Washington DC

States - Big Screen

With the motto "Justice for All," the District of Columbia is committed to equal rights and opportunities for all people with disabilities, especially when it comes to Employment First and career success.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington D.C.’s VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
1.31%
Change from
2015 to 2016
681,170
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.75%
Change from
2015 to 2016
44,921
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.05%
Change from
2015 to 2016
15,292
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.73%
Change from
2015 to 2016
34.04%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.57%
Change from
2015 to 2016
77.09%

General

2014 2015 2016
Population. 658,893 672,228 681,170
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 44,504 45,260 44,921
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 13,478 14,214 15,292
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 314,545 329,002 330,700
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.28% 31.41% 34.04%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.49% 77.53% 77.09%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.80% 6.90% 6.00%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 35.80% 34.50% 31.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.30% 15.10% 17.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 33,530 33,886 31,870
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 42,477 41,824 43,913
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 12,270 13,248 14,902
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 59,878 56,726 55,854
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,206 3,658 4,694
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,890 1,696 1,267
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 724 1,684 1,719
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 740 2,025 1,735

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 686 741 810
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.70% 2.90% 3.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 14,732 14,612 14,451

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. N/A N/A N/A
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). N/A N/A N/A
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.10% 4.10% N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.30% 4.60% N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 8.30% 9.60% N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 700 699 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 734 786 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,419 1,640 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,733 1,809 1,751
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06 0.07 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 9 8 14
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2 1 5
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 22.00% 13.00% 36.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.31 0.15 0.74

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,311
1,518
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 58 28 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 97 61 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 507 258 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 597 423 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 822 611 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 229 137 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 17.10% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,276 2,371 2,385
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 32,424 33,344 32,491
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 69 61 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,214,000 $1,335,000 $1,540,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $9,585,000 $15,429,000 $22,905,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $2,269,000 $3,861,000 $4,490,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 17.00% 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A 338 363
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,092 706 1,111
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 22.70 31.70 25.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 53.51% 54.99% 55.61%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.64% 15.24% 17.38%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 12.40% 11.53% 10.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 50.00% 69.67% 63.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 43.45% 17.29% 12.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 48.11% 25.94% 18.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 56.33% 36.93% 32.96%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 4.66% 8.65% 6.49%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 352,814
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 240
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 228
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 228
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,891,549

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1 2 2
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 2 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 31 31
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 31 31

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~As part of the technical assistance that will be provided through this program, technical assistance is being provided to some of our community rehabilitation providers. In addition, our counselors will receive training on how to better engage with providers in partnership to help people with most significant disabilities achieve employment outcomes.  (Page 258)
Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling;
Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short–term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area.
Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community.
Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 260)
In addition, this counselor will participate in all Employment First training, in order to be familiar with customized employment services available to  DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. In the summer of 2015, DCRSA and the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) worked closely to make necessary changes. (Pages 256- 266)
 

Customized Employment

~~Benefits planning
• Partnership Plus model for extended service provision
• Expand scope of employment readiness workshops
• Education campaign for local employers regarding the hiring of persons with blindness
• Training for BRU staff around job carving/customized employment model
• Examine case recording process for identification of the receipt of SSI/DI by consumers to ensure accuracy (Page 236)
Objective 2.2 –   Retain, train, and recruit experienced and qualified VR staff and service providers to improve services to the low incidence populations, including people who are blind, deafblind, have autism or other autism spectrum disorders.
Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. Provide continuous training to staff on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
2. Provide continuous training to service providers on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
3. Develop and implement outreach plan to recruit providers, who can provide services to low incidence populations.
4. Develop and implement outreach plan on DCRSA services to the low incidence population. (Page 244)
In FY 2015, DCRSA established new agreements with all job placement and supported employment providers. These are performance based agreements. Some changes were made in the payment structure in order more closely align payment to the providers with successful employment placements. In addition, we added payment support to supported employment providers to provide Discovery Assessments and Customized Employment. The District is also currently participating in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. (Page 257-258)
DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. In the summer of 2015, DCRSA and the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) worked closely to make necessary changes. First, DCRSA identified one counselor to handle all existing Evidence Based Supported Employment cases. (Page 266)
In addition, in new human care agreements issued in FY 2015, DCRSA included Discovery Assessment and Customized Employment as services in our supported employment agreements. Other consumers may require a job coach model for their initial placement but do not require the extended services as provided under the provisions of supported employment services. (Page 268)
Indicator 1.3 Competitive Employment Outcomes: the percentage of individuals who exit the VR program in employment in integrated settings with hourly rate of earnings equivalent to at least the federal or state minimum wage rate, whichever is higher.
Strategy 1: Continue quarterly CRP meetings to provide a forum for discussions and to ensure all providers are aware of the agency’s policies, regulations and expectations governing the provision of services.
Strategy 2: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. (Page 259)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. (Page 45)
Most importantly, all of these agencies participated in the development of the Career Pathways Strategic Plan which lays out the framework for an aligned system. Moving forward, the agencies will establish one umbrella MOA for AJC partners. (Page 73)
 

DEI/DRC

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The Administration’s Supported Employment program (SE) for persons with persistent mental illness utilizes an evidenced–based approach to help individuals with the most significant disabilities to secure, retain, or regain competitive employment in an integrated setting that pays minimum or better wages, and provides benefits. Supported Employment services are individualized and include, but are not limited to:
• Counseling and guidance
• Job coaching (on–the–job training)
• Rapid job search and placement
• Short–term training
• Follow–along (unlimited supports)
• Development of natural supports. (Page 224)
Pursuant to DOES Policy 300.20-4, AJC Reasonable Accommodation Policy, qualified individuals with disabilities will be given a meaningful opportunity to participate in and benefit from aid, benefits, services, or training, including core, intensive, training, and supportive services. (Page 146)
II. Needs of persons with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment
• Benefits planning for Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSI/DI) beneficiaries
• Need for increased and improved supported employment (SE) providers and services
 SE services for persons with mental health impairments
 extended service provider for mental health
 Train staff on role of DBH as an extended service provider
• Holistic approach to VR process
 Holistic assessment at intake
 Housing
 Improved literacy
 Sobriety
 Training programs
 Benefits planning
• Partnership Plus model for extended service provision
• Expand scope of employment readiness workshops
• Education campaign for local employers regarding the hiring of persons with blindness
• Training for BRU staff around job carving/customized employment model
• Examine case recording process for identification of the receipt of SSI/DI by consumers to ensure accuracy (Page 236)
Objective 1.2 Increase outreach to people with HIV in order to increase the number of people with HIV served by DCRSA and the number of successful employment outcomes achieved by people with HIV.
Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. In support of the Mayor’s initiative to reduce HIV infections in the City and improve outcomes for people with HIV, DCRSA will expand outreach to at least two community based AIDS services providers in order to provide VR services at their location.
2. Provide benefits counseling orientation to staff and clients at the identified community based AIDS services providers.
3. Train staff to ensure that counselors are properly tracking people with HIV who are served by the agency. (Page 241)
Performance by June 30, 2017:
a. Complete a solicitation to identify an appropriate training provider who understands person centered training and has experience in using this in the VR process.
b. Identify a training provider who can provide training for VR and provider agency staff, and provide “train the trainer” sessions, to increase capability of DCRSA to provide this on an ongoing basis.
c. All general VR and sensory unit intakes will complete the eCASAS assessment as part of their intake and eligibility determination.
d. Increase the number of people who receive job readiness training by 10%.
e. Ensure that at least 250 people receive benefits counseling/orientation each quarter (the agency currently serves approximately 1700 people who receive SSI/SSDI). (Page 243)
 (Pages 244, 246, 257, 260)
 

Career Pathways

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation Capacity Fails to Meet Demand - A recent policy brief noted that DC’s investments in adult education and career pathways skill building are insufficient to meet the demand for these services, as evidenced by waiting lists for many programs and the significant need for these services (see workforce analyses above)[3]. OSSE AFE also cited capacity as a challenge, despite increased enrollment and provider offerings in recent years. DDS/RSA has also noted increased demand for their services that has resulted in requests for additional funding and the possible need for more priority of service considerations. (Page 43) 
Overall, it is essential that we work as full partners in a workforce development system that efficiently and effectively allocates resources to assist all people to enter the workforce, especially those with significant barriers, including people with disabilities. In order to make best use of resources and ensure we are able to serve District residents to capacity, we must continue to truly integrate services and adopt career pathways with linkages between partners and programs. Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. Additionally, the District will continue to engage providers, partners, businesses and other key stakeholders in conversations about its efforts to increase the capacity of its providers throughout the implementation of the WIOA State Plan over the next four years. (Page 45) 
The agencies operating the core programs and the required partner programs made strides over the past year to improve coordination of services and jointly plan for the changes called for under WIOA. Members of the District’s Adult Career Pathways Task Force, first convened in December 2014, include leadership from the WIC, DOES, DDS/RSA, DHS, OSSE, DME, DMGEO, DCPS, the DC Council, the Public Charter School Board, the DC Public Library system, and three community-based organizations. Through the work of the Task Force’s Strategic Plan to build a career pathways system in the District, these agencies laid the ground work for how services and programs can better be integrated in order to improve delivery of services for our residents. Much of the content in this WIOA State Plan builds on the work of the Task Force, which will continue to meet quarterly to oversee implementation of the career pathways strategies. (Page 150)
 

Employer Engagement

~~The District of Columbia currently has availability for provision of extended supported employment services through Medicaid only for people with intellectual disabilities and people with serious mental illness or serious emotional disturbance. The Medicaid Waiver in the District for Elderly and Persons with Disabilities does not currently include Supported Employment as a covered service. Furthermore, the District currently has no other Waiver Services to provide extended supported employment services to people with developmental disabilities (e.g., autism, without an intellectual disability), traumatic brain injury, or other physical disabilities. In planning for extended services for these populations, DCRSA must rely on either Ticket to Work Employment Networks or natural supports.  (Page 224)

511

~~.   The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures, including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, and performance accountability measurement and reporting processes, to improve coordination of services across one-stop partner programs; (Page 68)
1. Student performance, progress and involvement,
2. Instructional Models and Methods,
3. Program Management and Leadership,
4. Data Collection/Reporting. OSSE AFE will monitor and evaluate providers on a monthly and bi-annual basis via desks reviews and onsite monitoring. Eligible providers will be required to: (Page 202)
 

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 146)
The AJCs will comply with WIA Section 188, Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and current District of Columbia method of administration. This assurance will be incorporated into all grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, or other arrangements whereby WIA funds are made available. (Page 146)
 

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DC DDS Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan Amendments

When D.C  plans to make a change to its Medicaid program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. This webpage include D.Cs Medicaid state plan amendments.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is the agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that D.C will administer its Medicaid program.  The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.    It  also gives an assurance that a state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities.     
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Customized Employment

Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.   Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following: DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices; DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers); DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment; and Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Association of the Deaf: Conference - Achieving Employment First

The Achieving Employment First Conference was “held on behalf of Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, St. John's Community Services, District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council, University Legal Services, Protection and Advocacy Services of the District of Columbia, Department on Disability Services, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, and Project Action.” This conference brought “together national and local experts to share innovative ideas and resources to help find meaningful employment for people with significant employment challenges due to their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Developmental Disabilities Council - Final five-year state plan (FY 2012-2016)

The Developmental Disabilities Council of the District of Columbia has a goal to see “young adults and job seekers with disabilities [with] meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages [to] exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

DC HCBS Waiver Program

"Home and Community Based (HCBS) Services waiver program is jointly funded with federal and local dollars. The federal government reimburses the District of Columbia 70 cents for every one dollar spent for qualifying services and supports for people enrolled in the HCBS waiver program. All supports and services provided through the DDA service delivery system are funded through the waiver program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

DC DDS Person-Centered Thinking Philosophy and Training

“Person-centered thinking is a philosophy behind service provision that supports positive control and self-direction of people’s own lives. Department on Disabilities Services (DDS) is working to implement person-centered thinking through training sessions and other agency wide initiatives.   “Teaching and supporting the use of person-centered thinking skills means that it is likelier that service plans will be used and acted on, that updating service plans will occur ‘naturally,’ needing less effort and time, and that the person’s ability to lead a fulfilling, independent life is maximized.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DDS Customized Employment Efforts

“Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.”

 

“Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following:

DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices;” “DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers);” “DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment;” and “Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
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District of Columbia ABLE Legislation (Title 47) - 01/04/2016

To amend, on an emergency basis,  Title 47 of the District of Columbia Official Code to establish a qualified ABLE Program to be known as the ABLE Program Trust, pursuant to the requirements of the federal Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 to exempt from income taxation the earnings on deposit made to an ABLE Program Trust by an eligible individual to assist the individual with certain expenses related to the individual’s blindness or disability.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

District of Columbia ARC Legislation (DC Act 21-203) - 11/23/2015

To amend Title 47 of the District of Columbia Official Code to establish  qualified ABLE Program, to be known as the ABLE Program trust, pursuant to the requirements of the federal Stephen Beck, Jr. achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 to exempt from income taxation the earnings on deposits made to an ABLE Program Trust by an eligible individual to assist the individual with certain expenses related to the individual's blindness or disability.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

D.C Employment First Proclamation - 10/08/2012

“On October 8, 2012, DC Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring the District of Columbia an Employment First State—the 20th state to do so nationwide. Mayor Gray’s proclamation affirms that ‘employment is an important part of the lives of all working age adults and people with disabilities are a largely untapped resource with skills and talents who can meet the needs of area business and employers.’ Under the Employment First philosophy, competitive, integrated employment is the first and overwhelmingly preferred option for working-age youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of the complexity or severity of their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

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D.C. Dept. of Education “Competitive Employment Opportunity (CEO) Program)”

~~“Competitive Employment Opportunities (CEO) consists of preparatory experiences designed to help students with disabilities attain their career and postsecondary training goals. The model aims to expose students to career experiences, and equip them with the knowledge and skills needed to be successful in a postsecondary  environment. A paid postsecondary training program for students, CEO is comprised of 3 academies:

1.Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) Academy – 9th/10th grade students are exposed to work experiences in their field of interest. Students engage in instructional activities that provide a foundation of the skills needed to be successful in the workforce.2.CEO Mentoring & Internship Academy – 11th/12th grade students are paired with a mentor who works in the student's career field of interest. Mentors and students work together to create a "Career-Focused Project" and students attend an 8-part professional development series from January to May. During the summer, students apply skills learned by working an 80 hour internship at their mentor's place of employment.”

.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DC DDS Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C. Developmental Disabilities Council - Final five-year state plan (FY 2012-2016)

The Developmental Disabilities Council of the District of Columbia has a goal to see “young adults and job seekers with disabilities [with] meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages [to] exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Project Search - 08/14/2017

~~“Project SEARCH Hilton – Capital Area Region (Formerly Embassy Suites—DC) is a one-year “school-to-work” transition program designed to prepare DCPS adult students with intellectual and other developmental disabilities for competitive employment. Project SEARCH Interns receive daily instruction in employability skills and gain hands-on work experiences by rotating among three 10-week unique paid internships at a one of four Hilton Worldwide host site locations. The goal for each student is competitive, integrated employment by the end of the experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Secondary Transition Community of Practice - 06/01/2013

This was launched earlier in 2013 to bring together transition experts from the District’s school system, disability advocacy organizations, direct-service agencies, and transition-aged youth and their parents.  These stakeholders in the transition process meet monthly to collaborate on increasing and improving outcomes for transition-age youth with disabilities as they leave secondary school and pursue work or higher education.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment Learning Community - 10/08/2012

As part of a competitive application process, the District was selected to receive technical assistance through the Employment Learning Community (ELC). A project of the Institute for Community Inclusion in partnership with The National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services and TransCen, Inc, the ELC will provide significant technical assistance on ways to implement Employment First in the District as well as networking and learning opportunities from those other states selected to participate.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Leadership Consortium of Practice - 10/08/2012

DDS launched an Employment First Leadership Consortium of Practice following the District’s October 2012 declaration as an Employment First state. Consortium members include representatives from District agencies, RSA and DDA providers, and advocacy organizations who are leaders in promoting Employment First practices throughout the District.  Consortium members meet on a monthly basis to discuss new strategies and opportunities for collaboration in implementing and expanding Employment First practices District wide.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Association of the Deaf: Conference - Achieving Employment First

The Achieving Employment First Conference was “held on behalf of Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, St. John's Community Services, District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council, University Legal Services, Protection and Advocacy Services of the District of Columbia, Department on Disability Services, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, and Project Action.” This conference brought “together national and local experts to share innovative ideas and resources to help find meaningful employment for people with significant employment challenges due to their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Project SEARCH - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:Young adult between 18-30 years oldHave a documented intellectual/developmental disabilityCompleting final year of high school OR recent high school graduateShow willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readinessStrong attendance record is preferred 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

District of Columbia Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 06/01/2015

2015 NWD System Grantee Summaries:  The coordination of Long-Term Supports and Services (LTSS) in the District of Columbia has been a priority for DC government for several years. DC’s Health and Human Services agencies, in partnership with people in need of LTSS, families, advocates, public/private partners, referral sources and others, will finalize and implement a 3-year plan to transform current systems into a No Wrong Door (NWD) system for all populations and all payers. DC’s goal is to create an LTSS system in which people encounter person- and family centered systems/staff with core competencies that facilitate their connection to formal and informal LTSS, regardless of where they enter the system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 10/01/2014

“District of Columbia has recently received a No Wrong Door planning grant. Their state team is working to incorporate the LifeCourse Framework as they re-design the front door to long term services and supports as well as the person-centered planning process. The goal is to create a system that supports people and their families to have a good life. At their last team meeting, the group advised on what is work and not working in the system of long term services and supports. This information was shared with the No Wrong Door Leadership Council in order to guide the work as they plan improvements.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment First - 10/08/2012

On October 8, 2012, DC Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring the District of Columbia an Employment First State…Under the Employment First philosophy, competitive, integrated employment is the first and overwhelmingly preferred option for working-age youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of the complexity or severity of their disabilities. The other main tenets of Employment First are that: Employment services are tailored and customized to a person’s needs, interests, and skill set with the ultimate goal of achieving long-term employment in a competitive business or organization, or self-employment. Employment is at the prevailing wage, and never less than minimum wage. The employee has ample opportunities to integrate and interact with his or her coworkers, the public, and/or customers without disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Customized Employment

Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.   Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following: DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices; DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers); DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment; and Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

DC DDS Person-Centered Thinking Philosophy and Training

“Person-centered thinking is a philosophy behind service provision that supports positive control and self-direction of people’s own lives. Department on Disabilities Services (DDS) is working to implement person-centered thinking through training sessions and other agency wide initiatives.   “Teaching and supporting the use of person-centered thinking skills means that it is likelier that service plans will be used and acted on, that updating service plans will occur ‘naturally,’ needing less effort and time, and that the person’s ability to lead a fulfilling, independent life is maximized.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DDS Customized Employment Efforts

“Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.”

 

“Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following:

DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices;” “DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers);” “DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment;” and “Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Justice Department Reaches Agreement With Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority to Resolve Disability Discrimination Complaint - 03/01/2017

~~“The Justice Department filed a proposed consent decree today to resolve a complaint that the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) discriminated against a job applicant on the basis of his disability, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The department’s complaint alleges that WMATA extended a job offer as an elevator/escalator parts supervisor to an applicant but withdrew the offer upon learning that the applicant had epilepsy. The complaint further alleges that WMATA failed to discuss with the applicant how his disability might affect his ability to do the job or whether there were any available accommodations that would allow him to do the job.

As part of the consent decree, which is subject to approval by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, WMATA will institute new policies to ensure that employees and job applicants with disabilities have the opportunity to confer with WMATA about their limitations as well as opportunities for reasonable accommodation in the workplace. WMATA will also ensure that supervisors are fully trained in those policies.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Notice of Emergency and Proposed Rulemaking: ID/DD Waiver - 11/24/2017

~~“The Department of Disability Services (DDS), Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA), operates the Medicaid Home and Community–Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) under the supervision of DHCF.  The ID/DD Waiver was approved by the Council of the District of Columbia (Council) and renewed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for a five year period beginning November 20, 2012 and ending November 19, 2017.  An amendment to renew the ID/DD Waiver for another five-year period beginning November 20, 2017 and ending November 19, 2022, was approved by the Council through the Medicaid Assistance Program Emergency Amendment Act  of 2017, effective July 20, 2017 (D.C. Act 22-0104, D.C. Official Code §  1-307.02(a)(11)(D)(2017 Supp.)), and subsequently was sent by DHCF to CMS for its approval. DHCF anticipates that CMS will approve the renewal amendment effective November 20, 2017”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Submitted to CMS: District of Columbia Plan to Comply with New Federal Home and Community Based Services Requirements - 03/25/2017

~~“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS statewide transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan. The District maintains two HCBS waiver programs: the Elderly and Persons with Disabilities (EPD) Waiver, run by the District’s Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), and the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) waiver, run by the District’s Department of Disability Services (DDS). The EPD waiver program is for the elderly and individuals with physical disabilities who are able to safely receive supportive services in a home and community-based setting. The IDD waiver program provides residential, day/vocational and other support services in the community for District residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Public Notice of Revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan for the District Medicaid Program's Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 03/13/2017

~~“The Directors of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF) and Department on Disability Services (DDS), pursuant to the authority set forth in an Act to enable the District of Columbia to receive federal financial assistance under Title XIX of the Social Security Act for a medical assistance program, and for other purposes, approved December 27, 1967 (81 Stat. 774; D.C. Official Code § 1-307.02) (2012 Repl. & 2013 Supp.)), and Section 6(6) of the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, effective February 27, 2008 (D.C. Law 17-109; D.C. Official Code § 7-771.05(6) (2012 Repl.)) hereby give notice of their intent to submit revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan (STP) for the District of Columbia Medicaid program’s Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waivers to the Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and final approval. 

CMS regulations, effective March 17, 2014, and published in 79 Fed. Reg. 2948-3039 (Jan. 16, 2014), changed the definition of home and community-based services settings for HCBS Waiver services and required that DHCF and DDS develop and submit to CMS a transition plan identifying how the HCBS Waivers will be brought into compliance with the new outcome-oriented definition of HCBS settings.  DHCF and DDS submitted a STP to CMS on March 17, 2015.  That plan is available online on the DHCF website at: https://dhcf.dc.gov/release/announcement-submitted-cms-district-columbia-plan-comply-new-federal-home-and-community  and the DDS website at: http://dds.dc.gov/publication/dc-statewide-transition-plan-3-17-2015

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C. HCBS Waiver Transition Plan - 03/17/2015

"The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines, and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REQUEST FOR INFORMATION: DCJM-2015-I-0003 Community Rehabilitation Provider Milestone Payment System - 08/14/2014

A request to the field for feedback and information on adequate rate structures for the performance of an array of employment-related services, including Customized Employment and Customized Employment Planning. The plan also outlines a draft Milestone and Incentive payment system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Health Care Finance: Notice of Final Rulemaking - 04/01/2014

“These final rules establish standards governing the participation requirements for providers who provide supported employment services to participants in the Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) and to establish conditions of participation for providers."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC HCBS Waiver MR DD (0307.R04.00) (1915c) - 11/20/2012

~~Provides day habilitation, employment readiness, in-home supports, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment, personal care services, skilled nursing, assistive technology services, behavioral supports, companion services, creative arts therapies, dental, family training, host, home, individualized day supports, occupational therapy, one-time transitional services, parenting supports, physical therapy, small group supported employment, speech, hearing and language services, supported living with transportation, supported living, wellness services for individuals with ID/DD ages 18+ no max

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan Amendments

When D.C  plans to make a change to its Medicaid program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. This webpage include D.Cs Medicaid state plan amendments.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is the agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that D.C will administer its Medicaid program.  The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.    It  also gives an assurance that a state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities.     
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC HCBS Waiver Program

"Home and Community Based (HCBS) Services waiver program is jointly funded with federal and local dollars. The federal government reimburses the District of Columbia 70 cents for every one dollar spent for qualifying services and supports for people enrolled in the HCBS waiver program. All supports and services provided through the DDA service delivery system are funded through the waiver program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

With the motto "Justice for All," the District of Columbia is committed to equal rights and opportunities for all people with disabilities, especially when it comes to Employment First and career success.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington D.C.’s VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
1.31%
Change from
2015 to 2016
681,170
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.75%
Change from
2015 to 2016
44,921
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.05%
Change from
2015 to 2016
15,292
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.73%
Change from
2015 to 2016
34.04%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.57%
Change from
2015 to 2016
77.09%

State Data

General

2014 2015 2016
Population. 658,893 672,228 681,170
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 44,504 45,260 44,921
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 13,478 14,214 15,292
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 314,545 329,002 330,700
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.28% 31.41% 34.04%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.49% 77.53% 77.09%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.80% 6.90% 6.00%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 35.80% 34.50% 31.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.30% 15.10% 17.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 33,530 33,886 31,870
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 42,477 41,824 43,913
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 12,270 13,248 14,902
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 59,878 56,726 55,854
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,206 3,658 4,694
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,890 1,696 1,267
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 724 1,684 1,719
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 740 2,025 1,735

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 686 741 810
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.70% 2.90% 3.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 14,732 14,612 14,451

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. N/A N/A N/A
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). N/A N/A N/A
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.10% 4.10% N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.30% 4.60% N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 8.30% 9.60% N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 700 699 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 734 786 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,419 1,640 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,733 1,809 1,751
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06 0.07 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 9 8 14
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2 1 5
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 22.00% 13.00% 36.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.31 0.15 0.74

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,311
1,518
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 58 28 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 97 61 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 507 258 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 597 423 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 822 611 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 229 137 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 17.10% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,276 2,371 2,385
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 32,424 33,344 32,491
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 69 61 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,214,000 $1,335,000 $1,540,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $9,585,000 $15,429,000 $22,905,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $2,269,000 $3,861,000 $4,490,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 17.00% 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A 338 363
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,092 706 1,111
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 22.70 31.70 25.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 53.51% 54.99% 55.61%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.64% 15.24% 17.38%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 12.40% 11.53% 10.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 50.00% 69.67% 63.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 43.45% 17.29% 12.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 48.11% 25.94% 18.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 56.33% 36.93% 32.96%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 4.66% 8.65% 6.49%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 352,814
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 240
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 228
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 228
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,891,549

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1 2 2
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 2 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 31 31
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 31 31

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~As part of the technical assistance that will be provided through this program, technical assistance is being provided to some of our community rehabilitation providers. In addition, our counselors will receive training on how to better engage with providers in partnership to help people with most significant disabilities achieve employment outcomes.  (Page 258)
Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling;
Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short–term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area.
Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community.
Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 260)
In addition, this counselor will participate in all Employment First training, in order to be familiar with customized employment services available to  DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. In the summer of 2015, DCRSA and the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) worked closely to make necessary changes. (Pages 256- 266)
 

Customized Employment

~~Benefits planning
• Partnership Plus model for extended service provision
• Expand scope of employment readiness workshops
• Education campaign for local employers regarding the hiring of persons with blindness
• Training for BRU staff around job carving/customized employment model
• Examine case recording process for identification of the receipt of SSI/DI by consumers to ensure accuracy (Page 236)
Objective 2.2 –   Retain, train, and recruit experienced and qualified VR staff and service providers to improve services to the low incidence populations, including people who are blind, deafblind, have autism or other autism spectrum disorders.
Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. Provide continuous training to staff on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
2. Provide continuous training to service providers on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
3. Develop and implement outreach plan to recruit providers, who can provide services to low incidence populations.
4. Develop and implement outreach plan on DCRSA services to the low incidence population. (Page 244)
In FY 2015, DCRSA established new agreements with all job placement and supported employment providers. These are performance based agreements. Some changes were made in the payment structure in order more closely align payment to the providers with successful employment placements. In addition, we added payment support to supported employment providers to provide Discovery Assessments and Customized Employment. The District is also currently participating in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. (Page 257-258)
DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. In the summer of 2015, DCRSA and the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) worked closely to make necessary changes. First, DCRSA identified one counselor to handle all existing Evidence Based Supported Employment cases. (Page 266)
In addition, in new human care agreements issued in FY 2015, DCRSA included Discovery Assessment and Customized Employment as services in our supported employment agreements. Other consumers may require a job coach model for their initial placement but do not require the extended services as provided under the provisions of supported employment services. (Page 268)
Indicator 1.3 Competitive Employment Outcomes: the percentage of individuals who exit the VR program in employment in integrated settings with hourly rate of earnings equivalent to at least the federal or state minimum wage rate, whichever is higher.
Strategy 1: Continue quarterly CRP meetings to provide a forum for discussions and to ensure all providers are aware of the agency’s policies, regulations and expectations governing the provision of services.
Strategy 2: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. (Page 259)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. (Page 45)
Most importantly, all of these agencies participated in the development of the Career Pathways Strategic Plan which lays out the framework for an aligned system. Moving forward, the agencies will establish one umbrella MOA for AJC partners. (Page 73)
 

DEI/DRC

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The Administration’s Supported Employment program (SE) for persons with persistent mental illness utilizes an evidenced–based approach to help individuals with the most significant disabilities to secure, retain, or regain competitive employment in an integrated setting that pays minimum or better wages, and provides benefits. Supported Employment services are individualized and include, but are not limited to:
• Counseling and guidance
• Job coaching (on–the–job training)
• Rapid job search and placement
• Short–term training
• Follow–along (unlimited supports)
• Development of natural supports. (Page 224)
Pursuant to DOES Policy 300.20-4, AJC Reasonable Accommodation Policy, qualified individuals with disabilities will be given a meaningful opportunity to participate in and benefit from aid, benefits, services, or training, including core, intensive, training, and supportive services. (Page 146)
II. Needs of persons with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment
• Benefits planning for Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSI/DI) beneficiaries
• Need for increased and improved supported employment (SE) providers and services
 SE services for persons with mental health impairments
 extended service provider for mental health
 Train staff on role of DBH as an extended service provider
• Holistic approach to VR process
 Holistic assessment at intake
 Housing
 Improved literacy
 Sobriety
 Training programs
 Benefits planning
• Partnership Plus model for extended service provision
• Expand scope of employment readiness workshops
• Education campaign for local employers regarding the hiring of persons with blindness
• Training for BRU staff around job carving/customized employment model
• Examine case recording process for identification of the receipt of SSI/DI by consumers to ensure accuracy (Page 236)
Objective 1.2 Increase outreach to people with HIV in order to increase the number of people with HIV served by DCRSA and the number of successful employment outcomes achieved by people with HIV.
Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. In support of the Mayor’s initiative to reduce HIV infections in the City and improve outcomes for people with HIV, DCRSA will expand outreach to at least two community based AIDS services providers in order to provide VR services at their location.
2. Provide benefits counseling orientation to staff and clients at the identified community based AIDS services providers.
3. Train staff to ensure that counselors are properly tracking people with HIV who are served by the agency. (Page 241)
Performance by June 30, 2017:
a. Complete a solicitation to identify an appropriate training provider who understands person centered training and has experience in using this in the VR process.
b. Identify a training provider who can provide training for VR and provider agency staff, and provide “train the trainer” sessions, to increase capability of DCRSA to provide this on an ongoing basis.
c. All general VR and sensory unit intakes will complete the eCASAS assessment as part of their intake and eligibility determination.
d. Increase the number of people who receive job readiness training by 10%.
e. Ensure that at least 250 people receive benefits counseling/orientation each quarter (the agency currently serves approximately 1700 people who receive SSI/SSDI). (Page 243)
 (Pages 244, 246, 257, 260)
 

Career Pathways

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation Capacity Fails to Meet Demand - A recent policy brief noted that DC’s investments in adult education and career pathways skill building are insufficient to meet the demand for these services, as evidenced by waiting lists for many programs and the significant need for these services (see workforce analyses above)[3]. OSSE AFE also cited capacity as a challenge, despite increased enrollment and provider offerings in recent years. DDS/RSA has also noted increased demand for their services that has resulted in requests for additional funding and the possible need for more priority of service considerations. (Page 43) 
Overall, it is essential that we work as full partners in a workforce development system that efficiently and effectively allocates resources to assist all people to enter the workforce, especially those with significant barriers, including people with disabilities. In order to make best use of resources and ensure we are able to serve District residents to capacity, we must continue to truly integrate services and adopt career pathways with linkages between partners and programs. Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. Additionally, the District will continue to engage providers, partners, businesses and other key stakeholders in conversations about its efforts to increase the capacity of its providers throughout the implementation of the WIOA State Plan over the next four years. (Page 45) 
The agencies operating the core programs and the required partner programs made strides over the past year to improve coordination of services and jointly plan for the changes called for under WIOA. Members of the District’s Adult Career Pathways Task Force, first convened in December 2014, include leadership from the WIC, DOES, DDS/RSA, DHS, OSSE, DME, DMGEO, DCPS, the DC Council, the Public Charter School Board, the DC Public Library system, and three community-based organizations. Through the work of the Task Force’s Strategic Plan to build a career pathways system in the District, these agencies laid the ground work for how services and programs can better be integrated in order to improve delivery of services for our residents. Much of the content in this WIOA State Plan builds on the work of the Task Force, which will continue to meet quarterly to oversee implementation of the career pathways strategies. (Page 150)
 

Employer Engagement

~~The District of Columbia currently has availability for provision of extended supported employment services through Medicaid only for people with intellectual disabilities and people with serious mental illness or serious emotional disturbance. The Medicaid Waiver in the District for Elderly and Persons with Disabilities does not currently include Supported Employment as a covered service. Furthermore, the District currently has no other Waiver Services to provide extended supported employment services to people with developmental disabilities (e.g., autism, without an intellectual disability), traumatic brain injury, or other physical disabilities. In planning for extended services for these populations, DCRSA must rely on either Ticket to Work Employment Networks or natural supports.  (Page 224)

511

~~.   The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures, including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, and performance accountability measurement and reporting processes, to improve coordination of services across one-stop partner programs; (Page 68)
1. Student performance, progress and involvement,
2. Instructional Models and Methods,
3. Program Management and Leadership,
4. Data Collection/Reporting. OSSE AFE will monitor and evaluate providers on a monthly and bi-annual basis via desks reviews and onsite monitoring. Eligible providers will be required to: (Page 202)
 

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 146)
The AJCs will comply with WIA Section 188, Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and current District of Columbia method of administration. This assurance will be incorporated into all grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, or other arrangements whereby WIA funds are made available. (Page 146)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 51 - 59 of 59

DC DDS Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan Amendments

When D.C  plans to make a change to its Medicaid program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. This webpage include D.Cs Medicaid state plan amendments.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is the agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that D.C will administer its Medicaid program.  The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.    It  also gives an assurance that a state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities.     
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Customized Employment

Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.   Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following: DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices; DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers); DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment; and Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Association of the Deaf: Conference - Achieving Employment First

The Achieving Employment First Conference was “held on behalf of Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, St. John's Community Services, District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council, University Legal Services, Protection and Advocacy Services of the District of Columbia, Department on Disability Services, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, and Project Action.” This conference brought “together national and local experts to share innovative ideas and resources to help find meaningful employment for people with significant employment challenges due to their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Developmental Disabilities Council - Final five-year state plan (FY 2012-2016)

The Developmental Disabilities Council of the District of Columbia has a goal to see “young adults and job seekers with disabilities [with] meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages [to] exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

DC HCBS Waiver Program

"Home and Community Based (HCBS) Services waiver program is jointly funded with federal and local dollars. The federal government reimburses the District of Columbia 70 cents for every one dollar spent for qualifying services and supports for people enrolled in the HCBS waiver program. All supports and services provided through the DDA service delivery system are funded through the waiver program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

DC DDS Person-Centered Thinking Philosophy and Training

“Person-centered thinking is a philosophy behind service provision that supports positive control and self-direction of people’s own lives. Department on Disabilities Services (DDS) is working to implement person-centered thinking through training sessions and other agency wide initiatives.   “Teaching and supporting the use of person-centered thinking skills means that it is likelier that service plans will be used and acted on, that updating service plans will occur ‘naturally,’ needing less effort and time, and that the person’s ability to lead a fulfilling, independent life is maximized.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DDS Customized Employment Efforts

“Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.”

 

“Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following:

DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices;” “DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers);” “DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment;” and “Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

District of Columbia ABLE Legislation (Title 47) - 01/04/2016

To amend, on an emergency basis,  Title 47 of the District of Columbia Official Code to establish a qualified ABLE Program to be known as the ABLE Program Trust, pursuant to the requirements of the federal Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 to exempt from income taxation the earnings on deposit made to an ABLE Program Trust by an eligible individual to assist the individual with certain expenses related to the individual’s blindness or disability.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

District of Columbia ARC Legislation (DC Act 21-203) - 11/23/2015

To amend Title 47 of the District of Columbia Official Code to establish  qualified ABLE Program, to be known as the ABLE Program trust, pursuant to the requirements of the federal Stephen Beck, Jr. achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 to exempt from income taxation the earnings on deposits made to an ABLE Program Trust by an eligible individual to assist the individual with certain expenses related to the individual's blindness or disability.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

D.C Employment First Proclamation - 10/08/2012

“On October 8, 2012, DC Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring the District of Columbia an Employment First State—the 20th state to do so nationwide. Mayor Gray’s proclamation affirms that ‘employment is an important part of the lives of all working age adults and people with disabilities are a largely untapped resource with skills and talents who can meet the needs of area business and employers.’ Under the Employment First philosophy, competitive, integrated employment is the first and overwhelmingly preferred option for working-age youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of the complexity or severity of their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 21 - 23 of 23

D.C. Dept. of Education “Competitive Employment Opportunity (CEO) Program)”

~~“Competitive Employment Opportunities (CEO) consists of preparatory experiences designed to help students with disabilities attain their career and postsecondary training goals. The model aims to expose students to career experiences, and equip them with the knowledge and skills needed to be successful in a postsecondary  environment. A paid postsecondary training program for students, CEO is comprised of 3 academies:

1.Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) Academy – 9th/10th grade students are exposed to work experiences in their field of interest. Students engage in instructional activities that provide a foundation of the skills needed to be successful in the workforce.2.CEO Mentoring & Internship Academy – 11th/12th grade students are paired with a mentor who works in the student's career field of interest. Mentors and students work together to create a "Career-Focused Project" and students attend an 8-part professional development series from January to May. During the summer, students apply skills learned by working an 80 hour internship at their mentor's place of employment.”

.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DC DDS Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C. Developmental Disabilities Council - Final five-year state plan (FY 2012-2016)

The Developmental Disabilities Council of the District of Columbia has a goal to see “young adults and job seekers with disabilities [with] meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages [to] exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Project Search - 08/14/2017

~~“Project SEARCH Hilton – Capital Area Region (Formerly Embassy Suites—DC) is a one-year “school-to-work” transition program designed to prepare DCPS adult students with intellectual and other developmental disabilities for competitive employment. Project SEARCH Interns receive daily instruction in employability skills and gain hands-on work experiences by rotating among three 10-week unique paid internships at a one of four Hilton Worldwide host site locations. The goal for each student is competitive, integrated employment by the end of the experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Secondary Transition Community of Practice - 06/01/2013

This was launched earlier in 2013 to bring together transition experts from the District’s school system, disability advocacy organizations, direct-service agencies, and transition-aged youth and their parents.  These stakeholders in the transition process meet monthly to collaborate on increasing and improving outcomes for transition-age youth with disabilities as they leave secondary school and pursue work or higher education.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment Learning Community - 10/08/2012

As part of a competitive application process, the District was selected to receive technical assistance through the Employment Learning Community (ELC). A project of the Institute for Community Inclusion in partnership with The National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services and TransCen, Inc, the ELC will provide significant technical assistance on ways to implement Employment First in the District as well as networking and learning opportunities from those other states selected to participate.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Leadership Consortium of Practice - 10/08/2012

DDS launched an Employment First Leadership Consortium of Practice following the District’s October 2012 declaration as an Employment First state. Consortium members include representatives from District agencies, RSA and DDA providers, and advocacy organizations who are leaders in promoting Employment First practices throughout the District.  Consortium members meet on a monthly basis to discuss new strategies and opportunities for collaboration in implementing and expanding Employment First practices District wide.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Association of the Deaf: Conference - Achieving Employment First

The Achieving Employment First Conference was “held on behalf of Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, St. John's Community Services, District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council, University Legal Services, Protection and Advocacy Services of the District of Columbia, Department on Disability Services, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, and Project Action.” This conference brought “together national and local experts to share innovative ideas and resources to help find meaningful employment for people with significant employment challenges due to their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Project SEARCH - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:Young adult between 18-30 years oldHave a documented intellectual/developmental disabilityCompleting final year of high school OR recent high school graduateShow willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readinessStrong attendance record is preferred 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

District of Columbia Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 06/01/2015

2015 NWD System Grantee Summaries:  The coordination of Long-Term Supports and Services (LTSS) in the District of Columbia has been a priority for DC government for several years. DC’s Health and Human Services agencies, in partnership with people in need of LTSS, families, advocates, public/private partners, referral sources and others, will finalize and implement a 3-year plan to transform current systems into a No Wrong Door (NWD) system for all populations and all payers. DC’s goal is to create an LTSS system in which people encounter person- and family centered systems/staff with core competencies that facilitate their connection to formal and informal LTSS, regardless of where they enter the system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 10/01/2014

“District of Columbia has recently received a No Wrong Door planning grant. Their state team is working to incorporate the LifeCourse Framework as they re-design the front door to long term services and supports as well as the person-centered planning process. The goal is to create a system that supports people and their families to have a good life. At their last team meeting, the group advised on what is work and not working in the system of long term services and supports. This information was shared with the No Wrong Door Leadership Council in order to guide the work as they plan improvements.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment First - 10/08/2012

On October 8, 2012, DC Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring the District of Columbia an Employment First State…Under the Employment First philosophy, competitive, integrated employment is the first and overwhelmingly preferred option for working-age youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of the complexity or severity of their disabilities. The other main tenets of Employment First are that: Employment services are tailored and customized to a person’s needs, interests, and skill set with the ultimate goal of achieving long-term employment in a competitive business or organization, or self-employment. Employment is at the prevailing wage, and never less than minimum wage. The employee has ample opportunities to integrate and interact with his or her coworkers, the public, and/or customers without disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Customized Employment

Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.   Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following: DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices; DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers); DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment; and Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

DC DDS Person-Centered Thinking Philosophy and Training

“Person-centered thinking is a philosophy behind service provision that supports positive control and self-direction of people’s own lives. Department on Disabilities Services (DDS) is working to implement person-centered thinking through training sessions and other agency wide initiatives.   “Teaching and supporting the use of person-centered thinking skills means that it is likelier that service plans will be used and acted on, that updating service plans will occur ‘naturally,’ needing less effort and time, and that the person’s ability to lead a fulfilling, independent life is maximized.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DDS Customized Employment Efforts

“Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.”

 

“Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following:

DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices;” “DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers);” “DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment;” and “Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Justice Department Reaches Agreement With Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority to Resolve Disability Discrimination Complaint - 03/01/2017

~~“The Justice Department filed a proposed consent decree today to resolve a complaint that the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) discriminated against a job applicant on the basis of his disability, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The department’s complaint alleges that WMATA extended a job offer as an elevator/escalator parts supervisor to an applicant but withdrew the offer upon learning that the applicant had epilepsy. The complaint further alleges that WMATA failed to discuss with the applicant how his disability might affect his ability to do the job or whether there were any available accommodations that would allow him to do the job.

As part of the consent decree, which is subject to approval by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, WMATA will institute new policies to ensure that employees and job applicants with disabilities have the opportunity to confer with WMATA about their limitations as well as opportunities for reasonable accommodation in the workplace. WMATA will also ensure that supervisors are fully trained in those policies.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Notice of Emergency and Proposed Rulemaking: ID/DD Waiver - 11/24/2017

~~“The Department of Disability Services (DDS), Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA), operates the Medicaid Home and Community–Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) under the supervision of DHCF.  The ID/DD Waiver was approved by the Council of the District of Columbia (Council) and renewed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for a five year period beginning November 20, 2012 and ending November 19, 2017.  An amendment to renew the ID/DD Waiver for another five-year period beginning November 20, 2017 and ending November 19, 2022, was approved by the Council through the Medicaid Assistance Program Emergency Amendment Act  of 2017, effective July 20, 2017 (D.C. Act 22-0104, D.C. Official Code §  1-307.02(a)(11)(D)(2017 Supp.)), and subsequently was sent by DHCF to CMS for its approval. DHCF anticipates that CMS will approve the renewal amendment effective November 20, 2017”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Submitted to CMS: District of Columbia Plan to Comply with New Federal Home and Community Based Services Requirements - 03/25/2017

~~“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS statewide transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan. The District maintains two HCBS waiver programs: the Elderly and Persons with Disabilities (EPD) Waiver, run by the District’s Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), and the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) waiver, run by the District’s Department of Disability Services (DDS). The EPD waiver program is for the elderly and individuals with physical disabilities who are able to safely receive supportive services in a home and community-based setting. The IDD waiver program provides residential, day/vocational and other support services in the community for District residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Public Notice of Revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan for the District Medicaid Program's Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 03/13/2017

~~“The Directors of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF) and Department on Disability Services (DDS), pursuant to the authority set forth in an Act to enable the District of Columbia to receive federal financial assistance under Title XIX of the Social Security Act for a medical assistance program, and for other purposes, approved December 27, 1967 (81 Stat. 774; D.C. Official Code § 1-307.02) (2012 Repl. & 2013 Supp.)), and Section 6(6) of the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, effective February 27, 2008 (D.C. Law 17-109; D.C. Official Code § 7-771.05(6) (2012 Repl.)) hereby give notice of their intent to submit revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan (STP) for the District of Columbia Medicaid program’s Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waivers to the Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and final approval. 

CMS regulations, effective March 17, 2014, and published in 79 Fed. Reg. 2948-3039 (Jan. 16, 2014), changed the definition of home and community-based services settings for HCBS Waiver services and required that DHCF and DDS develop and submit to CMS a transition plan identifying how the HCBS Waivers will be brought into compliance with the new outcome-oriented definition of HCBS settings.  DHCF and DDS submitted a STP to CMS on March 17, 2015.  That plan is available online on the DHCF website at: https://dhcf.dc.gov/release/announcement-submitted-cms-district-columbia-plan-comply-new-federal-home-and-community  and the DDS website at: http://dds.dc.gov/publication/dc-statewide-transition-plan-3-17-2015

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C. HCBS Waiver Transition Plan - 03/17/2015

"The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines, and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REQUEST FOR INFORMATION: DCJM-2015-I-0003 Community Rehabilitation Provider Milestone Payment System - 08/14/2014

A request to the field for feedback and information on adequate rate structures for the performance of an array of employment-related services, including Customized Employment and Customized Employment Planning. The plan also outlines a draft Milestone and Incentive payment system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Health Care Finance: Notice of Final Rulemaking - 04/01/2014

“These final rules establish standards governing the participation requirements for providers who provide supported employment services to participants in the Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) and to establish conditions of participation for providers."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC HCBS Waiver MR DD (0307.R04.00) (1915c) - 11/20/2012

~~Provides day habilitation, employment readiness, in-home supports, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment, personal care services, skilled nursing, assistive technology services, behavioral supports, companion services, creative arts therapies, dental, family training, host, home, individualized day supports, occupational therapy, one-time transitional services, parenting supports, physical therapy, small group supported employment, speech, hearing and language services, supported living with transportation, supported living, wellness services for individuals with ID/DD ages 18+ no max

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan Amendments

When D.C  plans to make a change to its Medicaid program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. This webpage include D.Cs Medicaid state plan amendments.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is the agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that D.C will administer its Medicaid program.  The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.    It  also gives an assurance that a state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities.     
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC HCBS Waiver Program

"Home and Community Based (HCBS) Services waiver program is jointly funded with federal and local dollars. The federal government reimburses the District of Columbia 70 cents for every one dollar spent for qualifying services and supports for people enrolled in the HCBS waiver program. All supports and services provided through the DDA service delivery system are funded through the waiver program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

With the motto "Justice for All," the District of Columbia is committed to equal rights and opportunities for all people with disabilities, especially when it comes to Employment First and career success.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington D.C.’s VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
1.31%
Change from
2015 to 2016
681,170
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.75%
Change from
2015 to 2016
44,921
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.05%
Change from
2015 to 2016
15,292
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.73%
Change from
2015 to 2016
34.04%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.57%
Change from
2015 to 2016
77.09%

State Data

General

2014 2015 2016
Population. 658,893 672,228 681,170
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 44,504 45,260 44,921
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 13,478 14,214 15,292
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 314,545 329,002 330,700
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.28% 31.41% 34.04%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.49% 77.53% 77.09%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.80% 6.90% 6.00%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 35.80% 34.50% 31.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.30% 15.10% 17.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 33,530 33,886 31,870
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 42,477 41,824 43,913
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 12,270 13,248 14,902
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 59,878 56,726 55,854
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 3,206 3,658 4,694
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,890 1,696 1,267
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 724 1,684 1,719
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 740 2,025 1,735

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 686 741 810
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.70% 2.90% 3.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 14,732 14,612 14,451

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. N/A N/A N/A
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). N/A N/A N/A
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.10% 4.10% N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.30% 4.60% N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 8.30% 9.60% N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 700 699 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 734 786 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,419 1,640 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,733 1,809 1,751
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06 0.07 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 9 8 14
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2 1 5
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 22.00% 13.00% 36.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.31 0.15 0.74

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,311
1,518
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 58 28 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 97 61 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 507 258 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 597 423 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 822 611 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 229 137 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 17.10% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,276 2,371 2,385
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 32,424 33,344 32,491
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 69 61 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,214,000 $1,335,000 $1,540,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $9,585,000 $15,429,000 $22,905,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $2,269,000 $3,861,000 $4,490,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 17.00% 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A 338 363
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,092 706 1,111
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 22.70 31.70 25.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 53.51% 54.99% 55.61%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.64% 15.24% 17.38%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 12.40% 11.53% 10.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 50.00% 69.67% 63.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 43.45% 17.29% 12.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 48.11% 25.94% 18.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 56.33% 36.93% 32.96%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 4.66% 8.65% 6.49%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 352,814
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 240
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 228
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 228
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,891,549

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1 2 2
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 2 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 31 31
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 31 31

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~As part of the technical assistance that will be provided through this program, technical assistance is being provided to some of our community rehabilitation providers. In addition, our counselors will receive training on how to better engage with providers in partnership to help people with most significant disabilities achieve employment outcomes.  (Page 258)
Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling;
Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short–term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area.
Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community.
Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 260)
In addition, this counselor will participate in all Employment First training, in order to be familiar with customized employment services available to  DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. In the summer of 2015, DCRSA and the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) worked closely to make necessary changes. (Pages 256- 266)
 

Customized Employment

~~Benefits planning
• Partnership Plus model for extended service provision
• Expand scope of employment readiness workshops
• Education campaign for local employers regarding the hiring of persons with blindness
• Training for BRU staff around job carving/customized employment model
• Examine case recording process for identification of the receipt of SSI/DI by consumers to ensure accuracy (Page 236)
Objective 2.2 –   Retain, train, and recruit experienced and qualified VR staff and service providers to improve services to the low incidence populations, including people who are blind, deafblind, have autism or other autism spectrum disorders.
Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. Provide continuous training to staff on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
2. Provide continuous training to service providers on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
3. Develop and implement outreach plan to recruit providers, who can provide services to low incidence populations.
4. Develop and implement outreach plan on DCRSA services to the low incidence population. (Page 244)
In FY 2015, DCRSA established new agreements with all job placement and supported employment providers. These are performance based agreements. Some changes were made in the payment structure in order more closely align payment to the providers with successful employment placements. In addition, we added payment support to supported employment providers to provide Discovery Assessments and Customized Employment. The District is also currently participating in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. (Page 257-258)
DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. In the summer of 2015, DCRSA and the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) worked closely to make necessary changes. First, DCRSA identified one counselor to handle all existing Evidence Based Supported Employment cases. (Page 266)
In addition, in new human care agreements issued in FY 2015, DCRSA included Discovery Assessment and Customized Employment as services in our supported employment agreements. Other consumers may require a job coach model for their initial placement but do not require the extended services as provided under the provisions of supported employment services. (Page 268)
Indicator 1.3 Competitive Employment Outcomes: the percentage of individuals who exit the VR program in employment in integrated settings with hourly rate of earnings equivalent to at least the federal or state minimum wage rate, whichever is higher.
Strategy 1: Continue quarterly CRP meetings to provide a forum for discussions and to ensure all providers are aware of the agency’s policies, regulations and expectations governing the provision of services.
Strategy 2: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. (Page 259)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. (Page 45)
Most importantly, all of these agencies participated in the development of the Career Pathways Strategic Plan which lays out the framework for an aligned system. Moving forward, the agencies will establish one umbrella MOA for AJC partners. (Page 73)
 

DEI/DRC

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The Administration’s Supported Employment program (SE) for persons with persistent mental illness utilizes an evidenced–based approach to help individuals with the most significant disabilities to secure, retain, or regain competitive employment in an integrated setting that pays minimum or better wages, and provides benefits. Supported Employment services are individualized and include, but are not limited to:
• Counseling and guidance
• Job coaching (on–the–job training)
• Rapid job search and placement
• Short–term training
• Follow–along (unlimited supports)
• Development of natural supports. (Page 224)
Pursuant to DOES Policy 300.20-4, AJC Reasonable Accommodation Policy, qualified individuals with disabilities will be given a meaningful opportunity to participate in and benefit from aid, benefits, services, or training, including core, intensive, training, and supportive services. (Page 146)
II. Needs of persons with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment
• Benefits planning for Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSI/DI) beneficiaries
• Need for increased and improved supported employment (SE) providers and services
 SE services for persons with mental health impairments
 extended service provider for mental health
 Train staff on role of DBH as an extended service provider
• Holistic approach to VR process
 Holistic assessment at intake
 Housing
 Improved literacy
 Sobriety
 Training programs
 Benefits planning
• Partnership Plus model for extended service provision
• Expand scope of employment readiness workshops
• Education campaign for local employers regarding the hiring of persons with blindness
• Training for BRU staff around job carving/customized employment model
• Examine case recording process for identification of the receipt of SSI/DI by consumers to ensure accuracy (Page 236)
Objective 1.2 Increase outreach to people with HIV in order to increase the number of people with HIV served by DCRSA and the number of successful employment outcomes achieved by people with HIV.
Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. In support of the Mayor’s initiative to reduce HIV infections in the City and improve outcomes for people with HIV, DCRSA will expand outreach to at least two community based AIDS services providers in order to provide VR services at their location.
2. Provide benefits counseling orientation to staff and clients at the identified community based AIDS services providers.
3. Train staff to ensure that counselors are properly tracking people with HIV who are served by the agency. (Page 241)
Performance by June 30, 2017:
a. Complete a solicitation to identify an appropriate training provider who understands person centered training and has experience in using this in the VR process.
b. Identify a training provider who can provide training for VR and provider agency staff, and provide “train the trainer” sessions, to increase capability of DCRSA to provide this on an ongoing basis.
c. All general VR and sensory unit intakes will complete the eCASAS assessment as part of their intake and eligibility determination.
d. Increase the number of people who receive job readiness training by 10%.
e. Ensure that at least 250 people receive benefits counseling/orientation each quarter (the agency currently serves approximately 1700 people who receive SSI/SSDI). (Page 243)
 (Pages 244, 246, 257, 260)
 

Career Pathways

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation Capacity Fails to Meet Demand - A recent policy brief noted that DC’s investments in adult education and career pathways skill building are insufficient to meet the demand for these services, as evidenced by waiting lists for many programs and the significant need for these services (see workforce analyses above)[3]. OSSE AFE also cited capacity as a challenge, despite increased enrollment and provider offerings in recent years. DDS/RSA has also noted increased demand for their services that has resulted in requests for additional funding and the possible need for more priority of service considerations. (Page 43) 
Overall, it is essential that we work as full partners in a workforce development system that efficiently and effectively allocates resources to assist all people to enter the workforce, especially those with significant barriers, including people with disabilities. In order to make best use of resources and ensure we are able to serve District residents to capacity, we must continue to truly integrate services and adopt career pathways with linkages between partners and programs. Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. Additionally, the District will continue to engage providers, partners, businesses and other key stakeholders in conversations about its efforts to increase the capacity of its providers throughout the implementation of the WIOA State Plan over the next four years. (Page 45) 
The agencies operating the core programs and the required partner programs made strides over the past year to improve coordination of services and jointly plan for the changes called for under WIOA. Members of the District’s Adult Career Pathways Task Force, first convened in December 2014, include leadership from the WIC, DOES, DDS/RSA, DHS, OSSE, DME, DMGEO, DCPS, the DC Council, the Public Charter School Board, the DC Public Library system, and three community-based organizations. Through the work of the Task Force’s Strategic Plan to build a career pathways system in the District, these agencies laid the ground work for how services and programs can better be integrated in order to improve delivery of services for our residents. Much of the content in this WIOA State Plan builds on the work of the Task Force, which will continue to meet quarterly to oversee implementation of the career pathways strategies. (Page 150)
 

Employer Engagement

~~The District of Columbia currently has availability for provision of extended supported employment services through Medicaid only for people with intellectual disabilities and people with serious mental illness or serious emotional disturbance. The Medicaid Waiver in the District for Elderly and Persons with Disabilities does not currently include Supported Employment as a covered service. Furthermore, the District currently has no other Waiver Services to provide extended supported employment services to people with developmental disabilities (e.g., autism, without an intellectual disability), traumatic brain injury, or other physical disabilities. In planning for extended services for these populations, DCRSA must rely on either Ticket to Work Employment Networks or natural supports.  (Page 224)

511

~~.   The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures, including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, and performance accountability measurement and reporting processes, to improve coordination of services across one-stop partner programs; (Page 68)
1. Student performance, progress and involvement,
2. Instructional Models and Methods,
3. Program Management and Leadership,
4. Data Collection/Reporting. OSSE AFE will monitor and evaluate providers on a monthly and bi-annual basis via desks reviews and onsite monitoring. Eligible providers will be required to: (Page 202)
 

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 146)
The AJCs will comply with WIA Section 188, Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and current District of Columbia method of administration. This assurance will be incorporated into all grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, or other arrangements whereby WIA funds are made available. (Page 146)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 51 - 59 of 59

DC DDS Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan Amendments

When D.C  plans to make a change to its Medicaid program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. This webpage include D.Cs Medicaid state plan amendments.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is the agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that D.C will administer its Medicaid program.  The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.    It  also gives an assurance that a state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities.     
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Customized Employment

Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.   Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following: DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices; DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers); DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment; and Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Association of the Deaf: Conference - Achieving Employment First

The Achieving Employment First Conference was “held on behalf of Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, St. John's Community Services, District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council, University Legal Services, Protection and Advocacy Services of the District of Columbia, Department on Disability Services, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, and Project Action.” This conference brought “together national and local experts to share innovative ideas and resources to help find meaningful employment for people with significant employment challenges due to their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Developmental Disabilities Council - Final five-year state plan (FY 2012-2016)

The Developmental Disabilities Council of the District of Columbia has a goal to see “young adults and job seekers with disabilities [with] meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages [to] exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

DC HCBS Waiver Program

"Home and Community Based (HCBS) Services waiver program is jointly funded with federal and local dollars. The federal government reimburses the District of Columbia 70 cents for every one dollar spent for qualifying services and supports for people enrolled in the HCBS waiver program. All supports and services provided through the DDA service delivery system are funded through the waiver program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

DC DDS Person-Centered Thinking Philosophy and Training

“Person-centered thinking is a philosophy behind service provision that supports positive control and self-direction of people’s own lives. Department on Disabilities Services (DDS) is working to implement person-centered thinking through training sessions and other agency wide initiatives.   “Teaching and supporting the use of person-centered thinking skills means that it is likelier that service plans will be used and acted on, that updating service plans will occur ‘naturally,’ needing less effort and time, and that the person’s ability to lead a fulfilling, independent life is maximized.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DDS Customized Employment Efforts

“Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.”

 

“Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following:

DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices;” “DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers);” “DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment;” and “Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

District of Columbia ABLE Legislation (Title 47) - 01/04/2016

To amend, on an emergency basis,  Title 47 of the District of Columbia Official Code to establish a qualified ABLE Program to be known as the ABLE Program Trust, pursuant to the requirements of the federal Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 to exempt from income taxation the earnings on deposit made to an ABLE Program Trust by an eligible individual to assist the individual with certain expenses related to the individual’s blindness or disability.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

District of Columbia ARC Legislation (DC Act 21-203) - 11/23/2015

To amend Title 47 of the District of Columbia Official Code to establish  qualified ABLE Program, to be known as the ABLE Program trust, pursuant to the requirements of the federal Stephen Beck, Jr. achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 to exempt from income taxation the earnings on deposits made to an ABLE Program Trust by an eligible individual to assist the individual with certain expenses related to the individual's blindness or disability.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

D.C Employment First Proclamation - 10/08/2012

“On October 8, 2012, DC Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring the District of Columbia an Employment First State—the 20th state to do so nationwide. Mayor Gray’s proclamation affirms that ‘employment is an important part of the lives of all working age adults and people with disabilities are a largely untapped resource with skills and talents who can meet the needs of area business and employers.’ Under the Employment First philosophy, competitive, integrated employment is the first and overwhelmingly preferred option for working-age youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of the complexity or severity of their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 21 - 23 of 23

D.C. Dept. of Education “Competitive Employment Opportunity (CEO) Program)”

~~“Competitive Employment Opportunities (CEO) consists of preparatory experiences designed to help students with disabilities attain their career and postsecondary training goals. The model aims to expose students to career experiences, and equip them with the knowledge and skills needed to be successful in a postsecondary  environment. A paid postsecondary training program for students, CEO is comprised of 3 academies:

1.Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) Academy – 9th/10th grade students are exposed to work experiences in their field of interest. Students engage in instructional activities that provide a foundation of the skills needed to be successful in the workforce.2.CEO Mentoring & Internship Academy – 11th/12th grade students are paired with a mentor who works in the student's career field of interest. Mentors and students work together to create a "Career-Focused Project" and students attend an 8-part professional development series from January to May. During the summer, students apply skills learned by working an 80 hour internship at their mentor's place of employment.”

.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DC DDS Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C. Developmental Disabilities Council - Final five-year state plan (FY 2012-2016)

The Developmental Disabilities Council of the District of Columbia has a goal to see “young adults and job seekers with disabilities [with] meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages [to] exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Project Search - 08/14/2017

~~“Project SEARCH Hilton – Capital Area Region (Formerly Embassy Suites—DC) is a one-year “school-to-work” transition program designed to prepare DCPS adult students with intellectual and other developmental disabilities for competitive employment. Project SEARCH Interns receive daily instruction in employability skills and gain hands-on work experiences by rotating among three 10-week unique paid internships at a one of four Hilton Worldwide host site locations. The goal for each student is competitive, integrated employment by the end of the experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Secondary Transition Community of Practice - 06/01/2013

This was launched earlier in 2013 to bring together transition experts from the District’s school system, disability advocacy organizations, direct-service agencies, and transition-aged youth and their parents.  These stakeholders in the transition process meet monthly to collaborate on increasing and improving outcomes for transition-age youth with disabilities as they leave secondary school and pursue work or higher education.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment Learning Community - 10/08/2012

As part of a competitive application process, the District was selected to receive technical assistance through the Employment Learning Community (ELC). A project of the Institute for Community Inclusion in partnership with The National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services and TransCen, Inc, the ELC will provide significant technical assistance on ways to implement Employment First in the District as well as networking and learning opportunities from those other states selected to participate.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Leadership Consortium of Practice - 10/08/2012

DDS launched an Employment First Leadership Consortium of Practice following the District’s October 2012 declaration as an Employment First state. Consortium members include representatives from District agencies, RSA and DDA providers, and advocacy organizations who are leaders in promoting Employment First practices throughout the District.  Consortium members meet on a monthly basis to discuss new strategies and opportunities for collaboration in implementing and expanding Employment First practices District wide.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Association of the Deaf: Conference - Achieving Employment First

The Achieving Employment First Conference was “held on behalf of Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, St. John's Community Services, District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council, University Legal Services, Protection and Advocacy Services of the District of Columbia, Department on Disability Services, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, and Project Action.” This conference brought “together national and local experts to share innovative ideas and resources to help find meaningful employment for people with significant employment challenges due to their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Project SEARCH - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:Young adult between 18-30 years oldHave a documented intellectual/developmental disabilityCompleting final year of high school OR recent high school graduateShow willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readinessStrong attendance record is preferred 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

District of Columbia Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 06/01/2015

2015 NWD System Grantee Summaries:  The coordination of Long-Term Supports and Services (LTSS) in the District of Columbia has been a priority for DC government for several years. DC’s Health and Human Services agencies, in partnership with people in need of LTSS, families, advocates, public/private partners, referral sources and others, will finalize and implement a 3-year plan to transform current systems into a No Wrong Door (NWD) system for all populations and all payers. DC’s goal is to create an LTSS system in which people encounter person- and family centered systems/staff with core competencies that facilitate their connection to formal and informal LTSS, regardless of where they enter the system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 10/01/2014

“District of Columbia has recently received a No Wrong Door planning grant. Their state team is working to incorporate the LifeCourse Framework as they re-design the front door to long term services and supports as well as the person-centered planning process. The goal is to create a system that supports people and their families to have a good life. At their last team meeting, the group advised on what is work and not working in the system of long term services and supports. This information was shared with the No Wrong Door Leadership Council in order to guide the work as they plan improvements.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment First - 10/08/2012

On October 8, 2012, DC Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring the District of Columbia an Employment First State…Under the Employment First philosophy, competitive, integrated employment is the first and overwhelmingly preferred option for working-age youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of the complexity or severity of their disabilities. The other main tenets of Employment First are that: Employment services are tailored and customized to a person’s needs, interests, and skill set with the ultimate goal of achieving long-term employment in a competitive business or organization, or self-employment. Employment is at the prevailing wage, and never less than minimum wage. The employee has ample opportunities to integrate and interact with his or her coworkers, the public, and/or customers without disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Customized Employment

Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.   Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following: DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices; DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers); DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment; and Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

DC DDS Person-Centered Thinking Philosophy and Training

“Person-centered thinking is a philosophy behind service provision that supports positive control and self-direction of people’s own lives. Department on Disabilities Services (DDS) is working to implement person-centered thinking through training sessions and other agency wide initiatives.   “Teaching and supporting the use of person-centered thinking skills means that it is likelier that service plans will be used and acted on, that updating service plans will occur ‘naturally,’ needing less effort and time, and that the person’s ability to lead a fulfilling, independent life is maximized.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DDS Customized Employment Efforts

“Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.”

 

“Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following:

DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices;” “DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers);” “DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment;” and “Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Justice Department Reaches Agreement With Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority to Resolve Disability Discrimination Complaint - 03/01/2017

~~“The Justice Department filed a proposed consent decree today to resolve a complaint that the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) discriminated against a job applicant on the basis of his disability, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The department’s complaint alleges that WMATA extended a job offer as an elevator/escalator parts supervisor to an applicant but withdrew the offer upon learning that the applicant had epilepsy. The complaint further alleges that WMATA failed to discuss with the applicant how his disability might affect his ability to do the job or whether there were any available accommodations that would allow him to do the job.

As part of the consent decree, which is subject to approval by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, WMATA will institute new policies to ensure that employees and job applicants with disabilities have the opportunity to confer with WMATA about their limitations as well as opportunities for reasonable accommodation in the workplace. WMATA will also ensure that supervisors are fully trained in those policies.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Notice of Emergency and Proposed Rulemaking: ID/DD Waiver - 11/24/2017

~~“The Department of Disability Services (DDS), Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA), operates the Medicaid Home and Community–Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) under the supervision of DHCF.  The ID/DD Waiver was approved by the Council of the District of Columbia (Council) and renewed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for a five year period beginning November 20, 2012 and ending November 19, 2017.  An amendment to renew the ID/DD Waiver for another five-year period beginning November 20, 2017 and ending November 19, 2022, was approved by the Council through the Medicaid Assistance Program Emergency Amendment Act  of 2017, effective July 20, 2017 (D.C. Act 22-0104, D.C. Official Code §  1-307.02(a)(11)(D)(2017 Supp.)), and subsequently was sent by DHCF to CMS for its approval. DHCF anticipates that CMS will approve the renewal amendment effective November 20, 2017”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Submitted to CMS: District of Columbia Plan to Comply with New Federal Home and Community Based Services Requirements - 03/25/2017

~~“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS statewide transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan. The District maintains two HCBS waiver programs: the Elderly and Persons with Disabilities (EPD) Waiver, run by the District’s Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), and the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) waiver, run by the District’s Department of Disability Services (DDS). The EPD waiver program is for the elderly and individuals with physical disabilities who are able to safely receive supportive services in a home and community-based setting. The IDD waiver program provides residential, day/vocational and other support services in the community for District residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Public Notice of Revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan for the District Medicaid Program's Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 03/13/2017

~~“The Directors of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF) and Department on Disability Services (DDS), pursuant to the authority set forth in an Act to enable the District of Columbia to receive federal financial assistance under Title XIX of the Social Security Act for a medical assistance program, and for other purposes, approved December 27, 1967 (81 Stat. 774; D.C. Official Code § 1-307.02) (2012 Repl. & 2013 Supp.)), and Section 6(6) of the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, effective February 27, 2008 (D.C. Law 17-109; D.C. Official Code § 7-771.05(6) (2012 Repl.)) hereby give notice of their intent to submit revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan (STP) for the District of Columbia Medicaid program’s Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waivers to the Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and final approval. 

CMS regulations, effective March 17, 2014, and published in 79 Fed. Reg. 2948-3039 (Jan. 16, 2014), changed the definition of home and community-based services settings for HCBS Waiver services and required that DHCF and DDS develop and submit to CMS a transition plan identifying how the HCBS Waivers will be brought into compliance with the new outcome-oriented definition of HCBS settings.  DHCF and DDS submitted a STP to CMS on March 17, 2015.  That plan is available online on the DHCF website at: https://dhcf.dc.gov/release/announcement-submitted-cms-district-columbia-plan-comply-new-federal-home-and-community  and the DDS website at: http://dds.dc.gov/publication/dc-statewide-transition-plan-3-17-2015

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C. HCBS Waiver Transition Plan - 03/17/2015

"The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines, and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REQUEST FOR INFORMATION: DCJM-2015-I-0003 Community Rehabilitation Provider Milestone Payment System - 08/14/2014

A request to the field for feedback and information on adequate rate structures for the performance of an array of employment-related services, including Customized Employment and Customized Employment Planning. The plan also outlines a draft Milestone and Incentive payment system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Health Care Finance: Notice of Final Rulemaking - 04/01/2014

“These final rules establish standards governing the participation requirements for providers who provide supported employment services to participants in the Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) and to establish conditions of participation for providers."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC HCBS Waiver MR DD (0307.R04.00) (1915c) - 11/20/2012

~~Provides day habilitation, employment readiness, in-home supports, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment, personal care services, skilled nursing, assistive technology services, behavioral supports, companion services, creative arts therapies, dental, family training, host, home, individualized day supports, occupational therapy, one-time transitional services, parenting supports, physical therapy, small group supported employment, speech, hearing and language services, supported living with transportation, supported living, wellness services for individuals with ID/DD ages 18+ no max

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan Amendments

When D.C  plans to make a change to its Medicaid program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. This webpage include D.Cs Medicaid state plan amendments.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is the agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that D.C will administer its Medicaid program.  The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.    It  also gives an assurance that a state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities.     
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC HCBS Waiver Program

"Home and Community Based (HCBS) Services waiver program is jointly funded with federal and local dollars. The federal government reimburses the District of Columbia 70 cents for every one dollar spent for qualifying services and supports for people enrolled in the HCBS waiver program. All supports and services provided through the DDA service delivery system are funded through the waiver program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

States - Phablet

Snapshot

With the motto "Justice for All," the District of Columbia is committed to equal rights and opportunities for all people with disabilities, especially when it comes to Employment First and career success.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington D.C.’s VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
1.31%
Change from
2015 to 2016
681,170
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.75%
Change from
2015 to 2016
44,921
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.05%
Change from
2015 to 2016
15,292
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.73%
Change from
2015 to 2016
34.04%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.57%
Change from
2015 to 2016
77.09%

State Data

General

2016
Population. 681,170
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 44,921
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 15,292
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 330,700
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.04%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.09%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.00%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 31.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 31,870
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 43,913
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 14,902
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 55,854
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 4,694
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,267
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 1,719
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 1,735

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 810
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 14,451

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. N/A
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). N/A
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. N/A
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. N/A
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,751
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 14
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 5
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 36.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.74

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,385
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 32,491
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,540,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $22,905,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $4,490,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 363
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,111
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 25.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 55.61%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 17.38%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 10.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 63.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 12.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 18.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 32.96%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 6.49%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 352,814
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 240
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 228
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 228
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,891,549

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 31
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 31

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~As part of the technical assistance that will be provided through this program, technical assistance is being provided to some of our community rehabilitation providers. In addition, our counselors will receive training on how to better engage with providers in partnership to help people with most significant disabilities achieve employment outcomes.  (Page 258)
Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling;
Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short–term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area.
Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community.
Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 260)
In addition, this counselor will participate in all Employment First training, in order to be familiar with customized employment services available to  DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. In the summer of 2015, DCRSA and the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) worked closely to make necessary changes. (Pages 256- 266)
 

Customized Employment

~~Benefits planning
• Partnership Plus model for extended service provision
• Expand scope of employment readiness workshops
• Education campaign for local employers regarding the hiring of persons with blindness
• Training for BRU staff around job carving/customized employment model
• Examine case recording process for identification of the receipt of SSI/DI by consumers to ensure accuracy (Page 236)
Objective 2.2 –   Retain, train, and recruit experienced and qualified VR staff and service providers to improve services to the low incidence populations, including people who are blind, deafblind, have autism or other autism spectrum disorders.
Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. Provide continuous training to staff on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
2. Provide continuous training to service providers on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
3. Develop and implement outreach plan to recruit providers, who can provide services to low incidence populations.
4. Develop and implement outreach plan on DCRSA services to the low incidence population. (Page 244)
In FY 2015, DCRSA established new agreements with all job placement and supported employment providers. These are performance based agreements. Some changes were made in the payment structure in order more closely align payment to the providers with successful employment placements. In addition, we added payment support to supported employment providers to provide Discovery Assessments and Customized Employment. The District is also currently participating in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. (Page 257-258)
DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. In the summer of 2015, DCRSA and the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) worked closely to make necessary changes. First, DCRSA identified one counselor to handle all existing Evidence Based Supported Employment cases. (Page 266)
In addition, in new human care agreements issued in FY 2015, DCRSA included Discovery Assessment and Customized Employment as services in our supported employment agreements. Other consumers may require a job coach model for their initial placement but do not require the extended services as provided under the provisions of supported employment services. (Page 268)
Indicator 1.3 Competitive Employment Outcomes: the percentage of individuals who exit the VR program in employment in integrated settings with hourly rate of earnings equivalent to at least the federal or state minimum wage rate, whichever is higher.
Strategy 1: Continue quarterly CRP meetings to provide a forum for discussions and to ensure all providers are aware of the agency’s policies, regulations and expectations governing the provision of services.
Strategy 2: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. (Page 259)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. (Page 45)
Most importantly, all of these agencies participated in the development of the Career Pathways Strategic Plan which lays out the framework for an aligned system. Moving forward, the agencies will establish one umbrella MOA for AJC partners. (Page 73)
 

DEI/DRC

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The Administration’s Supported Employment program (SE) for persons with persistent mental illness utilizes an evidenced–based approach to help individuals with the most significant disabilities to secure, retain, or regain competitive employment in an integrated setting that pays minimum or better wages, and provides benefits. Supported Employment services are individualized and include, but are not limited to:
• Counseling and guidance
• Job coaching (on–the–job training)
• Rapid job search and placement
• Short–term training
• Follow–along (unlimited supports)
• Development of natural supports. (Page 224)
Pursuant to DOES Policy 300.20-4, AJC Reasonable Accommodation Policy, qualified individuals with disabilities will be given a meaningful opportunity to participate in and benefit from aid, benefits, services, or training, including core, intensive, training, and supportive services. (Page 146)
II. Needs of persons with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment
• Benefits planning for Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSI/DI) beneficiaries
• Need for increased and improved supported employment (SE) providers and services
 SE services for persons with mental health impairments
 extended service provider for mental health
 Train staff on role of DBH as an extended service provider
• Holistic approach to VR process
 Holistic assessment at intake
 Housing
 Improved literacy
 Sobriety
 Training programs
 Benefits planning
• Partnership Plus model for extended service provision
• Expand scope of employment readiness workshops
• Education campaign for local employers regarding the hiring of persons with blindness
• Training for BRU staff around job carving/customized employment model
• Examine case recording process for identification of the receipt of SSI/DI by consumers to ensure accuracy (Page 236)
Objective 1.2 Increase outreach to people with HIV in order to increase the number of people with HIV served by DCRSA and the number of successful employment outcomes achieved by people with HIV.
Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. In support of the Mayor’s initiative to reduce HIV infections in the City and improve outcomes for people with HIV, DCRSA will expand outreach to at least two community based AIDS services providers in order to provide VR services at their location.
2. Provide benefits counseling orientation to staff and clients at the identified community based AIDS services providers.
3. Train staff to ensure that counselors are properly tracking people with HIV who are served by the agency. (Page 241)
Performance by June 30, 2017:
a. Complete a solicitation to identify an appropriate training provider who understands person centered training and has experience in using this in the VR process.
b. Identify a training provider who can provide training for VR and provider agency staff, and provide “train the trainer” sessions, to increase capability of DCRSA to provide this on an ongoing basis.
c. All general VR and sensory unit intakes will complete the eCASAS assessment as part of their intake and eligibility determination.
d. Increase the number of people who receive job readiness training by 10%.
e. Ensure that at least 250 people receive benefits counseling/orientation each quarter (the agency currently serves approximately 1700 people who receive SSI/SSDI). (Page 243)
 (Pages 244, 246, 257, 260)
 

Career Pathways

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation Capacity Fails to Meet Demand - A recent policy brief noted that DC’s investments in adult education and career pathways skill building are insufficient to meet the demand for these services, as evidenced by waiting lists for many programs and the significant need for these services (see workforce analyses above)[3]. OSSE AFE also cited capacity as a challenge, despite increased enrollment and provider offerings in recent years. DDS/RSA has also noted increased demand for their services that has resulted in requests for additional funding and the possible need for more priority of service considerations. (Page 43) 
Overall, it is essential that we work as full partners in a workforce development system that efficiently and effectively allocates resources to assist all people to enter the workforce, especially those with significant barriers, including people with disabilities. In order to make best use of resources and ensure we are able to serve District residents to capacity, we must continue to truly integrate services and adopt career pathways with linkages between partners and programs. Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. Additionally, the District will continue to engage providers, partners, businesses and other key stakeholders in conversations about its efforts to increase the capacity of its providers throughout the implementation of the WIOA State Plan over the next four years. (Page 45) 
The agencies operating the core programs and the required partner programs made strides over the past year to improve coordination of services and jointly plan for the changes called for under WIOA. Members of the District’s Adult Career Pathways Task Force, first convened in December 2014, include leadership from the WIC, DOES, DDS/RSA, DHS, OSSE, DME, DMGEO, DCPS, the DC Council, the Public Charter School Board, the DC Public Library system, and three community-based organizations. Through the work of the Task Force’s Strategic Plan to build a career pathways system in the District, these agencies laid the ground work for how services and programs can better be integrated in order to improve delivery of services for our residents. Much of the content in this WIOA State Plan builds on the work of the Task Force, which will continue to meet quarterly to oversee implementation of the career pathways strategies. (Page 150)
 

Employer Engagement

~~The District of Columbia currently has availability for provision of extended supported employment services through Medicaid only for people with intellectual disabilities and people with serious mental illness or serious emotional disturbance. The Medicaid Waiver in the District for Elderly and Persons with Disabilities does not currently include Supported Employment as a covered service. Furthermore, the District currently has no other Waiver Services to provide extended supported employment services to people with developmental disabilities (e.g., autism, without an intellectual disability), traumatic brain injury, or other physical disabilities. In planning for extended services for these populations, DCRSA must rely on either Ticket to Work Employment Networks or natural supports.  (Page 224)

511

~~.   The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures, including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, and performance accountability measurement and reporting processes, to improve coordination of services across one-stop partner programs; (Page 68)
1. Student performance, progress and involvement,
2. Instructional Models and Methods,
3. Program Management and Leadership,
4. Data Collection/Reporting. OSSE AFE will monitor and evaluate providers on a monthly and bi-annual basis via desks reviews and onsite monitoring. Eligible providers will be required to: (Page 202)
 

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 146)
The AJCs will comply with WIA Section 188, Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and current District of Columbia method of administration. This assurance will be incorporated into all grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, or other arrangements whereby WIA funds are made available. (Page 146)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 51 - 59 of 59

DC DDS Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan Amendments

When D.C  plans to make a change to its Medicaid program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. This webpage include D.Cs Medicaid state plan amendments.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is the agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that D.C will administer its Medicaid program.  The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.    It  also gives an assurance that a state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities.     
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Customized Employment

Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.   Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following: DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices; DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers); DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment; and Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Association of the Deaf: Conference - Achieving Employment First

The Achieving Employment First Conference was “held on behalf of Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, St. John's Community Services, District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council, University Legal Services, Protection and Advocacy Services of the District of Columbia, Department on Disability Services, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, and Project Action.” This conference brought “together national and local experts to share innovative ideas and resources to help find meaningful employment for people with significant employment challenges due to their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Developmental Disabilities Council - Final five-year state plan (FY 2012-2016)

The Developmental Disabilities Council of the District of Columbia has a goal to see “young adults and job seekers with disabilities [with] meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages [to] exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

DC HCBS Waiver Program

"Home and Community Based (HCBS) Services waiver program is jointly funded with federal and local dollars. The federal government reimburses the District of Columbia 70 cents for every one dollar spent for qualifying services and supports for people enrolled in the HCBS waiver program. All supports and services provided through the DDA service delivery system are funded through the waiver program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

DC DDS Person-Centered Thinking Philosophy and Training

“Person-centered thinking is a philosophy behind service provision that supports positive control and self-direction of people’s own lives. Department on Disabilities Services (DDS) is working to implement person-centered thinking through training sessions and other agency wide initiatives.   “Teaching and supporting the use of person-centered thinking skills means that it is likelier that service plans will be used and acted on, that updating service plans will occur ‘naturally,’ needing less effort and time, and that the person’s ability to lead a fulfilling, independent life is maximized.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DDS Customized Employment Efforts

“Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.”

 

“Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following:

DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices;” “DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers);” “DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment;” and “Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

District of Columbia ABLE Legislation (Title 47) - 01/04/2016

To amend, on an emergency basis,  Title 47 of the District of Columbia Official Code to establish a qualified ABLE Program to be known as the ABLE Program Trust, pursuant to the requirements of the federal Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 to exempt from income taxation the earnings on deposit made to an ABLE Program Trust by an eligible individual to assist the individual with certain expenses related to the individual’s blindness or disability.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

District of Columbia ARC Legislation (DC Act 21-203) - 11/23/2015

To amend Title 47 of the District of Columbia Official Code to establish  qualified ABLE Program, to be known as the ABLE Program trust, pursuant to the requirements of the federal Stephen Beck, Jr. achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 to exempt from income taxation the earnings on deposits made to an ABLE Program Trust by an eligible individual to assist the individual with certain expenses related to the individual's blindness or disability.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

D.C Employment First Proclamation - 10/08/2012

“On October 8, 2012, DC Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring the District of Columbia an Employment First State—the 20th state to do so nationwide. Mayor Gray’s proclamation affirms that ‘employment is an important part of the lives of all working age adults and people with disabilities are a largely untapped resource with skills and talents who can meet the needs of area business and employers.’ Under the Employment First philosophy, competitive, integrated employment is the first and overwhelmingly preferred option for working-age youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of the complexity or severity of their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 21 - 23 of 23

D.C. Dept. of Education “Competitive Employment Opportunity (CEO) Program)”

~~“Competitive Employment Opportunities (CEO) consists of preparatory experiences designed to help students with disabilities attain their career and postsecondary training goals. The model aims to expose students to career experiences, and equip them with the knowledge and skills needed to be successful in a postsecondary  environment. A paid postsecondary training program for students, CEO is comprised of 3 academies:

1.Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) Academy – 9th/10th grade students are exposed to work experiences in their field of interest. Students engage in instructional activities that provide a foundation of the skills needed to be successful in the workforce.2.CEO Mentoring & Internship Academy – 11th/12th grade students are paired with a mentor who works in the student's career field of interest. Mentors and students work together to create a "Career-Focused Project" and students attend an 8-part professional development series from January to May. During the summer, students apply skills learned by working an 80 hour internship at their mentor's place of employment.”

.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DC DDS Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C. Developmental Disabilities Council - Final five-year state plan (FY 2012-2016)

The Developmental Disabilities Council of the District of Columbia has a goal to see “young adults and job seekers with disabilities [with] meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages [to] exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Project Search - 08/14/2017

~~“Project SEARCH Hilton – Capital Area Region (Formerly Embassy Suites—DC) is a one-year “school-to-work” transition program designed to prepare DCPS adult students with intellectual and other developmental disabilities for competitive employment. Project SEARCH Interns receive daily instruction in employability skills and gain hands-on work experiences by rotating among three 10-week unique paid internships at a one of four Hilton Worldwide host site locations. The goal for each student is competitive, integrated employment by the end of the experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Secondary Transition Community of Practice - 06/01/2013

This was launched earlier in 2013 to bring together transition experts from the District’s school system, disability advocacy organizations, direct-service agencies, and transition-aged youth and their parents.  These stakeholders in the transition process meet monthly to collaborate on increasing and improving outcomes for transition-age youth with disabilities as they leave secondary school and pursue work or higher education.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment Learning Community - 10/08/2012

As part of a competitive application process, the District was selected to receive technical assistance through the Employment Learning Community (ELC). A project of the Institute for Community Inclusion in partnership with The National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services and TransCen, Inc, the ELC will provide significant technical assistance on ways to implement Employment First in the District as well as networking and learning opportunities from those other states selected to participate.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Leadership Consortium of Practice - 10/08/2012

DDS launched an Employment First Leadership Consortium of Practice following the District’s October 2012 declaration as an Employment First state. Consortium members include representatives from District agencies, RSA and DDA providers, and advocacy organizations who are leaders in promoting Employment First practices throughout the District.  Consortium members meet on a monthly basis to discuss new strategies and opportunities for collaboration in implementing and expanding Employment First practices District wide.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Association of the Deaf: Conference - Achieving Employment First

The Achieving Employment First Conference was “held on behalf of Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, St. John's Community Services, District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council, University Legal Services, Protection and Advocacy Services of the District of Columbia, Department on Disability Services, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, and Project Action.” This conference brought “together national and local experts to share innovative ideas and resources to help find meaningful employment for people with significant employment challenges due to their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Project SEARCH - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:Young adult between 18-30 years oldHave a documented intellectual/developmental disabilityCompleting final year of high school OR recent high school graduateShow willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readinessStrong attendance record is preferred 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

District of Columbia Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 06/01/2015

2015 NWD System Grantee Summaries:  The coordination of Long-Term Supports and Services (LTSS) in the District of Columbia has been a priority for DC government for several years. DC’s Health and Human Services agencies, in partnership with people in need of LTSS, families, advocates, public/private partners, referral sources and others, will finalize and implement a 3-year plan to transform current systems into a No Wrong Door (NWD) system for all populations and all payers. DC’s goal is to create an LTSS system in which people encounter person- and family centered systems/staff with core competencies that facilitate their connection to formal and informal LTSS, regardless of where they enter the system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 10/01/2014

“District of Columbia has recently received a No Wrong Door planning grant. Their state team is working to incorporate the LifeCourse Framework as they re-design the front door to long term services and supports as well as the person-centered planning process. The goal is to create a system that supports people and their families to have a good life. At their last team meeting, the group advised on what is work and not working in the system of long term services and supports. This information was shared with the No Wrong Door Leadership Council in order to guide the work as they plan improvements.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment First - 10/08/2012

On October 8, 2012, DC Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring the District of Columbia an Employment First State…Under the Employment First philosophy, competitive, integrated employment is the first and overwhelmingly preferred option for working-age youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of the complexity or severity of their disabilities. The other main tenets of Employment First are that: Employment services are tailored and customized to a person’s needs, interests, and skill set with the ultimate goal of achieving long-term employment in a competitive business or organization, or self-employment. Employment is at the prevailing wage, and never less than minimum wage. The employee has ample opportunities to integrate and interact with his or her coworkers, the public, and/or customers without disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Customized Employment

Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.   Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following: DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices; DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers); DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment; and Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

DC DDS Person-Centered Thinking Philosophy and Training

“Person-centered thinking is a philosophy behind service provision that supports positive control and self-direction of people’s own lives. Department on Disabilities Services (DDS) is working to implement person-centered thinking through training sessions and other agency wide initiatives.   “Teaching and supporting the use of person-centered thinking skills means that it is likelier that service plans will be used and acted on, that updating service plans will occur ‘naturally,’ needing less effort and time, and that the person’s ability to lead a fulfilling, independent life is maximized.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DDS Customized Employment Efforts

“Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.”

 

“Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following:

DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices;” “DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers);” “DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment;” and “Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Justice Department Reaches Agreement With Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority to Resolve Disability Discrimination Complaint - 03/01/2017

~~“The Justice Department filed a proposed consent decree today to resolve a complaint that the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) discriminated against a job applicant on the basis of his disability, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The department’s complaint alleges that WMATA extended a job offer as an elevator/escalator parts supervisor to an applicant but withdrew the offer upon learning that the applicant had epilepsy. The complaint further alleges that WMATA failed to discuss with the applicant how his disability might affect his ability to do the job or whether there were any available accommodations that would allow him to do the job.

As part of the consent decree, which is subject to approval by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, WMATA will institute new policies to ensure that employees and job applicants with disabilities have the opportunity to confer with WMATA about their limitations as well as opportunities for reasonable accommodation in the workplace. WMATA will also ensure that supervisors are fully trained in those policies.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Notice of Emergency and Proposed Rulemaking: ID/DD Waiver - 11/24/2017

~~“The Department of Disability Services (DDS), Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA), operates the Medicaid Home and Community–Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) under the supervision of DHCF.  The ID/DD Waiver was approved by the Council of the District of Columbia (Council) and renewed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for a five year period beginning November 20, 2012 and ending November 19, 2017.  An amendment to renew the ID/DD Waiver for another five-year period beginning November 20, 2017 and ending November 19, 2022, was approved by the Council through the Medicaid Assistance Program Emergency Amendment Act  of 2017, effective July 20, 2017 (D.C. Act 22-0104, D.C. Official Code §  1-307.02(a)(11)(D)(2017 Supp.)), and subsequently was sent by DHCF to CMS for its approval. DHCF anticipates that CMS will approve the renewal amendment effective November 20, 2017”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Submitted to CMS: District of Columbia Plan to Comply with New Federal Home and Community Based Services Requirements - 03/25/2017

~~“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS statewide transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan. The District maintains two HCBS waiver programs: the Elderly and Persons with Disabilities (EPD) Waiver, run by the District’s Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), and the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) waiver, run by the District’s Department of Disability Services (DDS). The EPD waiver program is for the elderly and individuals with physical disabilities who are able to safely receive supportive services in a home and community-based setting. The IDD waiver program provides residential, day/vocational and other support services in the community for District residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Public Notice of Revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan for the District Medicaid Program's Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 03/13/2017

~~“The Directors of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF) and Department on Disability Services (DDS), pursuant to the authority set forth in an Act to enable the District of Columbia to receive federal financial assistance under Title XIX of the Social Security Act for a medical assistance program, and for other purposes, approved December 27, 1967 (81 Stat. 774; D.C. Official Code § 1-307.02) (2012 Repl. & 2013 Supp.)), and Section 6(6) of the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, effective February 27, 2008 (D.C. Law 17-109; D.C. Official Code § 7-771.05(6) (2012 Repl.)) hereby give notice of their intent to submit revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan (STP) for the District of Columbia Medicaid program’s Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waivers to the Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and final approval. 

CMS regulations, effective March 17, 2014, and published in 79 Fed. Reg. 2948-3039 (Jan. 16, 2014), changed the definition of home and community-based services settings for HCBS Waiver services and required that DHCF and DDS develop and submit to CMS a transition plan identifying how the HCBS Waivers will be brought into compliance with the new outcome-oriented definition of HCBS settings.  DHCF and DDS submitted a STP to CMS on March 17, 2015.  That plan is available online on the DHCF website at: https://dhcf.dc.gov/release/announcement-submitted-cms-district-columbia-plan-comply-new-federal-home-and-community  and the DDS website at: http://dds.dc.gov/publication/dc-statewide-transition-plan-3-17-2015

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C. HCBS Waiver Transition Plan - 03/17/2015

"The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines, and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REQUEST FOR INFORMATION: DCJM-2015-I-0003 Community Rehabilitation Provider Milestone Payment System - 08/14/2014

A request to the field for feedback and information on adequate rate structures for the performance of an array of employment-related services, including Customized Employment and Customized Employment Planning. The plan also outlines a draft Milestone and Incentive payment system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Health Care Finance: Notice of Final Rulemaking - 04/01/2014

“These final rules establish standards governing the participation requirements for providers who provide supported employment services to participants in the Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) and to establish conditions of participation for providers."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC HCBS Waiver MR DD (0307.R04.00) (1915c) - 11/20/2012

~~Provides day habilitation, employment readiness, in-home supports, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment, personal care services, skilled nursing, assistive technology services, behavioral supports, companion services, creative arts therapies, dental, family training, host, home, individualized day supports, occupational therapy, one-time transitional services, parenting supports, physical therapy, small group supported employment, speech, hearing and language services, supported living with transportation, supported living, wellness services for individuals with ID/DD ages 18+ no max

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan Amendments

When D.C  plans to make a change to its Medicaid program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. This webpage include D.Cs Medicaid state plan amendments.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is the agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that D.C will administer its Medicaid program.  The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.    It  also gives an assurance that a state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities.     
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC HCBS Waiver Program

"Home and Community Based (HCBS) Services waiver program is jointly funded with federal and local dollars. The federal government reimburses the District of Columbia 70 cents for every one dollar spent for qualifying services and supports for people enrolled in the HCBS waiver program. All supports and services provided through the DDA service delivery system are funded through the waiver program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

States - Phone

Snapshot

With the motto "Justice for All," the District of Columbia is committed to equal rights and opportunities for all people with disabilities, especially when it comes to Employment First and career success.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Washington D.C.’s VR Rates and Services

2016 State Population.
1.31%
Change from
2015 to 2016
681,170
2016 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-0.75%
Change from
2015 to 2016
44,921
2016 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
7.05%
Change from
2015 to 2016
15,292
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
7.73%
Change from
2015 to 2016
34.04%
2016 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.57%
Change from
2015 to 2016
77.09%

State Data

General

2016
Population. 681,170
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 44,921
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 15,292
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 330,700
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.04%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.09%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.00%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 31.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 31,870
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 43,913
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 14,902
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 55,854
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 4,694
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,267
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 1,719
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 1,735

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 810
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 14,451

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. N/A
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). N/A
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. N/A
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. N/A
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,751
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 14
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 5
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 36.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.74

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,385
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 32,491
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,540,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $22,905,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $4,490,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 10.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 363
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,111
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 25.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 55.61%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 17.38%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 10.04%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 63.00%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 12.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 18.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 32.96%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 6.49%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 352,814
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 240
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 339,475
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 228
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 228
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,891,549

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 31
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 31

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program/Employment First Initiative

~~As part of the technical assistance that will be provided through this program, technical assistance is being provided to some of our community rehabilitation providers. In addition, our counselors will receive training on how to better engage with providers in partnership to help people with most significant disabilities achieve employment outcomes.  (Page 258)
Strategy 1: Increase the number of SSI/DI recipients referred for Benefits Counseling;
Strategy 2: Encourage enrollment in short–term training/certificate Workforce Development programs offered by community colleges the DC metropolitan area.
Strategy 3: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community.
Strategy 4: Increase the use of Customized Employment enabling persons with significant disabilities the opportunity to achieve successful employment outcomes. (Page 260)
In addition, this counselor will participate in all Employment First training, in order to be familiar with customized employment services available to  DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. In the summer of 2015, DCRSA and the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) worked closely to make necessary changes. (Pages 256- 266)
 

Customized Employment

~~Benefits planning
• Partnership Plus model for extended service provision
• Expand scope of employment readiness workshops
• Education campaign for local employers regarding the hiring of persons with blindness
• Training for BRU staff around job carving/customized employment model
• Examine case recording process for identification of the receipt of SSI/DI by consumers to ensure accuracy (Page 236)
Objective 2.2 –   Retain, train, and recruit experienced and qualified VR staff and service providers to improve services to the low incidence populations, including people who are blind, deafblind, have autism or other autism spectrum disorders.
Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. Provide continuous training to staff on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
2. Provide continuous training to service providers on customized employment policies, procedures, protocols, and best practices.
3. Develop and implement outreach plan to recruit providers, who can provide services to low incidence populations.
4. Develop and implement outreach plan on DCRSA services to the low incidence population. (Page 244)
In FY 2015, DCRSA established new agreements with all job placement and supported employment providers. These are performance based agreements. Some changes were made in the payment structure in order more closely align payment to the providers with successful employment placements. In addition, we added payment support to supported employment providers to provide Discovery Assessments and Customized Employment. The District is also currently participating in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. USOR develops and improves pathways providing increased alternative training models and options. (Page 257-258)
DCRSA clients and participate in customized employment assessment and discovery training. DCRSA made a number of changes throughout FY 2015 because we were not achieving the identified goals. In the summer of 2015, DCRSA and the Department of Behavioral Health (DBH) worked closely to make necessary changes. First, DCRSA identified one counselor to handle all existing Evidence Based Supported Employment cases. (Page 266)
In addition, in new human care agreements issued in FY 2015, DCRSA included Discovery Assessment and Customized Employment as services in our supported employment agreements. Other consumers may require a job coach model for their initial placement but do not require the extended services as provided under the provisions of supported employment services. (Page 268)
Indicator 1.3 Competitive Employment Outcomes: the percentage of individuals who exit the VR program in employment in integrated settings with hourly rate of earnings equivalent to at least the federal or state minimum wage rate, whichever is higher.
Strategy 1: Continue quarterly CRP meetings to provide a forum for discussions and to ensure all providers are aware of the agency’s policies, regulations and expectations governing the provision of services.
Strategy 2: Continue to develop the agency’s Employment First initiative, a concept designed to facilitate the full inclusion of people with the most significant disabilities in the workplace and community. (Page 259)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. (Page 45)
Most importantly, all of these agencies participated in the development of the Career Pathways Strategic Plan which lays out the framework for an aligned system. Moving forward, the agencies will establish one umbrella MOA for AJC partners. (Page 73)
 

DEI/DRC

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Competitive Integrated Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The Administration’s Supported Employment program (SE) for persons with persistent mental illness utilizes an evidenced–based approach to help individuals with the most significant disabilities to secure, retain, or regain competitive employment in an integrated setting that pays minimum or better wages, and provides benefits. Supported Employment services are individualized and include, but are not limited to:
• Counseling and guidance
• Job coaching (on–the–job training)
• Rapid job search and placement
• Short–term training
• Follow–along (unlimited supports)
• Development of natural supports. (Page 224)
Pursuant to DOES Policy 300.20-4, AJC Reasonable Accommodation Policy, qualified individuals with disabilities will be given a meaningful opportunity to participate in and benefit from aid, benefits, services, or training, including core, intensive, training, and supportive services. (Page 146)
II. Needs of persons with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment
• Benefits planning for Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSI/DI) beneficiaries
• Need for increased and improved supported employment (SE) providers and services
 SE services for persons with mental health impairments
 extended service provider for mental health
 Train staff on role of DBH as an extended service provider
• Holistic approach to VR process
 Holistic assessment at intake
 Housing
 Improved literacy
 Sobriety
 Training programs
 Benefits planning
• Partnership Plus model for extended service provision
• Expand scope of employment readiness workshops
• Education campaign for local employers regarding the hiring of persons with blindness
• Training for BRU staff around job carving/customized employment model
• Examine case recording process for identification of the receipt of SSI/DI by consumers to ensure accuracy (Page 236)
Objective 1.2 Increase outreach to people with HIV in order to increase the number of people with HIV served by DCRSA and the number of successful employment outcomes achieved by people with HIV.
Strategies: DCRSA will:
1. In support of the Mayor’s initiative to reduce HIV infections in the City and improve outcomes for people with HIV, DCRSA will expand outreach to at least two community based AIDS services providers in order to provide VR services at their location.
2. Provide benefits counseling orientation to staff and clients at the identified community based AIDS services providers.
3. Train staff to ensure that counselors are properly tracking people with HIV who are served by the agency. (Page 241)
Performance by June 30, 2017:
a. Complete a solicitation to identify an appropriate training provider who understands person centered training and has experience in using this in the VR process.
b. Identify a training provider who can provide training for VR and provider agency staff, and provide “train the trainer” sessions, to increase capability of DCRSA to provide this on an ongoing basis.
c. All general VR and sensory unit intakes will complete the eCASAS assessment as part of their intake and eligibility determination.
d. Increase the number of people who receive job readiness training by 10%.
e. Ensure that at least 250 people receive benefits counseling/orientation each quarter (the agency currently serves approximately 1700 people who receive SSI/SSDI). (Page 243)
 (Pages 244, 246, 257, 260)
 

Career Pathways

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Adult Education and Vocational Rehabilitation Capacity Fails to Meet Demand - A recent policy brief noted that DC’s investments in adult education and career pathways skill building are insufficient to meet the demand for these services, as evidenced by waiting lists for many programs and the significant need for these services (see workforce analyses above)[3]. OSSE AFE also cited capacity as a challenge, despite increased enrollment and provider offerings in recent years. DDS/RSA has also noted increased demand for their services that has resulted in requests for additional funding and the possible need for more priority of service considerations. (Page 43) 
Overall, it is essential that we work as full partners in a workforce development system that efficiently and effectively allocates resources to assist all people to enter the workforce, especially those with significant barriers, including people with disabilities. In order to make best use of resources and ensure we are able to serve District residents to capacity, we must continue to truly integrate services and adopt career pathways with linkages between partners and programs. Through these efforts, we will be able to increase our capacity to better serve District residents, reduce duplication of services and streamline funding through shared contracts and blending and braiding of funding. The District will continue to strategize how to leverage funding across all of the WIOA Titles to meet as much of the Workforce Development and adult education needs of District residents as possible. Additionally, the District will continue to engage providers, partners, businesses and other key stakeholders in conversations about its efforts to increase the capacity of its providers throughout the implementation of the WIOA State Plan over the next four years. (Page 45) 
The agencies operating the core programs and the required partner programs made strides over the past year to improve coordination of services and jointly plan for the changes called for under WIOA. Members of the District’s Adult Career Pathways Task Force, first convened in December 2014, include leadership from the WIC, DOES, DDS/RSA, DHS, OSSE, DME, DMGEO, DCPS, the DC Council, the Public Charter School Board, the DC Public Library system, and three community-based organizations. Through the work of the Task Force’s Strategic Plan to build a career pathways system in the District, these agencies laid the ground work for how services and programs can better be integrated in order to improve delivery of services for our residents. Much of the content in this WIOA State Plan builds on the work of the Task Force, which will continue to meet quarterly to oversee implementation of the career pathways strategies. (Page 150)
 

Employer Engagement

~~The District of Columbia currently has availability for provision of extended supported employment services through Medicaid only for people with intellectual disabilities and people with serious mental illness or serious emotional disturbance. The Medicaid Waiver in the District for Elderly and Persons with Disabilities does not currently include Supported Employment as a covered service. Furthermore, the District currently has no other Waiver Services to provide extended supported employment services to people with developmental disabilities (e.g., autism, without an intellectual disability), traumatic brain injury, or other physical disabilities. In planning for extended services for these populations, DCRSA must rely on either Ticket to Work Employment Networks or natural supports.  (Page 224)

511

~~.   The development of strategies for aligning technology and data systems across one-stop partner programs to enhance service delivery and improve efficiencies in reporting on performance accountability measures, including the design and implementation of common intake, data collection, case management information, and performance accountability measurement and reporting processes, to improve coordination of services across one-stop partner programs; (Page 68)
1. Student performance, progress and involvement,
2. Instructional Models and Methods,
3. Program Management and Leadership,
4. Data Collection/Reporting. OSSE AFE will monitor and evaluate providers on a monthly and bi-annual basis via desks reviews and onsite monitoring. Eligible providers will be required to: (Page 202)
 

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. (Page 146)
The AJCs will comply with WIA Section 188, Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and current District of Columbia method of administration. This assurance will be incorporated into all grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, or other arrangements whereby WIA funds are made available. (Page 146)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 51 - 59 of 59

DC DDS Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan Amendments

When D.C  plans to make a change to its Medicaid program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. This webpage include D.Cs Medicaid state plan amendments.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is the agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that D.C will administer its Medicaid program.  The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.    It  also gives an assurance that a state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities.     
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Customized Employment

Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.   Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following: DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices; DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers); DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment; and Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Association of the Deaf: Conference - Achieving Employment First

The Achieving Employment First Conference was “held on behalf of Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, St. John's Community Services, District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council, University Legal Services, Protection and Advocacy Services of the District of Columbia, Department on Disability Services, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, and Project Action.” This conference brought “together national and local experts to share innovative ideas and resources to help find meaningful employment for people with significant employment challenges due to their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Developmental Disabilities Council - Final five-year state plan (FY 2012-2016)

The Developmental Disabilities Council of the District of Columbia has a goal to see “young adults and job seekers with disabilities [with] meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages [to] exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security

DC HCBS Waiver Program

"Home and Community Based (HCBS) Services waiver program is jointly funded with federal and local dollars. The federal government reimburses the District of Columbia 70 cents for every one dollar spent for qualifying services and supports for people enrolled in the HCBS waiver program. All supports and services provided through the DDA service delivery system are funded through the waiver program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

DC DDS Person-Centered Thinking Philosophy and Training

“Person-centered thinking is a philosophy behind service provision that supports positive control and self-direction of people’s own lives. Department on Disabilities Services (DDS) is working to implement person-centered thinking through training sessions and other agency wide initiatives.   “Teaching and supporting the use of person-centered thinking skills means that it is likelier that service plans will be used and acted on, that updating service plans will occur ‘naturally,’ needing less effort and time, and that the person’s ability to lead a fulfilling, independent life is maximized.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DDS Customized Employment Efforts

“Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.”

 

“Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following:

DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices;” “DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers);” “DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment;” and “Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

District of Columbia ABLE Legislation (Title 47) - 01/04/2016

To amend, on an emergency basis,  Title 47 of the District of Columbia Official Code to establish a qualified ABLE Program to be known as the ABLE Program Trust, pursuant to the requirements of the federal Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 to exempt from income taxation the earnings on deposit made to an ABLE Program Trust by an eligible individual to assist the individual with certain expenses related to the individual’s blindness or disability.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

District of Columbia ARC Legislation (DC Act 21-203) - 11/23/2015

To amend Title 47 of the District of Columbia Official Code to establish  qualified ABLE Program, to be known as the ABLE Program trust, pursuant to the requirements of the federal Stephen Beck, Jr. achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014 to exempt from income taxation the earnings on deposits made to an ABLE Program Trust by an eligible individual to assist the individual with certain expenses related to the individual's blindness or disability.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

D.C Employment First Proclamation - 10/08/2012

“On October 8, 2012, DC Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring the District of Columbia an Employment First State—the 20th state to do so nationwide. Mayor Gray’s proclamation affirms that ‘employment is an important part of the lives of all working age adults and people with disabilities are a largely untapped resource with skills and talents who can meet the needs of area business and employers.’ Under the Employment First philosophy, competitive, integrated employment is the first and overwhelmingly preferred option for working-age youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of the complexity or severity of their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 21 - 23 of 23

D.C. Dept. of Education “Competitive Employment Opportunity (CEO) Program)”

~~“Competitive Employment Opportunities (CEO) consists of preparatory experiences designed to help students with disabilities attain their career and postsecondary training goals. The model aims to expose students to career experiences, and equip them with the knowledge and skills needed to be successful in a postsecondary  environment. A paid postsecondary training program for students, CEO is comprised of 3 academies:

1.Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) Academy – 9th/10th grade students are exposed to work experiences in their field of interest. Students engage in instructional activities that provide a foundation of the skills needed to be successful in the workforce.2.CEO Mentoring & Internship Academy – 11th/12th grade students are paired with a mentor who works in the student's career field of interest. Mentors and students work together to create a "Career-Focused Project" and students attend an 8-part professional development series from January to May. During the summer, students apply skills learned by working an 80 hour internship at their mentor's place of employment.”

.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DC DDS Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

DDA supports individuals with intellectual disabilities to have the most independence and choice and control over their own lives through person-centered service planning and delivery and increased provider capacity. DDA coordinates home and community services for over 2,000 individuals so each person can live and work in the neighborhood of his or her choosing, and promotes health, wellness and a high quality of life through service coordination and monitoring, clinical supports, and a robust quality management program.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C. Developmental Disabilities Council - Final five-year state plan (FY 2012-2016)

The Developmental Disabilities Council of the District of Columbia has a goal to see “young adults and job seekers with disabilities [with] meaningful employment opportunities with competitive wages [to] exhibit their abilities and skills in an inclusive environment working alongside their peers without disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Project Search - 08/14/2017

~~“Project SEARCH Hilton – Capital Area Region (Formerly Embassy Suites—DC) is a one-year “school-to-work” transition program designed to prepare DCPS adult students with intellectual and other developmental disabilities for competitive employment. Project SEARCH Interns receive daily instruction in employability skills and gain hands-on work experiences by rotating among three 10-week unique paid internships at a one of four Hilton Worldwide host site locations. The goal for each student is competitive, integrated employment by the end of the experience.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Citations

Secondary Transition Community of Practice - 06/01/2013

This was launched earlier in 2013 to bring together transition experts from the District’s school system, disability advocacy organizations, direct-service agencies, and transition-aged youth and their parents.  These stakeholders in the transition process meet monthly to collaborate on increasing and improving outcomes for transition-age youth with disabilities as they leave secondary school and pursue work or higher education.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment Learning Community - 10/08/2012

As part of a competitive application process, the District was selected to receive technical assistance through the Employment Learning Community (ELC). A project of the Institute for Community Inclusion in partnership with The National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services and TransCen, Inc, the ELC will provide significant technical assistance on ways to implement Employment First in the District as well as networking and learning opportunities from those other states selected to participate.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First Leadership Consortium of Practice - 10/08/2012

DDS launched an Employment First Leadership Consortium of Practice following the District’s October 2012 declaration as an Employment First state. Consortium members include representatives from District agencies, RSA and DDA providers, and advocacy organizations who are leaders in promoting Employment First practices throughout the District.  Consortium members meet on a monthly basis to discuss new strategies and opportunities for collaboration in implementing and expanding Employment First practices District wide.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C. Association of the Deaf: Conference - Achieving Employment First

The Achieving Employment First Conference was “held on behalf of Georgetown University, Center for Child and Human Development, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, St. John's Community Services, District of Columbia Developmental Disabilities Council, University Legal Services, Protection and Advocacy Services of the District of Columbia, Department on Disability Services, Quality Trust for Individuals with Disabilities, and Project Action.” This conference brought “together national and local experts to share innovative ideas and resources to help find meaningful employment for people with significant employment challenges due to their disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Project SEARCH - 06/22/2018

~~Project SEARCH was originally launched in 1996 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Designed to prepare young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for competitive employment, this one-year “school- to-work” transition program now operates over 400 locations in six countries. The Project SEARCH model includes total workplace immersion. Interns participate in daily classroom instruction and on-the-job training, where they receive feedback from teachers, job coaches and employers. Interns gain hands-on work experience at unique business host sites.DC Project SEARCH is a partnership between SEEC, DC Public Schools, Ivymount School, DC Department on Disability Services / Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the host businesses: National Institutes of Health, Smithsonian Institution, Capital Area Hilton/Embassy Suites DC, and Montgomery County Government. The Project SEARCH program continues to prepare interns with skills that match labor needs in today's integrated workforce.DC Project SEARCH Eligibility Requirements:Young adult between 18-30 years oldHave a documented intellectual/developmental disabilityCompleting final year of high school OR recent high school graduateShow willingness to take risks, accept critical feed-back, and grow in independence (including travel)Show a demonstrated commitment to employment and career readinessStrong attendance record is preferred 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

District of Columbia Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 06/01/2015

2015 NWD System Grantee Summaries:  The coordination of Long-Term Supports and Services (LTSS) in the District of Columbia has been a priority for DC government for several years. DC’s Health and Human Services agencies, in partnership with people in need of LTSS, families, advocates, public/private partners, referral sources and others, will finalize and implement a 3-year plan to transform current systems into a No Wrong Door (NWD) system for all populations and all payers. DC’s goal is to create an LTSS system in which people encounter person- and family centered systems/staff with core competencies that facilitate their connection to formal and informal LTSS, regardless of where they enter the system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC Transforming State Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS)/No Wrong Door Grant - 10/01/2014

“District of Columbia has recently received a No Wrong Door planning grant. Their state team is working to incorporate the LifeCourse Framework as they re-design the front door to long term services and supports as well as the person-centered planning process. The goal is to create a system that supports people and their families to have a good life. At their last team meeting, the group advised on what is work and not working in the system of long term services and supports. This information was shared with the No Wrong Door Leadership Council in order to guide the work as they plan improvements.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

D.C Employment First - 10/08/2012

On October 8, 2012, DC Mayor Vincent Gray issued a proclamation declaring the District of Columbia an Employment First State…Under the Employment First philosophy, competitive, integrated employment is the first and overwhelmingly preferred option for working-age youth and adults with disabilities, regardless of the complexity or severity of their disabilities. The other main tenets of Employment First are that: Employment services are tailored and customized to a person’s needs, interests, and skill set with the ultimate goal of achieving long-term employment in a competitive business or organization, or self-employment. Employment is at the prevailing wage, and never less than minimum wage. The employee has ample opportunities to integrate and interact with his or her coworkers, the public, and/or customers without disabilities.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Customized Employment

Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.   Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following: DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices; DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers); DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment; and Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

DC DDS Person-Centered Thinking Philosophy and Training

“Person-centered thinking is a philosophy behind service provision that supports positive control and self-direction of people’s own lives. Department on Disabilities Services (DDS) is working to implement person-centered thinking through training sessions and other agency wide initiatives.   “Teaching and supporting the use of person-centered thinking skills means that it is likelier that service plans will be used and acted on, that updating service plans will occur ‘naturally,’ needing less effort and time, and that the person’s ability to lead a fulfilling, independent life is maximized.”  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DC DDS Customized Employment Efforts

“Customized Employment is being promoted by the United States Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) as an effective set of techniques to create a win-win for people with disabilities and employers.”

 

“Some of the ways DDS is working to implement and promote Customized Employment in the District include the following:

DDS has launched a Customized Employment Community of Practice for people who are interested in learning customized employment strategies and practices;” “DDS has launched a second Customized Employment Trainers Community of Practice geared specifically for Customized Employment Trainers (i.e., people who have been trained to train others on customized employment, including DDA and RSA staff, job/career coaches, people with disabilities, and area employers);” “DDS is working with TransCen, Inc. to offer a monthly webinar series on implementing different aspects of Customized Employment;” and “Through a grant, a DDS employment services provider is working with several other DDS provider organizations, providing technical assistance on customized employment through RSA and the Medicaid waiver. The initiative’s end goal is to increase integrated employment and integrated day opportunities for people served by DDA and/or RSA.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Justice Department Reaches Agreement With Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority to Resolve Disability Discrimination Complaint - 03/01/2017

~~“The Justice Department filed a proposed consent decree today to resolve a complaint that the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) discriminated against a job applicant on the basis of his disability, in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The department’s complaint alleges that WMATA extended a job offer as an elevator/escalator parts supervisor to an applicant but withdrew the offer upon learning that the applicant had epilepsy. The complaint further alleges that WMATA failed to discuss with the applicant how his disability might affect his ability to do the job or whether there were any available accommodations that would allow him to do the job.

As part of the consent decree, which is subject to approval by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, WMATA will institute new policies to ensure that employees and job applicants with disabilities have the opportunity to confer with WMATA about their limitations as well as opportunities for reasonable accommodation in the workplace. WMATA will also ensure that supervisors are fully trained in those policies.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Notice of Emergency and Proposed Rulemaking: ID/DD Waiver - 11/24/2017

~~“The Department of Disability Services (DDS), Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA), operates the Medicaid Home and Community–Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) under the supervision of DHCF.  The ID/DD Waiver was approved by the Council of the District of Columbia (Council) and renewed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for a five year period beginning November 20, 2012 and ending November 19, 2017.  An amendment to renew the ID/DD Waiver for another five-year period beginning November 20, 2017 and ending November 19, 2022, was approved by the Council through the Medicaid Assistance Program Emergency Amendment Act  of 2017, effective July 20, 2017 (D.C. Act 22-0104, D.C. Official Code §  1-307.02(a)(11)(D)(2017 Supp.)), and subsequently was sent by DHCF to CMS for its approval. DHCF anticipates that CMS will approve the renewal amendment effective November 20, 2017”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Submitted to CMS: District of Columbia Plan to Comply with New Federal Home and Community Based Services Requirements - 03/25/2017

~~“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS statewide transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan. The District maintains two HCBS waiver programs: the Elderly and Persons with Disabilities (EPD) Waiver, run by the District’s Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF), and the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) waiver, run by the District’s Department of Disability Services (DDS). The EPD waiver program is for the elderly and individuals with physical disabilities who are able to safely receive supportive services in a home and community-based setting. The IDD waiver program provides residential, day/vocational and other support services in the community for District residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Public Notice of Revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan for the District Medicaid Program's Home and Community-Based Services Waivers - 03/13/2017

~~“The Directors of the Department of Health Care Finance (DHCF) and Department on Disability Services (DDS), pursuant to the authority set forth in an Act to enable the District of Columbia to receive federal financial assistance under Title XIX of the Social Security Act for a medical assistance program, and for other purposes, approved December 27, 1967 (81 Stat. 774; D.C. Official Code § 1-307.02) (2012 Repl. & 2013 Supp.)), and Section 6(6) of the Department of Health Care Finance Establishment Act of 2007, effective February 27, 2008 (D.C. Law 17-109; D.C. Official Code § 7-771.05(6) (2012 Repl.)) hereby give notice of their intent to submit revisions to the Statewide Transition Plan (STP) for the District of Columbia Medicaid program’s Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waivers to the Department of Health and Human Services’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and final approval. 

CMS regulations, effective March 17, 2014, and published in 79 Fed. Reg. 2948-3039 (Jan. 16, 2014), changed the definition of home and community-based services settings for HCBS Waiver services and required that DHCF and DDS develop and submit to CMS a transition plan identifying how the HCBS Waivers will be brought into compliance with the new outcome-oriented definition of HCBS settings.  DHCF and DDS submitted a STP to CMS on March 17, 2015.  That plan is available online on the DHCF website at: https://dhcf.dc.gov/release/announcement-submitted-cms-district-columbia-plan-comply-new-federal-home-and-community  and the DDS website at: http://dds.dc.gov/publication/dc-statewide-transition-plan-3-17-2015

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C. HCBS Waiver Transition Plan - 03/17/2015

"The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule effective March 17, 2014, that contains a new, outcome-oriented definition of home and community-based services (HCBS) settings. The purpose of the federal regulation, in part, is to ensure that people receive Medicaid HCBS in settings that are integrated in and support full access to the greater community. This includes opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive and integrated settings, engage in community life, control personal resources, and receive services in the community to the same degree as people who do not receive HCBS. CMS expects all states to develop an HCBS transition plan that provides a comprehensive assessment of potential gaps in compliance with the new regulation, as well as strategies, timelines, and milestones for becoming compliant with the rule’s requirements. CMS further requires that states seek input from the public in the development of this transition plan."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REQUEST FOR INFORMATION: DCJM-2015-I-0003 Community Rehabilitation Provider Milestone Payment System - 08/14/2014

A request to the field for feedback and information on adequate rate structures for the performance of an array of employment-related services, including Customized Employment and Customized Employment Planning. The plan also outlines a draft Milestone and Incentive payment system.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Health Care Finance: Notice of Final Rulemaking - 04/01/2014

“These final rules establish standards governing the participation requirements for providers who provide supported employment services to participants in the Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD Waiver) and to establish conditions of participation for providers."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC HCBS Waiver MR DD (0307.R04.00) (1915c) - 11/20/2012

~~Provides day habilitation, employment readiness, in-home supports, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment, personal care services, skilled nursing, assistive technology services, behavioral supports, companion services, creative arts therapies, dental, family training, host, home, individualized day supports, occupational therapy, one-time transitional services, parenting supports, physical therapy, small group supported employment, speech, hearing and language services, supported living with transportation, supported living, wellness services for individuals with ID/DD ages 18+ no max

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan Amendments

When D.C  plans to make a change to its Medicaid program policies or operational approach, states send state plan amendments (SPAs) to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for review and approval. This webpage include D.Cs Medicaid state plan amendments.  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

D.C Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid state plan is the agreement between a state and the Federal government describing how that D.C will administer its Medicaid program.  The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.    It  also gives an assurance that a state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities.     
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

DC HCBS Waiver Program

"Home and Community Based (HCBS) Services waiver program is jointly funded with federal and local dollars. The federal government reimburses the District of Columbia 70 cents for every one dollar spent for qualifying services and supports for people enrolled in the HCBS waiver program. All supports and services provided through the DDA service delivery system are funded through the waiver program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging