral health services to be provided as extended services for joint DSHS/DVR supported employment customers.
  • DBHR-MH has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model.
  • DSHS/DVR is participating with DBHR-MH in conducting a pilot project at two locations that is designed to integrate the Individual Placement Support (IPS) model of supported employment with DSHS/DVR supported employment services.
  • DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 267)

Washington State Business Leadership Network (WSBLN), the National Employment Team (NET), and Puget Sound Diversity Employment Network (PSDEN) – DSB has an active relationship and partnership in the activities of the WSBLN, the NET and the PSDEN, providing our specialized expertise as a resource to businesses locally, and connecting agency participant talent to businesses that understand the importance of inclusion of people with disabilities into their workforce. Yakima Special Needs Coalition – This group is a gathering of many community programs working on issues of transportation for individuals with disabilities. The lead agency for the coalition is People for People, a primary regional transportation provider for individuals that cannot access the public transit. (Page 347)

Ticket to Work Employment Network. Washington State DSHS agencies (DBHR, DDA, ALTSA/HCS and DVR) are now partners as an administrative Employment Network. The SCSEP State Leadership has expressed interest in being involved with this collaboration. Goodwill Industries is currently an Employment Network and several of the State Sub–grantees are either currently or in discussions with becoming an Employment Network via their involvement with the local WDCs. (Page 514)

Displaying 1 - 10 of 63

Kaiser Aluminum Settles EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 10/24/2017

“Kaiser Aluminum Corporation, the leading producer of fabricated aluminum products in the United States, will pay $175,000 and reinstate its hiring offer to a qualified production worker to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's suit, Kaiser withdrew its job offer for production work at its Trentwood mill in Spokane after Donald McMurray's medical records showed a workplace injury from over 10 years ago. The EEOC found that McMurray, with a long history of construction work at the time, was a well-qualified candidate fully capable of meeting the job's physical demands.”

Systems
  • Other

Washington Medicaid Transformation - 07/06/2017

“The state is leading strategic changes within Medicaid, allowing us to move toward a healthier Washington. The Medicaid transformation project demonstration is an agreement with the federal government which allows us to test new and innovative approaches to providing health coverage and care.”

There are three initiatives under the transformation project:

Transforming Medicaid service delivery through Accountable Communities of Health Expanding options for long-term services and supports Increasing the availability of supportive housing and supported employment”
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington State’s Statewide Transition Plan for New HCBS Rules - 03/15/2017

The Washington State Health Care Authority (HCA, the state’s Medicaid Agency), the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Aging and Long-Term Support Administration (ALTSA) and Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) submit this proposed transition plan in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services new requirements for Home and Community-based Services (HCBS Final Rule 42 CFR Parts 430, 431, 435, 436, 441 and 447) that became effective March 17, 2014. Washington State fully supports the intent of the HCBS setting rules. Washington State has long been an advocate for providing services to clients in the most integrated home and community-based settings, and is a leader in providing clients with choices regarding the settings in which long-term services and supports are provided and will continue its partnership with participants, advocacy groups, stakeholders and Tribes.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Student-Youth Transition Handbook - 07/22/2016

The information provided in this handbook is intended for students and youth with disabilities, their families, staff from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), teachers, school counselors, school administrators, school district personnel, and other agencies supporting students and youth with disabilities who want to participate in secondary transition planning and services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation State Plan: 2017-2020 - 07/01/2016

"The goals and priorities established in this State Plan reflect DSHS/DVR’s ongoing commitments to customer service, successful outcomes, staff development, organizational system improvement, strong partnerships, and business engagement. These goals and priorities were collaboratively developed by DSHS/DVR and leadership of the Washington State Rehabilitation Council."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

ABLE Legislation HB 2323 - 03/29/2016

AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience program; amending RCW 43.33A.190; reenacting and amending RCW 43.79A.040; adding new sections to chapter 43.330 RCW; and providing an expiration date….    The governing board is further authorized to contract with other organizations to administer, manage, promote, or market the Washington achieving a better life experience program. This program must allow for the creation of savings or investment accounts for eligible individuals with disabilities and the funds must be invested.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Data Sharing

US Department of Labor- ETA- Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Round 6 - 11/01/2015

WADEI will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and leverage, blend and braid funds and resources to support increased access and better outcomes for people with disabilities through: 1) Facilitation by DRCs of Integrated Resource Teams that integrate instructors, Navigators, student service coordinators and other college partners and mentor them in their use. 2) Partner policy makers will meet quarterly to identify emerging issues, develop collaborative solutions, and evaluate performance. 3) In partnership with the Department of Services for the Blind, use Wi-Fi hotspots to provide assistive technology access in AJCs that will be sustainable and will also offer greater range of access and AT options. 3) The Washington Access Fund will provide group and individual financial education and counseling to improve credit, lower debt and increase savings, while improving informed financial decision making. 4) Through a partnership with the WIPA program, working-age Social Security beneficiaries will have access to benefits counseling and individual benefits plans. 5) The Washington Business Alliance will recruit, coordinate and manage active participation of businesses and trade associations that are committed to using career pathways and WIOA programs and services to improve their access to qualified working-age applicants with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Washington State HB 1496 Employment of Workers with Permanent Disabilities - 07/24/2015

“AN ACT Relating to addressing vocational rehabilitation by making 2 certain recommendations from the vocational rehabilitation 3 subcommittee permanent and creating certain incentives for employers 4 to employ injured workers with permanent disabilities…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Washington House Bill 1636 - 07/24/2015

Requires state agencies with 100 or more employees to submit an annual report. The State Disability Employment Parity Act declares intent to increase the hiring of persons with disabilities in the state workforce. The bill includes sharing of disability employment statistics.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

King County Developmental Disabilities Division: WA Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) Employment and Day Program Service Definitions - 07/01/2015

“The following definitions apply to all King County Employment and Day Program services, including Child Development Services (CDS), Community Information and Education services, and Adult Employment services...”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

ABLE Legislation HB 2323 - 03/29/2016

AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience program; amending RCW 43.33A.190; reenacting and amending RCW 43.79A.040; adding new sections to chapter 43.330 RCW; and providing an expiration date….    The governing board is further authorized to contract with other organizations to administer, manage, promote, or market the Washington achieving a better life experience program. This program must allow for the creation of savings or investment accounts for eligible individuals with disabilities and the funds must be invested.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Data Sharing

Washington State HB 1496 Employment of Workers with Permanent Disabilities - 07/24/2015

“AN ACT Relating to addressing vocational rehabilitation by making 2 certain recommendations from the vocational rehabilitation 3 subcommittee permanent and creating certain incentives for employers 4 to employ injured workers with permanent disabilities…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Washington House Bill 1636 - 07/24/2015

Requires state agencies with 100 or more employees to submit an annual report. The State Disability Employment Parity Act declares intent to increase the hiring of persons with disabilities in the state workforce. The bill includes sharing of disability employment statistics.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Washington House Bill 1299 - 06/11/2015

Transportation appropriations bill for the 2015–2017 biennium. Includes $7.5 million for the state’s Paratransit/Special Needs Grant Program, which awards funds to nonprofits to improve transit services for people who can’t provide their own transportation due to age, disability or income; program goals include enhanced access to employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Washington House Bill 2063 - 05/01/2015

"AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience [ABLE] program; and creating new sections."

"The legislature finds that the federal achieving a better life experience act of 2014 (P.L. 113-295) encourages and assists individuals and families in saving private moneys for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Washington RCW 28A.155.220: High School Transition Services - 04/15/2015

“The office of the superintendent of public instruction must establish interagency agreements with the department of social and health services, the department of services for the blind, and any other state agency that provides high school transition services for special education students. Such interagency agreements shall not interfere with existing individualized education programs, nor override any individualized education program team's decision-making power. The purpose of the interagency agreements is to foster effective collaboration among the multiple agencies providing transition services for individualized education program-eligible special education students from the beginning of transition planning, as soon as educationally and developmentally appropriate, through age twenty-one, or through high school graduation, whichever occurs first. Interagency agreements are also intended to streamline services and programs, promote efficiencies, and establish a uniform focus on improved outcomes related to self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

WA County Services for Working Age Adults Policy 4.11 - 07/15/2013

“This policy establishes employment supports as the first use of employment and day program funds for working age adults and ensures that after nine months of employment services the person may choose Community Access. The policy establishes guidelines for Field Services staff of the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and Counties to follow when providing services to working age adults.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Washington Second Substitute Senate Bill 5732 - 04/28/2013

“AN ACT Relating to improving behavioral health services provided to adults in Washington state…”    Some of the significant policy changes include: “Beginning May 1, 2014, the legislature shall convene a task force to examine reform of the adult behavioral health system, with voting members as provided in this subsection;… The systems responsible for financing, administration, and delivery of publicly funded mental health and chemical dependency services to adults must be designed and administered to achieve improved outcomes for adult clients served by those systems…” one of which is “increased participation in employment and education;…” [and] The department and the health care authority must implement a strategy for the improvement of the adult behavioral health system,” among others.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Washington House Bill 1519 - 04/22/2013

“AN ACT Relating to establishing accountability measures for service coordination organizations…” It contains performance measure such as, “Improvements in client health status and wellness; increases in client participation in meaningful activities; reductions in client involvement with criminal justice systems; reductions in avoidable costs in hospitals, emergency rooms, crisis services, and jails and prisons; increases in stable housing in the community; improvements in client satisfaction with quality of life; and reductions in population-level health disparities.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Senate Bill 6384 - 03/19/2012

“AN ACT Relating to ensuring that persons with developmental disabilities be given the opportunity to transition to a community access program after enrollment in an employment program; and adding a new section to chapter 71A.12 RCW.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

WA State Governor’s Executive Order 13-02 - Employment of people with disabilities - 03/22/2013

Executive Order 13-02 includes several directives including a Disability Employment Challenge that establishes a goal of five percent of Washington state government’s workforce being comprised of persons living with a disability. A Disability Employment Task Force has been established to help state agencies with the recruitment and retention of persons with disabilities.    
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation State Plan: 2017-2020 - 07/01/2016

"The goals and priorities established in this State Plan reflect DSHS/DVR’s ongoing commitments to customer service, successful outcomes, staff development, organizational system improvement, strong partnerships, and business engagement. These goals and priorities were collaboratively developed by DSHS/DVR and leadership of the Washington State Rehabilitation Council."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

King County Developmental Disabilities Division: WA Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) Employment and Day Program Service Definitions - 07/01/2015

“The following definitions apply to all King County Employment and Day Program services, including Child Development Services (CDS), Community Information and Education services, and Adult Employment services...”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health

DVR Services for Employers - 11/06/2014

“Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) offers a variety of support services to assist employers in hiring and retaining VR customers with disabilities: Employment Services Team, Recruiter, Human Resource Consultant and Manager, Awareness and Etiquette Training, Hiring Incentives, Recruiting DVR Customers, DVR Internship Program, On the Job Training, Job Site Modifications and Assistive Technology, Supported Employment, [and] VR's - National Employment Team (The NET).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

DVR Supported Employment - 09/08/2014

“In some settings a potential employee may need additional support to be successful on the job. This support may be in the form of a job coach who works with persons with severe disabilities by providing on-site job training assistance and long term support to the employer and employee. The job coach will help the employee learn good work habits and job skills. DVR can often contract with local community rehabilitation programs to provide supported employment services and long term support. During this process, employers gain reliable, dependable and hardworking employees with a better than average chance of success.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

DVR Customer Services Manual - 07/31/2014

“This chapter explains the types of vocational rehabilitation services (referred to as ‘VR services’ in this chapter) available to individuals who are eligible through the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). VR services are offered to assist individuals with disabilities to prepare for, get, and keep jobs that are consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. This chapter is consistent with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 and codified in 34 Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 361 and 363 and with state laws and DSHS requirements.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

DSHS Strategic Plan and Lean Report (2014) - 01/31/2014

Washington State’s expressed goal is to, “Be the national leader in: Providing a safe, high-quality, home, community and facility-based array of residential services and employment supports.” This report describes the State’s progress in providing Home and Community Based Services, Vocational Rehabilitation job rates and wage progression, and employment supports for people with developmental disabilities, among others.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

DDA Working Age Adult Policy - 07/15/2013

“This policy establishes employment supports as the first use of employment and day program funds for working age adults and ensures that after nine months of employment services the person may choose Community Access. The policy establishes guidelines for Field Services staff of the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and Counties to follow when providing services to working age adults.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Case Studies of Emerging/ Innovative Vocational, Rehabilitation Agency Practices - 04/01/2013

This report documents emerging promising practices for job seekers with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Increasing Integrated Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Disabilities and DSHS Clients - 09/01/2012

This Integrated Employment Report marks the completion of an effort begun at DSHS in 2010 by a group of employees charged with developing a Model Employment Plan. The intent of the original plan was to address the Department’s desire to hire more persons with disabilities. At the time, our employee pool included only 4.7% of people with disabilities, while the agency served more than over 217,000 of clients who identified themselves as having some form of a disability (Source: DSHS RDA Client Services Database). This Integrated Employment Plan addresses a Priority of the Executive Leadership Team (ELT), which is to create new job opportunities within the Department. Specifically, it targets not just the potential hiring of people with disabilities, but also of clients who are on Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration (JRA) young adults who will transition out of the Juvenile Justice system into society, and Children’s Administration foster youth and alums who seek employment. This Jobs Priority / Integrated Employment Initiative comes at a time of harsh unemployment across Washington State. The initiative is intended to promote competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities within the Department by proposing a way to overcome employment barriers, employment discrimination and related biases. It is important to note that the Department is already working in conjunction with community case resource managers on supported employment opportunities for working age adults with development disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

DVR Business Plan - 06/15/2010

“The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) serves eligible individuals with all types of disabilities who want to work and need vocational rehabilitation services to overcome barriers to employment that result from a disability. Individuals are eligible for services if they have a physical, mental, or sensory disability that results in an impediment to employment and they require vocational rehabilitation services to become employed. The services DVR provides are person centered and based on each individual’s strengths and informed choice. DVR strives to achieve full employment for people with disabilities in career-focused positions providing competitive wages and benefits.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging

Washington State DSHS/DVR 2016-2020 State Plan: the Supported Employment Program (Draft)

The cooperative agreements, program goals, funding distribution, and supported employment services described in this section represent the coordinated efforts of DSHS/DVR, its State collaborators, and its service delivery partners to ensure that all Washingtonians with disabilities can access the support services needed to obtain and maintain employment, maximize independence, and experience improved quality of life.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Project Search

 

“The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, business led, one year school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the workplace. Total workplace immersion facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

WA State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) Member State

 

SELN brings together state Developmental Disability agencies for sharing, educating and providing guidance on practices and policies around employment to its members. Annual membership is required for participation in all network events.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

US Department of Labor- ETA- Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Round 6 - 11/01/2015

WADEI will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and leverage, blend and braid funds and resources to support increased access and better outcomes for people with disabilities through: 1) Facilitation by DRCs of Integrated Resource Teams that integrate instructors, Navigators, student service coordinators and other college partners and mentor them in their use. 2) Partner policy makers will meet quarterly to identify emerging issues, develop collaborative solutions, and evaluate performance. 3) In partnership with the Department of Services for the Blind, use Wi-Fi hotspots to provide assistive technology access in AJCs that will be sustainable and will also offer greater range of access and AT options. 3) The Washington Access Fund will provide group and individual financial education and counseling to improve credit, lower debt and increase savings, while improving informed financial decision making. 4) Through a partnership with the WIPA program, working-age Social Security beneficiaries will have access to benefits counseling and individual benefits plans. 5) The Washington Business Alliance will recruit, coordinate and manage active participation of businesses and trade associations that are committed to using career pathways and WIOA programs and services to improve their access to qualified working-age applicants with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

 

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Customized Employment Employers and Workers: Creating a Competitive Edge (July 2007) Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) - 07/01/2007

“Customized Employment strategies offer new processes to advance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor initiated a series of demonstration projects to identify policy issues that support the use of Customized Employment strategies in the workforce development system. The purpose of this report is to summarize the lessons learned from this demonstration initiative and the policy recommendations it has generated.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

WA Social Security Administration - Mental Health Treatment Study - 10/01/2006

 

“The Mental Health Treatment Study (MHTS) evaluated the impact that better access to treatment and employment support services would have on outcomes such as medical recovery, functioning, employment, and benefit receipt for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries with a primary impairment of schizophrenia or affective disorder. We examined the advantages and disadvantages of providing these SSDI beneficiaries access to high quality services designed to improve their employment outcomes.  The services included systematic medication management, the services of a nurse-care coordinator to coordinate participants’ physical and mental health therapies, and the services of a supported employment specialist trained in the individual placement and support model.  We also paid for out-of-pocket mental health expenses and other expenses necessary to help participants return to work.” [Study included Vancouver, WA]

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Washington Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) Program

“The Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) project is designed to transform service delivery by promoting sustainable access to evidence-based, supported employment. BEST provides consumers with meaningful choice and control of employment and support services. It uses peer counselors, reduces unemployment, and supports the recovery and resiliency of individuals with serious mental illness, including co-occurring substance use disorders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WA Division of Developmental Disabilities, Jobs by 21 Partnership Project Report for FY 2009

“The Jobs by 21 Partnership Project was funded by the Washington State Legislature for the 2007–2009 biennium. The Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) was authorized to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s counties, school districts, employers, families, students with developmental disabilities, and adult service agencies. The focus of the collaborative relationships between Partnership Projects stakeholders was to obtain “Jobs by 21” for young adults with developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) – Access to recovery (ATR)

 

“The State of Washington directly funded six counties (Clark, King, Pierce, Snohomish, Spokane, and Yakima) to implement ATR. Each county administered its voucher program with relative autonomy.”

“Washington State reports that ATR has had a number of beneficial effects. It has led to a more person-centered approach to services in which individual choice and preference have heightened importance, there is greater emphasis on culturally specific services, and there is openness to and acceptance of spiritual support and other services that have not historically been funded. In addition, ATR has played a role in moving the State toward a service paradigm designed to support recovery.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) – WA Individualized Learning Plan Research and Demonstration Project

“The ODEP study launched in the 2008-09 school year and targeted for completion in 2012-13, is the first longitudinal research and demonstration project designed to understand the effectiveness of ILPs. It looks at ILPs in 14 (rural, urban and suburban) schools in four states (LA, NM, SC, and WA). The research is built around core features included in the Guideposts for Success."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WA Disability Program Navigator (DPN) Demonstration Initiative

 

“The DPN Initiative is: developing new/sustaining ongoing partnerships to achieve seamless, comprehensive, and integrated services; promoting the workforce investment system becoming Employment Networks under the Ticket-to-Work Program; blending/braiding resources to leverage funding for individual customers; creating systemic change; and expanding the capacity of the workforce investment system to serve customers with disabilities and employers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Mental Health Transformation State Infrastructure Grant (MHTIG) - Permanent Options for Recovery–Centered Housing (PORCH) Project

"The Permanent Options for Recovery-Centered Housing (PORCH) project is designed to transform service delivery by promoting sustainable access to evidence-based Permanent Supportive Housing throughout one urban and two rural Washington counties…Services will be prioritized for adults and young adults who are in transition, who have severe mental illnesses and who are experiencing homelessness, at risk of homelessness, inappropriately housed, or transitioning from state institutions. The project will provide special training to the teams on the unique trauma-related needs of the population. The project team will work with local community and consumer groups and organizations to identify any modifications needed to ensure that services are culturally relevant.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Student-Youth Transition Handbook - 07/22/2016

The information provided in this handbook is intended for students and youth with disabilities, their families, staff from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), teachers, school counselors, school administrators, school district personnel, and other agencies supporting students and youth with disabilities who want to participate in secondary transition planning and services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Community Summit at Ellensburg, WA [Annual Ellensburg Employment Conference] - 01/11/2013

 

“The Community Summit ....Let's Get Connected will bring together individuals committed to building inclusive communities rich with people participating as neighbors, co-workers, friends, family members, and citizens. People with developmental disabilities and their families, friends, individual and agency staff that provide residential, employment and personal supports, DDD staff, county, other state and local government staff, and interested community members are all welcome. We want everyone to come together to actively discuss ideas and learn from each other about how to build and participate in inclusive communities that enrich everyone.” The Summit is organized by WiSe.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Guide to Transition Assessment in Washington State - 12/01/2007

Age-appropriate transition assessment is the primary component in the process of secondary transition planning. The transition assessments are the framework through which information is gathered to guide the development of a student’s program in order to successfully move the student from the public school to a post–high school setting. While the transition assessments can include formal or commercial assessments, they can also include interviews, observation, and surveys. Perhaps more important than the type of assessment used is that the process is a systematic method used to collect and organize information regarding the student’s interests, skills, strengths, temperaments and areas of need. This process should begin early and be quite broad during the middle school years, but becomes increasingly more specific as the student moves closer to graduation. The goal of transition assessment is to assist the student in achieving her or his vocational potential; therefore, the goal of the person responsible for the age-appropriate transition assessments is to accurately determine that potential as closely as possible. This becomes more likely by looking at the student’s interests, aptitudes, and preparation opportunities from a global concept and gathering that information in a systematic way.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology (DO-IT)

“The DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) Center is dedicated to empowering people with disabilities through technology and education. It promotes awareness and accessibility—in both the classroom and the workplace—to maximize the potential of individuals with disabilities and make our communities more vibrant, diverse, and inclusive.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Customized Employment

“Customized Employment is a unique approach to providing job development and job retention services through an individualized process that fits each person's particular needs. Services are provided by qualified staff who are ACRE Certified (The Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators) through the Rehabilitation Services Commission. All Customized Employment Services are funded through the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission (ORSC).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Learn and Earn: Supporting Teens

“Parents, teachers, and mentors encourage teens with disabilities to participate in work-based learning experiences in this video presentation. It can be used as training for training these stakeholders so that they can more effectively promote work-based learning for young people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WA Highline Community College Employment Professional Certificate Program

 

“We are in our seventh year of partnership with Highline College providing a program, originally envisioned by a group of individuals and county representatives, to establish a certification path for employment professionals. These professionals provide employment support to individuals with developmental disabilities, and play an integral role in assisting people to become contributing members of their community. The program offers high quality training taught by skilled professionals, intended to build on the skills of the participants, offer opportunities for networking with others, and serve as a building block for future leaders in supported employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

WiSe Washington Initiative for Supported Employment

“We provide training to agencies, employers, school districts and other groups interested in equitable employment for people with developmental disabilities. Here you will find the On Demand training, links to our Webinar offerings, and other local training opportunities!”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kaiser Aluminum Settles EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 10/24/2017

“Kaiser Aluminum Corporation, the leading producer of fabricated aluminum products in the United States, will pay $175,000 and reinstate its hiring offer to a qualified production worker to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's suit, Kaiser withdrew its job offer for production work at its Trentwood mill in Spokane after Donald McMurray's medical records showed a workplace injury from over 10 years ago. The EEOC found that McMurray, with a long history of construction work at the time, was a well-qualified candidate fully capable of meeting the job's physical demands.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Washington Medicaid Transformation - 07/06/2017

“The state is leading strategic changes within Medicaid, allowing us to move toward a healthier Washington. The Medicaid transformation project demonstration is an agreement with the federal government which allows us to test new and innovative approaches to providing health coverage and care.”

There are three initiatives under the transformation project:

Transforming Medicaid service delivery through Accountable Communities of Health Expanding options for long-term services and supports Increasing the availability of supportive housing and supported employment”
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington State’s Statewide Transition Plan for New HCBS Rules - 03/15/2017

The Washington State Health Care Authority (HCA, the state’s Medicaid Agency), the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Aging and Long-Term Support Administration (ALTSA) and Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) submit this proposed transition plan in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services new requirements for Home and Community-based Services (HCBS Final Rule 42 CFR Parts 430, 431, 435, 436, 441 and 447) that became effective March 17, 2014. Washington State fully supports the intent of the HCBS setting rules. Washington State has long been an advocate for providing services to clients in the most integrated home and community-based settings, and is a leader in providing clients with choices regarding the settings in which long-term services and supports are provided and will continue its partnership with participants, advocacy groups, stakeholders and Tribes.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Promoting Integrated Employment: Lessons Learned - 12/01/2013

Medicaid is the single largest source of health care financing for low-income people with disabilities, a population that increasingly receives long-term services and supports (LTSS) in community-based set-tings instead of in institutions.1 Growth in the funding of community-based services and the evolution of federal policies and initiatives that emphasize community integration and employment for individuals with disabilities have been driving forces behind many states’ efforts to transform their service systems to make integrated employment the preferred service outcome for individuals with IDDs.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant – Washington State Pathways to Employment

“Helping Washingtonians with a disability make informed decisions about going to work.”   By promoting the awareness and use of work incentives provided under Medicaid regulations and the Social Security Act, Pathways to Employment continues to foster an expectation of competitive employment and economic advancement for individuals with disabilities.   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Washington Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Washington until 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington Medicaid State Plan

The Washington Medicaid state plan details the agreement between the state and the Federal government. It describes how Washington administers its Medicaid program and explains how the state will abide by Federal rules.  It also explains how Washington may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WA COPES Waiver

 

“Provides adult day health, home health aide, personal care, adult day care, client support training, community transition, environmental mods, home delivered meals, nurse delegation, personal emergency response, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age and physical and other disabilities ages 18-64.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Washington Basic Waiver (#0408)

 

“WAIVER TERMINATED 9/29/12 - To provide personal care, respite, habilitation (day and supported employment), environ mods., transportation, specialized medical equipment and supplies, PT, OT, SHL, community access, community guide, person to person, behavior management, family training and emergency assistance to individuals who are DD and live with their families or in their own home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Basic Plus Waiver 0409.R024

"To provide community access, individual supported employment/group supported employment, personal care, prevocational services, respite, OT, PT, speech/hearing/language services, adult dental, adult family home, adult residential care, behavior support and consultation, behavioral health stabilization services-behavior support and consultation, behavioral health stabilization services-behavioral health crisis diversion bed services, behavioral health stabilization services-specialized psychiatric services, community guide, emergency assistance, environmental accessibility adaptations, individualized technical assistance, sexual deviancy evaluation, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, specialized psychiatric services, staff/family consultation and training, transportation for individuals with DD ages 0 – no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WA - Community Protection Waiver (0411.R02.00)

 

“To provide individual supported employment/group supported employment, prevocational services, residential hab, OT, PT, speech/hearing/language services, adult dental, behavior support and consultation, behavioral health stabilization services-behavior support and consultation, behavioral health stabilization services-behavioral health crisis diversion beds, behavioral health stabilization services-specialized psychiatric services, community transition, environmental accessibility adaptations, individualized technical assistance, sexual deviancy evaluation, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, specialized psychiatric services, staff/family consultation and training, transportation for individuals with DD ages 18 – no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

In the Evergreen State of Washington, individuals with disabilities are thriving in the "Home of Bigfoot and Big Imaginations" through clever innovations in promoting Universal Design in the workplace for all workers.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington State’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.52%
Change from
2014 to 2015
7,170,351
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
483,334
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.49%
Change from
2014 to 2015
177,921
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-2.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
36.81%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.54%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.40%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 6,971,406 7,061,530 7,170,351
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 482,279 488,620 483,334
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 175,620 184,137 177,921
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,881,865 2,959,067 3,022,973
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 36.41% 37.69% 36.81%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.72% 75.99% 76.40%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.00% 6.20% 5.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.50% 20.80% 19.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.10% 12.10% 11.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 455,951 452,486 459,384
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 438,558 454,931 449,434
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 738,042 749,436 745,794
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 35,277 31,381 31,690
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 62,724 64,739 71,971
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 15,801 15,522 16,929
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 43,953 45,545 41,361
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,617 4,692 5,376
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 42,022 42,003 42,733
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 16,797 18,838 24,935

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 5,546 5,832 6,537
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.10% 4.30% 4.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 177,421 179,192 179,674

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,710 7,229 13,815
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 16,449 19,201 31,120
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 66,061 68,072 93,235
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 8.60% 10.60% 14.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 12,765 9,476 7,168
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 111 118 114
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 79 80 78
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 71.00% 68.00% 68.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.15 1.15 1.09

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,778
4,634
4,832
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 39 36 38
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 401 419 489
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,184 1,069 1,033
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,663 1,713 1,780
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,412 1,339 1,436
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 79 58 56
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 26.60% 29.70% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 4,050 4,063
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 276,661 279,875
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 152 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 403 443 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $42,330,000 $45,072,000 $50,806,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $4,338,000 $4,384,000 $3,194,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $35,000 $33,000 $22,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $2,875,000 $3,824,000 $3,581,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 87.00% 86.00% 86.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 719 961 1,045
Number of people served in facility based work. 748 679 475
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 9 9 8
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 105.20 101.80 102.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 52.40% 52.57% 53.49%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.20% 13.22% 13.27%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.83% 0.81% 0.84%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.10% 92.11% 95.79%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 25.00% 23.74% 22.30%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 47.60% 52.11% 53.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 65.70% 65.13% 67.38%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 22.60% 28.37% 30.91%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,496,068
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,522
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 167,758
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,680,068
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,847,826
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 156
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,511
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,667
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,885,131
AbilityOne wages (services). $27,786,395

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 30 30 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 4 4 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 35 35 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,751 1,684 718
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 278 278 74
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,030 1,963 792

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

Collaborate with disability and employment partners to sponsor events that focus on disability recruitment, hiring and retention issues such as mentoring, disability awareness, reasonable accommodation, customized employment, transportation, independent living, benefits issues, etc. 

  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR collaborated with the Community Networks Program (a statewide consortium of local organizations) to fund over 50 local projects and events focusing on disability recruitment, hiring and retention, including events focusing on the employment of students and youth with disabilities.
  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR collaborated with the Community Networks Program (a statewide consortium of local organizations) to fund over 50 local projects and events focusing on disability recruitment, hiring and retention, including events focusing on the employment of students and youth with disabilities. 

Goal Three Priority 

Bring together employers, DSHS/DVR staff and other workforce partners on a regular basis at the local level to update trends in the job market and maintain a good understanding of employer needs, so that customers are given useful guidance and current information.

  • Evaluation: This activity occurred sporadically in some locales but was not implemented on a statewide basis due to staff turnover in the statewide DSHS/DVR Business Services Manager position. The position was responsible for facilitating this priority and became vacant during FFY 2015. It took time to recruit and hire a new incumbent; during this period it was not possible to fully implement this priority. 

Goal Three Priority 

Support the DSHS/DVR Business Services Team in developing ongoing employer relationships and providing job placement assistance to customers, including participation in the nationwide employer network sponsored by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation.

  • Evaluation: The statewide DSHS/DVR Business Services Manager position became vacant and was re-hired during FFY 2015. The new Business Services Manager is reinvigorating the team and providing extensive support to develop ongoing business relationships. 

Goal Three Priority 

Serve on local WorkSource Business Service Teams to market DSHS/DVR job seekers to employers. (Page 312)

Braiding/Blending Resources

In pursuit of the goal of more seamless and fully-integrated career, training and follow up services to UI claimants and other unemployed individuals, a number of WDCs in the state have voluntarily convened with the Employment Security Department and state Workforce Board to explore Integrated Service Delivery (ISD) models. All areas envision greater collaboration and coordination while local conditions may favor piloting a substantially integrated and simultaneous enrollment model in other areas encompassing all programs customers are eligible for such as Title 1, Title III, Trade Act and targeted population programs. One hallmark of ISD, as envisioned by the ISD consortium, is building upon functional teams. Function as the primary organizing principle—in contrast to focusing on separate programs and partner organizations—indicates major components of the one-stops such as business services; front-end activities like Resource Room, triage, and workshops; community outreach and marketing; Rapid Response; job training etc. ISD also promises to better leverage staff and administrative resources for leaner, more productive one-stop field operations. Functional teams will continually examine changing customer needs, fill gaps and enhance services, and address apparent and unnecessary duplication of services and processes. Another aspect of ISD in Washington State is extending co-enrollment or possibly simultaneous enrollment for current and future jobseekers accessing WorkSource Services. As envisioned in Washington State co/simultaneous enrollment into multiple programs is the braiding or directing of program resources to provide appropriate services when needed as efficiently as possible. ISD partners will continue working through the technical issues around ISD mainly for WIOA Title 1 Adult and Dislocated Worker programs, Wagner-Peyser, Trade Act, Jobs for Veterans State Grant, and WorkFirst (TANF Job Search).  (Page 196) 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Local and State Advisory Groups on Barrier Solutions 

WIOA allows local area boards to establish standing committees to work on issues specifically faced by individuals with disabilities, including Section 188 and ADA compliance. Washington’s workforce system has embraced a more expansive goal of improving access for populations with a wide variety of barriers to access, including economic barriers, geographic barriers, physical barriers, language and cultural barriers, low–level education and skills barriers, and behavioral health barriers. To build consensus on a coordinated and sustained effort to remove these access barriers, a standing Workforce Board committee on accessibility issues is being created.

The Workforce Board’s advisory committee on barrier solutions will be informed by local advisory committees that evaluate accessibility issues at the community level and will help local boards prioritize projects and track progress toward improved customer service for those populations. The state standing committee will additionally serve as a forum for sharing best practices and strategies to improve access and advocate for resources and policy development that will improve services for all populations with barriers. (Page 66)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. 

System–wide Commitment to Improving Accessibility for All Participants 

Fundamental to the Workforce Board’s vision for the workforce system is the concept of universal accessibility: Washington’s workforce system must be prepared and able to serve jobseekers from all kinds of backgrounds, who face a variety of barriers. Universal accessibility encompasses both physical accessibility of all facilities, as well as programmatic accessibility—taking into account customers’ particular access needs. Integration of service delivery and better coordination among workforce system partners will allow services and delivery approaches to be customized to particular access needs.

WIOA has provided new energy across Washington’s workforce system to address and remove barriers to access so that a greater number of Washingtonians will be able to connect with a career pathway and a living–wage job. Advances in personal computing and telecommunications technology have made the Internet and person–to–person connectivity a feature of many people’s daily lives. WIOA acknowledges these improvements by opening the door to “virtual” service delivery—bringing services each participant needs to their doorstep, or kitchen table.

Recognizing that barrier removal is a project that requires sustained effort over time, the Workforce Board started work on establishing its first standing advisory committee to lead a statewide effort on removing barriers to access throughout the system. The standing advisory committee, described below, is expected to work with local advisory committees on accessibility issues, starting an ongoing conversation between local workforce system practitioners and state–level policymakers. In this way, the committee will be able to systematically identify and address access barriers. (Page 161)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

In accordance with section 8(b) in the Wagner–Peyser Act, local comprehensive centers and affiliates have assigned disability specialists. The ES staff serving in this role receive training on serving individuals with disabilities and on accessible computer work stations. Also, they are often involved in local efforts to enhance employment and training access for individuals with disabilities. When there are special grants such as the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), core program staff will be equipped to direct referrals for assessment and program services.

In cooperation with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Department of Services for the Blind, ESD will support ongoing efforts to expand accessibility for blind individuals who, as a population, infrequently use one stops. One stops and the WorkSourceWA.com website will be ADA section 508/Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) compatible. Local one stops will accommodate blind, deaf and other individuals with disabilities. Such strategies as having a sign language interpreter scheduled to come in for accommodating those who are deaf will continue. Blind individuals can be served in any of the large variety of one stop workshops by staff offering to go over written handouts on an individual basis, or simply offering to email materials that could be made accessible by the individual’s own text–to–voice software.

Some centers have co–located vocational rehabilitation counselors with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation in the Department of Social and Health Services. Co–location of VR staff increases referrals from Wagner–Peyser and other co–located staff and vice versa. Coordination between core and other programs is better so that persons with disabilities can get more help to compete for and enjoy high quality employment through acquiring the necessary skills while receiving any necessary supports. Under WIOA Title IV, VR staff outreach to disabled youth graduating from the K–12 system will encourage more young people to pursue assistance from WorkSource to begin career pathways toward self–support through viable avenues. Many ES–staffed one stops have taken the initiative to invite high school teachers of students on IEPs to make field trips fostering a sense of comfort in approaching WorkSource.(Page 107)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment
  • Identify and encourage local pilot programs that use technology to facilitate and improve integrated service delivery for customers, including programs designed to improve access to the system. 

In addition, soon after the passage of WIOA, Governor Jay Inslee directed the Workforce Board to work with the system’s stakeholders to shape Washington’s strategic plan toward three goals to maximize the workforce system’s impact: 

  1. Help more people find and keep jobs that lead to economic self–sufficiency, with a focus on disadvantaged populations.
  2. Close skill gaps for employers, with a focus on in–demand industry sectors and occupations, including through apprenticeships.
  3. Work together as a single, seamless team to make this happen. 

These three goals will inform the larger system and guide any changes. Below are ways the system is evolving to better serve all populations through enhanced accessibility. 

Universal access across the workforce system (Page 62)

In conclusion, a truly accessible workforce system that makes full use of technology, will implement secure, wireless Internet access in public areas of all comprehensive One–Stop centers in Washington by 2020. The system will also include state–level advisory committees during the first two years of the plan, with annual progress reports on One–Stop center accessibility at the local level. Finally, the local pilot programs that use technology to facilitate and improve integrated service delivery for all customers will be identified and encouraged. (Page 67)

Washington is already known as a leader in business engagement. The state piloted Industry Skill Panels, which bring together employers, educators, and community leaders to address common skill gaps and training needs. Skill Panels, in turn, were instrumental in establishing Centers of Excellence, which serve as statewide resources to address the needs of a specific industry sector—from aerospace to allied health. Housed within the state’s community and technical college system, Centers of Excellence provide fast and flexible education and training programs that respond directly to the needs of industry. (Page 51)

Expanding wireless Internet connectivity at one–stop centers could pay off particularly for the blind and low–vision community. One local area in Washington is piloting a “paperless” one–stop experience facilitated by secure wireless access at its WorkSource center. All education and training information, including pamphlets and documents, are digitized in a standard format and stored online. WorkSource center staff members receive regular training on how to digitize materials. People who are blind or low–vision who visit a one–stop center can navigate to those digitally archived materials using their own accessibility devices. Digitally archived materials are also accessible to jobseekers with mobility, transportation, and/or childcare responsibilities that may prevent them from accessing a WorkSource center. Expanding wireless Internet connectivity at one–stop centers could pay off particularly for the blind and low–vision community. One local area in Washington is piloting a “paperless” one–stop experience facilitated by secure wireless access at its WorkSource center. All education and training information, including pamphlets and documents, are digitized in a standard format and stored online. WorkSource center staff members receive regular training on how to digitize materials. People who are blind or low–vision who visit a one–stop center can navigate to those digitally archived materials using their own accessibility devices. Digitally archived materials are also accessible to jobseekers with mobility, transportation, and/or childcare responsibilities that may prevent them from accessing a WorkSource center. (Page 64)

Virtual Service Delivery 

With WIOA, education and training services are no longer required to be administered in person. The availability of online, real–time, hybrid (blended online and face to face), and open source course materials warrants close system collaboration. Beyond simply providing access, the system must help customers gain the skills to effectively use these new technological tools. Some tools have become increasingly common in just a few short years. Video conferencing technology, for example, is widely available and less expensive than in years past. Reducing or eliminating the need for customers to travel and physically access a one–stop center will remove accessibility barriers for many Washingtonians. Services offered virtually via computer, tablet, or smartphone empower people with mobility challenges, or anyone preferring to access information remotely. These tools allow them to begin progressing down a career pathway on their terms and at a time and location more convenient to them. Virtual service delivery helps customers with childcare or transportation barriers make progress toward a better future. A parent can hop online when the kids are asleep and gain access to services, or a family who lacks a car can avoid making several bus transfers to reach a one–stop center––if the center is reachable by bus at all. Many rural Washingtonians live hours away from the nearest comprehensive one–stop center. Accessing these services at home just makes sense. Even rural customers without reliable Internet connections still benefit from virtual service delivery—library systems statewide have expressed interest in partnering with the workforce system to create “remote connection sites” strategically located around Washington. (Page 65)

In many aspects ES operations is well–positioned to expand its partnership with the Department of Labor and Industries injured worker Return–to–Work efforts. A pilot project at WorkSource Everett, one of the state’s busiest one–stops, has been very successful in helping injured and recovered workers find suitable employment.

Washington State Department of Social and Health Services received a 3–year $22 million federal grant from the Department of Agriculture to help elevate Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to self–reliance. Resources to Initiate Successful Employment (RISE) will involve many community–based organizations and colleges who will serve SNAP recipients who are homeless, veterans, those with limited English proficiency, the long–term unemployed and non–custodial parents with access to skill building and job search assistance.

Funded providers use key elements of I-BEST programs, e.g. contextualization, team teaching, enhanced students services, and articulated college and career pathways, to increase the speed at which students master basic and ELA skills at federal levels 1, 2 and 3. On Ramp options include, but are not limited to: programs focused on career clusters; partnership efforts between colleges and community-based organizations and local workforce development councils (WIBs); I-BEST at Work projects that partner providers, employers and WIBs; Project I-DEA (Integrated Digital English Acceleration), a three-year pilot program with support from the Gates Foundation that will transform ELA instruction using a flipped classroom model and 50% online instruction. (Page 222)

In 1-3 quarters, On Ramp students acquire the skills needed to transition to basic skills education classes at federal levels 4-6 and/or Professional/Technical or Academic I-BEST pathways. (Page 222)

Students in correctional education programs have access to the same quality programs as offered on our community college campuses. In 2011–12, the Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I–BEST) model was piloted in the Specialty Baking program at Clallam Bay Corrections Center. Currently four I–BEST programs are up and running in correctional facilities. In addition to I–BEST, Washington’s correction education programs offer the same programming as traditional Basic Education for Adults and workforce training programs in the community and technical college system. Washington state currently has two two–year degree programs operating on private funds at two institutions. Programming in correctional facilities include: Adult Basic Education; Vocational programming; English Language Acquisition; High school diploma and equivalency; Limited AA degree programs; Offender Change programs; and Re–entry services. (Page 226)

Beginning July 1, 2017, WIOA Section 243 funds will only be allocated to providers with a clear description of how funding and civics instruction will be used in combination with Integrated Education and Training as defined in WIOA Section 203(11):

“ ‘Integrated Education and Training’.—The term integrated education and training means a service approach that provides adult education and training concurrently and contextually with workforce preparation activities and workforce training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster for the purpose of educational and career advancement.” 

IEL Civics Programs that meet the requirements of Section 243 funds have been established, piloted, and implemented across the system. Full implementation of integrated employment and training activities include: state-approved I–BEST programs that co-enroll ELA students in college-level, career technical certificate and degree programs in high demand career fields; I–BEST at Work programming which enroll ELA incumbent workers in career specific coursework to upskill students in basic, employability, civic, and workplace skills in order for them to advance in their place of employment. In the I-BEST at Work model, the teaching team is made up of a basic skills instructor and a trainer from the worksite and classes are held at the place of employment; on-ramps to I-BEST programs where all instruction is contextualized and delivered concurrently with training in a specific occupation or occupational cluster like allied health; and staffing to provide navigational support specifically to IEL Civics students enrolled in IEL Civics eligible programs described above. These integrated education and training models of instruction are required in order to be awarded IEL Civics funding. Training and/or technical support are made available to all providers on an on-going basis for each of these integrated instructional models. (Page 228)

Assistance in the use of technology, including for staff training, to eligible providers, especially the use of technology to improve system efficiencies

  • To enhance system efficiencies, Washington conducts trainings through the Blackboard Collaborate system and also offers training to assist staff in the use of Collaborate.
  • SBCTC also offers training in the online management system, CANVAS for faculty and staff wanting to enhance instruction with technology in the classroom.
  • A major focus in the next two years is on increasing instruction in problem solving in technology rich environments. Initiatives currently under way that support this work include:
    • Project I-DEA (Integrated Digital English Acceleration),
    • a three-year pilot program with support from the Gates Foundation that will transform ELA instruction using a flipped classroom model and 50% online instruction 
  • System-wide training on implementing the flipped classroom model significantly increasing access to online learning opportunities. (Page 232)
  • Assistance in the use of technology, including for staff training, to eligible providers, especially the use of technology to improve system efficiencies
  • To enhance system efficiencies, Washington conducts trainings through the Blackboard Collaborate system and also offers training to assist staff in the use of Collaborate.
  • SBCTC also offers training in the online management system, CANVAS for faculty and staff wanting to enhance instruction with technology in the classroom.
  • A major focus in the next two years is on increasing instruction in problem solving in technology rich environments. Initiatives currently under way that support this work include:
    • Project I-DEA (Integrated Digital English Acceleration),
    • a three-year pilot program with support from the Gates Foundation that will transform ELA instruction using a flipped classroom model and 50% online instruction
  • System-wide training on implementing the flipped classroom model significantly increasing access to online learning opportunities. (Page 234)
  • DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR-CD contracts with each county.
  • DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH have signed a memorandum of collaboration that establishes methods for Medicaid outpatient behavioral health services to be provided as extended services for joint DSHS/DVR supported employment customers.
  • DBHR-MH has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model.
  • DSHS/DVR is participating with DBHR-MH in conducting a pilot project at two locations that is designed to integrate the Individual Placement Support (IPS) model of supported employment with DSHS/DVR supported employment services.
  • DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 250)
  • Establish interagency transition councils in each Educational Service District that include local DSHS/DVR and educational staff and community partners.
  • Develop pilot transition projects in each Educational Service District.
  • Develop and provide individual online education portfolios that provide updated educational and employment progress for students.
  • Provide training and technical assistance to DSHS/DVR staff, teachers, and community partners.
  • Provide gap analysis and outcome data regarding coordinated services between DSHS/DVR and local education agencies.
  • Partner with education and community partners to present a yearly statewide transition conference, beginning in 2017, that is focused on services to all students with disabilities. (Page 256)

DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR-CD contracts with each county. 

  • DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH have signed a memorandum of collaboration that establishes methods for Medicaid outpatient behavioral health services to be provided as extended services for joint DSHS/DVR supported employment customers.
  • DBHR-MH has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model.
  • DSHS/DVR is participating with DBHR-MH in conducting a pilot project at two locations that is designed to integrate the Individual Placement Support (IPS) model of supported employment with DSHS/DVR supported employment services.
  • DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 267)
Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement
  • Occupational skills training with priority for those that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials aligned with in–demand sectors or occupations
  • Education offered concurrently with or in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or cluster
  • Leadership development opportunities, including community service and peer–centered activities that promote responsibility and positive social and civic behaviors
  • Supportive services
  • Adult mentoring for the period of participation and for not less than 12 months following participation
  • Follow–up services for not less than 12 months (includes all allowable youth services and activities)
  • Comprehensive guidance and counseling, which may include drug and alcohol abuse and referral
  • Financial literacy education
  • Entrepreneurial skills training (Page 75)
Benefits

2. Increase Business Engagement with a Clearly Defined Workforce Value Stream: Only 8 percent of Washington businesses utilize the public workforce system. This stark fact underscores the limited interaction between businesses and workforce development service providers at all levels. Businesses need simple paths to the workforce system and a better understanding of the benefits, whether it’s filling open positions with qualified applicants from WorkSource, shaping training programs to ensure workers have industry–specific skills, or partnering with higher education. In addition, once businesses and industries are engaged—be it through sector strategies or recruitment services—the workforce system must build and sustain these partnership (Page 38)

The Social Security and entitlements (Federal, State and Veterans) can be very complex and difficult to understand and navigate. Many individuals decide not to work or work fewer hours based upon the misperceptions that they will lose their benefits (medical and financial) if they go to work. As such we are in the process of developing partnership efforts with the Washington State Benefits Planner Networks, The Maximus Ticket to Work WIPA program, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and others in an effort to provide individuals with access to these resources. This is in addition to the Affordable Care Act and the Healthcare for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) or Medicaid Buy In program. (Page103)

Blind, low vision and deaf blind users of the workforce system have typically been left unserved in the good work of the state’s sector industry strategies. In addressing the business needs for identifying and developing targeted training to fill workforce gap needs in the key sector industries, Washington State’s workforce system has a stellar reputation, but those with visual disability have not typically benefited from the programs, apprenticeships and opportunities. (Page 128)

The goal is to develop more formal agreements between the State and National Grantees in order to expand upon the strengths, capabilities and resources of the individual grantees. These formal partnerships and working agreements will be of benefit not just to the SCSEP provider organizations, but also for the benefit of the spectrum of Workforce employment and education programs.

The State Program Manager has approached DOL about implementing changes to the Grantee contracting to process in order to achieve greater collaboration and cohesion for the SCSEP program within the State of Washington. Beyond the DOL contracting process the state manager is exploring the development of MOUs between the State and the National grantees in order to create cohesion of the program; develop formal agreements with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation; potentially data sharing agreements with State entities; accessing the DSHS and or WDC Ticket to Work EN network for reimbursement for the services provided by the grantees (with the exception of Goodwill Industries which already is a EN). (Page 132)

The Workforce Board coordinates 16 workforce programs (Title I, Title II, Title III, and Title IV WIOA Programs; Postsecondary Professional Technical Education, Worker Retraining Program, Job Skills Program, Customized Training Program, Secondary Career and Technical Education Programs, Training Benefits Program, Apprenticeships, Perkins Act programs, and the Private Vocational Schools Act), administered by seven agencies. We measure the performance of programs accounting for about 95 percent of federal and state dollars spent on our workforce system––or roughly $780 million per year. (Page 138)

Additional Programs under the State’s Workforce Development Plan: Secondary and Postsecondary Career and Technical Education, Job Skills Program, Customized Training Program, Worker Retraining Program, Training Benefits Program, Apprenticeship, Private Vocational Schools (Page 169)

Washington’s local boards routinely activate the rapid response teams when a TAA petition is filed. That approach is directed by state WIOA Title I Policy 5603 https://esd.wa.gov/WIOA/WIOA-Title-I-Policy-5603 (Rapid Response for WIOA and TAA). Washington’s State Employment Security Department (the State Workforce Agency) also engages local boards after TAA petitions are filed to determine if “gap” funding in the form of Rapid Response Additional Assistance is needed to serve dislocated workers attached to events for which TAA petitions have been filed between the time those event occur and such time as the events are certified by the U.S. Department of Labor. This approach is enshrined in WIOA Title I Policy 5604 https://esd.wa.gov/WIOA/WIOA-Title-I-Policy-5604 (Rapid Response Additional Assistance).

Washington has a comprehensive policy and procedures for determining training provider eligibility as articulated in state WIOA Title I Policy 5611, Revision 1 https://esd.wa.gov/WIOA/WIOA-Title-I-Policy-5611-Revision-1 (Governor’s Procedures for Determining Training Program Eligibility). The state’s Eligible Training Provider List is managed by the State Workforce Development Board and is widely employed by the state and federally-funded training programs in Washington as a consumer report tool. In addition to WIOA Title I, other programs that have policies requiring the use of the state’s Eligible Training Provider List to identify qualified training providers includes the state’s Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program, Unemployment Insurance-related Training Benefits program, and Worker Retraining, Job Skills, and Customized Training programs under the public community and technical college system.( Page 181)

In PY14 Washington State Employment Security Department took a major step in reorganizing divisions and responsibilities as the state’s administrative entity for WIA programs. Formerly siloed WIA policy functions were reassigned and placed in the UI Division to form the new Employment System Policy and Integrity Operations directorate including Employment Systems Administration and Policy). This bold change is providing new mutual learning and leadership opportunities across both the UI division and the Workforce Career Development Division (WCDD) operating Wagner-Peyser, UI Reemployment and RESEA, TAA and WorkFirst (TANF Job Search) at the state level. Embedding WIOA policy administration within the UI division well-positions the State for a more coordinated policy nexus around Wagner-Peyser, WIOA Title 1-B, inclusive of UI benefits and reemployment functions. (Page 193)

This research-based program was named a Bright Idea by Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government in 2011 and has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as the most significant innovation in the last 20 years. According to a December, 2012 report by the Community College Research Center, I-BEST programs provide benefits that justify additional costs.

Research conducted separately by the Community College Research Center and the Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board found that I-BEST students outperform similar students enrolled in traditional basic skills programs. I-BEST students are: 3 times more likely to earn college credits; 9 times more likely to earn a workforce credential; Employed at double the hours per week (35 hours versus 15 hours); Earning an average of $2,310 more per year than similar adults who did not receive basic skills training; and more than 3,000 Washington students are enrolled in I-BEST programs annually. (Page 221)

The WSRC recommends that DVR address the need for additional resources for benefits planning and assistive technology services required in WIOA. Within WIOA, benefits planning and assistive technology services are emphasized. The agency needs to create a plan to address these required services. (Page 244)

DSHS/DVR and WDVA have procedures for referring DSHS/DVR customers with military service to WDVA to determine eligibility for any state or federal Veterans’ benefits. This collaboration has increased the use of Veterans’ benefits as comparable services for DSHS/DVR customers who are veterans with disabilities. ( Page 249)

The Health Care Authority (HCA) administers Medicaid services to all DSHS/DVR customer recipients. DSHS/DVR and HCA closely coordinate to assure that individuals receive medical and behavioral health services necessary to achieve their employment goals. In addition, DSHS/DVR is working to develop a cooperative agreement with HCA, DBHR, and DDA that describes how Title 19 services under the State Medicaid Plan, including community-based waiver programs, will be utilized to develop and support integrated, community-based employment opportunities for customers.

HCA also administers Health Care for Workers with Disabilities (HWD), a Medicaid buy-in program. DSHS/DVR coordinates with HWD to assist qualified individuals in continuing to receive medical benefits after they become employed. (Page 251)

CLOSED REHABILITATED SURVEY RESPONSES 

A majority of closed rehabilitated respondents answered with strong agreement or agreement to all satisfaction survey responses.

Over 90.0% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with:

  • DVR treated me with courtesy and respect. (93.94%)
  • Overall, DVR helped me. (91.50%)
  • I was given enough information to understand how DVR could help me with employment. (91.09%)
  • I chose where to get services in my DVR plan. (90.91%)
  • DVR answered my questions. (90.63%)
  • DVR explained what services were available to help me. (90.35%)
  • DVR listened to me. (90.20%) 

80.0% - 90.0% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with: 

  • DVR does good work. (89.76%)
  • I chose my own job goal. (88.26%)
  • I like the work I do. (88.07%)
  • I use my skills and abilities that are most important to me in my job. (86.0%)
  • DVR understood my problems the problems I faced in getting and keeping a job. (84.11%)
  • Overall, I am satisfied with my job. (83.77%)
  • I received services in my DVR employment plan quickly enough. (81.77%)
  • DVR returned my phone calls quickly. (80.50%)

50.0% - 80.0% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with: 

  • DVR gave me information about other programs that could help me. (74.45%)
  • If I had complaints or concerns about services, I was satisfied with how DVR responded. (71.81%)
  • My pay is enough for my basic needs. (68.95%)
  • I am satisfied with my benefits (medical, dental, etc.). (59.87%) ( Page 279)

Goal one reflects DSHS/DVR’s focus on providing high-quality services that result in high-quality employment outcomes. Based on 2014 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) findings and stakeholder input, these priorities emphasize the importance of supporting customers in high-quality employment which offers the pay and benefits that support financial independence. ( Page 291)

Provide Pre-employment Transition Services designed to facilitate job exploration and other services such as counseling and self-advocacy training in the early stages of the school to work transition. 

  • Broaden the population of individuals with disabilities served by DSHS/DVR through outreach which increases the representation of underserved or unserved populations, specifically emphasizing outreach to Washington’s Hispanic and Latino communities.
  • Target outreach, education, and marketing to individuals with disabilities who are currently employed to retain or advance, previous customers who may be unemployed and are seeking employment, students nearing completion of academic programs, individuals who have exhausted Unemployment Insurance benefits, and other underserved populations.
  • Utilize contracted translation and interpreter services, including American Sign Language services, to improve accessible and quality services to customers with limited English proficiency or who are Deaf or hard of hearing. (Page 297)
  • Increase use of Post–Employment Services to support customers in maintaining, regaining, or advancing in employment through better communicating these services and their benefits.
  • Provide training and technical assistance to businesses on best practices for recruiting and retaining employees with disabilities ( Page 302)

Outreach, education, and marketing efforts will be targeted to individuals with disabilities who are: already working to retain or progress in employment, previous DSHS/DVR customers who may have lost employment and want to become reemployed, college students nearing completion of their academic programs, individuals who have exhausted their Unemployment Insurance benefits, and other groups who are identified as underserved. 

  • Evaluation: Outreach plans were developed and implemented by local DSHS/DVR offices to reach these targeted populations. Overall, the success of these plans was mixed and continued emphasis is being placed on reaching these underserved populations. Efforts to coordinate outreach with the Employment Security Department and LWDBs proved to be more challenging than anticipated and will be a focus of improvement throughout development and implementation of this Combined State Plan. (Page 305)

Increase DSHS/DVR’s ability to assist customers to achieve higher wage jobs with health benefits. 

  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR conducted Lean A3 events to identify ways to encourage more customers to pursue higher wage jobs with benefits. This produced specific recommendations that have been incorporated in to DSHS/DVR Counselor practices (e.g. assisting customers to conduct more substantive labor market research before choosing an employment goal, encouraging customers to consider employment goals beyond the entry-level, and providing customers with better information about training opportunities that lead to higher wage jobs). (Page 306)

Provide more timely and thorough Benefits Planning to customers who receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) so they can make better informed choices about the types of jobs they seek and amount of hours they will work. 

  • Evaluation: All DSHS/DVR counselors have been trained to provide Benefits Planning to their customers who receive SSI. In addition, four DSHS/DVR Benefits Specialists provide Benefits Planning to customers who receive SSDI or both SSDI/SSI. Plans are underway to hire 12 Benefits Technicians who will provide additional Benefits Planning capacity statewide. (Page 306)

Improve and expand services to enhance earnings, employee benefits and career advancement for customers, including individuals served through supported employment. 

  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR conducted Lean A3 events to identify ways to encourage more customers to pursue higher wage jobs with benefits. This produced specific recommendations that have been incorporated in to DSHS/DVR counselor practices (e.g. assisting customers to conduct more substantive labor market research before choosing an employment goal, encouraging customers to consider employment goals beyond the entry-level, and providing customers with better information about training opportunities that lead to higher wage jobs). (Page 307-312) 

Statewide Assessment (j): The SRC commends DSB for conducting good demographic data analysis under this section. The SRC also suggests that DSB consider conducting analysis of individuals who are blind with co–occurring disabilities compared with the general population. This would emphasize the extent to which services that meet the needs of these specific populations are needed in order for these individuals to achieve employment outcomes and related benefits at the same rate as other VR participants and as the general population. ( Page 335)

Diligent efforts by DSB staff have facilitated long–term services through state benefits, natural supports, employers and self–pay. DSB continues to promote the use of Ticket to Work as a potential income source for developmental disability (DD), mental health (MH), and traumatic brain injury (TBI) service providers to provide long–term support services to our customers after exit from the VR program. The DSB continues to work with employers and other natural supports to identify funding for long–term support services. (Page 348)

  • DSB will facilitate a coordinated effort to engage Business Leadership Network (BLN) businesses with our collaborative efforts on behalf of the WIOA system, job seekers and transition youth to support mutual success and benefits.
  • DSB will develop appropriate internal business engagement strategies that will assist the agency in scaling to the statewide and local business engagement efforts. (Page 351)

The RSA r–911 data provides strong evidence that DSB places emphasis on careers that provide living wages and benefits, within a competitive and integrated context. The agency wants to maintain and build on this excellence in quality of services and outcomes.

Demographic data compiled from the agency and compared to general Washington state demographics through tools such as the American Community Survey highlights underserved communities for agency programs. (368)

For the year 2014, Social Security Administration estimates for Social Security disability recipients in Washington State show that approximately 16.3% of all residents with a disability receive SSI/SSDI benefits.

For FFY2015, 20.4% of all participants served through the agency’s VR program were recipients of Social Security benefits.

Of those individuals who exited with an employment outcome and had listed public assistance as their primary support at application, 75% instead were able to list earnings from their work as primary support at exit. We serve a higher proportion of individuals on SSI/SSDI, and fewer DSB participants require those benefits upon exiting the program.

What we know about DSB from the Comprehensive Needs Assessment data:

RSA and performance data: 

  • DSB customer base is predominantly made up of individuals who have either significant or most significant disabilities
  • Strengths of the agency can be seen in quality of employment outcomes – high percentage competitive and integrated; high average hourly and weekly wages; high number hours worked per week; high number of participants meeting Substantial Gainful Activity; diversity of career outcomes and individualized vocational goals; strong supports for higher education and adaptive technology within the vocational plan. (Page 371)

Under the Combined State Plan, the DSB expects the new relationship among core group and partner programs to genuinely address the development of pathways for access that allow blind, low vision and deaf blind individuals to also engage in the workforce activities that enhance and increase their opportunities towards the State’s strategy of High Skills/High Wages. This access to workforce activities is currently aspirational, as our agency blind participants have been largely denied access to the benefits of the greater workforce system since the 1998 WIA implementation. Future success of equal participation in these workforce activities will depend on the WIOA partners’ active awareness and belief that individuals who are blind are viable participants within the workforce, and that the DSB is a valuable collaborator among workforce partners. Access and navigation issues must be addressed with highest priority among all partner programs. (Page 383)

The DSB will consistently offer information as to the benefits of making access an organizational essential priority, and provide supports to get partner organizations and businesses on the path towards accessibility. (Page 338)

Washington State currently estimates 104,809 ABAWDs statewide, with 22,231 in non-exempt areas. After applying the maximum number of 15% exemptions (278 clients receiving the exemption for 12 months), 21,953 are considered at-risk for losing SNAP benefits due to having no personal or geographical exemptions. The ABAWDs in the two ABAWD Counties without the waiver are typically among the lowest income individuals, who also face some of the highest barriers such as homelessness and undiagnosed mental/physical health conditions. DSHS will attempt to assist at-risk ABAWDs by providing all available resources directly to clients, as well as providing education to other community agencies that ABAWDs may access. (Page 448)

C.F.R. §273.7(f), will not apply for noncompliance. The amount of hours to be worked will be negotiated between the household and the operating agency, though not to exceed the limits provided under 7 C.F.R. §273.7(m)(5)(ii). In addition, all protections provided under 7 C.F.R. §273.7(m)(6)(i) shall continue to apply. Those State agencies and political subdivisions choosing to operate such a program shall indicate in their workfare plan how their staffing will adapt to anticipated and unanticipated levels of participation for each Federal fiscal year covered by the Combined Plan under WIOA. FNS will not approve plans which do not show that the benefits of the workfare program, in terms of hours worked by participants and reduced SNAP allotments due to successful job attainment, are expected to exceed the costs of such a program. In addition, if FNS finds that an approved voluntary program does not meet this criterion, FNS reserves the right to withdraw approval.* * 7 CFR § 273.7(m)(8) WA State will not be using this option. (Page 454)

(E) COMPARABLE WORKFARE 

The State agency or political subdivision must provide a description of its program, including a methodology for ensuring compliance with 7 C.F.R §273.7(m)(9)(ii) for each Federal fiscal year covered by the Combined Plan under WIOA.* *7 CFR § 273.7(m)(9)

Washington State’s Workfare program is under development but will follow the Comparable Workfare format in that ABAWDs who are at risk of losing their SNAP benefits will be allowed to count volunteer workfare hours to regain or retain eligibility.

DSHS provides a Workfare component in FFY 2017. DSHS has contact with at least 50 non-profit agencies to provide voluntary positions that comply with Workfare provisions. The State will consider the minimum Workfare requirement for ABAWDs choosing the Workfare option to be the SNAP monthly benefit amount divided by The Washington State Minimum wage of $9.47 per hour. Workfare will comply with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) minimum wage laws. (Page 455)

(A) HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG 

To improve veterans services, LVERs and DVOPs will support improvements in their AJCs and communities where: 

  • LVERs work with all AJC staff to identify and increase skill development opportunities designed to generate pathways to long-term high-wage employment for veterans who can qualify for support such as unemployment benefits while in training, the GI Bill, etc.;
  • DVOPs articulate training programs to Veterans with SBEs, for alignment with military experience in order to expedite advanced placement whenever possible;
  • LVERs build bridges to apprenticeship providers and advocate for placement based upon the merits veterans bring from their prior training and experience; and (Page 459)
  • Planning and participating in job and career fairs. The LVERs routinely host or partner in employment events focused on the hiring of veterans. These include specialized hiring events, such as a June 2014 one for Federal contractors that was attended by more than 70 employers with current job openings. At hiring events, the LVERs collect contact data and conduct outreach to promote One-Stop services and DVOP referral, where appropriate.
  • Conducting employer outreach. LVERs reach out to local employers to promote the hiring of veterans, explaining the practical advantages to hiring veterans, as well as the benefits, such as Work Opportunity Tax Credit and potential for funded OJTs.
  • Partnering with employers to conduct job searches and workshops. Washington State’s LVERs conduct job search workshops and establish job search groups/job clubs in conjunction with the needs of local employers. This has proven beneficial to both providing employers a better appreciation for the challenges faced by veterans in transitioning to civilian employment. This practice will be implemented statewide in this program period. (Page 460)
  • Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans. LVERs reach out to Federal contractors using Labor Exchange job listings, Federal contractor listings, VetCentral listings, company web-sites, and other places where employers may post job announcements. ESD has engaged with OFCCP to provide valuable information on Federal contractor participation in the state employment system. Additionally, LVERs work directly with contractors to advise them on the benefits and process for locating and hiring veterans into their workforces. Recently, the state program coordinator spoke at an event hosted by OFCCP to educate Federal contractors on utilizing the One-Stop system for veteran recruitment. We will continue this focus, with the future LVER position being hired to Central Office.
  • Working with other One-Stop staff to assist in development of the service delivery strategies for veterans and educating partner staff with employment initiatives and programs for veterans. Statewide, LVERs are providing training to AJC staff on serving veterans, which will be critical in promoting the new culture, where an anticipated 70% of veterans are being served by non-JVSG staff. The LVERs are using and promoting completion of the recently released online NVTI course for front line staff serving veterans. (Page 470)

One good example of successful partnering takes place in King County, the state’s most populated area. DVOPs collaborate with the King County Veterans Program, which is funded by a Veterans and Human Services Levy through 2017. This partnership, which includes a plethora of community and veterans services organizations, provides low-income, homeless, disabled and at-risk veterans with emergency financial assistance, housing, employment guidance, benefits counseling and health referrals. (Page 467)

The Social Security and entitlements (Federal, State and Veterans) can be very complex and difficult to understand and navigate. Many individuals decide not to work or work fewer hours based upon the misperceptions that they will lose their benefits (medical and financial) if they go to work. As such we are in the process of developing partnership efforts with the Washington State Benefits Planner Networks, The Maximus Ticket to Work WIPA program, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and others in an effort to provide individuals with access to these resources. This is in addition to the Affordable Care Act and the Healthcare for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) or Medicaid Buy In program. (Page 512)

At this point in time it is uncertain how many individuals may be enrolled /co–enrolled with DVR services. One of DVR’s goals on its newly developed State Plan is to increase access to services for those individuals with disabilities (on SSDI) who have a work history but became unemployed and exhausted their unemployment benefits. Based upon the Washington State ESD data approximately 5,000 individuals are identified in this category in the state of Washington. We will strive to work with DVR leadership and local staff to support these individuals engaging with DVR. Additionally this could be an additional source of revenue for the SCSEP programs if they were to become Community Rehabilitation Programs able to contract to provide these services. (Page 514)

School to Work Transition
  • Facilitate the development of programs for school–to–work transition that combine classroom education and on–the–job training, including entrepreneurial education and training, in industries and occupations without a significant number of apprenticeship programs;
  • Include in the planning requirements for local workforce investment boards a requirement that the local workforce investment boards specify how entrepreneurial training is to be offered through the one–stop system required under the workforce investment act, P.L. 105–220, or its successor;
  • Encourage and assess progress for the equitable representation of racial and ethnic minorities, women, and people with disabilities among the students, teachers, and administrators of the state training system. Equitable, for this purpose, shall mean substantially proportional to their percentage of the state population in the geographic area served. This function of the board shall in no way lessen more stringent state or federal requirements for representation of racial and ethnic minorities, women, and people with disabilities; (Page142)
  • Increase outreach to students in traditionally unserved and underserved populations that include tribal youth, justice-involved youth, homeless youth, and students and youth receiving foster care. Outreach activities include media, opportunities for participation in group-based PETS activities, individual outreach at schools, DSHS/DVR relationship building and coordination with education officials, presentations and career fairs for students, youth, families, schools, and community partners.
  • Solicit proposals for Project Search development, and became a funding partner with current Project Search programs in Washington State that serve students with disabilities.
  • Strengthen DSHS/DVR participation in current School-to-Work programs statewide by providing increased training and technical assistance for School-to-Work partners, including earlier DVR input into assessment and employment planning for students.
  • Contract with Centers for Independent Living to enhance and expand core independent living services, focusing on youth with significant disabilities. In addition to core services, Centers for Independent Living have been focusing on outreach to increase services in unserved or underserved geographic areas. Additional outreach efforts include targeted disability groups, minority groups, and urban or rural populations with the focus on youth with significant disabilities and 504 plans. The goal is to create a safe environment in which youth feel comfortable and confident when talking to allies. This goal will be accomplished by enhancing youth understanding of the Independent Living philosophy, successful self-advocacy, and how engage with legislators about disability issues.  (Page 257)

Provide Pre-employment Transition Services designed to facilitate job exploration and other services such as counseling and self-advocacy training in the early stages of the school to work transition. 

  • Broaden the population of individuals with disabilities served by DSHS/DVR through outreach which increases the representation of underserved or unserved populations, specifically emphasizing outreach to Washington’s Hispanic and Latino communities.
  • Target outreach, education, and marketing to individuals with disabilities who are currently employed to retain or advance, previous customers who may be unemployed and are seeking employment, students nearing completion of academic programs, individuals who have exhausted Unemployment Insurance benefits, and other underserved populations.
  • Utilize contracted translation and interpreter services, including American Sign Language services, to improve accessible and quality services to customers with limited English proficiency or who are Deaf or hard of hearing. (Page 297)
Data Collection

No specific disability related information found.

Small business/Entrepreneurship
  • Customized Training Program (State Board for Community and Technical Colleges): A training institution delivers dedicated customized employee training as requested by the business. The level of customization ranges from existing training curriculum delivered at the job site to fully customized training curriculum developed exclusively for the business.
  • Higher Education (Community and Technical Colleges, Four–year Colleges and Universities, Private Career Schools): Education and training, customized training, incumbent worker training, certification, apprenticeship related supplemental instruction (RSI), education and career counseling, small business resources.
  • Job Skills Program (State Board for Community and Technical Colleges): Prospective and current employees of a business receiving a Job Skills Program (JSP) grant are eligible for training. Eligible businesses and industries include private firms and institutions, groups, or associations concerned with commerce, trade, manufacturing, or service provisions. Public or nonprofit hospitals are also eligible.
  • Title I Youth, Adult and Dislocated Worker programs (Various state and local service providers): Workforce development workshops, assessment and career guidance, resources for worker training, on–the–job training, support services. (Page 28)

To a change in vision. Another aspect is the ability to fulfill business recruitment needs through connecting the business with the talents of job–ready and skilled agency participants, and to offer the ability to create individualized and low–risk opportunities for the business so that a participant might best showcase their ability and potential value to the workplace. The DSB will provide guidance on issues of disability in the workplace, including education around the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) Act; information on how to benefit from federal and local incentives for hiring of individuals with disabilities, and offer supports to the business for successfully meeting required mandates for hiring of individuals with disabilities. The DSB will offer workplace accommodation recommendations and supports, and education and guidance on making the workplace a disability–friendly and inclusive environment. The DSB will connect business to disability–related resources, training and/or education available in the community at large. The DSB will engage business in identifying supply chain needs, and will assist in establishing entrepreneurs and small businesses that might best fulfill that supply chain need. ( Page 84)

A DSB–offered array of services for business includes many components. One component is to increase awareness among business of the agency’s range of services, in order to provide an easy pathway for business to retain a talented employee whose work performance may be impacted due to a change in vision. Another aspect is the ability to fulfill business recruitment needs through connecting the business with the talents of job–ready and skilled agency participants, and to offer the ability to create individualized and low–risk opportunities for the business so that a participant might best showcase their ability and potential value to the workplace. The DSB will provide guidance on issues of disability in the workplace, including education around the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) Act; information on how to benefit from federal and local incentives for hiring of individuals with disabilities, and offer supports to the business for successfully meeting required mandates for hiring of individuals with disabilities. The DSB will offer workplace accommodation recommendations and supports, and education and guidance on making the workplace a disability–friendly and inclusive environment. The DSB will connect business to disability–related resources, training and/or education available in the community at large. The DSB will engage business in identifying supply chain needs, and will assist in establishing entrepreneurs and small businesses that might best fulfill that supply chain need. (Page 119)

The DSB and its Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act partners are the key players in Washington State economic strategy for workforce development, and the DSB encourages and supports science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) employment goals and vocational and academic training for all eligible participants who have aptitude and interest, and look to collaborate with the Washington School for the Blind and other partners to develop workshops and programs that will encourage interest in STEM activities at a young age.

The DSB will continue to identify eligible participants with aptitude for entrepreneurialism, and continue to support start–up opportunities of small business as an important means for blind, low vision and/or deaf blind individuals to join in on the key Washington State economic development strategy of encouraging small business. Blind business owners often become employers themselves, helping drive the state’s workforce engine. (Page 130)

The DSB will engage business in identifying supply chain needs, and will assist in establishing entrepreneurs and small businesses that might best fulfill that supply chain need.

Due to the small size of the DSB customer base and agency staffing in comparison to other workforce partner programs, the agency and its eligible participants will benefit from the broader infrastructure that state plan partners develop and nurture towards increased business engagement. The DSB alone cannot fully provide the amount of skilled talent business requires, and the DSB as a separate entity cannot efficiently engage business statewide.

The DSB will rely on active inclusion of its staff in the One–Stop Business Services Teams, and depend on the accessibility of workforce programs for agency participants, in order to meet the broader engagement of business in a manner that works best for business – through a seamless single point of contact. DSB counselors develop relationships with local business partners, and will guide those relationships (as applicable) into the greater workforce system in order to best fulfill the business needs. (Page 385)

Career Pathways

I–BEST Programs 

Professional Technical I–BEST co–enrolls students in adult basic education and college credit–bearing career pathways that lead to living wage jobs. I–BEST accelerates students down their career pathway, by contextualizing and team teaching the language, math, and other foundational skills needed to succeed in their professional–technical program. I–BEST students are nine times more likely to earn a workforce credential than students in traditional basic education programs.

Professional Technical Expansion I–BEST allows students to move further and faster down their career pathway by putting English and math courses in context, as needed for longer–term certificate and degree programs. This allows students to skip developmental education and earn their college or terminal–level English and math credits through contextualization and team teaching.

Academic I–BEST co–enrolls students in adult basic education and Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA) courses for students intending to earn a transfer degree. Through Academic I–BEST, adult education students can accelerate their progress down a transfer career pathway and reduce or eliminate time spent in developmental education. (Page 50)

Integrated Service Delivery Summary and Goals 

In conclusion, a truly integrated service delivery system holds promise for Washington’s workforce by helping people reach their goals no matter their barriers, their background, or where they entered the system. Doing this effectively calls for increasing the number of navigators in the state’s WorkSource system, eliminating redundant assessments, and helping more customers define career pathways that help them achieve portable skills, higher education levels, industry credentials, and satisfying, living–wage careers. 

Engaging Business for Better Results 

When Washington’s workforce system effectively engages with business, it’s a win–win situation for workers, and for employers. By working closely with firms to determine their talent challenges and by implementing effective solutions, the workforce system helps both businesses and workers prosper. (Page 51)

Job order listings and applicant referrals through WorkSourceWA.com, the Monster–based  job matching system to provide a deeper pool of talent for employers to recruit

  • Employer Needs Assessment
  • Unemployment Insurance Access
  • Access to Facilities
  • Translation Services
  • Developing and delivering innovative workforce investment services and strategies for area employers, e.g., career pathways, skills upgrading, skill standard development and certification for recognized postsecondary credential or other employer use, apprenticeship, and other effective initiatives for meeting the workforce investment needs of area employers and workers
  • Assistance in managing reductions in force in coordination with rapid response activities and with strategies for the aversion of layoffs, and the delivery of employment and training activities to address risk factors
  • Assisting employers with accessing local, state, and federal tax credits, including Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) certification
  • Local Veterans Employment Representatives outreach to businesses to veterans to employers interested in attracting qualified veterans
  • Recruiting and initial screening for participation in WIOA special projects to train for demand occupations, OJTs or customized training
  • Increasing rapid response and pursuing National Dislocated Worker Grant funding to serve dislocated workers (Page 79)

Some centers have co–located vocational rehabilitation counselors with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation in the Department of Social and Health Services. Co–location of VR staff increases referrals from Wagner–Peyser and other co–located staff and vice versa. Coordination between core and other programs is better so that persons with disabilities can get more help to compete for and enjoy high quality employment through acquiring the necessary skills while receiving any necessary supports. Under WIOA Title IV, VR staff outreach to disabled youth graduating from the K–12 system will encourage more young people to pursue assistance from WorkSource to begin career pathways toward self–support through viable avenues. Many ES–staffed one stops have taken the initiative to invite high school teachers of students on IEPs to make field trips fostering a sense of comfort in approaching WorkSource. (Page 107)

  • Developing and delivering innovative workforce investment services and strategies for area employers, e.g., career pathways, skills upgrading, skill standard development and certification for recognized postsecondary credentials or other employer use, apprenticeship, and other effective initiatives for meeting the workforce investment needs of area employers and workers
  • Assistance in managing reductions in force in coordination with rapid response activities and with strategies for the aversion of layoffs, and the delivery of employment and training activities to address risk factors. (Page 115)

DSHS TANF (WorkFirst) and SNAP Employment and Training (Basic Food Employment and Training–BFET) strategies support access to post–secondary credentials through contracting and partnering with the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges. This partnership includes all 34 community and technical colleges.

TANF: Through TANF (WorkFirst), participants have access to a continuum of educational opportunities to include Basic Education for Adults and Vocational education. Washington’s innovative post–secondary educational opportunities are structured around career pathways with stackable certificates allowing students to earn college credits leading to industry recognized certifications and degrees. DSHS supports participant access to these programs through referral, tuition payment, coordinated case management, supportive services, and childcare. In addition, the TANF/WorkFirst program actively supports and promotes the use of the Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I–BEST) program, allowing low skilled (literacy and numeracy) adults or those without a high school diploma or equivalent to enter a college–level, credit bearing, career pathways program and bolster basic skills through team–taught, integrated instruction contextualized to the vocational education career pathway. (Page 126)

  • Labor exchange services (job search and placement, info on in–demand industries and occupations, info on non–traditional employment for current and future jobseekers; recruitment and other business services for employers)

Streamlining customer intake means taking targeted information from a participant on day one to place them in a program, or mixture of programs, that will—at a minimum—meet their immediate needs. New participants, particularly individuals with barriers to employment, should experience connection and the feeling of momentum or forward movement beginning on the first day. Finding the right program fit can occur in subsequent visits, but the customer should not be bombarded with duplicative requests for information or skills assessments. Staff must be “Navigators” who help people design individual career pathways and then assist them in finding an economically self–sustaining route forward. Partners will need to work together differently, including at points of transition (hand–offs) between organizations, the points of co–servicing (participant receiving multiple services from multiple organizations at the same time), and in the way they manage funding and services braided across organizations. (Page 136)

6.   Whether the activities are built on a strong foundation of research and effective educational practice;

7.   Whether the activities effectively employ advances in technology, as appropriate, including the use of computers and blended learning resources;

8.   Whether the activities provide learning in real life, college and career contexts to ensure that an individual has the skills needed to compete in the workplace and exercise the rights and responsibilities of citizenship;

9.   Whether the activities are staffed by well-trained instructors, counselors, and administrators;

10.  Whether the activities coordinate with other available resources in the community, such as establishing strong links with elementary and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies;

11.  Whether the activities offer flexible schedules and support services (such as child care and transportation) as needed to enable all students, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;

12.  Whether the activities maintain a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report participant outcomes and to monitor program performance against the eligible agency performance measures; and

13. Whether the local communities have a demonstrated need for additional English literacy programs. In addition, to ensure that providers meet the WIOA requirements, proposals will be evaluated by teams from SBCTC on their ability to:

  • Implement and scale effective college and career pathways that accelerate student completion and foster economic growth
  • Guide and support transformational instructional practices that accelerate student completion to diplomas, high school equivalency, certificates, the Tipping Point, and AA/BA degrees leading to family wage jobs. Plans must include:
    • Implementing the CCR Standards in all programming;
    • Integrating employability skills training and instruction in all courses at all levels;
    • Beginning implementation of integrated employment and training activities such as I BEST into all EL Civics instruction to be fully implemented by July 1, 2016;
    • Expanding the teaching of speaking and listening into all levels of both ABE and ELA programming; and
    • Integrating problem solving in technology rich environments at all levels of instruction. (Page 150)

The department’s overall strategy for providing reemployment services to UI and other unemployed individuals encompasses a number of mandatory and optional program partnerships. Under WIA, partnerships evolved and are expected to expand even more with WIOA with an expectation of more seamless service delivery. More integrated service delivery should ideally result in developing an intake process that eliminates redundant assessments and streamlines the customer experience. ESD is leading with local Workforce Development Councils. Other entities with specialized programs serving parents on TANF, Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs), MSFWs, homeless, ex-offenders, veterans, dislocated workers, persons with disabilities, and the long-term unemployed when included should increase the number of participants who have defined career pathways and who gain portable skills. All will be better informed and served as Integrated Service Delivery advances. (Page 197)

Guide and support transformational instructional practices that accelerate student completion to diplomas, high school equivalency, certificates, the Tipping Point, and AA/BA degrees leading to family wage jobs;

Plans must include: Implementing the CCR Standards in all programming; Integrating employability skills training and instruction in all courses at all levels; Beginning implementation of integrated employment and training activities such as I-BEST into all IEL/Civics instruction to be fully implemented by July 1, 2016; Integrated reading strategies instruction at all levels in all courses; Expanding the teaching of speaking and listening into all levels of both ABE and ELA programming; and Integrating problem solving in technology-rich environments at all levels of instruction;

Support one-stop centers through in-kind services/funding; Support alignment of workforce investment, education, and economic development; Improve labor market relevance; Improve the structure of service delivery; Increase prosperity; employment, retention, earnings, and the attainment of recognized postsecondary credentials. (Page 213)

Funded providers use key elements of I-BEST programs, e.g. contextualization, team teaching, enhanced students services, and articulated college and career pathways, to increase the speed at which students master basic and ELA skills at federal levels 1, 2 and 3. On Ramp options include, but are not limited to: programs focused on career clusters; partnership efforts between colleges and community-based organizations and local workforce development councils (WIBs); I-BEST at Work projects that partner providers, employers and WIBs; Project I-DEA (Integrated Digital English Acceleration), a three-year pilot program with support from the Gates Foundation that will transform ELA instruction using a flipped classroom model and 50% online instruction.

In 1-3 quarters, On Ramp students acquire the skills needed to transition to basic skills education classes at federal levels 4-6 and/or Professional/Technical or Academic I-BEST pathways. (Page 222)

Washington state’s combined plan will address the activities that will be undertaken to meet the requirements of Section 233 of WIOA to promote transitions from adult education to postsecondary education and training through career pathways. Under the new combined plan, all Basic Education for Adults providers will use funds made available under section 222(a)(2) for the adult education and literacy required WIOA activities including the four new required national leadership activities to develop or enhance the adult education system across the state. All funded providers will be required to detail the process that will be used to collaborate with all stakeholders and align Basic Education for Adults programming in their 2015-2016 extension and 2017-2022 competitive grant plans with all partners named in the combined state plan. Eligible providers will provide services in alignment with local plans detailing how they will promote concurrent enrollment with Title I programs and activities in order to meet the state adjusted levels of performance and collect data to report on performance indicators. In addition, all providers will describe how they will fulfill one-stop responsibilities in their region. As members of local Workforce Development Boards, local providers will participate in ongoing plan development and implementation of WIOA. The following transition activities are underway in Washington to meet the four newly required state leadership activities requirements of WIOA: following activities have been completed or are underway in support:

  • The Washington State Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board (WTECB) has established a highly inclusive committee structure to identify key areas of work and implementation planning. Basic Education for Adults is represented on each of the committees with local providers being engaged as needed. The committees are:
    • Steering Committee: members include WTECB, Business, Labor, all core programs, Chief Local Elected Officials (CLEO), TANF, and the SBCTC. This committee’s work includes creating the WIOA vision and goals, state and local plan development, state policies and guidance to facilitate integrated services development, funding formula guidance, One Stop certification and evaluation criteria, oversight of work plans and timelines, facilitation of communication state-to-state, local-to-state, local-to-local, and among WIOA implementation committees, and state legislative issues.
    • Committee for Sector Strategies to Close Skill Gaps in the Workplace: members include WTECB, Educational Service Districts (ESD), Business, Labor, all core programs, Washington Workforce Association (WWA), Commerce, CLEO, SBCTC, and the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI).This committee’s work includes regional designation and governance, data analysis, local workforce development council designations, local board configuration, and sector strategy and industry engagement.
    • Committee for Performance Accountability and Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) Committee: members include WTECB, BEdA, DVR, Department of Services for the Blind (DSB) (Page 230)

The BEdA office works closely with the Council for Basic Skills (CBS) to determine areas in which programs need professional development in curriculum and instruction, policy and procedures, and implementation of new programming including reading strategies, IEL Civics program implementation, College and Career Readiness Standards, employability skills, and comprehensive guided pathways. The SBCTC agency also works across the various departments (WorkForce, Developmental Education, Research, Academic Transfer, Student Services, and eLearning) to determine and develop various professional development opportunities that are implemented to move targeted WIOA statewide initiatives forward. During the assessment of individual trainings participants are identify areas of further professional development needs. Once the need has been determined, SBCTC employs a variety of resources to develop and deliver the trainings. National organization such as LINCs and College and Career Readiness and Success Center at American Institute for Research (AIR); CLASP; and SBCTC’s Assessment, Teaching and Learning (ATL) Unit; Student Success Center, Guided Career Pathways Initiative , and eLearning departments. All State Leadership activities align with the required and permissible activities in SEC. 223.a.1 and 2 of WIOA. Federal leadership dollars are granted to providers in support of professional and program development initiatives that include: 

  • Team teacher training for all programming (ABE, ELA, HS 21+, On-Ramp to I-BEST, IEL Civics, and I-BEST) to support career pathways integrated employment and training activities;
  • Contextualized instruction training centered on the CCR Standards, integrated employability skills, and reading strategies;
  • Technology in flipped classroom instruction to integrate technology and employability skills development at all levels;
  • LINCS Adult Numeracy Training to integrate math instruction into ELA pathways and to increase numeracy instructional skills of faculty in order to meet the College and Career Readiness Standard, the new NRS Level descriptors, and to increase outcomes across the system in mathematics;
  • Innovation in IEL Civics supporting the development of co-enrolled integrated employment and training activities (I-BEST) as well as math at all levels;
  • Reading Apprenticeship Training to prepare students for college-level instruction; and
  • Contextualized integrated employability skills training. (Page 231)

Unlike traditional approaches in which students must learn English before pursuing job-training, I-DEA teaches English in tandem with college and career skills. This program has a highly intensive, quarterly staff training and implementation component in addition to on-going program support from SBCTC. I-DEA will be fully implemented in all programs by June 2016. 

  • Reading Apprenticeship training and implementation, which will continue in Washington State as a strategic instructional model throughout Adult Basic Education and college programming, incorporating the essential components of reading specific to adult learners’ needs.
  • LINCS Adult Numeracy Training, which will be conducted throughout 2014-15 in support of mathematics instruction for increased rigor of programing in order to prepare students for college and career pathways.
  • Technology and the flipped classroom model training which will begin in 2015 to enhance faculty skills in the use of instructional technology for distance education and student skill development in solving problems in technology rich environments. (Page 232)

2.   The provision of technical assistance to eligible providers of adult education and literacy activities receiving funds under this title, include:

  • The development and dissemination of instructional and programmatic practices based on the most rigorous or scientifically valid research available and appropriate, in reading, writing, speaking, mathematics, English language acquisition programs, distance education, and staff training. Current initiatives include:
    • Washington’s adoption in October of 2014 of the College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards as the basis for all instruction. 2014-17 will focus on training to transition from the Washington State Adult Learning Standards to CCR Standards with full implementation in 2017 with system wide professional development provided.
    • Integrated Digital English Acceleration (I-DEA), which is a hybrid instructional model based on the flipped classroom, providing problem solving activities in technology rich environments. Each student is provided with a laptop computer and 24/7 access to learning. Curriculum including language acquisition, rights and responsibilities of citizens and workforce training is thus available around the clock for ELA levels 1-3. Unlike traditional approaches in which students must learn English before pursuing job-training, I-DEA teaches English in tandem with college and career skills. This program has a highly intensive, quarterly staff training and implementation component in addition to on-going program support from SBCTC. I-DEA will be fully implemented in all programs by June 2016.
    • Reading Apprenticeship training and implementation, which will continue in Washington State as a strategic instructional model throughout Adult Basic Education and college programming, incorporating the essential components of reading specific to adult learners’ needs.
    • LINCS Adult Numeracy Training, which will be conducted throughout 2014-15 in support of mathematics instruction for increased rigor of programing in order to prepare students for college and career pathways.
    • Technology and the flipped classroom model training which will begin in 2015 to enhance faculty skills in the use of instructional technology for distance education and student skill development in solving problems in technology rich environments. (Page 234)

JR provides rehabilitative services to justice-involved youth. DSHS/DVR and JR have a cooperative agreement to jointly serve JR youth who are eligible for Pre-employment Transition Services and other DSHS/DVR services. Through coordinated services, JR youth with disabilities will receive services supporting community re-entry along career pathways. (Page 250)

  • Engage in the development and implementation of coordinated business engagement, industry sector strategies, and career pathways programs.
  • Utilize DSHS/DVR Business Specialists to assist with the recruitment and referral of qualified job seekers with disabilities to meet businesses’ demands.
  • Lead coordinated LWDB engagement of federal contractors and subcontractors, linking these contractors to skilled job seekers with disabilities.
  • Increase visibility through a methodical outreach and marketing plan which includes participation in local boards of commerce, membership in professional organizations, representation at career and recruitment fairs, and the provision of training services.
  • Support and expand innovative partnerships, such as Microsoft’s Specialisterne Project, which partners DSHS/DVR and Washington’s businesses to promote the hiring of individuals with disabilities in high–skill and high–demand occupations. (Page 264)
  • Leverage the labor market exchange, labor market research tools, and industry sector strategies to ensure that customers’ vocational goals are aligned with in–demand occupations to the greatest extent possible.
  • Integrate and align DSHS/DVR services and career pathways programs.
  • Increase use of Post–Employment Services to support customers in maintaining, regaining, or advancing in employment through better communicating these services and their benefits.
  • Provide training and technical assistance to businesses on best practices for recruiting and retaining employees with disabilities.
  • Support apprenticeships, paid internships, and on–the–job training opportunities to enhance customers’ employability, in partnership with LWDBs and the business community.
  • Utilize the results of the new comprehensive vocational assessment to evaluate customers’ skills, abilities, interests, as well as potential barriers to successful participation in, or completion of, training programs.
  • Complete required meetings at the end of every post–secondary term to review grades, progress, and support needs of customers participating in associate’s, baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral programs. (Page 302)

DSHS/DVR has identified Goal One, Priority Two strategies and activities to specifically target equitable access for unserved and underserved populations. The activities include, but are not limited to: enhanced outreach to students with disabilities in partnership with OSPI, the Center for Change in Transition Services, and local education agencies; targeted outreach to Washingtonians with disabilities who identify as Hispanic or Latino; and new business partnerships which provide career pathways for highly skilled adults living with an autism spectrum disorder in Washington’s technology industry. When served, these populations will experience equitable access to services and resources, including Supported Employment services, needed to achieve competitive employment outcomes within integrated settings. (Page 303)

This will also be the challenge of the WIOA partners and business development segments of the WorkSource system. It will be critical for the business development aspects to be marketing not only for the Youth in Transition, the younger workforce towards the Sector strategies professional sectors, but for those within the disadvantaged, disabilities and SCSEP communities for positions that may not necessarily be Career Pathways for all involved in the Work Force system. (Page 509)

The transition from WIA to WIOA will have significant impacts to how the different employment programs operationalize and provide services. SCSEP program staff and representatives are becoming familiar with the changes and how this may impact the SCSEP program(s). The State SCSEP Manager has been involved with the Washington State Auditor’s Office as they review all of the state and federally funded programs operating in the state of Washington that are involved with WIA/WIOA. Additionally the State SCSEP Manager has been invited to participate in two of the four State Key areas of Work and Potential WIOA Implementation Committees. The two committees being: The Performance Accountability and ETPL Committee and the Education and Career Pathways through Integrated Service Delivery Models. In addition there are significant changes to the Rehabilitation Services Act that are impacting how DVR provides services; There are also many changes through the Center for Medicaid Services (CMS), the Administration for Community Living that have positive ramifications for enhancing employment services. An additional partner in this process is the Office for Disabilities and Employment Policy at the Federal and local levels. (Page 511)

Employment Networks
  • DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR-CD contracts with each county.
  • DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH have signed a memorandum of collaboration that establishes methods for Medicaid outpatient behavioral health services to be provided as extended services for joint DSHS/DVR supported employment customers.
  • DBHR-MH has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model.
  • DSHS/DVR is participating with DBHR-MH in conducting a pilot project at two locations that is designed to integrate the Individual Placement Support (IPS) model of supported employment with DSHS/DVR supported employment services.
  • DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 250)

DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR-CD contracts with each county. 

  • DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH have signed a memorandum of collaboration that establishes methods for Medicaid outpatient behavioral health services to be provided as extended services for joint DSHS/DVR supported employment customers.
  • DBHR-MH has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model.
  • DSHS/DVR is participating with DBHR-MH in conducting a pilot project at two locations that is designed to integrate the Individual Placement Support (IPS) model of supported employment with DSHS/DVR supported employment services.
  • DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 267)

Washington State Business Leadership Network (WSBLN), the National Employment Team (NET), and Puget Sound Diversity Employment Network (PSDEN) – DSB has an active relationship and partnership in the activities of the WSBLN, the NET and the PSDEN, providing our specialized expertise as a resource to businesses locally, and connecting agency participant talent to businesses that understand the importance of inclusion of people with disabilities into their workforce. Yakima Special Needs Coalition – This group is a gathering of many community programs working on issues of transportation for individuals with disabilities. The lead agency for the coalition is People for People, a primary regional transportation provider for individuals that cannot access the public transit. (Page 347)

Ticket to Work Employment Network. Washington State DSHS agencies (DBHR, DDA, ALTSA/HCS and DVR) are now partners as an administrative Employment Network. The SCSEP State Leadership has expressed interest in being involved with this collaboration. Goodwill Industries is currently an Employment Network and several of the State Sub–grantees are either currently or in discussions with becoming an Employment Network via their involvement with the local WDCs. (Page 514)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 63

Kaiser Aluminum Settles EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 10/24/2017

“Kaiser Aluminum Corporation, the leading producer of fabricated aluminum products in the United States, will pay $175,000 and reinstate its hiring offer to a qualified production worker to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's suit, Kaiser withdrew its job offer for production work at its Trentwood mill in Spokane after Donald McMurray's medical records showed a workplace injury from over 10 years ago. The EEOC found that McMurray, with a long history of construction work at the time, was a well-qualified candidate fully capable of meeting the job's physical demands.”

Systems
  • Other

Washington Medicaid Transformation - 07/06/2017

“The state is leading strategic changes within Medicaid, allowing us to move toward a healthier Washington. The Medicaid transformation project demonstration is an agreement with the federal government which allows us to test new and innovative approaches to providing health coverage and care.”

There are three initiatives under the transformation project:

Transforming Medicaid service delivery through Accountable Communities of Health Expanding options for long-term services and supports Increasing the availability of supportive housing and supported employment”
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington State’s Statewide Transition Plan for New HCBS Rules - 03/15/2017

The Washington State Health Care Authority (HCA, the state’s Medicaid Agency), the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Aging and Long-Term Support Administration (ALTSA) and Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) submit this proposed transition plan in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services new requirements for Home and Community-based Services (HCBS Final Rule 42 CFR Parts 430, 431, 435, 436, 441 and 447) that became effective March 17, 2014. Washington State fully supports the intent of the HCBS setting rules. Washington State has long been an advocate for providing services to clients in the most integrated home and community-based settings, and is a leader in providing clients with choices regarding the settings in which long-term services and supports are provided and will continue its partnership with participants, advocacy groups, stakeholders and Tribes.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Student-Youth Transition Handbook - 07/22/2016

The information provided in this handbook is intended for students and youth with disabilities, their families, staff from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), teachers, school counselors, school administrators, school district personnel, and other agencies supporting students and youth with disabilities who want to participate in secondary transition planning and services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation State Plan: 2017-2020 - 07/01/2016

"The goals and priorities established in this State Plan reflect DSHS/DVR’s ongoing commitments to customer service, successful outcomes, staff development, organizational system improvement, strong partnerships, and business engagement. These goals and priorities were collaboratively developed by DSHS/DVR and leadership of the Washington State Rehabilitation Council."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

ABLE Legislation HB 2323 - 03/29/2016

AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience program; amending RCW 43.33A.190; reenacting and amending RCW 43.79A.040; adding new sections to chapter 43.330 RCW; and providing an expiration date….    The governing board is further authorized to contract with other organizations to administer, manage, promote, or market the Washington achieving a better life experience program. This program must allow for the creation of savings or investment accounts for eligible individuals with disabilities and the funds must be invested.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Data Sharing

US Department of Labor- ETA- Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Round 6 - 11/01/2015

WADEI will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and leverage, blend and braid funds and resources to support increased access and better outcomes for people with disabilities through: 1) Facilitation by DRCs of Integrated Resource Teams that integrate instructors, Navigators, student service coordinators and other college partners and mentor them in their use. 2) Partner policy makers will meet quarterly to identify emerging issues, develop collaborative solutions, and evaluate performance. 3) In partnership with the Department of Services for the Blind, use Wi-Fi hotspots to provide assistive technology access in AJCs that will be sustainable and will also offer greater range of access and AT options. 3) The Washington Access Fund will provide group and individual financial education and counseling to improve credit, lower debt and increase savings, while improving informed financial decision making. 4) Through a partnership with the WIPA program, working-age Social Security beneficiaries will have access to benefits counseling and individual benefits plans. 5) The Washington Business Alliance will recruit, coordinate and manage active participation of businesses and trade associations that are committed to using career pathways and WIOA programs and services to improve their access to qualified working-age applicants with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Washington State HB 1496 Employment of Workers with Permanent Disabilities - 07/24/2015

“AN ACT Relating to addressing vocational rehabilitation by making 2 certain recommendations from the vocational rehabilitation 3 subcommittee permanent and creating certain incentives for employers 4 to employ injured workers with permanent disabilities…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Washington House Bill 1636 - 07/24/2015

Requires state agencies with 100 or more employees to submit an annual report. The State Disability Employment Parity Act declares intent to increase the hiring of persons with disabilities in the state workforce. The bill includes sharing of disability employment statistics.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

King County Developmental Disabilities Division: WA Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) Employment and Day Program Service Definitions - 07/01/2015

“The following definitions apply to all King County Employment and Day Program services, including Child Development Services (CDS), Community Information and Education services, and Adult Employment services...”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

ABLE Legislation HB 2323 - 03/29/2016

AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience program; amending RCW 43.33A.190; reenacting and amending RCW 43.79A.040; adding new sections to chapter 43.330 RCW; and providing an expiration date….    The governing board is further authorized to contract with other organizations to administer, manage, promote, or market the Washington achieving a better life experience program. This program must allow for the creation of savings or investment accounts for eligible individuals with disabilities and the funds must be invested.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Data Sharing

Washington State HB 1496 Employment of Workers with Permanent Disabilities - 07/24/2015

“AN ACT Relating to addressing vocational rehabilitation by making 2 certain recommendations from the vocational rehabilitation 3 subcommittee permanent and creating certain incentives for employers 4 to employ injured workers with permanent disabilities…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Washington House Bill 1636 - 07/24/2015

Requires state agencies with 100 or more employees to submit an annual report. The State Disability Employment Parity Act declares intent to increase the hiring of persons with disabilities in the state workforce. The bill includes sharing of disability employment statistics.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Washington House Bill 1299 - 06/11/2015

Transportation appropriations bill for the 2015–2017 biennium. Includes $7.5 million for the state’s Paratransit/Special Needs Grant Program, which awards funds to nonprofits to improve transit services for people who can’t provide their own transportation due to age, disability or income; program goals include enhanced access to employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Washington House Bill 2063 - 05/01/2015

"AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience [ABLE] program; and creating new sections."

"The legislature finds that the federal achieving a better life experience act of 2014 (P.L. 113-295) encourages and assists individuals and families in saving private moneys for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Washington RCW 28A.155.220: High School Transition Services - 04/15/2015

“The office of the superintendent of public instruction must establish interagency agreements with the department of social and health services, the department of services for the blind, and any other state agency that provides high school transition services for special education students. Such interagency agreements shall not interfere with existing individualized education programs, nor override any individualized education program team's decision-making power. The purpose of the interagency agreements is to foster effective collaboration among the multiple agencies providing transition services for individualized education program-eligible special education students from the beginning of transition planning, as soon as educationally and developmentally appropriate, through age twenty-one, or through high school graduation, whichever occurs first. Interagency agreements are also intended to streamline services and programs, promote efficiencies, and establish a uniform focus on improved outcomes related to self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

WA County Services for Working Age Adults Policy 4.11 - 07/15/2013

“This policy establishes employment supports as the first use of employment and day program funds for working age adults and ensures that after nine months of employment services the person may choose Community Access. The policy establishes guidelines for Field Services staff of the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and Counties to follow when providing services to working age adults.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Washington Second Substitute Senate Bill 5732 - 04/28/2013

“AN ACT Relating to improving behavioral health services provided to adults in Washington state…”    Some of the significant policy changes include: “Beginning May 1, 2014, the legislature shall convene a task force to examine reform of the adult behavioral health system, with voting members as provided in this subsection;… The systems responsible for financing, administration, and delivery of publicly funded mental health and chemical dependency services to adults must be designed and administered to achieve improved outcomes for adult clients served by those systems…” one of which is “increased participation in employment and education;…” [and] The department and the health care authority must implement a strategy for the improvement of the adult behavioral health system,” among others.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Washington House Bill 1519 - 04/22/2013

“AN ACT Relating to establishing accountability measures for service coordination organizations…” It contains performance measure such as, “Improvements in client health status and wellness; increases in client participation in meaningful activities; reductions in client involvement with criminal justice systems; reductions in avoidable costs in hospitals, emergency rooms, crisis services, and jails and prisons; increases in stable housing in the community; improvements in client satisfaction with quality of life; and reductions in population-level health disparities.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Senate Bill 6384 - 03/19/2012

“AN ACT Relating to ensuring that persons with developmental disabilities be given the opportunity to transition to a community access program after enrollment in an employment program; and adding a new section to chapter 71A.12 RCW.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

WA State Governor’s Executive Order 13-02 - Employment of people with disabilities - 03/22/2013

Executive Order 13-02 includes several directives including a Disability Employment Challenge that establishes a goal of five percent of Washington state government’s workforce being comprised of persons living with a disability. A Disability Employment Task Force has been established to help state agencies with the recruitment and retention of persons with disabilities.    
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation State Plan: 2017-2020 - 07/01/2016

"The goals and priorities established in this State Plan reflect DSHS/DVR’s ongoing commitments to customer service, successful outcomes, staff development, organizational system improvement, strong partnerships, and business engagement. These goals and priorities were collaboratively developed by DSHS/DVR and leadership of the Washington State Rehabilitation Council."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

King County Developmental Disabilities Division: WA Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) Employment and Day Program Service Definitions - 07/01/2015

“The following definitions apply to all King County Employment and Day Program services, including Child Development Services (CDS), Community Information and Education services, and Adult Employment services...”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health

DVR Services for Employers - 11/06/2014

“Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) offers a variety of support services to assist employers in hiring and retaining VR customers with disabilities: Employment Services Team, Recruiter, Human Resource Consultant and Manager, Awareness and Etiquette Training, Hiring Incentives, Recruiting DVR Customers, DVR Internship Program, On the Job Training, Job Site Modifications and Assistive Technology, Supported Employment, [and] VR's - National Employment Team (The NET).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

DVR Supported Employment - 09/08/2014

“In some settings a potential employee may need additional support to be successful on the job. This support may be in the form of a job coach who works with persons with severe disabilities by providing on-site job training assistance and long term support to the employer and employee. The job coach will help the employee learn good work habits and job skills. DVR can often contract with local community rehabilitation programs to provide supported employment services and long term support. During this process, employers gain reliable, dependable and hardworking employees with a better than average chance of success.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

DVR Customer Services Manual - 07/31/2014

“This chapter explains the types of vocational rehabilitation services (referred to as ‘VR services’ in this chapter) available to individuals who are eligible through the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). VR services are offered to assist individuals with disabilities to prepare for, get, and keep jobs that are consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. This chapter is consistent with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 and codified in 34 Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 361 and 363 and with state laws and DSHS requirements.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

DSHS Strategic Plan and Lean Report (2014) - 01/31/2014

Washington State’s expressed goal is to, “Be the national leader in: Providing a safe, high-quality, home, community and facility-based array of residential services and employment supports.” This report describes the State’s progress in providing Home and Community Based Services, Vocational Rehabilitation job rates and wage progression, and employment supports for people with developmental disabilities, among others.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

DDA Working Age Adult Policy - 07/15/2013

“This policy establishes employment supports as the first use of employment and day program funds for working age adults and ensures that after nine months of employment services the person may choose Community Access. The policy establishes guidelines for Field Services staff of the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and Counties to follow when providing services to working age adults.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Case Studies of Emerging/ Innovative Vocational, Rehabilitation Agency Practices - 04/01/2013

This report documents emerging promising practices for job seekers with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Increasing Integrated Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Disabilities and DSHS Clients - 09/01/2012

This Integrated Employment Report marks the completion of an effort begun at DSHS in 2010 by a group of employees charged with developing a Model Employment Plan. The intent of the original plan was to address the Department’s desire to hire more persons with disabilities. At the time, our employee pool included only 4.7% of people with disabilities, while the agency served more than over 217,000 of clients who identified themselves as having some form of a disability (Source: DSHS RDA Client Services Database). This Integrated Employment Plan addresses a Priority of the Executive Leadership Team (ELT), which is to create new job opportunities within the Department. Specifically, it targets not just the potential hiring of people with disabilities, but also of clients who are on Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration (JRA) young adults who will transition out of the Juvenile Justice system into society, and Children’s Administration foster youth and alums who seek employment. This Jobs Priority / Integrated Employment Initiative comes at a time of harsh unemployment across Washington State. The initiative is intended to promote competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities within the Department by proposing a way to overcome employment barriers, employment discrimination and related biases. It is important to note that the Department is already working in conjunction with community case resource managers on supported employment opportunities for working age adults with development disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

DVR Business Plan - 06/15/2010

“The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) serves eligible individuals with all types of disabilities who want to work and need vocational rehabilitation services to overcome barriers to employment that result from a disability. Individuals are eligible for services if they have a physical, mental, or sensory disability that results in an impediment to employment and they require vocational rehabilitation services to become employed. The services DVR provides are person centered and based on each individual’s strengths and informed choice. DVR strives to achieve full employment for people with disabilities in career-focused positions providing competitive wages and benefits.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging

Washington State DSHS/DVR 2016-2020 State Plan: the Supported Employment Program (Draft)

The cooperative agreements, program goals, funding distribution, and supported employment services described in this section represent the coordinated efforts of DSHS/DVR, its State collaborators, and its service delivery partners to ensure that all Washingtonians with disabilities can access the support services needed to obtain and maintain employment, maximize independence, and experience improved quality of life.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Project Search

 

“The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, business led, one year school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the workplace. Total workplace immersion facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

WA State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) Member State

 

SELN brings together state Developmental Disability agencies for sharing, educating and providing guidance on practices and policies around employment to its members. Annual membership is required for participation in all network events.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

US Department of Labor- ETA- Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Round 6 - 11/01/2015

WADEI will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and leverage, blend and braid funds and resources to support increased access and better outcomes for people with disabilities through: 1) Facilitation by DRCs of Integrated Resource Teams that integrate instructors, Navigators, student service coordinators and other college partners and mentor them in their use. 2) Partner policy makers will meet quarterly to identify emerging issues, develop collaborative solutions, and evaluate performance. 3) In partnership with the Department of Services for the Blind, use Wi-Fi hotspots to provide assistive technology access in AJCs that will be sustainable and will also offer greater range of access and AT options. 3) The Washington Access Fund will provide group and individual financial education and counseling to improve credit, lower debt and increase savings, while improving informed financial decision making. 4) Through a partnership with the WIPA program, working-age Social Security beneficiaries will have access to benefits counseling and individual benefits plans. 5) The Washington Business Alliance will recruit, coordinate and manage active participation of businesses and trade associations that are committed to using career pathways and WIOA programs and services to improve their access to qualified working-age applicants with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

 

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Customized Employment Employers and Workers: Creating a Competitive Edge (July 2007) Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) - 07/01/2007

“Customized Employment strategies offer new processes to advance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor initiated a series of demonstration projects to identify policy issues that support the use of Customized Employment strategies in the workforce development system. The purpose of this report is to summarize the lessons learned from this demonstration initiative and the policy recommendations it has generated.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

WA Social Security Administration - Mental Health Treatment Study - 10/01/2006

 

“The Mental Health Treatment Study (MHTS) evaluated the impact that better access to treatment and employment support services would have on outcomes such as medical recovery, functioning, employment, and benefit receipt for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries with a primary impairment of schizophrenia or affective disorder. We examined the advantages and disadvantages of providing these SSDI beneficiaries access to high quality services designed to improve their employment outcomes.  The services included systematic medication management, the services of a nurse-care coordinator to coordinate participants’ physical and mental health therapies, and the services of a supported employment specialist trained in the individual placement and support model.  We also paid for out-of-pocket mental health expenses and other expenses necessary to help participants return to work.” [Study included Vancouver, WA]

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Washington Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) Program

“The Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) project is designed to transform service delivery by promoting sustainable access to evidence-based, supported employment. BEST provides consumers with meaningful choice and control of employment and support services. It uses peer counselors, reduces unemployment, and supports the recovery and resiliency of individuals with serious mental illness, including co-occurring substance use disorders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WA Division of Developmental Disabilities, Jobs by 21 Partnership Project Report for FY 2009

“The Jobs by 21 Partnership Project was funded by the Washington State Legislature for the 2007–2009 biennium. The Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) was authorized to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s counties, school districts, employers, families, students with developmental disabilities, and adult service agencies. The focus of the collaborative relationships between Partnership Projects stakeholders was to obtain “Jobs by 21” for young adults with developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) – Access to recovery (ATR)

 

“The State of Washington directly funded six counties (Clark, King, Pierce, Snohomish, Spokane, and Yakima) to implement ATR. Each county administered its voucher program with relative autonomy.”

“Washington State reports that ATR has had a number of beneficial effects. It has led to a more person-centered approach to services in which individual choice and preference have heightened importance, there is greater emphasis on culturally specific services, and there is openness to and acceptance of spiritual support and other services that have not historically been funded. In addition, ATR has played a role in moving the State toward a service paradigm designed to support recovery.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) – WA Individualized Learning Plan Research and Demonstration Project

“The ODEP study launched in the 2008-09 school year and targeted for completion in 2012-13, is the first longitudinal research and demonstration project designed to understand the effectiveness of ILPs. It looks at ILPs in 14 (rural, urban and suburban) schools in four states (LA, NM, SC, and WA). The research is built around core features included in the Guideposts for Success."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WA Disability Program Navigator (DPN) Demonstration Initiative

 

“The DPN Initiative is: developing new/sustaining ongoing partnerships to achieve seamless, comprehensive, and integrated services; promoting the workforce investment system becoming Employment Networks under the Ticket-to-Work Program; blending/braiding resources to leverage funding for individual customers; creating systemic change; and expanding the capacity of the workforce investment system to serve customers with disabilities and employers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Mental Health Transformation State Infrastructure Grant (MHTIG) - Permanent Options for Recovery–Centered Housing (PORCH) Project

"The Permanent Options for Recovery-Centered Housing (PORCH) project is designed to transform service delivery by promoting sustainable access to evidence-based Permanent Supportive Housing throughout one urban and two rural Washington counties…Services will be prioritized for adults and young adults who are in transition, who have severe mental illnesses and who are experiencing homelessness, at risk of homelessness, inappropriately housed, or transitioning from state institutions. The project will provide special training to the teams on the unique trauma-related needs of the population. The project team will work with local community and consumer groups and organizations to identify any modifications needed to ensure that services are culturally relevant.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Student-Youth Transition Handbook - 07/22/2016

The information provided in this handbook is intended for students and youth with disabilities, their families, staff from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), teachers, school counselors, school administrators, school district personnel, and other agencies supporting students and youth with disabilities who want to participate in secondary transition planning and services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Community Summit at Ellensburg, WA [Annual Ellensburg Employment Conference] - 01/11/2013

 

“The Community Summit ....Let's Get Connected will bring together individuals committed to building inclusive communities rich with people participating as neighbors, co-workers, friends, family members, and citizens. People with developmental disabilities and their families, friends, individual and agency staff that provide residential, employment and personal supports, DDD staff, county, other state and local government staff, and interested community members are all welcome. We want everyone to come together to actively discuss ideas and learn from each other about how to build and participate in inclusive communities that enrich everyone.” The Summit is organized by WiSe.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Guide to Transition Assessment in Washington State - 12/01/2007

Age-appropriate transition assessment is the primary component in the process of secondary transition planning. The transition assessments are the framework through which information is gathered to guide the development of a student’s program in order to successfully move the student from the public school to a post–high school setting. While the transition assessments can include formal or commercial assessments, they can also include interviews, observation, and surveys. Perhaps more important than the type of assessment used is that the process is a systematic method used to collect and organize information regarding the student’s interests, skills, strengths, temperaments and areas of need. This process should begin early and be quite broad during the middle school years, but becomes increasingly more specific as the student moves closer to graduation. The goal of transition assessment is to assist the student in achieving her or his vocational potential; therefore, the goal of the person responsible for the age-appropriate transition assessments is to accurately determine that potential as closely as possible. This becomes more likely by looking at the student’s interests, aptitudes, and preparation opportunities from a global concept and gathering that information in a systematic way.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology (DO-IT)

“The DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) Center is dedicated to empowering people with disabilities through technology and education. It promotes awareness and accessibility—in both the classroom and the workplace—to maximize the potential of individuals with disabilities and make our communities more vibrant, diverse, and inclusive.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Customized Employment

“Customized Employment is a unique approach to providing job development and job retention services through an individualized process that fits each person's particular needs. Services are provided by qualified staff who are ACRE Certified (The Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators) through the Rehabilitation Services Commission. All Customized Employment Services are funded through the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission (ORSC).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Learn and Earn: Supporting Teens

“Parents, teachers, and mentors encourage teens with disabilities to participate in work-based learning experiences in this video presentation. It can be used as training for training these stakeholders so that they can more effectively promote work-based learning for young people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WA Highline Community College Employment Professional Certificate Program

 

“We are in our seventh year of partnership with Highline College providing a program, originally envisioned by a group of individuals and county representatives, to establish a certification path for employment professionals. These professionals provide employment support to individuals with developmental disabilities, and play an integral role in assisting people to become contributing members of their community. The program offers high quality training taught by skilled professionals, intended to build on the skills of the participants, offer opportunities for networking with others, and serve as a building block for future leaders in supported employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

WiSe Washington Initiative for Supported Employment

“We provide training to agencies, employers, school districts and other groups interested in equitable employment for people with developmental disabilities. Here you will find the On Demand training, links to our Webinar offerings, and other local training opportunities!”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kaiser Aluminum Settles EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 10/24/2017

“Kaiser Aluminum Corporation, the leading producer of fabricated aluminum products in the United States, will pay $175,000 and reinstate its hiring offer to a qualified production worker to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's suit, Kaiser withdrew its job offer for production work at its Trentwood mill in Spokane after Donald McMurray's medical records showed a workplace injury from over 10 years ago. The EEOC found that McMurray, with a long history of construction work at the time, was a well-qualified candidate fully capable of meeting the job's physical demands.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Washington Medicaid Transformation - 07/06/2017

“The state is leading strategic changes within Medicaid, allowing us to move toward a healthier Washington. The Medicaid transformation project demonstration is an agreement with the federal government which allows us to test new and innovative approaches to providing health coverage and care.”

There are three initiatives under the transformation project:

Transforming Medicaid service delivery through Accountable Communities of Health Expanding options for long-term services and supports Increasing the availability of supportive housing and supported employment”
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington State’s Statewide Transition Plan for New HCBS Rules - 03/15/2017

The Washington State Health Care Authority (HCA, the state’s Medicaid Agency), the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Aging and Long-Term Support Administration (ALTSA) and Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) submit this proposed transition plan in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services new requirements for Home and Community-based Services (HCBS Final Rule 42 CFR Parts 430, 431, 435, 436, 441 and 447) that became effective March 17, 2014. Washington State fully supports the intent of the HCBS setting rules. Washington State has long been an advocate for providing services to clients in the most integrated home and community-based settings, and is a leader in providing clients with choices regarding the settings in which long-term services and supports are provided and will continue its partnership with participants, advocacy groups, stakeholders and Tribes.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Promoting Integrated Employment: Lessons Learned - 12/01/2013

Medicaid is the single largest source of health care financing for low-income people with disabilities, a population that increasingly receives long-term services and supports (LTSS) in community-based set-tings instead of in institutions.1 Growth in the funding of community-based services and the evolution of federal policies and initiatives that emphasize community integration and employment for individuals with disabilities have been driving forces behind many states’ efforts to transform their service systems to make integrated employment the preferred service outcome for individuals with IDDs.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant – Washington State Pathways to Employment

“Helping Washingtonians with a disability make informed decisions about going to work.”   By promoting the awareness and use of work incentives provided under Medicaid regulations and the Social Security Act, Pathways to Employment continues to foster an expectation of competitive employment and economic advancement for individuals with disabilities.   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Washington Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Washington until 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington Medicaid State Plan

The Washington Medicaid state plan details the agreement between the state and the Federal government. It describes how Washington administers its Medicaid program and explains how the state will abide by Federal rules.  It also explains how Washington may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WA COPES Waiver

 

“Provides adult day health, home health aide, personal care, adult day care, client support training, community transition, environmental mods, home delivered meals, nurse delegation, personal emergency response, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age and physical and other disabilities ages 18-64.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Washington Basic Waiver (#0408)

 

“WAIVER TERMINATED 9/29/12 - To provide personal care, respite, habilitation (day and supported employment), environ mods., transportation, specialized medical equipment and supplies, PT, OT, SHL, community access, community guide, person to person, behavior management, family training and emergency assistance to individuals who are DD and live with their families or in their own home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Basic Plus Waiver 0409.R024

"To provide community access, individual supported employment/group supported employment, personal care, prevocational services, respite, OT, PT, speech/hearing/language services, adult dental, adult family home, adult residential care, behavior support and consultation, behavioral health stabilization services-behavior support and consultation, behavioral health stabilization services-behavioral health crisis diversion bed services, behavioral health stabilization services-specialized psychiatric services, community guide, emergency assistance, environmental accessibility adaptations, individualized technical assistance, sexual deviancy evaluation, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, specialized psychiatric services, staff/family consultation and training, transportation for individuals with DD ages 0 – no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WA - Community Protection Waiver (0411.R02.00)

 

“To provide individual supported employment/group supported employment, prevocational services, residential hab, OT, PT, speech/hearing/language services, adult dental, behavior support and consultation, behavioral health stabilization services-behavior support and consultation, behavioral health stabilization services-behavioral health crisis diversion beds, behavioral health stabilization services-specialized psychiatric services, community transition, environmental accessibility adaptations, individualized technical assistance, sexual deviancy evaluation, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, specialized psychiatric services, staff/family consultation and training, transportation for individuals with DD ages 18 – no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

In the Evergreen State of Washington, individuals with disabilities are thriving in the "Home of Bigfoot and Big Imaginations" through clever innovations in promoting Universal Design in the workplace for all workers.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington State’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.52%
Change from
2014 to 2015
7,170,351
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
483,334
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.49%
Change from
2014 to 2015
177,921
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-2.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
36.81%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.54%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.40%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 6,971,406 7,061,530 7,170,351
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 482,279 488,620 483,334
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 175,620 184,137 177,921
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,881,865 2,959,067 3,022,973
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 36.41% 37.69% 36.81%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.72% 75.99% 76.40%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.00% 6.20% 5.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.50% 20.80% 19.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.10% 12.10% 11.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 455,951 452,486 459,384
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 438,558 454,931 449,434
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 738,042 749,436 745,794
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 35,277 31,381 31,690
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 62,724 64,739 71,971
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 15,801 15,522 16,929
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 43,953 45,545 41,361
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 2,617 4,692 5,376
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 42,022 42,003 42,733
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 16,797 18,838 24,935

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 5,546 5,832 6,537
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.10% 4.30% 4.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 177,421 179,192 179,674

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,710 7,229 13,815
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 16,449 19,201 31,120
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 66,061 68,072 93,235
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 8.60% 10.60% 14.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 12,765 9,476 7,168
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 111 118 114
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 79 80 78
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 71.00% 68.00% 68.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.15 1.15 1.09

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,778
4,634
4,832
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 39 36 38
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 401 419 489
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,184 1,069 1,033
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,663 1,713 1,780
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,412 1,339 1,436
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 79 58 56
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 26.60% 29.70% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 4,050 4,063
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 276,661 279,875
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 152 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 403 443 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $42,330,000 $45,072,000 $50,806,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $4,338,000 $4,384,000 $3,194,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $35,000 $33,000 $22,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $2,875,000 $3,824,000 $3,581,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 87.00% 86.00% 86.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 719 961 1,045
Number of people served in facility based work. 748 679 475
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 9 9 8
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 105.20 101.80 102.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 52.40% 52.57% 53.49%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.20% 13.22% 13.27%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.83% 0.81% 0.84%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.10% 92.11% 95.79%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 25.00% 23.74% 22.30%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 47.60% 52.11% 53.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 65.70% 65.13% 67.38%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 22.60% 28.37% 30.91%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,496,068
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,522
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 167,758
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,680,068
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,847,826
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 156
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,511
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,667
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,885,131
AbilityOne wages (services). $27,786,395

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 30 30 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 4 4 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 35 35 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,751 1,684 718
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 278 278 74
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,030 1,963 792

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

Collaborate with disability and employment partners to sponsor events that focus on disability recruitment, hiring and retention issues such as mentoring, disability awareness, reasonable accommodation, customized employment, transportation, independent living, benefits issues, etc. 

  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR collaborated with the Community Networks Program (a statewide consortium of local organizations) to fund over 50 local projects and events focusing on disability recruitment, hiring and retention, including events focusing on the employment of students and youth with disabilities.
  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR collaborated with the Community Networks Program (a statewide consortium of local organizations) to fund over 50 local projects and events focusing on disability recruitment, hiring and retention, including events focusing on the employment of students and youth with disabilities. 

Goal Three Priority 

Bring together employers, DSHS/DVR staff and other workforce partners on a regular basis at the local level to update trends in the job market and maintain a good understanding of employer needs, so that customers are given useful guidance and current information.

  • Evaluation: This activity occurred sporadically in some locales but was not implemented on a statewide basis due to staff turnover in the statewide DSHS/DVR Business Services Manager position. The position was responsible for facilitating this priority and became vacant during FFY 2015. It took time to recruit and hire a new incumbent; during this period it was not possible to fully implement this priority. 

Goal Three Priority 

Support the DSHS/DVR Business Services Team in developing ongoing employer relationships and providing job placement assistance to customers, including participation in the nationwide employer network sponsored by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation.

  • Evaluation: The statewide DSHS/DVR Business Services Manager position became vacant and was re-hired during FFY 2015. The new Business Services Manager is reinvigorating the team and providing extensive support to develop ongoing business relationships. 

Goal Three Priority 

Serve on local WorkSource Business Service Teams to market DSHS/DVR job seekers to employers. (Page 312)

Braiding/Blending Resources

In pursuit of the goal of more seamless and fully-integrated career, training and follow up services to UI claimants and other unemployed individuals, a number of WDCs in the state have voluntarily convened with the Employment Security Department and state Workforce Board to explore Integrated Service Delivery (ISD) models. All areas envision greater collaboration and coordination while local conditions may favor piloting a substantially integrated and simultaneous enrollment model in other areas encompassing all programs customers are eligible for such as Title 1, Title III, Trade Act and targeted population programs. One hallmark of ISD, as envisioned by the ISD consortium, is building upon functional teams. Function as the primary organizing principle—in contrast to focusing on separate programs and partner organizations—indicates major components of the one-stops such as business services; front-end activities like Resource Room, triage, and workshops; community outreach and marketing; Rapid Response; job training etc. ISD also promises to better leverage staff and administrative resources for leaner, more productive one-stop field operations. Functional teams will continually examine changing customer needs, fill gaps and enhance services, and address apparent and unnecessary duplication of services and processes. Another aspect of ISD in Washington State is extending co-enrollment or possibly simultaneous enrollment for current and future jobseekers accessing WorkSource Services. As envisioned in Washington State co/simultaneous enrollment into multiple programs is the braiding or directing of program resources to provide appropriate services when needed as efficiently as possible. ISD partners will continue working through the technical issues around ISD mainly for WIOA Title 1 Adult and Dislocated Worker programs, Wagner-Peyser, Trade Act, Jobs for Veterans State Grant, and WorkFirst (TANF Job Search).  (Page 196) 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Local and State Advisory Groups on Barrier Solutions 

WIOA allows local area boards to establish standing committees to work on issues specifically faced by individuals with disabilities, including Section 188 and ADA compliance. Washington’s workforce system has embraced a more expansive goal of improving access for populations with a wide variety of barriers to access, including economic barriers, geographic barriers, physical barriers, language and cultural barriers, low–level education and skills barriers, and behavioral health barriers. To build consensus on a coordinated and sustained effort to remove these access barriers, a standing Workforce Board committee on accessibility issues is being created.

The Workforce Board’s advisory committee on barrier solutions will be informed by local advisory committees that evaluate accessibility issues at the community level and will help local boards prioritize projects and track progress toward improved customer service for those populations. The state standing committee will additionally serve as a forum for sharing best practices and strategies to improve access and advocate for resources and policy development that will improve services for all populations with barriers. (Page 66)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. 

System–wide Commitment to Improving Accessibility for All Participants 

Fundamental to the Workforce Board’s vision for the workforce system is the concept of universal accessibility: Washington’s workforce system must be prepared and able to serve jobseekers from all kinds of backgrounds, who face a variety of barriers. Universal accessibility encompasses both physical accessibility of all facilities, as well as programmatic accessibility—taking into account customers’ particular access needs. Integration of service delivery and better coordination among workforce system partners will allow services and delivery approaches to be customized to particular access needs.

WIOA has provided new energy across Washington’s workforce system to address and remove barriers to access so that a greater number of Washingtonians will be able to connect with a career pathway and a living–wage job. Advances in personal computing and telecommunications technology have made the Internet and person–to–person connectivity a feature of many people’s daily lives. WIOA acknowledges these improvements by opening the door to “virtual” service delivery—bringing services each participant needs to their doorstep, or kitchen table.

Recognizing that barrier removal is a project that requires sustained effort over time, the Workforce Board started work on establishing its first standing advisory committee to lead a statewide effort on removing barriers to access throughout the system. The standing advisory committee, described below, is expected to work with local advisory committees on accessibility issues, starting an ongoing conversation between local workforce system practitioners and state–level policymakers. In this way, the committee will be able to systematically identify and address access barriers. (Page 161)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

In accordance with section 8(b) in the Wagner–Peyser Act, local comprehensive centers and affiliates have assigned disability specialists. The ES staff serving in this role receive training on serving individuals with disabilities and on accessible computer work stations. Also, they are often involved in local efforts to enhance employment and training access for individuals with disabilities. When there are special grants such as the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), core program staff will be equipped to direct referrals for assessment and program services.

In cooperation with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Department of Services for the Blind, ESD will support ongoing efforts to expand accessibility for blind individuals who, as a population, infrequently use one stops. One stops and the WorkSourceWA.com website will be ADA section 508/Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) compatible. Local one stops will accommodate blind, deaf and other individuals with disabilities. Such strategies as having a sign language interpreter scheduled to come in for accommodating those who are deaf will continue. Blind individuals can be served in any of the large variety of one stop workshops by staff offering to go over written handouts on an individual basis, or simply offering to email materials that could be made accessible by the individual’s own text–to–voice software.

Some centers have co–located vocational rehabilitation counselors with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation in the Department of Social and Health Services. Co–location of VR staff increases referrals from Wagner–Peyser and other co–located staff and vice versa. Coordination between core and other programs is better so that persons with disabilities can get more help to compete for and enjoy high quality employment through acquiring the necessary skills while receiving any necessary supports. Under WIOA Title IV, VR staff outreach to disabled youth graduating from the K–12 system will encourage more young people to pursue assistance from WorkSource to begin career pathways toward self–support through viable avenues. Many ES–staffed one stops have taken the initiative to invite high school teachers of students on IEPs to make field trips fostering a sense of comfort in approaching WorkSource.(Page 107)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment
  • Identify and encourage local pilot programs that use technology to facilitate and improve integrated service delivery for customers, including programs designed to improve access to the system. 

In addition, soon after the passage of WIOA, Governor Jay Inslee directed the Workforce Board to work with the system’s stakeholders to shape Washington’s strategic plan toward three goals to maximize the workforce system’s impact: 

  1. Help more people find and keep jobs that lead to economic self–sufficiency, with a focus on disadvantaged populations.
  2. Close skill gaps for employers, with a focus on in–demand industry sectors and occupations, including through apprenticeships.
  3. Work together as a single, seamless team to make this happen. 

These three goals will inform the larger system and guide any changes. Below are ways the system is evolving to better serve all populations through enhanced accessibility. 

Universal access across the workforce system (Page 62)

In conclusion, a truly accessible workforce system that makes full use of technology, will implement secure, wireless Internet access in public areas of all comprehensive One–Stop centers in Washington by 2020. The system will also include state–level advisory committees during the first two years of the plan, with annual progress reports on One–Stop center accessibility at the local level. Finally, the local pilot programs that use technology to facilitate and improve integrated service delivery for all customers will be identified and encouraged. (Page 67)

Washington is already known as a leader in business engagement. The state piloted Industry Skill Panels, which bring together employers, educators, and community leaders to address common skill gaps and training needs. Skill Panels, in turn, were instrumental in establishing Centers of Excellence, which serve as statewide resources to address the needs of a specific industry sector—from aerospace to allied health. Housed within the state’s community and technical college system, Centers of Excellence provide fast and flexible education and training programs that respond directly to the needs of industry. (Page 51)

Expanding wireless Internet connectivity at one–stop centers could pay off particularly for the blind and low–vision community. One local area in Washington is piloting a “paperless” one–stop experience facilitated by secure wireless access at its WorkSource center. All education and training information, including pamphlets and documents, are digitized in a standard format and stored online. WorkSource center staff members receive regular training on how to digitize materials. People who are blind or low–vision who visit a one–stop center can navigate to those digitally archived materials using their own accessibility devices. Digitally archived materials are also accessible to jobseekers with mobility, transportation, and/or childcare responsibilities that may prevent them from accessing a WorkSource center. Expanding wireless Internet connectivity at one–stop centers could pay off particularly for the blind and low–vision community. One local area in Washington is piloting a “paperless” one–stop experience facilitated by secure wireless access at its WorkSource center. All education and training information, including pamphlets and documents, are digitized in a standard format and stored online. WorkSource center staff members receive regular training on how to digitize materials. People who are blind or low–vision who visit a one–stop center can navigate to those digitally archived materials using their own accessibility devices. Digitally archived materials are also accessible to jobseekers with mobility, transportation, and/or childcare responsibilities that may prevent them from accessing a WorkSource center. (Page 64)

Virtual Service Delivery 

With WIOA, education and training services are no longer required to be administered in person. The availability of online, real–time, hybrid (blended online and face to face), and open source course materials warrants close system collaboration. Beyond simply providing access, the system must help customers gain the skills to effectively use these new technological tools. Some tools have become increasingly common in just a few short years. Video conferencing technology, for example, is widely available and less expensive than in years past. Reducing or eliminating the need for customers to travel and physically access a one–stop center will remove accessibility barriers for many Washingtonians. Services offered virtually via computer, tablet, or smartphone empower people with mobility challenges, or anyone preferring to access information remotely. These tools allow them to begin progressing down a career pathway on their terms and at a time and location more convenient to them. Virtual service delivery helps customers with childcare or transportation barriers make progress toward a better future. A parent can hop online when the kids are asleep and gain access to services, or a family who lacks a car can avoid making several bus transfers to reach a one–stop center––if the center is reachable by bus at all. Many rural Washingtonians live hours away from the nearest comprehensive one–stop center. Accessing these services at home just makes sense. Even rural customers without reliable Internet connections still benefit from virtual service delivery—library systems statewide have expressed interest in partnering with the workforce system to create “remote connection sites” strategically located around Washington. (Page 65)

In many aspects ES operations is well–positioned to expand its partnership with the Department of Labor and Industries injured worker Return–to–Work efforts. A pilot project at WorkSource Everett, one of the state’s busiest one–stops, has been very successful in helping injured and recovered workers find suitable employment.

Washington State Department of Social and Health Services received a 3–year $22 million federal grant from the Department of Agriculture to help elevate Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to self–reliance. Resources to Initiate Successful Employment (RISE) will involve many community–based organizations and colleges who will serve SNAP recipients who are homeless, veterans, those with limited English proficiency, the long–term unemployed and non–custodial parents with access to skill building and job search assistance.

Funded providers use key elements of I-BEST programs, e.g. contextualization, team teaching, enhanced students services, and articulated college and career pathways, to increase the speed at which students master basic and ELA skills at federal levels 1, 2 and 3. On Ramp options include, but are not limited to: programs focused on career clusters; partnership efforts between colleges and community-based organizations and local workforce development councils (WIBs); I-BEST at Work projects that partner providers, employers and WIBs; Project I-DEA (Integrated Digital English Acceleration), a three-year pilot program with support from the Gates Foundation that will transform ELA instruction using a flipped classroom model and 50% online instruction. (Page 222)

In 1-3 quarters, On Ramp students acquire the skills needed to transition to basic skills education classes at federal levels 4-6 and/or Professional/Technical or Academic I-BEST pathways. (Page 222)

Students in correctional education programs have access to the same quality programs as offered on our community college campuses. In 2011–12, the Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I–BEST) model was piloted in the Specialty Baking program at Clallam Bay Corrections Center. Currently four I–BEST programs are up and running in correctional facilities. In addition to I–BEST, Washington’s correction education programs offer the same programming as traditional Basic Education for Adults and workforce training programs in the community and technical college system. Washington state currently has two two–year degree programs operating on private funds at two institutions. Programming in correctional facilities include: Adult Basic Education; Vocational programming; English Language Acquisition; High school diploma and equivalency; Limited AA degree programs; Offender Change programs; and Re–entry services. (Page 226)

Beginning July 1, 2017, WIOA Section 243 funds will only be allocated to providers with a clear description of how funding and civics instruction will be used in combination with Integrated Education and Training as defined in WIOA Section 203(11):

“ ‘Integrated Education and Training’.—The term integrated education and training means a service approach that provides adult education and training concurrently and contextually with workforce preparation activities and workforce training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster for the purpose of educational and career advancement.” 

IEL Civics Programs that meet the requirements of Section 243 funds have been established, piloted, and implemented across the system. Full implementation of integrated employment and training activities include: state-approved I–BEST programs that co-enroll ELA students in college-level, career technical certificate and degree programs in high demand career fields; I–BEST at Work programming which enroll ELA incumbent workers in career specific coursework to upskill students in basic, employability, civic, and workplace skills in order for them to advance in their place of employment. In the I-BEST at Work model, the teaching team is made up of a basic skills instructor and a trainer from the worksite and classes are held at the place of employment; on-ramps to I-BEST programs where all instruction is contextualized and delivered concurrently with training in a specific occupation or occupational cluster like allied health; and staffing to provide navigational support specifically to IEL Civics students enrolled in IEL Civics eligible programs described above. These integrated education and training models of instruction are required in order to be awarded IEL Civics funding. Training and/or technical support are made available to all providers on an on-going basis for each of these integrated instructional models. (Page 228)

Assistance in the use of technology, including for staff training, to eligible providers, especially the use of technology to improve system efficiencies

  • To enhance system efficiencies, Washington conducts trainings through the Blackboard Collaborate system and also offers training to assist staff in the use of Collaborate.
  • SBCTC also offers training in the online management system, CANVAS for faculty and staff wanting to enhance instruction with technology in the classroom.
  • A major focus in the next two years is on increasing instruction in problem solving in technology rich environments. Initiatives currently under way that support this work include:
    • Project I-DEA (Integrated Digital English Acceleration),
    • a three-year pilot program with support from the Gates Foundation that will transform ELA instruction using a flipped classroom model and 50% online instruction 
  • System-wide training on implementing the flipped classroom model significantly increasing access to online learning opportunities. (Page 232)
  • Assistance in the use of technology, including for staff training, to eligible providers, especially the use of technology to improve system efficiencies
  • To enhance system efficiencies, Washington conducts trainings through the Blackboard Collaborate system and also offers training to assist staff in the use of Collaborate.
  • SBCTC also offers training in the online management system, CANVAS for faculty and staff wanting to enhance instruction with technology in the classroom.
  • A major focus in the next two years is on increasing instruction in problem solving in technology rich environments. Initiatives currently under way that support this work include:
    • Project I-DEA (Integrated Digital English Acceleration),
    • a three-year pilot program with support from the Gates Foundation that will transform ELA instruction using a flipped classroom model and 50% online instruction
  • System-wide training on implementing the flipped classroom model significantly increasing access to online learning opportunities. (Page 234)
  • DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR-CD contracts with each county.
  • DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH have signed a memorandum of collaboration that establishes methods for Medicaid outpatient behavioral health services to be provided as extended services for joint DSHS/DVR supported employment customers.
  • DBHR-MH has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model.
  • DSHS/DVR is participating with DBHR-MH in conducting a pilot project at two locations that is designed to integrate the Individual Placement Support (IPS) model of supported employment with DSHS/DVR supported employment services.
  • DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 250)
  • Establish interagency transition councils in each Educational Service District that include local DSHS/DVR and educational staff and community partners.
  • Develop pilot transition projects in each Educational Service District.
  • Develop and provide individual online education portfolios that provide updated educational and employment progress for students.
  • Provide training and technical assistance to DSHS/DVR staff, teachers, and community partners.
  • Provide gap analysis and outcome data regarding coordinated services between DSHS/DVR and local education agencies.
  • Partner with education and community partners to present a yearly statewide transition conference, beginning in 2017, that is focused on services to all students with disabilities. (Page 256)

DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR-CD contracts with each county. 

  • DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH have signed a memorandum of collaboration that establishes methods for Medicaid outpatient behavioral health services to be provided as extended services for joint DSHS/DVR supported employment customers.
  • DBHR-MH has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model.
  • DSHS/DVR is participating with DBHR-MH in conducting a pilot project at two locations that is designed to integrate the Individual Placement Support (IPS) model of supported employment with DSHS/DVR supported employment services.
  • DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 267)
Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement
  • Occupational skills training with priority for those that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials aligned with in–demand sectors or occupations
  • Education offered concurrently with or in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or cluster
  • Leadership development opportunities, including community service and peer–centered activities that promote responsibility and positive social and civic behaviors
  • Supportive services
  • Adult mentoring for the period of participation and for not less than 12 months following participation
  • Follow–up services for not less than 12 months (includes all allowable youth services and activities)
  • Comprehensive guidance and counseling, which may include drug and alcohol abuse and referral
  • Financial literacy education
  • Entrepreneurial skills training (Page 75)
Benefits

2. Increase Business Engagement with a Clearly Defined Workforce Value Stream: Only 8 percent of Washington businesses utilize the public workforce system. This stark fact underscores the limited interaction between businesses and workforce development service providers at all levels. Businesses need simple paths to the workforce system and a better understanding of the benefits, whether it’s filling open positions with qualified applicants from WorkSource, shaping training programs to ensure workers have industry–specific skills, or partnering with higher education. In addition, once businesses and industries are engaged—be it through sector strategies or recruitment services—the workforce system must build and sustain these partnership (Page 38)

The Social Security and entitlements (Federal, State and Veterans) can be very complex and difficult to understand and navigate. Many individuals decide not to work or work fewer hours based upon the misperceptions that they will lose their benefits (medical and financial) if they go to work. As such we are in the process of developing partnership efforts with the Washington State Benefits Planner Networks, The Maximus Ticket to Work WIPA program, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and others in an effort to provide individuals with access to these resources. This is in addition to the Affordable Care Act and the Healthcare for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) or Medicaid Buy In program. (Page103)

Blind, low vision and deaf blind users of the workforce system have typically been left unserved in the good work of the state’s sector industry strategies. In addressing the business needs for identifying and developing targeted training to fill workforce gap needs in the key sector industries, Washington State’s workforce system has a stellar reputation, but those with visual disability have not typically benefited from the programs, apprenticeships and opportunities. (Page 128)

The goal is to develop more formal agreements between the State and National Grantees in order to expand upon the strengths, capabilities and resources of the individual grantees. These formal partnerships and working agreements will be of benefit not just to the SCSEP provider organizations, but also for the benefit of the spectrum of Workforce employment and education programs.

The State Program Manager has approached DOL about implementing changes to the Grantee contracting to process in order to achieve greater collaboration and cohesion for the SCSEP program within the State of Washington. Beyond the DOL contracting process the state manager is exploring the development of MOUs between the State and the National grantees in order to create cohesion of the program; develop formal agreements with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation; potentially data sharing agreements with State entities; accessing the DSHS and or WDC Ticket to Work EN network for reimbursement for the services provided by the grantees (with the exception of Goodwill Industries which already is a EN). (Page 132)

The Workforce Board coordinates 16 workforce programs (Title I, Title II, Title III, and Title IV WIOA Programs; Postsecondary Professional Technical Education, Worker Retraining Program, Job Skills Program, Customized Training Program, Secondary Career and Technical Education Programs, Training Benefits Program, Apprenticeships, Perkins Act programs, and the Private Vocational Schools Act), administered by seven agencies. We measure the performance of programs accounting for about 95 percent of federal and state dollars spent on our workforce system––or roughly $780 million per year. (Page 138)

Additional Programs under the State’s Workforce Development Plan: Secondary and Postsecondary Career and Technical Education, Job Skills Program, Customized Training Program, Worker Retraining Program, Training Benefits Program, Apprenticeship, Private Vocational Schools (Page 169)

Washington’s local boards routinely activate the rapid response teams when a TAA petition is filed. That approach is directed by state WIOA Title I Policy 5603 https://esd.wa.gov/WIOA/WIOA-Title-I-Policy-5603 (Rapid Response for WIOA and TAA). Washington’s State Employment Security Department (the State Workforce Agency) also engages local boards after TAA petitions are filed to determine if “gap” funding in the form of Rapid Response Additional Assistance is needed to serve dislocated workers attached to events for which TAA petitions have been filed between the time those event occur and such time as the events are certified by the U.S. Department of Labor. This approach is enshrined in WIOA Title I Policy 5604 https://esd.wa.gov/WIOA/WIOA-Title-I-Policy-5604 (Rapid Response Additional Assistance).

Washington has a comprehensive policy and procedures for determining training provider eligibility as articulated in state WIOA Title I Policy 5611, Revision 1 https://esd.wa.gov/WIOA/WIOA-Title-I-Policy-5611-Revision-1 (Governor’s Procedures for Determining Training Program Eligibility). The state’s Eligible Training Provider List is managed by the State Workforce Development Board and is widely employed by the state and federally-funded training programs in Washington as a consumer report tool. In addition to WIOA Title I, other programs that have policies requiring the use of the state’s Eligible Training Provider List to identify qualified training providers includes the state’s Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program, Unemployment Insurance-related Training Benefits program, and Worker Retraining, Job Skills, and Customized Training programs under the public community and technical college system.( Page 181)

In PY14 Washington State Employment Security Department took a major step in reorganizing divisions and responsibilities as the state’s administrative entity for WIA programs. Formerly siloed WIA policy functions were reassigned and placed in the UI Division to form the new Employment System Policy and Integrity Operations directorate including Employment Systems Administration and Policy). This bold change is providing new mutual learning and leadership opportunities across both the UI division and the Workforce Career Development Division (WCDD) operating Wagner-Peyser, UI Reemployment and RESEA, TAA and WorkFirst (TANF Job Search) at the state level. Embedding WIOA policy administration within the UI division well-positions the State for a more coordinated policy nexus around Wagner-Peyser, WIOA Title 1-B, inclusive of UI benefits and reemployment functions. (Page 193)

This research-based program was named a Bright Idea by Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government in 2011 and has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as the most significant innovation in the last 20 years. According to a December, 2012 report by the Community College Research Center, I-BEST programs provide benefits that justify additional costs.

Research conducted separately by the Community College Research Center and the Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board found that I-BEST students outperform similar students enrolled in traditional basic skills programs. I-BEST students are: 3 times more likely to earn college credits; 9 times more likely to earn a workforce credential; Employed at double the hours per week (35 hours versus 15 hours); Earning an average of $2,310 more per year than similar adults who did not receive basic skills training; and more than 3,000 Washington students are enrolled in I-BEST programs annually. (Page 221)

The WSRC recommends that DVR address the need for additional resources for benefits planning and assistive technology services required in WIOA. Within WIOA, benefits planning and assistive technology services are emphasized. The agency needs to create a plan to address these required services. (Page 244)

DSHS/DVR and WDVA have procedures for referring DSHS/DVR customers with military service to WDVA to determine eligibility for any state or federal Veterans’ benefits. This collaboration has increased the use of Veterans’ benefits as comparable services for DSHS/DVR customers who are veterans with disabilities. ( Page 249)

The Health Care Authority (HCA) administers Medicaid services to all DSHS/DVR customer recipients. DSHS/DVR and HCA closely coordinate to assure that individuals receive medical and behavioral health services necessary to achieve their employment goals. In addition, DSHS/DVR is working to develop a cooperative agreement with HCA, DBHR, and DDA that describes how Title 19 services under the State Medicaid Plan, including community-based waiver programs, will be utilized to develop and support integrated, community-based employment opportunities for customers.

HCA also administers Health Care for Workers with Disabilities (HWD), a Medicaid buy-in program. DSHS/DVR coordinates with HWD to assist qualified individuals in continuing to receive medical benefits after they become employed. (Page 251)

CLOSED REHABILITATED SURVEY RESPONSES 

A majority of closed rehabilitated respondents answered with strong agreement or agreement to all satisfaction survey responses.

Over 90.0% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with:

  • DVR treated me with courtesy and respect. (93.94%)
  • Overall, DVR helped me. (91.50%)
  • I was given enough information to understand how DVR could help me with employment. (91.09%)
  • I chose where to get services in my DVR plan. (90.91%)
  • DVR answered my questions. (90.63%)
  • DVR explained what services were available to help me. (90.35%)
  • DVR listened to me. (90.20%) 

80.0% - 90.0% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with: 

  • DVR does good work. (89.76%)
  • I chose my own job goal. (88.26%)
  • I like the work I do. (88.07%)
  • I use my skills and abilities that are most important to me in my job. (86.0%)
  • DVR understood my problems the problems I faced in getting and keeping a job. (84.11%)
  • Overall, I am satisfied with my job. (83.77%)
  • I received services in my DVR employment plan quickly enough. (81.77%)
  • DVR returned my phone calls quickly. (80.50%)

50.0% - 80.0% of respondents strongly agreed or agreed with: 

  • DVR gave me information about other programs that could help me. (74.45%)
  • If I had complaints or concerns about services, I was satisfied with how DVR responded. (71.81%)
  • My pay is enough for my basic needs. (68.95%)
  • I am satisfied with my benefits (medical, dental, etc.). (59.87%) ( Page 279)

Goal one reflects DSHS/DVR’s focus on providing high-quality services that result in high-quality employment outcomes. Based on 2014 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) findings and stakeholder input, these priorities emphasize the importance of supporting customers in high-quality employment which offers the pay and benefits that support financial independence. ( Page 291)

Provide Pre-employment Transition Services designed to facilitate job exploration and other services such as counseling and self-advocacy training in the early stages of the school to work transition. 

  • Broaden the population of individuals with disabilities served by DSHS/DVR through outreach which increases the representation of underserved or unserved populations, specifically emphasizing outreach to Washington’s Hispanic and Latino communities.
  • Target outreach, education, and marketing to individuals with disabilities who are currently employed to retain or advance, previous customers who may be unemployed and are seeking employment, students nearing completion of academic programs, individuals who have exhausted Unemployment Insurance benefits, and other underserved populations.
  • Utilize contracted translation and interpreter services, including American Sign Language services, to improve accessible and quality services to customers with limited English proficiency or who are Deaf or hard of hearing. (Page 297)
  • Increase use of Post–Employment Services to support customers in maintaining, regaining, or advancing in employment through better communicating these services and their benefits.
  • Provide training and technical assistance to businesses on best practices for recruiting and retaining employees with disabilities ( Page 302)

Outreach, education, and marketing efforts will be targeted to individuals with disabilities who are: already working to retain or progress in employment, previous DSHS/DVR customers who may have lost employment and want to become reemployed, college students nearing completion of their academic programs, individuals who have exhausted their Unemployment Insurance benefits, and other groups who are identified as underserved. 

  • Evaluation: Outreach plans were developed and implemented by local DSHS/DVR offices to reach these targeted populations. Overall, the success of these plans was mixed and continued emphasis is being placed on reaching these underserved populations. Efforts to coordinate outreach with the Employment Security Department and LWDBs proved to be more challenging than anticipated and will be a focus of improvement throughout development and implementation of this Combined State Plan. (Page 305)

Increase DSHS/DVR’s ability to assist customers to achieve higher wage jobs with health benefits. 

  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR conducted Lean A3 events to identify ways to encourage more customers to pursue higher wage jobs with benefits. This produced specific recommendations that have been incorporated in to DSHS/DVR Counselor practices (e.g. assisting customers to conduct more substantive labor market research before choosing an employment goal, encouraging customers to consider employment goals beyond the entry-level, and providing customers with better information about training opportunities that lead to higher wage jobs). (Page 306)

Provide more timely and thorough Benefits Planning to customers who receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) so they can make better informed choices about the types of jobs they seek and amount of hours they will work. 

  • Evaluation: All DSHS/DVR counselors have been trained to provide Benefits Planning to their customers who receive SSI. In addition, four DSHS/DVR Benefits Specialists provide Benefits Planning to customers who receive SSDI or both SSDI/SSI. Plans are underway to hire 12 Benefits Technicians who will provide additional Benefits Planning capacity statewide. (Page 306)

Improve and expand services to enhance earnings, employee benefits and career advancement for customers, including individuals served through supported employment. 

  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR conducted Lean A3 events to identify ways to encourage more customers to pursue higher wage jobs with benefits. This produced specific recommendations that have been incorporated in to DSHS/DVR counselor practices (e.g. assisting customers to conduct more substantive labor market research before choosing an employment goal, encouraging customers to consider employment goals beyond the entry-level, and providing customers with better information about training opportunities that lead to higher wage jobs). (Page 307-312) 

Statewide Assessment (j): The SRC commends DSB for conducting good demographic data analysis under this section. The SRC also suggests that DSB consider conducting analysis of individuals who are blind with co–occurring disabilities compared with the general population. This would emphasize the extent to which services that meet the needs of these specific populations are needed in order for these individuals to achieve employment outcomes and related benefits at the same rate as other VR participants and as the general population. ( Page 335)

Diligent efforts by DSB staff have facilitated long–term services through state benefits, natural supports, employers and self–pay. DSB continues to promote the use of Ticket to Work as a potential income source for developmental disability (DD), mental health (MH), and traumatic brain injury (TBI) service providers to provide long–term support services to our customers after exit from the VR program. The DSB continues to work with employers and other natural supports to identify funding for long–term support services. (Page 348)

  • DSB will facilitate a coordinated effort to engage Business Leadership Network (BLN) businesses with our collaborative efforts on behalf of the WIOA system, job seekers and transition youth to support mutual success and benefits.
  • DSB will develop appropriate internal business engagement strategies that will assist the agency in scaling to the statewide and local business engagement efforts. (Page 351)

The RSA r–911 data provides strong evidence that DSB places emphasis on careers that provide living wages and benefits, within a competitive and integrated context. The agency wants to maintain and build on this excellence in quality of services and outcomes.

Demographic data compiled from the agency and compared to general Washington state demographics through tools such as the American Community Survey highlights underserved communities for agency programs. (368)

For the year 2014, Social Security Administration estimates for Social Security disability recipients in Washington State show that approximately 16.3% of all residents with a disability receive SSI/SSDI benefits.

For FFY2015, 20.4% of all participants served through the agency’s VR program were recipients of Social Security benefits.

Of those individuals who exited with an employment outcome and had listed public assistance as their primary support at application, 75% instead were able to list earnings from their work as primary support at exit. We serve a higher proportion of individuals on SSI/SSDI, and fewer DSB participants require those benefits upon exiting the program.

What we know about DSB from the Comprehensive Needs Assessment data:

RSA and performance data: 

  • DSB customer base is predominantly made up of individuals who have either significant or most significant disabilities
  • Strengths of the agency can be seen in quality of employment outcomes – high percentage competitive and integrated; high average hourly and weekly wages; high number hours worked per week; high number of participants meeting Substantial Gainful Activity; diversity of career outcomes and individualized vocational goals; strong supports for higher education and adaptive technology within the vocational plan. (Page 371)

Under the Combined State Plan, the DSB expects the new relationship among core group and partner programs to genuinely address the development of pathways for access that allow blind, low vision and deaf blind individuals to also engage in the workforce activities that enhance and increase their opportunities towards the State’s strategy of High Skills/High Wages. This access to workforce activities is currently aspirational, as our agency blind participants have been largely denied access to the benefits of the greater workforce system since the 1998 WIA implementation. Future success of equal participation in these workforce activities will depend on the WIOA partners’ active awareness and belief that individuals who are blind are viable participants within the workforce, and that the DSB is a valuable collaborator among workforce partners. Access and navigation issues must be addressed with highest priority among all partner programs. (Page 383)

The DSB will consistently offer information as to the benefits of making access an organizational essential priority, and provide supports to get partner organizations and businesses on the path towards accessibility. (Page 338)

Washington State currently estimates 104,809 ABAWDs statewide, with 22,231 in non-exempt areas. After applying the maximum number of 15% exemptions (278 clients receiving the exemption for 12 months), 21,953 are considered at-risk for losing SNAP benefits due to having no personal or geographical exemptions. The ABAWDs in the two ABAWD Counties without the waiver are typically among the lowest income individuals, who also face some of the highest barriers such as homelessness and undiagnosed mental/physical health conditions. DSHS will attempt to assist at-risk ABAWDs by providing all available resources directly to clients, as well as providing education to other community agencies that ABAWDs may access. (Page 448)

C.F.R. §273.7(f), will not apply for noncompliance. The amount of hours to be worked will be negotiated between the household and the operating agency, though not to exceed the limits provided under 7 C.F.R. §273.7(m)(5)(ii). In addition, all protections provided under 7 C.F.R. §273.7(m)(6)(i) shall continue to apply. Those State agencies and political subdivisions choosing to operate such a program shall indicate in their workfare plan how their staffing will adapt to anticipated and unanticipated levels of participation for each Federal fiscal year covered by the Combined Plan under WIOA. FNS will not approve plans which do not show that the benefits of the workfare program, in terms of hours worked by participants and reduced SNAP allotments due to successful job attainment, are expected to exceed the costs of such a program. In addition, if FNS finds that an approved voluntary program does not meet this criterion, FNS reserves the right to withdraw approval.* * 7 CFR § 273.7(m)(8) WA State will not be using this option. (Page 454)

(E) COMPARABLE WORKFARE 

The State agency or political subdivision must provide a description of its program, including a methodology for ensuring compliance with 7 C.F.R §273.7(m)(9)(ii) for each Federal fiscal year covered by the Combined Plan under WIOA.* *7 CFR § 273.7(m)(9)

Washington State’s Workfare program is under development but will follow the Comparable Workfare format in that ABAWDs who are at risk of losing their SNAP benefits will be allowed to count volunteer workfare hours to regain or retain eligibility.

DSHS provides a Workfare component in FFY 2017. DSHS has contact with at least 50 non-profit agencies to provide voluntary positions that comply with Workfare provisions. The State will consider the minimum Workfare requirement for ABAWDs choosing the Workfare option to be the SNAP monthly benefit amount divided by The Washington State Minimum wage of $9.47 per hour. Workfare will comply with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) minimum wage laws. (Page 455)

(A) HOW THE STATE INTENDS TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT, TRAINING AND JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES TO VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE PERSONS UNDER THE JVSG 

To improve veterans services, LVERs and DVOPs will support improvements in their AJCs and communities where: 

  • LVERs work with all AJC staff to identify and increase skill development opportunities designed to generate pathways to long-term high-wage employment for veterans who can qualify for support such as unemployment benefits while in training, the GI Bill, etc.;
  • DVOPs articulate training programs to Veterans with SBEs, for alignment with military experience in order to expedite advanced placement whenever possible;
  • LVERs build bridges to apprenticeship providers and advocate for placement based upon the merits veterans bring from their prior training and experience; and (Page 459)
  • Planning and participating in job and career fairs. The LVERs routinely host or partner in employment events focused on the hiring of veterans. These include specialized hiring events, such as a June 2014 one for Federal contractors that was attended by more than 70 employers with current job openings. At hiring events, the LVERs collect contact data and conduct outreach to promote One-Stop services and DVOP referral, where appropriate.
  • Conducting employer outreach. LVERs reach out to local employers to promote the hiring of veterans, explaining the practical advantages to hiring veterans, as well as the benefits, such as Work Opportunity Tax Credit and potential for funded OJTs.
  • Partnering with employers to conduct job searches and workshops. Washington State’s LVERs conduct job search workshops and establish job search groups/job clubs in conjunction with the needs of local employers. This has proven beneficial to both providing employers a better appreciation for the challenges faced by veterans in transitioning to civilian employment. This practice will be implemented statewide in this program period. (Page 460)
  • Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans. LVERs reach out to Federal contractors using Labor Exchange job listings, Federal contractor listings, VetCentral listings, company web-sites, and other places where employers may post job announcements. ESD has engaged with OFCCP to provide valuable information on Federal contractor participation in the state employment system. Additionally, LVERs work directly with contractors to advise them on the benefits and process for locating and hiring veterans into their workforces. Recently, the state program coordinator spoke at an event hosted by OFCCP to educate Federal contractors on utilizing the One-Stop system for veteran recruitment. We will continue this focus, with the future LVER position being hired to Central Office.
  • Working with other One-Stop staff to assist in development of the service delivery strategies for veterans and educating partner staff with employment initiatives and programs for veterans. Statewide, LVERs are providing training to AJC staff on serving veterans, which will be critical in promoting the new culture, where an anticipated 70% of veterans are being served by non-JVSG staff. The LVERs are using and promoting completion of the recently released online NVTI course for front line staff serving veterans. (Page 470)

One good example of successful partnering takes place in King County, the state’s most populated area. DVOPs collaborate with the King County Veterans Program, which is funded by a Veterans and Human Services Levy through 2017. This partnership, which includes a plethora of community and veterans services organizations, provides low-income, homeless, disabled and at-risk veterans with emergency financial assistance, housing, employment guidance, benefits counseling and health referrals. (Page 467)

The Social Security and entitlements (Federal, State and Veterans) can be very complex and difficult to understand and navigate. Many individuals decide not to work or work fewer hours based upon the misperceptions that they will lose their benefits (medical and financial) if they go to work. As such we are in the process of developing partnership efforts with the Washington State Benefits Planner Networks, The Maximus Ticket to Work WIPA program, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and others in an effort to provide individuals with access to these resources. This is in addition to the Affordable Care Act and the Healthcare for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) or Medicaid Buy In program. (Page 512)

At this point in time it is uncertain how many individuals may be enrolled /co–enrolled with DVR services. One of DVR’s goals on its newly developed State Plan is to increase access to services for those individuals with disabilities (on SSDI) who have a work history but became unemployed and exhausted their unemployment benefits. Based upon the Washington State ESD data approximately 5,000 individuals are identified in this category in the state of Washington. We will strive to work with DVR leadership and local staff to support these individuals engaging with DVR. Additionally this could be an additional source of revenue for the SCSEP programs if they were to become Community Rehabilitation Programs able to contract to provide these services. (Page 514)

School to Work Transition
  • Facilitate the development of programs for school–to–work transition that combine classroom education and on–the–job training, including entrepreneurial education and training, in industries and occupations without a significant number of apprenticeship programs;
  • Include in the planning requirements for local workforce investment boards a requirement that the local workforce investment boards specify how entrepreneurial training is to be offered through the one–stop system required under the workforce investment act, P.L. 105–220, or its successor;
  • Encourage and assess progress for the equitable representation of racial and ethnic minorities, women, and people with disabilities among the students, teachers, and administrators of the state training system. Equitable, for this purpose, shall mean substantially proportional to their percentage of the state population in the geographic area served. This function of the board shall in no way lessen more stringent state or federal requirements for representation of racial and ethnic minorities, women, and people with disabilities; (Page142)
  • Increase outreach to students in traditionally unserved and underserved populations that include tribal youth, justice-involved youth, homeless youth, and students and youth receiving foster care. Outreach activities include media, opportunities for participation in group-based PETS activities, individual outreach at schools, DSHS/DVR relationship building and coordination with education officials, presentations and career fairs for students, youth, families, schools, and community partners.
  • Solicit proposals for Project Search development, and became a funding partner with current Project Search programs in Washington State that serve students with disabilities.
  • Strengthen DSHS/DVR participation in current School-to-Work programs statewide by providing increased training and technical assistance for School-to-Work partners, including earlier DVR input into assessment and employment planning for students.
  • Contract with Centers for Independent Living to enhance and expand core independent living services, focusing on youth with significant disabilities. In addition to core services, Centers for Independent Living have been focusing on outreach to increase services in unserved or underserved geographic areas. Additional outreach efforts include targeted disability groups, minority groups, and urban or rural populations with the focus on youth with significant disabilities and 504 plans. The goal is to create a safe environment in which youth feel comfortable and confident when talking to allies. This goal will be accomplished by enhancing youth understanding of the Independent Living philosophy, successful self-advocacy, and how engage with legislators about disability issues.  (Page 257)

Provide Pre-employment Transition Services designed to facilitate job exploration and other services such as counseling and self-advocacy training in the early stages of the school to work transition. 

  • Broaden the population of individuals with disabilities served by DSHS/DVR through outreach which increases the representation of underserved or unserved populations, specifically emphasizing outreach to Washington’s Hispanic and Latino communities.
  • Target outreach, education, and marketing to individuals with disabilities who are currently employed to retain or advance, previous customers who may be unemployed and are seeking employment, students nearing completion of academic programs, individuals who have exhausted Unemployment Insurance benefits, and other underserved populations.
  • Utilize contracted translation and interpreter services, including American Sign Language services, to improve accessible and quality services to customers with limited English proficiency or who are Deaf or hard of hearing. (Page 297)
Data Collection

No specific disability related information found.

Small business/Entrepreneurship
  • Customized Training Program (State Board for Community and Technical Colleges): A training institution delivers dedicated customized employee training as requested by the business. The level of customization ranges from existing training curriculum delivered at the job site to fully customized training curriculum developed exclusively for the business.
  • Higher Education (Community and Technical Colleges, Four–year Colleges and Universities, Private Career Schools): Education and training, customized training, incumbent worker training, certification, apprenticeship related supplemental instruction (RSI), education and career counseling, small business resources.
  • Job Skills Program (State Board for Community and Technical Colleges): Prospective and current employees of a business receiving a Job Skills Program (JSP) grant are eligible for training. Eligible businesses and industries include private firms and institutions, groups, or associations concerned with commerce, trade, manufacturing, or service provisions. Public or nonprofit hospitals are also eligible.
  • Title I Youth, Adult and Dislocated Worker programs (Various state and local service providers): Workforce development workshops, assessment and career guidance, resources for worker training, on–the–job training, support services. (Page 28)

To a change in vision. Another aspect is the ability to fulfill business recruitment needs through connecting the business with the talents of job–ready and skilled agency participants, and to offer the ability to create individualized and low–risk opportunities for the business so that a participant might best showcase their ability and potential value to the workplace. The DSB will provide guidance on issues of disability in the workplace, including education around the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) Act; information on how to benefit from federal and local incentives for hiring of individuals with disabilities, and offer supports to the business for successfully meeting required mandates for hiring of individuals with disabilities. The DSB will offer workplace accommodation recommendations and supports, and education and guidance on making the workplace a disability–friendly and inclusive environment. The DSB will connect business to disability–related resources, training and/or education available in the community at large. The DSB will engage business in identifying supply chain needs, and will assist in establishing entrepreneurs and small businesses that might best fulfill that supply chain need. ( Page 84)

A DSB–offered array of services for business includes many components. One component is to increase awareness among business of the agency’s range of services, in order to provide an easy pathway for business to retain a talented employee whose work performance may be impacted due to a change in vision. Another aspect is the ability to fulfill business recruitment needs through connecting the business with the talents of job–ready and skilled agency participants, and to offer the ability to create individualized and low–risk opportunities for the business so that a participant might best showcase their ability and potential value to the workplace. The DSB will provide guidance on issues of disability in the workplace, including education around the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) Act; information on how to benefit from federal and local incentives for hiring of individuals with disabilities, and offer supports to the business for successfully meeting required mandates for hiring of individuals with disabilities. The DSB will offer workplace accommodation recommendations and supports, and education and guidance on making the workplace a disability–friendly and inclusive environment. The DSB will connect business to disability–related resources, training and/or education available in the community at large. The DSB will engage business in identifying supply chain needs, and will assist in establishing entrepreneurs and small businesses that might best fulfill that supply chain need. (Page 119)

The DSB and its Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act partners are the key players in Washington State economic strategy for workforce development, and the DSB encourages and supports science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) employment goals and vocational and academic training for all eligible participants who have aptitude and interest, and look to collaborate with the Washington School for the Blind and other partners to develop workshops and programs that will encourage interest in STEM activities at a young age.

The DSB will continue to identify eligible participants with aptitude for entrepreneurialism, and continue to support start–up opportunities of small business as an important means for blind, low vision and/or deaf blind individuals to join in on the key Washington State economic development strategy of encouraging small business. Blind business owners often become employers themselves, helping drive the state’s workforce engine. (Page 130)

The DSB will engage business in identifying supply chain needs, and will assist in establishing entrepreneurs and small businesses that might best fulfill that supply chain need.

Due to the small size of the DSB customer base and agency staffing in comparison to other workforce partner programs, the agency and its eligible participants will benefit from the broader infrastructure that state plan partners develop and nurture towards increased business engagement. The DSB alone cannot fully provide the amount of skilled talent business requires, and the DSB as a separate entity cannot efficiently engage business statewide.

The DSB will rely on active inclusion of its staff in the One–Stop Business Services Teams, and depend on the accessibility of workforce programs for agency participants, in order to meet the broader engagement of business in a manner that works best for business – through a seamless single point of contact. DSB counselors develop relationships with local business partners, and will guide those relationships (as applicable) into the greater workforce system in order to best fulfill the business needs. (Page 385)

Career Pathways

I–BEST Programs 

Professional Technical I–BEST co–enrolls students in adult basic education and college credit–bearing career pathways that lead to living wage jobs. I–BEST accelerates students down their career pathway, by contextualizing and team teaching the language, math, and other foundational skills needed to succeed in their professional–technical program. I–BEST students are nine times more likely to earn a workforce credential than students in traditional basic education programs.

Professional Technical Expansion I–BEST allows students to move further and faster down their career pathway by putting English and math courses in context, as needed for longer–term certificate and degree programs. This allows students to skip developmental education and earn their college or terminal–level English and math credits through contextualization and team teaching.

Academic I–BEST co–enrolls students in adult basic education and Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA) courses for students intending to earn a transfer degree. Through Academic I–BEST, adult education students can accelerate their progress down a transfer career pathway and reduce or eliminate time spent in developmental education. (Page 50)

Integrated Service Delivery Summary and Goals 

In conclusion, a truly integrated service delivery system holds promise for Washington’s workforce by helping people reach their goals no matter their barriers, their background, or where they entered the system. Doing this effectively calls for increasing the number of navigators in the state’s WorkSource system, eliminating redundant assessments, and helping more customers define career pathways that help them achieve portable skills, higher education levels, industry credentials, and satisfying, living–wage careers. 

Engaging Business for Better Results 

When Washington’s workforce system effectively engages with business, it’s a win–win situation for workers, and for employers. By working closely with firms to determine their talent challenges and by implementing effective solutions, the workforce system helps both businesses and workers prosper. (Page 51)

Job order listings and applicant referrals through WorkSourceWA.com, the Monster–based  job matching system to provide a deeper pool of talent for employers to recruit

  • Employer Needs Assessment
  • Unemployment Insurance Access
  • Access to Facilities
  • Translation Services
  • Developing and delivering innovative workforce investment services and strategies for area employers, e.g., career pathways, skills upgrading, skill standard development and certification for recognized postsecondary credential or other employer use, apprenticeship, and other effective initiatives for meeting the workforce investment needs of area employers and workers
  • Assistance in managing reductions in force in coordination with rapid response activities and with strategies for the aversion of layoffs, and the delivery of employment and training activities to address risk factors
  • Assisting employers with accessing local, state, and federal tax credits, including Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) certification
  • Local Veterans Employment Representatives outreach to businesses to veterans to employers interested in attracting qualified veterans
  • Recruiting and initial screening for participation in WIOA special projects to train for demand occupations, OJTs or customized training
  • Increasing rapid response and pursuing National Dislocated Worker Grant funding to serve dislocated workers (Page 79)

Some centers have co–located vocational rehabilitation counselors with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation in the Department of Social and Health Services. Co–location of VR staff increases referrals from Wagner–Peyser and other co–located staff and vice versa. Coordination between core and other programs is better so that persons with disabilities can get more help to compete for and enjoy high quality employment through acquiring the necessary skills while receiving any necessary supports. Under WIOA Title IV, VR staff outreach to disabled youth graduating from the K–12 system will encourage more young people to pursue assistance from WorkSource to begin career pathways toward self–support through viable avenues. Many ES–staffed one stops have taken the initiative to invite high school teachers of students on IEPs to make field trips fostering a sense of comfort in approaching WorkSource. (Page 107)

  • Developing and delivering innovative workforce investment services and strategies for area employers, e.g., career pathways, skills upgrading, skill standard development and certification for recognized postsecondary credentials or other employer use, apprenticeship, and other effective initiatives for meeting the workforce investment needs of area employers and workers
  • Assistance in managing reductions in force in coordination with rapid response activities and with strategies for the aversion of layoffs, and the delivery of employment and training activities to address risk factors. (Page 115)

DSHS TANF (WorkFirst) and SNAP Employment and Training (Basic Food Employment and Training–BFET) strategies support access to post–secondary credentials through contracting and partnering with the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges. This partnership includes all 34 community and technical colleges.

TANF: Through TANF (WorkFirst), participants have access to a continuum of educational opportunities to include Basic Education for Adults and Vocational education. Washington’s innovative post–secondary educational opportunities are structured around career pathways with stackable certificates allowing students to earn college credits leading to industry recognized certifications and degrees. DSHS supports participant access to these programs through referral, tuition payment, coordinated case management, supportive services, and childcare. In addition, the TANF/WorkFirst program actively supports and promotes the use of the Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I–BEST) program, allowing low skilled (literacy and numeracy) adults or those without a high school diploma or equivalent to enter a college–level, credit bearing, career pathways program and bolster basic skills through team–taught, integrated instruction contextualized to the vocational education career pathway. (Page 126)

  • Labor exchange services (job search and placement, info on in–demand industries and occupations, info on non–traditional employment for current and future jobseekers; recruitment and other business services for employers)

Streamlining customer intake means taking targeted information from a participant on day one to place them in a program, or mixture of programs, that will—at a minimum—meet their immediate needs. New participants, particularly individuals with barriers to employment, should experience connection and the feeling of momentum or forward movement beginning on the first day. Finding the right program fit can occur in subsequent visits, but the customer should not be bombarded with duplicative requests for information or skills assessments. Staff must be “Navigators” who help people design individual career pathways and then assist them in finding an economically self–sustaining route forward. Partners will need to work together differently, including at points of transition (hand–offs) between organizations, the points of co–servicing (participant receiving multiple services from multiple organizations at the same time), and in the way they manage funding and services braided across organizations. (Page 136)

6.   Whether the activities are built on a strong foundation of research and effective educational practice;

7.   Whether the activities effectively employ advances in technology, as appropriate, including the use of computers and blended learning resources;

8.   Whether the activities provide learning in real life, college and career contexts to ensure that an individual has the skills needed to compete in the workplace and exercise the rights and responsibilities of citizenship;

9.   Whether the activities are staffed by well-trained instructors, counselors, and administrators;

10.  Whether the activities coordinate with other available resources in the community, such as establishing strong links with elementary and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies;

11.  Whether the activities offer flexible schedules and support services (such as child care and transportation) as needed to enable all students, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;

12.  Whether the activities maintain a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report participant outcomes and to monitor program performance against the eligible agency performance measures; and

13. Whether the local communities have a demonstrated need for additional English literacy programs. In addition, to ensure that providers meet the WIOA requirements, proposals will be evaluated by teams from SBCTC on their ability to:

  • Implement and scale effective college and career pathways that accelerate student completion and foster economic growth
  • Guide and support transformational instructional practices that accelerate student completion to diplomas, high school equivalency, certificates, the Tipping Point, and AA/BA degrees leading to family wage jobs. Plans must include:
    • Implementing the CCR Standards in all programming;
    • Integrating employability skills training and instruction in all courses at all levels;
    • Beginning implementation of integrated employment and training activities such as I BEST into all EL Civics instruction to be fully implemented by July 1, 2016;
    • Expanding the teaching of speaking and listening into all levels of both ABE and ELA programming; and
    • Integrating problem solving in technology rich environments at all levels of instruction. (Page 150)

The department’s overall strategy for providing reemployment services to UI and other unemployed individuals encompasses a number of mandatory and optional program partnerships. Under WIA, partnerships evolved and are expected to expand even more with WIOA with an expectation of more seamless service delivery. More integrated service delivery should ideally result in developing an intake process that eliminates redundant assessments and streamlines the customer experience. ESD is leading with local Workforce Development Councils. Other entities with specialized programs serving parents on TANF, Able-Bodied Adults Without Dependents (ABAWDs), MSFWs, homeless, ex-offenders, veterans, dislocated workers, persons with disabilities, and the long-term unemployed when included should increase the number of participants who have defined career pathways and who gain portable skills. All will be better informed and served as Integrated Service Delivery advances. (Page 197)

Guide and support transformational instructional practices that accelerate student completion to diplomas, high school equivalency, certificates, the Tipping Point, and AA/BA degrees leading to family wage jobs;

Plans must include: Implementing the CCR Standards in all programming; Integrating employability skills training and instruction in all courses at all levels; Beginning implementation of integrated employment and training activities such as I-BEST into all IEL/Civics instruction to be fully implemented by July 1, 2016; Integrated reading strategies instruction at all levels in all courses; Expanding the teaching of speaking and listening into all levels of both ABE and ELA programming; and Integrating problem solving in technology-rich environments at all levels of instruction;

Support one-stop centers through in-kind services/funding; Support alignment of workforce investment, education, and economic development; Improve labor market relevance; Improve the structure of service delivery; Increase prosperity; employment, retention, earnings, and the attainment of recognized postsecondary credentials. (Page 213)

Funded providers use key elements of I-BEST programs, e.g. contextualization, team teaching, enhanced students services, and articulated college and career pathways, to increase the speed at which students master basic and ELA skills at federal levels 1, 2 and 3. On Ramp options include, but are not limited to: programs focused on career clusters; partnership efforts between colleges and community-based organizations and local workforce development councils (WIBs); I-BEST at Work projects that partner providers, employers and WIBs; Project I-DEA (Integrated Digital English Acceleration), a three-year pilot program with support from the Gates Foundation that will transform ELA instruction using a flipped classroom model and 50% online instruction.

In 1-3 quarters, On Ramp students acquire the skills needed to transition to basic skills education classes at federal levels 4-6 and/or Professional/Technical or Academic I-BEST pathways. (Page 222)

Washington state’s combined plan will address the activities that will be undertaken to meet the requirements of Section 233 of WIOA to promote transitions from adult education to postsecondary education and training through career pathways. Under the new combined plan, all Basic Education for Adults providers will use funds made available under section 222(a)(2) for the adult education and literacy required WIOA activities including the four new required national leadership activities to develop or enhance the adult education system across the state. All funded providers will be required to detail the process that will be used to collaborate with all stakeholders and align Basic Education for Adults programming in their 2015-2016 extension and 2017-2022 competitive grant plans with all partners named in the combined state plan. Eligible providers will provide services in alignment with local plans detailing how they will promote concurrent enrollment with Title I programs and activities in order to meet the state adjusted levels of performance and collect data to report on performance indicators. In addition, all providers will describe how they will fulfill one-stop responsibilities in their region. As members of local Workforce Development Boards, local providers will participate in ongoing plan development and implementation of WIOA. The following transition activities are underway in Washington to meet the four newly required state leadership activities requirements of WIOA: following activities have been completed or are underway in support:

  • The Washington State Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board (WTECB) has established a highly inclusive committee structure to identify key areas of work and implementation planning. Basic Education for Adults is represented on each of the committees with local providers being engaged as needed. The committees are:
    • Steering Committee: members include WTECB, Business, Labor, all core programs, Chief Local Elected Officials (CLEO), TANF, and the SBCTC. This committee’s work includes creating the WIOA vision and goals, state and local plan development, state policies and guidance to facilitate integrated services development, funding formula guidance, One Stop certification and evaluation criteria, oversight of work plans and timelines, facilitation of communication state-to-state, local-to-state, local-to-local, and among WIOA implementation committees, and state legislative issues.
    • Committee for Sector Strategies to Close Skill Gaps in the Workplace: members include WTECB, Educational Service Districts (ESD), Business, Labor, all core programs, Washington Workforce Association (WWA), Commerce, CLEO, SBCTC, and the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI).This committee’s work includes regional designation and governance, data analysis, local workforce development council designations, local board configuration, and sector strategy and industry engagement.
    • Committee for Performance Accountability and Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) Committee: members include WTECB, BEdA, DVR, Department of Services for the Blind (DSB) (Page 230)

The BEdA office works closely with the Council for Basic Skills (CBS) to determine areas in which programs need professional development in curriculum and instruction, policy and procedures, and implementation of new programming including reading strategies, IEL Civics program implementation, College and Career Readiness Standards, employability skills, and comprehensive guided pathways. The SBCTC agency also works across the various departments (WorkForce, Developmental Education, Research, Academic Transfer, Student Services, and eLearning) to determine and develop various professional development opportunities that are implemented to move targeted WIOA statewide initiatives forward. During the assessment of individual trainings participants are identify areas of further professional development needs. Once the need has been determined, SBCTC employs a variety of resources to develop and deliver the trainings. National organization such as LINCs and College and Career Readiness and Success Center at American Institute for Research (AIR); CLASP; and SBCTC’s Assessment, Teaching and Learning (ATL) Unit; Student Success Center, Guided Career Pathways Initiative , and eLearning departments. All State Leadership activities align with the required and permissible activities in SEC. 223.a.1 and 2 of WIOA. Federal leadership dollars are granted to providers in support of professional and program development initiatives that include: 

  • Team teacher training for all programming (ABE, ELA, HS 21+, On-Ramp to I-BEST, IEL Civics, and I-BEST) to support career pathways integrated employment and training activities;
  • Contextualized instruction training centered on the CCR Standards, integrated employability skills, and reading strategies;
  • Technology in flipped classroom instruction to integrate technology and employability skills development at all levels;
  • LINCS Adult Numeracy Training to integrate math instruction into ELA pathways and to increase numeracy instructional skills of faculty in order to meet the College and Career Readiness Standard, the new NRS Level descriptors, and to increase outcomes across the system in mathematics;
  • Innovation in IEL Civics supporting the development of co-enrolled integrated employment and training activities (I-BEST) as well as math at all levels;
  • Reading Apprenticeship Training to prepare students for college-level instruction; and
  • Contextualized integrated employability skills training. (Page 231)

Unlike traditional approaches in which students must learn English before pursuing job-training, I-DEA teaches English in tandem with college and career skills. This program has a highly intensive, quarterly staff training and implementation component in addition to on-going program support from SBCTC. I-DEA will be fully implemented in all programs by June 2016. 

  • Reading Apprenticeship training and implementation, which will continue in Washington State as a strategic instructional model throughout Adult Basic Education and college programming, incorporating the essential components of reading specific to adult learners’ needs.
  • LINCS Adult Numeracy Training, which will be conducted throughout 2014-15 in support of mathematics instruction for increased rigor of programing in order to prepare students for college and career pathways.
  • Technology and the flipped classroom model training which will begin in 2015 to enhance faculty skills in the use of instructional technology for distance education and student skill development in solving problems in technology rich environments. (Page 232)

2.   The provision of technical assistance to eligible providers of adult education and literacy activities receiving funds under this title, include:

  • The development and dissemination of instructional and programmatic practices based on the most rigorous or scientifically valid research available and appropriate, in reading, writing, speaking, mathematics, English language acquisition programs, distance education, and staff training. Current initiatives include:
    • Washington’s adoption in October of 2014 of the College and Career Readiness (CCR) Standards as the basis for all instruction. 2014-17 will focus on training to transition from the Washington State Adult Learning Standards to CCR Standards with full implementation in 2017 with system wide professional development provided.
    • Integrated Digital English Acceleration (I-DEA), which is a hybrid instructional model based on the flipped classroom, providing problem solving activities in technology rich environments. Each student is provided with a laptop computer and 24/7 access to learning. Curriculum including language acquisition, rights and responsibilities of citizens and workforce training is thus available around the clock for ELA levels 1-3. Unlike traditional approaches in which students must learn English before pursuing job-training, I-DEA teaches English in tandem with college and career skills. This program has a highly intensive, quarterly staff training and implementation component in addition to on-going program support from SBCTC. I-DEA will be fully implemented in all programs by June 2016.
    • Reading Apprenticeship training and implementation, which will continue in Washington State as a strategic instructional model throughout Adult Basic Education and college programming, incorporating the essential components of reading specific to adult learners’ needs.
    • LINCS Adult Numeracy Training, which will be conducted throughout 2014-15 in support of mathematics instruction for increased rigor of programing in order to prepare students for college and career pathways.
    • Technology and the flipped classroom model training which will begin in 2015 to enhance faculty skills in the use of instructional technology for distance education and student skill development in solving problems in technology rich environments. (Page 234)

JR provides rehabilitative services to justice-involved youth. DSHS/DVR and JR have a cooperative agreement to jointly serve JR youth who are eligible for Pre-employment Transition Services and other DSHS/DVR services. Through coordinated services, JR youth with disabilities will receive services supporting community re-entry along career pathways. (Page 250)

  • Engage in the development and implementation of coordinated business engagement, industry sector strategies, and career pathways programs.
  • Utilize DSHS/DVR Business Specialists to assist with the recruitment and referral of qualified job seekers with disabilities to meet businesses’ demands.
  • Lead coordinated LWDB engagement of federal contractors and subcontractors, linking these contractors to skilled job seekers with disabilities.
  • Increase visibility through a methodical outreach and marketing plan which includes participation in local boards of commerce, membership in professional organizations, representation at career and recruitment fairs, and the provision of training services.
  • Support and expand innovative partnerships, such as Microsoft’s Specialisterne Project, which partners DSHS/DVR and Washington’s businesses to promote the hiring of individuals with disabilities in high–skill and high–demand occupations. (Page 264)
  • Leverage the labor market exchange, labor market research tools, and industry sector strategies to ensure that customers’ vocational goals are aligned with in–demand occupations to the greatest extent possible.
  • Integrate and align DSHS/DVR services and career pathways programs.
  • Increase use of Post–Employment Services to support customers in maintaining, regaining, or advancing in employment through better communicating these services and their benefits.
  • Provide training and technical assistance to businesses on best practices for recruiting and retaining employees with disabilities.
  • Support apprenticeships, paid internships, and on–the–job training opportunities to enhance customers’ employability, in partnership with LWDBs and the business community.
  • Utilize the results of the new comprehensive vocational assessment to evaluate customers’ skills, abilities, interests, as well as potential barriers to successful participation in, or completion of, training programs.
  • Complete required meetings at the end of every post–secondary term to review grades, progress, and support needs of customers participating in associate’s, baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral programs. (Page 302)

DSHS/DVR has identified Goal One, Priority Two strategies and activities to specifically target equitable access for unserved and underserved populations. The activities include, but are not limited to: enhanced outreach to students with disabilities in partnership with OSPI, the Center for Change in Transition Services, and local education agencies; targeted outreach to Washingtonians with disabilities who identify as Hispanic or Latino; and new business partnerships which provide career pathways for highly skilled adults living with an autism spectrum disorder in Washington’s technology industry. When served, these populations will experience equitable access to services and resources, including Supported Employment services, needed to achieve competitive employment outcomes within integrated settings. (Page 303)

This will also be the challenge of the WIOA partners and business development segments of the WorkSource system. It will be critical for the business development aspects to be marketing not only for the Youth in Transition, the younger workforce towards the Sector strategies professional sectors, but for those within the disadvantaged, disabilities and SCSEP communities for positions that may not necessarily be Career Pathways for all involved in the Work Force system. (Page 509)

The transition from WIA to WIOA will have significant impacts to how the different employment programs operationalize and provide services. SCSEP program staff and representatives are becoming familiar with the changes and how this may impact the SCSEP program(s). The State SCSEP Manager has been involved with the Washington State Auditor’s Office as they review all of the state and federally funded programs operating in the state of Washington that are involved with WIA/WIOA. Additionally the State SCSEP Manager has been invited to participate in two of the four State Key areas of Work and Potential WIOA Implementation Committees. The two committees being: The Performance Accountability and ETPL Committee and the Education and Career Pathways through Integrated Service Delivery Models. In addition there are significant changes to the Rehabilitation Services Act that are impacting how DVR provides services; There are also many changes through the Center for Medicaid Services (CMS), the Administration for Community Living that have positive ramifications for enhancing employment services. An additional partner in this process is the Office for Disabilities and Employment Policy at the Federal and local levels. (Page 511)

Employment Networks
  • DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR-CD contracts with each county.
  • DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH have signed a memorandum of collaboration that establishes methods for Medicaid outpatient behavioral health services to be provided as extended services for joint DSHS/DVR supported employment customers.
  • DBHR-MH has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model.
  • DSHS/DVR is participating with DBHR-MH in conducting a pilot project at two locations that is designed to integrate the Individual Placement Support (IPS) model of supported employment with DSHS/DVR supported employment services.
  • DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 250)

DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR-CD contracts with each county. 

  • DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH have signed a memorandum of collaboration that establishes methods for Medicaid outpatient behavioral health services to be provided as extended services for joint DSHS/DVR supported employment customers.
  • DBHR-MH has become a Ticket-to-Work (TTW) Employment Network and is establishing a Partnership Plus Agreement with DSHS/DVR to build a revenue stream from the TTW Program that will fund extended services for those mental health customers who require a supported employment model.
  • DSHS/DVR is participating with DBHR-MH in conducting a pilot project at two locations that is designed to integrate the Individual Placement Support (IPS) model of supported employment with DSHS/DVR supported employment services.
  • DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. The counselor works from the mental health center approximately one day per week, facilitating access to DSHS/DVR services for mental health consumers. (Page 267)

Washington State Business Leadership Network (WSBLN), the National Employment Team (NET), and Puget Sound Diversity Employment Network (PSDEN) – DSB has an active relationship and partnership in the activities of the WSBLN, the NET and the PSDEN, providing our specialized expertise as a resource to businesses locally, and connecting agency participant talent to businesses that understand the importance of inclusion of people with disabilities into their workforce. Yakima Special Needs Coalition – This group is a gathering of many community programs working on issues of transportation for individuals with disabilities. The lead agency for the coalition is People for People, a primary regional transportation provider for individuals that cannot access the public transit. (Page 347)

Ticket to Work Employment Network. Washington State DSHS agencies (DBHR, DDA, ALTSA/HCS and DVR) are now partners as an administrative Employment Network. The SCSEP State Leadership has expressed interest in being involved with this collaboration. Goodwill Industries is currently an Employment Network and several of the State Sub–grantees are either currently or in discussions with becoming an Employment Network via their involvement with the local WDCs. (Page 514)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 63

Kaiser Aluminum Settles EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 10/24/2017

“Kaiser Aluminum Corporation, the leading producer of fabricated aluminum products in the United States, will pay $175,000 and reinstate its hiring offer to a qualified production worker to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's suit, Kaiser withdrew its job offer for production work at its Trentwood mill in Spokane after Donald McMurray's medical records showed a workplace injury from over 10 years ago. The EEOC found that McMurray, with a long history of construction work at the time, was a well-qualified candidate fully capable of meeting the job's physical demands.”

Systems
  • Other

Washington Medicaid Transformation - 07/06/2017

“The state is leading strategic changes within Medicaid, allowing us to move toward a healthier Washington. The Medicaid transformation project demonstration is an agreement with the federal government which allows us to test new and innovative approaches to providing health coverage and care.”

There are three initiatives under the transformation project:

Transforming Medicaid service delivery through Accountable Communities of Health Expanding options for long-term services and supports Increasing the availability of supportive housing and supported employment”
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington State’s Statewide Transition Plan for New HCBS Rules - 03/15/2017

The Washington State Health Care Authority (HCA, the state’s Medicaid Agency), the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Aging and Long-Term Support Administration (ALTSA) and Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) submit this proposed transition plan in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services new requirements for Home and Community-based Services (HCBS Final Rule 42 CFR Parts 430, 431, 435, 436, 441 and 447) that became effective March 17, 2014. Washington State fully supports the intent of the HCBS setting rules. Washington State has long been an advocate for providing services to clients in the most integrated home and community-based settings, and is a leader in providing clients with choices regarding the settings in which long-term services and supports are provided and will continue its partnership with participants, advocacy groups, stakeholders and Tribes.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Student-Youth Transition Handbook - 07/22/2016

The information provided in this handbook is intended for students and youth with disabilities, their families, staff from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), teachers, school counselors, school administrators, school district personnel, and other agencies supporting students and youth with disabilities who want to participate in secondary transition planning and services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation State Plan: 2017-2020 - 07/01/2016

"The goals and priorities established in this State Plan reflect DSHS/DVR’s ongoing commitments to customer service, successful outcomes, staff development, organizational system improvement, strong partnerships, and business engagement. These goals and priorities were collaboratively developed by DSHS/DVR and leadership of the Washington State Rehabilitation Council."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

ABLE Legislation HB 2323 - 03/29/2016

AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience program; amending RCW 43.33A.190; reenacting and amending RCW 43.79A.040; adding new sections to chapter 43.330 RCW; and providing an expiration date….    The governing board is further authorized to contract with other organizations to administer, manage, promote, or market the Washington achieving a better life experience program. This program must allow for the creation of savings or investment accounts for eligible individuals with disabilities and the funds must be invested.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Data Sharing

US Department of Labor- ETA- Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Round 6 - 11/01/2015

WADEI will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and leverage, blend and braid funds and resources to support increased access and better outcomes for people with disabilities through: 1) Facilitation by DRCs of Integrated Resource Teams that integrate instructors, Navigators, student service coordinators and other college partners and mentor them in their use. 2) Partner policy makers will meet quarterly to identify emerging issues, develop collaborative solutions, and evaluate performance. 3) In partnership with the Department of Services for the Blind, use Wi-Fi hotspots to provide assistive technology access in AJCs that will be sustainable and will also offer greater range of access and AT options. 3) The Washington Access Fund will provide group and individual financial education and counseling to improve credit, lower debt and increase savings, while improving informed financial decision making. 4) Through a partnership with the WIPA program, working-age Social Security beneficiaries will have access to benefits counseling and individual benefits plans. 5) The Washington Business Alliance will recruit, coordinate and manage active participation of businesses and trade associations that are committed to using career pathways and WIOA programs and services to improve their access to qualified working-age applicants with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Washington State HB 1496 Employment of Workers with Permanent Disabilities - 07/24/2015

“AN ACT Relating to addressing vocational rehabilitation by making 2 certain recommendations from the vocational rehabilitation 3 subcommittee permanent and creating certain incentives for employers 4 to employ injured workers with permanent disabilities…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Washington House Bill 1636 - 07/24/2015

Requires state agencies with 100 or more employees to submit an annual report. The State Disability Employment Parity Act declares intent to increase the hiring of persons with disabilities in the state workforce. The bill includes sharing of disability employment statistics.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

King County Developmental Disabilities Division: WA Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) Employment and Day Program Service Definitions - 07/01/2015

“The following definitions apply to all King County Employment and Day Program services, including Child Development Services (CDS), Community Information and Education services, and Adult Employment services...”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

ABLE Legislation HB 2323 - 03/29/2016

AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience program; amending RCW 43.33A.190; reenacting and amending RCW 43.79A.040; adding new sections to chapter 43.330 RCW; and providing an expiration date….    The governing board is further authorized to contract with other organizations to administer, manage, promote, or market the Washington achieving a better life experience program. This program must allow for the creation of savings or investment accounts for eligible individuals with disabilities and the funds must be invested.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Data Sharing

Washington State HB 1496 Employment of Workers with Permanent Disabilities - 07/24/2015

“AN ACT Relating to addressing vocational rehabilitation by making 2 certain recommendations from the vocational rehabilitation 3 subcommittee permanent and creating certain incentives for employers 4 to employ injured workers with permanent disabilities…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

Washington House Bill 1636 - 07/24/2015

Requires state agencies with 100 or more employees to submit an annual report. The State Disability Employment Parity Act declares intent to increase the hiring of persons with disabilities in the state workforce. The bill includes sharing of disability employment statistics.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Washington House Bill 1299 - 06/11/2015

Transportation appropriations bill for the 2015–2017 biennium. Includes $7.5 million for the state’s Paratransit/Special Needs Grant Program, which awards funds to nonprofits to improve transit services for people who can’t provide their own transportation due to age, disability or income; program goals include enhanced access to employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Washington House Bill 2063 - 05/01/2015

"AN ACT Relating to the creation of the Washington achieving a better life experience [ABLE] program; and creating new sections."

"The legislature finds that the federal achieving a better life experience act of 2014 (P.L. 113-295) encourages and assists individuals and families in saving private moneys for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Washington RCW 28A.155.220: High School Transition Services - 04/15/2015

“The office of the superintendent of public instruction must establish interagency agreements with the department of social and health services, the department of services for the blind, and any other state agency that provides high school transition services for special education students. Such interagency agreements shall not interfere with existing individualized education programs, nor override any individualized education program team's decision-making power. The purpose of the interagency agreements is to foster effective collaboration among the multiple agencies providing transition services for individualized education program-eligible special education students from the beginning of transition planning, as soon as educationally and developmentally appropriate, through age twenty-one, or through high school graduation, whichever occurs first. Interagency agreements are also intended to streamline services and programs, promote efficiencies, and establish a uniform focus on improved outcomes related to self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

WA County Services for Working Age Adults Policy 4.11 - 07/15/2013

“This policy establishes employment supports as the first use of employment and day program funds for working age adults and ensures that after nine months of employment services the person may choose Community Access. The policy establishes guidelines for Field Services staff of the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and Counties to follow when providing services to working age adults.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Washington Second Substitute Senate Bill 5732 - 04/28/2013

“AN ACT Relating to improving behavioral health services provided to adults in Washington state…”    Some of the significant policy changes include: “Beginning May 1, 2014, the legislature shall convene a task force to examine reform of the adult behavioral health system, with voting members as provided in this subsection;… The systems responsible for financing, administration, and delivery of publicly funded mental health and chemical dependency services to adults must be designed and administered to achieve improved outcomes for adult clients served by those systems…” one of which is “increased participation in employment and education;…” [and] The department and the health care authority must implement a strategy for the improvement of the adult behavioral health system,” among others.  
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Washington House Bill 1519 - 04/22/2013

“AN ACT Relating to establishing accountability measures for service coordination organizations…” It contains performance measure such as, “Improvements in client health status and wellness; increases in client participation in meaningful activities; reductions in client involvement with criminal justice systems; reductions in avoidable costs in hospitals, emergency rooms, crisis services, and jails and prisons; increases in stable housing in the community; improvements in client satisfaction with quality of life; and reductions in population-level health disparities.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Senate Bill 6384 - 03/19/2012

“AN ACT Relating to ensuring that persons with developmental disabilities be given the opportunity to transition to a community access program after enrollment in an employment program; and adding a new section to chapter 71A.12 RCW.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

WA State Governor’s Executive Order 13-02 - Employment of people with disabilities - 03/22/2013

Executive Order 13-02 includes several directives including a Disability Employment Challenge that establishes a goal of five percent of Washington state government’s workforce being comprised of persons living with a disability. A Disability Employment Task Force has been established to help state agencies with the recruitment and retention of persons with disabilities.    
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 15

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation State Plan: 2017-2020 - 07/01/2016

"The goals and priorities established in this State Plan reflect DSHS/DVR’s ongoing commitments to customer service, successful outcomes, staff development, organizational system improvement, strong partnerships, and business engagement. These goals and priorities were collaboratively developed by DSHS/DVR and leadership of the Washington State Rehabilitation Council."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

King County Developmental Disabilities Division: WA Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) Employment and Day Program Service Definitions - 07/01/2015

“The following definitions apply to all King County Employment and Day Program services, including Child Development Services (CDS), Community Information and Education services, and Adult Employment services...”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health

DVR Services for Employers - 11/06/2014

“Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) offers a variety of support services to assist employers in hiring and retaining VR customers with disabilities: Employment Services Team, Recruiter, Human Resource Consultant and Manager, Awareness and Etiquette Training, Hiring Incentives, Recruiting DVR Customers, DVR Internship Program, On the Job Training, Job Site Modifications and Assistive Technology, Supported Employment, [and] VR's - National Employment Team (The NET).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

DVR Supported Employment - 09/08/2014

“In some settings a potential employee may need additional support to be successful on the job. This support may be in the form of a job coach who works with persons with severe disabilities by providing on-site job training assistance and long term support to the employer and employee. The job coach will help the employee learn good work habits and job skills. DVR can often contract with local community rehabilitation programs to provide supported employment services and long term support. During this process, employers gain reliable, dependable and hardworking employees with a better than average chance of success.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

DVR Customer Services Manual - 07/31/2014

“This chapter explains the types of vocational rehabilitation services (referred to as ‘VR services’ in this chapter) available to individuals who are eligible through the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). VR services are offered to assist individuals with disabilities to prepare for, get, and keep jobs that are consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. This chapter is consistent with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 and codified in 34 Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 361 and 363 and with state laws and DSHS requirements.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

DSHS Strategic Plan and Lean Report (2014) - 01/31/2014

Washington State’s expressed goal is to, “Be the national leader in: Providing a safe, high-quality, home, community and facility-based array of residential services and employment supports.” This report describes the State’s progress in providing Home and Community Based Services, Vocational Rehabilitation job rates and wage progression, and employment supports for people with developmental disabilities, among others.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

DDA Working Age Adult Policy - 07/15/2013

“This policy establishes employment supports as the first use of employment and day program funds for working age adults and ensures that after nine months of employment services the person may choose Community Access. The policy establishes guidelines for Field Services staff of the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and Counties to follow when providing services to working age adults.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Case Studies of Emerging/ Innovative Vocational, Rehabilitation Agency Practices - 04/01/2013

This report documents emerging promising practices for job seekers with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Increasing Integrated Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Disabilities and DSHS Clients - 09/01/2012

This Integrated Employment Report marks the completion of an effort begun at DSHS in 2010 by a group of employees charged with developing a Model Employment Plan. The intent of the original plan was to address the Department’s desire to hire more persons with disabilities. At the time, our employee pool included only 4.7% of people with disabilities, while the agency served more than over 217,000 of clients who identified themselves as having some form of a disability (Source: DSHS RDA Client Services Database). This Integrated Employment Plan addresses a Priority of the Executive Leadership Team (ELT), which is to create new job opportunities within the Department. Specifically, it targets not just the potential hiring of people with disabilities, but also of clients who are on Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration (JRA) young adults who will transition out of the Juvenile Justice system into society, and Children’s Administration foster youth and alums who seek employment. This Jobs Priority / Integrated Employment Initiative comes at a time of harsh unemployment across Washington State. The initiative is intended to promote competitive employment opportunities for people with disabilities within the Department by proposing a way to overcome employment barriers, employment discrimination and related biases. It is important to note that the Department is already working in conjunction with community case resource managers on supported employment opportunities for working age adults with development disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

DVR Business Plan - 06/15/2010

“The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) serves eligible individuals with all types of disabilities who want to work and need vocational rehabilitation services to overcome barriers to employment that result from a disability. Individuals are eligible for services if they have a physical, mental, or sensory disability that results in an impediment to employment and they require vocational rehabilitation services to become employed. The services DVR provides are person centered and based on each individual’s strengths and informed choice. DVR strives to achieve full employment for people with disabilities in career-focused positions providing competitive wages and benefits.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging

Washington State DSHS/DVR 2016-2020 State Plan: the Supported Employment Program (Draft)

The cooperative agreements, program goals, funding distribution, and supported employment services described in this section represent the coordinated efforts of DSHS/DVR, its State collaborators, and its service delivery partners to ensure that all Washingtonians with disabilities can access the support services needed to obtain and maintain employment, maximize independence, and experience improved quality of life.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Project Search

 

“The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, business led, one year school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the workplace. Total workplace immersion facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

WA State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) Member State

 

SELN brings together state Developmental Disability agencies for sharing, educating and providing guidance on practices and policies around employment to its members. Annual membership is required for participation in all network events.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

US Department of Labor- ETA- Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Round 6 - 11/01/2015

WADEI will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and leverage, blend and braid funds and resources to support increased access and better outcomes for people with disabilities through: 1) Facilitation by DRCs of Integrated Resource Teams that integrate instructors, Navigators, student service coordinators and other college partners and mentor them in their use. 2) Partner policy makers will meet quarterly to identify emerging issues, develop collaborative solutions, and evaluate performance. 3) In partnership with the Department of Services for the Blind, use Wi-Fi hotspots to provide assistive technology access in AJCs that will be sustainable and will also offer greater range of access and AT options. 3) The Washington Access Fund will provide group and individual financial education and counseling to improve credit, lower debt and increase savings, while improving informed financial decision making. 4) Through a partnership with the WIPA program, working-age Social Security beneficiaries will have access to benefits counseling and individual benefits plans. 5) The Washington Business Alliance will recruit, coordinate and manage active participation of businesses and trade associations that are committed to using career pathways and WIOA programs and services to improve their access to qualified working-age applicants with disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

WA Jobs by 21 Partnership Project - 07/01/2012

 

“In 2007 the Washington state legislature developed the Jobs by 21 Partnership Project to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s school and adult service systems in increasing employment of young adults with developmental disabilities.  Evaluation shows that student project participants were more likely to be employed following school exit and had stronger employment outcomes than students who did not participate.  Data suggest that improved employment outcomes were supported by leveraging and maximizing financial and in-kind resources and strengthening the collaborative relationships among project stakeholders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Customized Employment Employers and Workers: Creating a Competitive Edge (July 2007) Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) - 07/01/2007

“Customized Employment strategies offer new processes to advance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. The Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor initiated a series of demonstration projects to identify policy issues that support the use of Customized Employment strategies in the workforce development system. The purpose of this report is to summarize the lessons learned from this demonstration initiative and the policy recommendations it has generated.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

WA Social Security Administration - Mental Health Treatment Study - 10/01/2006

 

“The Mental Health Treatment Study (MHTS) evaluated the impact that better access to treatment and employment support services would have on outcomes such as medical recovery, functioning, employment, and benefit receipt for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries with a primary impairment of schizophrenia or affective disorder. We examined the advantages and disadvantages of providing these SSDI beneficiaries access to high quality services designed to improve their employment outcomes.  The services included systematic medication management, the services of a nurse-care coordinator to coordinate participants’ physical and mental health therapies, and the services of a supported employment specialist trained in the individual placement and support model.  We also paid for out-of-pocket mental health expenses and other expenses necessary to help participants return to work.” [Study included Vancouver, WA]

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Washington Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) Program

“The Becoming Employed Starts Today (BEST) project is designed to transform service delivery by promoting sustainable access to evidence-based, supported employment. BEST provides consumers with meaningful choice and control of employment and support services. It uses peer counselors, reduces unemployment, and supports the recovery and resiliency of individuals with serious mental illness, including co-occurring substance use disorders.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WA Division of Developmental Disabilities, Jobs by 21 Partnership Project Report for FY 2009

“The Jobs by 21 Partnership Project was funded by the Washington State Legislature for the 2007–2009 biennium. The Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) was authorized to identify and demonstrate best practices in sustainable partnerships among Washington’s counties, school districts, employers, families, students with developmental disabilities, and adult service agencies. The focus of the collaborative relationships between Partnership Projects stakeholders was to obtain “Jobs by 21” for young adults with developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) – Access to recovery (ATR)

 

“The State of Washington directly funded six counties (Clark, King, Pierce, Snohomish, Spokane, and Yakima) to implement ATR. Each county administered its voucher program with relative autonomy.”

“Washington State reports that ATR has had a number of beneficial effects. It has led to a more person-centered approach to services in which individual choice and preference have heightened importance, there is greater emphasis on culturally specific services, and there is openness to and acceptance of spiritual support and other services that have not historically been funded. In addition, ATR has played a role in moving the State toward a service paradigm designed to support recovery.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) – WA Individualized Learning Plan Research and Demonstration Project

“The ODEP study launched in the 2008-09 school year and targeted for completion in 2012-13, is the first longitudinal research and demonstration project designed to understand the effectiveness of ILPs. It looks at ILPs in 14 (rural, urban and suburban) schools in four states (LA, NM, SC, and WA). The research is built around core features included in the Guideposts for Success."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WA Disability Program Navigator (DPN) Demonstration Initiative

 

“The DPN Initiative is: developing new/sustaining ongoing partnerships to achieve seamless, comprehensive, and integrated services; promoting the workforce investment system becoming Employment Networks under the Ticket-to-Work Program; blending/braiding resources to leverage funding for individual customers; creating systemic change; and expanding the capacity of the workforce investment system to serve customers with disabilities and employers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WA Mental Health Transformation State Infrastructure Grant (MHTIG) - Permanent Options for Recovery–Centered Housing (PORCH) Project

"The Permanent Options for Recovery-Centered Housing (PORCH) project is designed to transform service delivery by promoting sustainable access to evidence-based Permanent Supportive Housing throughout one urban and two rural Washington counties…Services will be prioritized for adults and young adults who are in transition, who have severe mental illnesses and who are experiencing homelessness, at risk of homelessness, inappropriately housed, or transitioning from state institutions. The project will provide special training to the teams on the unique trauma-related needs of the population. The project team will work with local community and consumer groups and organizations to identify any modifications needed to ensure that services are culturally relevant.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Student-Youth Transition Handbook - 07/22/2016

The information provided in this handbook is intended for students and youth with disabilities, their families, staff from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), teachers, school counselors, school administrators, school district personnel, and other agencies supporting students and youth with disabilities who want to participate in secondary transition planning and services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Community Summit at Ellensburg, WA [Annual Ellensburg Employment Conference] - 01/11/2013

 

“The Community Summit ....Let's Get Connected will bring together individuals committed to building inclusive communities rich with people participating as neighbors, co-workers, friends, family members, and citizens. People with developmental disabilities and their families, friends, individual and agency staff that provide residential, employment and personal supports, DDD staff, county, other state and local government staff, and interested community members are all welcome. We want everyone to come together to actively discuss ideas and learn from each other about how to build and participate in inclusive communities that enrich everyone.” The Summit is organized by WiSe.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Guide to Transition Assessment in Washington State - 12/01/2007

Age-appropriate transition assessment is the primary component in the process of secondary transition planning. The transition assessments are the framework through which information is gathered to guide the development of a student’s program in order to successfully move the student from the public school to a post–high school setting. While the transition assessments can include formal or commercial assessments, they can also include interviews, observation, and surveys. Perhaps more important than the type of assessment used is that the process is a systematic method used to collect and organize information regarding the student’s interests, skills, strengths, temperaments and areas of need. This process should begin early and be quite broad during the middle school years, but becomes increasingly more specific as the student moves closer to graduation. The goal of transition assessment is to assist the student in achieving her or his vocational potential; therefore, the goal of the person responsible for the age-appropriate transition assessments is to accurately determine that potential as closely as possible. This becomes more likely by looking at the student’s interests, aptitudes, and preparation opportunities from a global concept and gathering that information in a systematic way.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology (DO-IT)

“The DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) Center is dedicated to empowering people with disabilities through technology and education. It promotes awareness and accessibility—in both the classroom and the workplace—to maximize the potential of individuals with disabilities and make our communities more vibrant, diverse, and inclusive.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Customized Employment

“Customized Employment is a unique approach to providing job development and job retention services through an individualized process that fits each person's particular needs. Services are provided by qualified staff who are ACRE Certified (The Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators) through the Rehabilitation Services Commission. All Customized Employment Services are funded through the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission (ORSC).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Learn and Earn: Supporting Teens

“Parents, teachers, and mentors encourage teens with disabilities to participate in work-based learning experiences in this video presentation. It can be used as training for training these stakeholders so that they can more effectively promote work-based learning for young people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WA Highline Community College Employment Professional Certificate Program

 

“We are in our seventh year of partnership with Highline College providing a program, originally envisioned by a group of individuals and county representatives, to establish a certification path for employment professionals. These professionals provide employment support to individuals with developmental disabilities, and play an integral role in assisting people to become contributing members of their community. The program offers high quality training taught by skilled professionals, intended to build on the skills of the participants, offer opportunities for networking with others, and serve as a building block for future leaders in supported employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

WiSe Washington Initiative for Supported Employment

“We provide training to agencies, employers, school districts and other groups interested in equitable employment for people with developmental disabilities. Here you will find the On Demand training, links to our Webinar offerings, and other local training opportunities!”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Kaiser Aluminum Settles EEOC Disability Discrimination Lawsuit - 10/24/2017

“Kaiser Aluminum Corporation, the leading producer of fabricated aluminum products in the United States, will pay $175,000 and reinstate its hiring offer to a qualified production worker to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit filed by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's suit, Kaiser withdrew its job offer for production work at its Trentwood mill in Spokane after Donald McMurray's medical records showed a workplace injury from over 10 years ago. The EEOC found that McMurray, with a long history of construction work at the time, was a well-qualified candidate fully capable of meeting the job's physical demands.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

Washington Medicaid Transformation - 07/06/2017

“The state is leading strategic changes within Medicaid, allowing us to move toward a healthier Washington. The Medicaid transformation project demonstration is an agreement with the federal government which allows us to test new and innovative approaches to providing health coverage and care.”

There are three initiatives under the transformation project:

Transforming Medicaid service delivery through Accountable Communities of Health Expanding options for long-term services and supports Increasing the availability of supportive housing and supported employment”
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington State’s Statewide Transition Plan for New HCBS Rules - 03/15/2017

The Washington State Health Care Authority (HCA, the state’s Medicaid Agency), the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) Aging and Long-Term Support Administration (ALTSA) and Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) submit this proposed transition plan in accordance with the requirements set forth in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services new requirements for Home and Community-based Services (HCBS Final Rule 42 CFR Parts 430, 431, 435, 436, 441 and 447) that became effective March 17, 2014. Washington State fully supports the intent of the HCBS setting rules. Washington State has long been an advocate for providing services to clients in the most integrated home and community-based settings, and is a leader in providing clients with choices regarding the settings in which long-term services and supports are provided and will continue its partnership with participants, advocacy groups, stakeholders and Tribes.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Promoting Integrated Employment: Lessons Learned - 12/01/2013

Medicaid is the single largest source of health care financing for low-income people with disabilities, a population that increasingly receives long-term services and supports (LTSS) in community-based set-tings instead of in institutions.1 Growth in the funding of community-based services and the evolution of federal policies and initiatives that emphasize community integration and employment for individuals with disabilities have been driving forces behind many states’ efforts to transform their service systems to make integrated employment the preferred service outcome for individuals with IDDs.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant – Washington State Pathways to Employment

“Helping Washingtonians with a disability make informed decisions about going to work.”   By promoting the awareness and use of work incentives provided under Medicaid regulations and the Social Security Act, Pathways to Employment continues to foster an expectation of competitive employment and economic advancement for individuals with disabilities.   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Washington Medicaid Spending Comparison Charts

This document provides comparison charts on Medicaid and non-Medicaid spending in the state of Washington until 2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Washington Medicaid State Plan

The Washington Medicaid state plan details the agreement between the state and the Federal government. It describes how Washington administers its Medicaid program and explains how the state will abide by Federal rules.  It also explains how Washington may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WA COPES Waiver

 

“Provides adult day health, home health aide, personal care, adult day care, client support training, community transition, environmental mods, home delivered meals, nurse delegation, personal emergency response, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, transportation for aged individuals ages 65 - no max age and physical and other disabilities ages 18-64.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations

Washington Basic Waiver (#0408)

 

“WAIVER TERMINATED 9/29/12 - To provide personal care, respite, habilitation (day and supported employment), environ mods., transportation, specialized medical equipment and supplies, PT, OT, SHL, community access, community guide, person to person, behavior management, family training and emergency assistance to individuals who are DD and live with their families or in their own home.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Basic Plus Waiver 0409.R024

"To provide community access, individual supported employment/group supported employment, personal care, prevocational services, respite, OT, PT, speech/hearing/language services, adult dental, adult family home, adult residential care, behavior support and consultation, behavioral health stabilization services-behavior support and consultation, behavioral health stabilization services-behavioral health crisis diversion bed services, behavioral health stabilization services-specialized psychiatric services, community guide, emergency assistance, environmental accessibility adaptations, individualized technical assistance, sexual deviancy evaluation, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, specialized psychiatric services, staff/family consultation and training, transportation for individuals with DD ages 0 – no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WA - Community Protection Waiver (0411.R02.00)

 

“To provide individual supported employment/group supported employment, prevocational services, residential hab, OT, PT, speech/hearing/language services, adult dental, behavior support and consultation, behavioral health stabilization services-behavior support and consultation, behavioral health stabilization services-behavioral health crisis diversion beds, behavioral health stabilization services-specialized psychiatric services, community transition, environmental accessibility adaptations, individualized technical assistance, sexual deviancy evaluation, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, specialized psychiatric services, staff/family consultation and training, transportation for individuals with DD ages 18 – no max age.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

In the Evergreen State of Washington, individuals with disabilities are thriving in the "Home of Bigfoot and Big Imaginations" through clever innovations in promoting Universal Design in the workplace for all workers.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington State’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
1.52%
Change from
2014 to 2015
7,170,351
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-1.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
483,334
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.49%
Change from
2014 to 2015
177,921
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-2.39%
Change from
2014 to 2015
36.81%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.54%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.40%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 7,170,351
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 483,334
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 177,921
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,022,973
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 36.81%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.40%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 11.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 459,384
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 449,434
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 745,794
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 31,690
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 71,971
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 16,929
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 41,361
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 5,376
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 42,733
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 24,935

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,537
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 179,674

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 13,815
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 31,120
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 93,235
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 14.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,168
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 114
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 78
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 68.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.09

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,832
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 38
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 489
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,033
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,780
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,436
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 56
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,063
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 279,875
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $50,806,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $3,194,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $22,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $3,581,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 86.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,045
Number of people served in facility based work. 475
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 8
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 102.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 53.49%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.27%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.84%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 95.79%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.30%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 53.21%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.38%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.91%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,496,068
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,522
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 167,758
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,680,068
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,847,826
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 156
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,511
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,667
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,885,131
AbilityOne wages (services). $27,786,395

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 718
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 74
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 792

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

No specific disability related information found.

Customized Employment

Collaborate with disability and employment partners to sponsor events that focus on disability recruitment, hiring and retention issues such as mentoring, disability awareness, reasonable accommodation, customized employment, transportation, independent living, benefits issues, etc. 

  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR collaborated with the Community Networks Program (a statewide consortium of local organizations) to fund over 50 local projects and events focusing on disability recruitment, hiring and retention, including events focusing on the employment of students and youth with disabilities.
  • Evaluation: DSHS/DVR collaborated with the Community Networks Program (a statewide consortium of local organizations) to fund over 50 local projects and events focusing on disability recruitment, hiring and retention, including events focusing on the employment of students and youth with disabilities. 

Goal Three Priority 

Bring together employers, DSHS/DVR staff and other workforce partners on a regular basis at the local level to update trends in the job market and maintain a good understanding of employer needs, so that customers are given useful guidance and current information.

  • Evaluation: This activity occurred sporadically in some locales but was not implemented on a statewide basis due to staff turnover in the statewide DSHS/DVR Business Services Manager position. The position was responsible for facilitating this priority and became vacant during FFY 2015. It took time to recruit and hire a new incumbent; during this period it was not possible to fully implement this priority. 

Goal Three Priority 

Support the DSHS/DVR Business Services Team in developing ongoing employer relationships and providing job placement assistance to customers, including participation in the nationwide employer network sponsored by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation.

  • Evaluation: The statewide DSHS/DVR Business Services Manager position became vacant and was re-hired during FFY 2015. The new Business Services Manager is reinvigorating the team and providing extensive support to develop ongoing business relationships. 

Goal Three Priority 

Serve on local WorkSource Business Service Teams to market DSHS/DVR job seekers to employers. (Page 312)

Braiding/Blending Resources

In pursuit of the goal of more seamless and fully-integrated career, training and follow up services to UI claimants and other unemployed individuals, a number of WDCs in the state have voluntarily convened with the Employment Security Department and state Workforce Board to explore Integrated Service Delivery (ISD) models. All areas envision greater collaboration and coordination while local conditions may favor piloting a substantially integrated and simultaneous enrollment model in other areas encompassing all programs customers are eligible for such as Title 1, Title III, Trade Act and targeted population programs. One hallmark of ISD, as envisioned by the ISD consortium, is building upon functional teams. Function as the primary organizing principle—in contrast to focusing on separate programs and partner organizations—indicates major components of the one-stops such as business services; front-end activities like Resource Room, triage, and workshops; community outreach and marketing; Rapid Response; job training etc. ISD also promises to better leverage staff and administrative resources for leaner, more productive one-stop field operations. Functional teams will continually examine changing customer needs, fill gaps and enhance services, and address apparent and unnecessary duplication of services and processes. Another aspect of ISD in Washington State is extending co-enrollment or possibly simultaneous enrollment for current and future jobseekers accessing WorkSource Services. As envisioned in Washington State co/simultaneous enrollment into multiple programs is the braiding or directing of program resources to provide appropriate services when needed as efficiently as possible. ISD partners will continue working through the technical issues around ISD mainly for WIOA Title 1 Adult and Dislocated Worker programs, Wagner-Peyser, Trade Act, Jobs for Veterans State Grant, and WorkFirst (TANF Job Search).  (Page 196) 

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Local and State Advisory Groups on Barrier Solutions 

WIOA allows local area boards to establish standing committees to work on issues specifically faced by individuals with disabilities, including Section 188 and ADA compliance. Washington’s workforce system has embraced a more expansive goal of improving access for populations with a wide variety of barriers to access, including economic barriers, geographic barriers, physical barriers, language and cultural barriers, low–level education and skills barriers, and behavioral health barriers. To build consensus on a coordinated and sustained effort to remove these access barriers, a standing Workforce Board committee on accessibility issues is being created.

The Workforce Board’s advisory committee on barrier solutions will be informed by local advisory committees that evaluate accessibility issues at the community level and will help local boards prioritize projects and track progress toward improved customer service for those populations. The state standing committee will additionally serve as a forum for sharing best practices and strategies to improve access and advocate for resources and policy development that will improve services for all populations with barriers. (Page 66)

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. 

System–wide Commitment to Improving Accessibility for All Participants 

Fundamental to the Workforce Board’s vision for the workforce system is the concept of universal accessibility: Washington’s workforce system must be prepared and able to serve jobseekers from all kinds of backgrounds, who face a variety of barriers. Universal accessibility encompasses both physical accessibility of all facilities, as well as programmatic accessibility—taking into account customers’ particular access needs. Integration of service delivery and better coordination among workforce system partners will allow services and delivery approaches to be customized to particular access needs.

WIOA has provided new energy across Washington’s workforce system to address and remove barriers to access so that a greater number of Washingtonians will be able to connect with a career pathway and a living–wage job. Advances in personal computing and telecommunications technology have made the Internet and person–to–person connectivity a feature of many people’s daily lives. WIOA acknowledges these improvements by opening the door to “virtual” service delivery—bringing services each participant needs to their doorstep, or kitchen table.

Recognizing that barrier removal is a project that requires sustained effort over time, the Workforce Board started work on establishing its first standing advisory committee to lead a statewide effort on removing barriers to access throughout the system. The standing advisory committee, described below, is expected to work with local advisory committees on accessibility issues, starting an ongoing conversation between local workforce system practitioners and state–level policymakers. In this way, the committee will be able to systematically identify and address access barriers. (Page 161)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

In accordance with section 8(b) in the Wagner–Peyser Act, local comprehensive centers and affiliates have assigned disability specialists. The ES staff serving in this role receive training on serving individuals with disabilities and on accessible computer work stations. Also, they are often involved in local efforts to enhance employment and training access for individuals with disabilities. When there are special grants such as the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), core program staff will be equipped to direct referrals for assessment and program services.

In cooperation with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Department of Services for the Blind, ESD will support ongoing efforts to expand accessibility for blind individuals who, as a population, infrequently use one stops. One stops and the WorkSourceWA.com website will be ADA section 508/Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) compatible. Local one stops will accommodate blind, deaf and other individuals with disabilities. Such strategies as having a sign language interpreter scheduled to come in for accommodating those who are deaf will continue. Blind individuals can be served in any of the large variety of one stop workshops by staff offering to go over written handouts on an individual basis, or simply offering to email materials that could be made accessible by the individual’s own text–to–voice software.

Some centers have co–located vocational rehabilitation counselors with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation in the Department of Social and Health Services. Co–location of VR staff increases referrals from Wagner–Peyser and other co–located staff and vice versa. Coordination between core and other programs is better so that persons with disabilities can get more help to compete for and enjoy high quality employment through acquiring the necessary skills while receiving any necessary supports. Under WIOA Title IV, VR staff outreach to disabled youth graduating from the K–12 system will encourage more young people to pursue assistance from WorkSource to begin career pathways toward self–support through viable avenues. Many ES–staffed one stops have taken the initiative to invite high school teachers of students on IEPs to make field trips fostering a sense of comfort in approaching WorkSource.(Page 107)

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment
  • Identify and encourage local pilot programs that use technology to facilitate and improve integrated service delivery for customers, including programs designed to improve access to the system. 

In addition, soon after the passage of WIOA, Governor Jay Inslee directed the Workforce Board to work with the system’s stakeholders to shape Washington’s strategic plan toward three goals to maximize the workforce system’s impact: 

  1. Help more people find and keep jobs that lead to economic self–sufficiency, with a focus on disadvantaged populations.
  2. Close skill gaps for employers, with a focus on in–demand industry sectors and occupations, including through apprenticeships.
  3. Work together as a single, seamless team to make this happen. 

These three goals will inform the larger system and guide any changes. Below are ways the system is evolving to better serve all populations through enhanced accessibility. 

Universal access across the workforce system (Page 62)

In conclusion, a truly accessible workforce system that makes full use of technology, will implement secure, wireless Internet access in public areas of all comprehensive One–Stop centers in Washington by 2020. The system will also include state–level advisory committees during the first two years of the plan, with annual progress reports on One–Stop center accessibility at the local level. Finally, the local pilot programs that use technology to facilitate and improve integrated service delivery for all customers will be identified and encouraged. (Page 67)

Washington is already known as a leader in business engagement. The state piloted Industry Skill Panels, which bring together employers, educators, and community leaders to address common skill gaps and training needs. Skill Panels, in turn, were instrumental in establishing Centers of Excellence, which serve as statewide resources to address the needs of a specific industry sector—from aerospace to allied health. Housed within the state’s community and technical college system, Centers of Excellence provide fast and flexible education and training programs that respond directly to the needs of industry. (Page 51)

Expanding wireless Internet connectivity at one–stop centers could pay off particularly for the blind and low–vision community. One local area in Washington is piloting a “paperless” one–stop experience facilitated by secure wireless access at its WorkSource center. All education and training information, including pamphlets and documents, are digitized in a standard format and stored online. WorkSource center staff members receive regular training on how to digitize materials. People who are blind or low–vision who visit a one–stop center can navigate to those digitally archived materials using their own accessibility devices. Digitally archived materials are also accessible to jobseekers with mobility, transportation, and/or childcare responsibilities that may prevent them from accessing a WorkSource center. Expanding wireless Internet connectivity at one–stop centers could pay off particularly for the blind and low–vision community. One local area in Washington is piloting a “paperless” one–stop experience facilitated by secure wireless access at its WorkSource center. All education and training information, including pamphlets and documents, are digitized in a standard format and stored online. WorkSource center staff members receive regular training on how to digitize materials. People who are blind or low–vision who visit a one–stop center can navigate to those digitally archived materials using their own accessibility devices. Digitally archived materials are also accessible to jobseekers with mobility, transportation, and/or childcare responsibilities that may prevent them from accessing a WorkSource center. (Page 64)

Virtual Service Delivery 

With WIOA, education and training services are no longer required to be administered in person. The availability of online, real–time, hybrid (blended online and face to face), and open source course materials warrants close system collaboration. Beyond simply providing access, the system must help customers gain the skills to effectively use these new technological tools. Some tools have become increasingly common in just a few short years. Video conferencing technology, for example, is widely available and less expensive than in years past. Reducing or eliminating the need for customers to travel and physically access a one–stop center will remove accessibility barriers for many Washingtonians. Services offered virtually via computer, tablet, or smartphone empower people with mobility challenges, or anyone preferring to access information remotely. These tools allow them to begin progressing down a career pathway on their terms and at a time and location more convenient to them. Virtual service delivery helps customers with childcare or transportation barriers make progress toward a better future. A parent can hop online when the kids are asleep and gain access to services, or a family who lacks a car can avoid making several bus transfers to reach a one–stop center––if the center is reachable by bus at all. Many rural Washingtonians live hours away from the nearest comprehensive one–stop center. Accessing these services at home just makes sense. Even rural customers without reliable Internet connections still benefit from virtual service delivery—library systems statewide have expressed interest in partnering with the workforce system to create “remote connection sites” strategically located around Washington. (Page 65)

In many aspects ES operations is well–positioned to expand its partnership with the Department of Labor and Industries injured worker Return–to–Work efforts. A pilot project at WorkSource Everett, one of the state’s busiest one–stops, has been very successful in helping injured and recovered workers find suitable employment.

Washington State Department of Social and Health Services received a 3–year $22 million federal grant from the Department of Agriculture to help elevate Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients to self–reliance. Resources to Initiate Successful Employment (RISE) will involve many community–based organizations and colleges who will serve SNAP recipients who are homeless, veterans, those with limited English proficiency, the long–term unemployed and non–custodial parents with access to skill building and job search assistance.

Funded providers use key elements of I-BEST programs, e.g. contextualization, team teaching, enhanced students services, and articulated college and career pathways, to increase the speed at which students master basic and ELA skills at federal levels 1, 2 and 3. On Ramp options include, but are not limited to: programs focused on career clusters; partnership efforts between colleges and community-based organizations and local workforce development councils (WIBs); I-BEST at Work projects that partner providers, employers and WIBs; Project I-DEA (Integrated Digital English Acceleration), a three-year pilot program with support from the Gates Foundation that will transform ELA instruction using a flipped classroom model and 50% online instruction. (Page 222)

In 1-3 quarters, On Ramp students acquire the skills needed to transition to basic skills education classes at federal levels 4-6 and/or Professional/Technical or Academic I-BEST pathways. (Page 222)

Students in correctional education programs have access to the same quality programs as offered on our community college campuses. In 2011–12, the Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I–BEST) model was piloted