West Virginia

States - Big Screen

The Mountain State of West Virginia is "Open for Business", and as such is ripe for the benefits of Employment First systems-change efforts as a way to improve socioeconomic outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon West Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
-0.34%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,844,128
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-6.75%
Change from
2014 to 2015
187,077
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.49%
Change from
2014 to 2015
47,517
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-0.67%
Change from
2014 to 2015
25.40%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-1.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
69.75%

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 1,854,304 1,850,326 1,844,128
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 205,141 199,707 187,077
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 51,995 51,074 47,517
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 655,158 647,970 643,270
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 25.35% 25.57% 25.40%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 70.63% 70.51% 69.75%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.70% 6.50% 6.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.20% 24.90% 22.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.00% 16.60% 16.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 187,342 179,417 182,889
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 181,641 183,030 168,797
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 349,810 344,523 335,192
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 9,501 11,408 10,904
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 2,345 3,018 2,234
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,748 747
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 432 1,018 598
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 7,351 3,584 3,792
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,154 2,054 2,070
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.70% 2.70% 2.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 95,060 93,837 91,995

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,992 2,375 8,465
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 19,002 12,220 14,965
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 38,749 19,557 40,645
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.50% 1,201.00% 20.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 0.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 10.00% 8.70% 10.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 1.10% 2.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A 1
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 3,723 3,852 2,228
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 395 466 565
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,673 2,694 2,647
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.03 0.03

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 13 8 13
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 9
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 54.00% 75.00% 69.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.38 0.32 0.49

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
5,082
3,801
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 163 187 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,702 920 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,614 1,107 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 934 874 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 618 636 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 51 77 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 50.70% 40.50% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 2,384 2,607
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 151,745 149,357
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 93 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 144 124 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A N/A $551,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A N/A $45,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A N/A $21,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A N/A $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 43.00% 41.00% 38.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A N/A 2,195
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A 11 19
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,464 1,238 1,360
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 51.80 47.40 44.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.90% 64.00% 63.88%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.70% 8.20% 8.03%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.70% 1.84% 1.74%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 90.50% 98.41% 96.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 15.00% 15.59% 13.65%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 49.30% 52.85% 44.25%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.70% 64.89% 67.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.30% 37.25% 30.60%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 979,277
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,319
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,851
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 313,739
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 315,590
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 254
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 294
AbilityOne wages (products). $11,625
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,283,821

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 18 8 8
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 18 8 8
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 809 276 276
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 809 276 276

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the WVDDC meetings, DRS participates in two subcommittees; Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the Bureau for Behavioral Health on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. These are often individuals that are also XIX Medicaid Waiver eligible. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

DRS counselors will, at the time of application, gather information regarding an individual’s third party resources, including Medicaid. If it is determined that the individual receives Medicaid benefits, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual, regardless of that individual’s continued status with DRS. If an individual is approved to receive services from DRS, and begins to receive Medicaid benefits at a later time, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual from that time forward. No specific disability related information found. (Page 249)

(WVDDC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs. (Page 250)

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the WVDDC meetings, DRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the Bureau for Behavioral Health on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. These are often individuals that are also XIX Medicaid Waiver eligible. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes. (Page 252)  

Customized Employment
  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs.
  • BBHHF and DRS will work together in mediating problems in cases being served jointly in the programs.
  • DRS will meet monthly with BBHHF staff to review applicants for an Unmet Needs funding program to foster assistance to IDD individuals where traditional funding sources do not provide needed supports.
  • Individuals receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time.
  • (Page 250)
  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs.
  • BBHHF and DRS will work together in mediating problems in cases being served jointly in the programs.
  • DRS will meet monthly with BBHHF staff to review applicants for an Unmet Needs funding program to foster assistance to IDD individuals where traditional funding sources do not provide needed supports.
  • Individuals receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time. 

In order to provide quality and timely vocational rehabilitation services to West Virginians with behavioral health conditions who qualify, DRS collaborates with the BBHHF and its partners. BBHHF is the federally designated Single State Authority for mental health and substance use disorders and operates under the auspices of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. The primary programs within BBHHF and their partners that DRS works with are as follows: 

  • The Office of Consumer Affairs and Community Outreach (CACO), is charged with providing collaborative support to the clinical section of the Office of Programs through the provision of legislative tracking, disaster coordination and response, development and operation of a Consumer Advisory Council, coordination of BBHHF training activities, researching and circulating information on evidence–based and emerging best practices, development of health promotion and wellness campaigns, researching and applying for high priority discretionary grants, and by providing a centralized response to requests for assistance and patient grievances. DRS maintains a relationship with this office and has worked together on anti–stigma campaigns, supporting recovery coaching and peer support, and training in the area of mental health first aid and medication assisted treatment. (Page 253)
Braiding/Blending Resources
  • Creating cross–system data capacity: using diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and also, the use performance data to assess the value of those investments.
  • Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. 

This State Plan provides the policy framework and direction for day–to–day operations of WIOA funded programs. The role of state agency and state department plan partners under this plan is to provide policy direction, program oversight, support, and technical assistance for and to local and regional service providers covered by the plan. State plan partners include the following: 

  • WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV)
  • West Virginia Workforce Development Board (WDB)
  • West Virginia Community and Technical College System (CTCS)
  • West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE)
  • West Virginia State Board of Education (SBE)
  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS)
  • West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR)
  • Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development (Page 51)
  • The braiding of WIOA Title I–B funded programs with other youth–directed state and local entities allows comprehensive services to be offered to all eligible low–income populations under WIOA. Available TANF funding will continue to support WIOA year–round services and summer employment activities.
  • Applicants for Title II funds are required to describe how they will align services with local workforce development plans and how they will coordinate with other available education, training, and social services in the community. Alignment with LWDB’s goals is required for funding.
  • Perkins postsecondary providers assist job seekers in identifying their interests and abilities and aligning these skills needs to training and financial resources to assist with training. Training is linked to the state’s high–demand jobs and is designed to lead to credential attainment. Both credential attainment and high–demand jobs alignment assist job seekers in securing employment with family–sustaining wages.(Page 72) 

DRS works with a variety of non–educational agencies serving out–of–school youth. The primary coordinated activities serving this population are with WIOA partners – WorkForce WV and the regional workforce development boards. DRS strives to coordinate referrals and services to eligible out–of–school youth served by the WIOA youth programs that are overseen by WorkForce WV and the regional workforce development boards. These partnerships allow for improved service delivery through the blending of resources and expertise among the agencies. For example, sharing costs allows DRS and other agencies to enhance outreach efforts, serve increased numbers of out–of–school youth, and improve outcomes for participants.

In addition to DRS’ reliance on WIOA partners in serving out–of–school youth, the agency continues to use community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) that have become a DRS–acknowledged vendor, to support the needs of this population across the state. (Page 228)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Section 188 of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act ensures nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for various categories of persons, including persons with disabilities, who apply for and participate in programs and activities operated by recipients of WIA Title I financial assistance. WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV) will use the "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: A Section 188 Disability Reference Guide” as a boilerplate in assuring compliance with Section 188 of WIOA. The Guide is designed to ensure meaningful participation of people with disabilities in programs and activities operated by recipients of financial assistance under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including those that are part of the One–Stop Center Network.

The Guide outlines promising practices in the provision of universal access and equal opportunity to programs and activities under WIOA. WorkForce West Virginia will use the Guide to monitor its own compliance, and that of its recipients, with the aspects of Section 188 and its implementing regulations that pertain to persons with disabilities. Through the monitoring process, WorkForce West Virginia can identify the disability–related requirements imposed by Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 38, to ensure equal access to programs and services under WIOA for people with disabilities. (Page 122)

7. The State has taken the appropriate action to be in compliance with WIOA section 188, Nondiscrimination, as applicable; Yes (Page 125)

Adherence to Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status and gender identity), national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or participation in any WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. By assuring adherence to Section 188 of WIOA, also assures acceptance to Title VI and title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; The Age Discrimination Act of 1975; Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

Adherence to the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, which prohibits the exclusion, on the basis of disability, from participation in or denial of the benefits of services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any public entity.

Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements (29 CFR, Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98): WIOA funded grantees certify that it will prove a drug-free workplace by notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the workplace and specifying the actions taken against employees for violation of such prohibition. Grantees certify that it will make a good faith effort to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of 28 CFR Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98. (Page 373)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

In addition to having a certified full–time WVABE SPOKES instructor, and in some cases a part time WVABE SPOKES instructor, the SPOKES program may have access to a career development consultant (CDC) and share a blended classroom with an ABE instructor.

Programs are encouraged to pilot and implement additional evidence and research–based strategies for college and career pathways that meet the goals of this plan.

Pursuant to WIOA, WorkForce West Virginia is required to allocate 75% of its local area youth funds to out–of–school youth. These funds are used to carry out programs that provide the following elements: (Page 162)

Other priorities for this funding cycle include facilitating the implementation of models for integrated education and training and continuing to grow the bridge and career pathways program models. Additionally, some funds will be used for the permissible activity of the development and implementation of a system to assist in the transition from adult education to post-secondary education and training, including linkages with postsecondary educational institutions or institutions of higher education, is another priority. The development and piloting of strategies for improving teacher quality and retention are critical to the long-term success of adult education, and best practices in these areas are provided through WV Adult Education Professional Development. The development and implementation of programs and services to meet the needs of adult learners with learning disabilities or English language learners, which may include new and promising assessment tools and strategies based on scientifically valid research, are included in the professional development activities provided to grant recipients. (Page 200)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

The group of 20 to 24 year olds contains an estimated number of 122,531. Of these, 66.9 percent are in the labor force with an estimated 58.4 percent employed. The corresponding unemployment rate is 12.6 percent. In 2014, 97 unemployed within the age range of 19 to 24 exhausted unemployment benefits. In 2015, that number had risen to 227.

The group of 25 to 44 year olds contains 447,092, the largest number among all age groups. Approximately 74.7 percent are in the labor force, with 69.0 percent employed. The unemployment rate for this group is 7.3 percent. In 2014, 931 unemployed within the age range of 25 to 44 exhausted unemployment benefits. That number rose to 1,652 in 2015. (Page 19)

The West Virginia population age 16 and over for whom the poverty status is determined during the 2014 survey is estimated to be 1,464,695, with 343,308 estimated to have a disability and 1,121,387 having no disability. Approximately 16.7 percent of this total civilian non–institutionalized population was below 100 percent of the poverty level. An estimated 24.0 percent of those having a disability are found in this group. Those at 100 to 149 percent of the poverty level registered at 10.2 percent. An estimated 14.6 percent of those with a disability are contained in this group. Persons at or above 150 percent of the poverty level are estimated at 73.1 percent. An estimated 61.4 percent of individuals with a disability are found in this group. In 2014, the number of unemployed with a disability who exhausted their unemployment benefits was 31. This number nearly doubled to 59 in 2015. (Page 20)

  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services strives to align its activities and services with other agencies, including WIOA partners. Because West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services provides services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), many alignment activities occur on the individual consumer level. West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services’ Client Services Manual Section 2501.3 requires VR counselors to assess and utilize, if appropriate, any third party comparable benefits and services. Furthermore, the Client Services Manual Section 3502.13 allows West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services consumers to request the VR counselor to participate in the arrangement and coordination of services not included in the IPE if those services are available from third party resources without cost to West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services and the VR counselor determines that the services would be appropriate to assist the individual in securing employment. One example of this alignment occurs with West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services consumers that choose to receive four–year and/or community college training; consumers must utilize grants and other non–loan resources prior to West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services providing financial support.
  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is mandated not only to coordinate services and resources with comparable services and benefits providers, but also to collect and report these data (any involvement with a comparable services benefits provider in relation to 33 service categories) to the federal Rehabilitation Services Administration at the individual consumer level. The collection, monitoring, and evaluation of these data allow West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services to ensure coordination and alignment is taking place across the state.  (Page 73)

Programs like these bring together employers, job seekers, and WIOA partner agencies. By identifying the needs of employers and sharing resources to train individuals, the state as a whole benefits from the West Virginia WDS. Community colleges and technical schools have a unique ability to specialize programs across the state depending on the demands of the local economy, including the needs of employers and job seekers. For example, in 2015, Proctor and Gamble announced a large production facility to be built in West Virginia; the facility will provide up to 700 jobs. From the Governor’s announcement about the project:

“These are good–paying jobs with great benefits,” Governor Tomblin said. “And P&G is a world–class company that’s committed to hiring skilled West Virginia workers. Through a partnership with Blue Ridge Community and Technical College, P&G is working hard to train its new employees and provide them with the skills they need to succeed in today’s jobs and those that will be available well into the future.” (page 78)

In serving veterans, DRS will continue to work closely with the Department of Education and student veteran organizations at colleges, universities, trade schools and other institutions of higher learning to create “veteran friendly” learning environments. The state will continue to support partners in education with focused outreach and coordination with community partners while supporting veterans and their family members to take full advantage of educational benefits that they have earned. This alignment of services will leverage these education and training platforms to focus on job skills that meet the needs of employers within the regions. Education will coordinate with partners to link employers to these educational institutions and programs to ensure that we graduate skilled applicants who have the greatest potential to move successfully into employment. (Page 82)

In addition, those selected to participate in UI Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) will receive all of the mandatory program components to include the creation of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) and additional services such as job search workshops, job search assistance or referrals to other partner programs. The RESEA workshop is designed to motivate and encourage those likely to exhaust benefits by exploring previous work experience, accomplishments and unique skill sets and how to effectively use while job searching. During the workshop individuals identify strengths and skill sets, set short and long term goals, begin developing a job search plan, and effectively network both in person and using social media. (Page 171)

DRS Response to Observation/Recommendation 4: DRS agrees with the importance of quality relationships with higher education institutions in better serving TY with disabilities. Several strategies to improve strategies to TY have been developed and utilized to establish and maintain working relationships with key stakeholders, including institutions of higher education. DRS works with secondary schools and institutions of higher education in many ways to form partnerships and better serve TY with disabilities. In addition to covering all high schools in the state, DRS has liaison counselors assigned to institutions of higher education including colleges, universities, and vocational/technical centers across the state. DRS staff members also attend and present at the annual West Virginia Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators Conference to increase awareness and knowledge of DRS services to higher education staff members statewide. To ensure DRS transition counselors are aware of changes in higher education, a representative from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission presented at the annual DRS Transition Conference. DRS will continue to explore this recommendation to assess the potential benefits and impact of a committee comprised of DRS staff, SRC members, educators, and other pertinent parties. DRS will also explore additional methods of information dissemination such as the use of its higher education liaisons and email list–servs. (Page 224)

DRS offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Additionally, counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. In FY 2015, DRS re–structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre–employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities. (Page 232)

  1. Obtain written parental consent; and
  2. Inform the parent that their refusal to permit the district to access the private insurance does not relieve the district of its responsibility to ensure that all required services are provided at no cost. 

Public Insurance Funds: Education may use the Medicaid or other public insurance benefits programs in which a student participates to provide or pay for services required. With regard to services required to provide FAPE to an eligible student under this part, Education may not: 

  1. Require parents to sign up for or enroll in public benefits or insurance programs in order for their child to receive FAPE under IDEA regulations;
  2. Require parents to incur an out–of–pocket expense, such as the payment of a deductible or co–pay incurred in filing a claim for services provided pursuant to this part, but may pay the cost that the parent otherwise would be required to pay; and
  3. Use a student’s benefits under a public benefits or insurance program if that use would
    1. decrease available lifetime coverage or any other insured benefit;
    2. result in the family paying for services that would otherwise be covered by the public benefits or insurance program and that are required for the child outside of the time the child is in school;
    3. increase premiums or lead to the discontinuation of benefits or insurance; or
    4. risk loss of eligibility for home and community–based waivers, based on aggregate health–related expenditures. (Page 239)

If education is unable to obtain parental consent to use the parent’s private insurance, or public benefits or insurance when the parents would incur a cost for a service specified on their child’s IEP, the district may use Part B funds to pay for services to ensure FAPE. To avoid financial cost to parents who otherwise would consent to use private insurance or public benefits or insurance if the parent would incur a cost, the district may use its Part B funds to pay the cost the parents otherwise would have to pay to use the parents’ benefits insurance (e.g., the deductible or co–pay amounts).

Proceeds from public or private insurance will not be treated as program income as pursuant to 34 CFR §80.25(2). If a district spends reimbursements from Federal funds (e.g., Medicaid) for services under this part, those funds will not be considered "State or local" funds for purposes of the maintenance of effort provisions of Part B of IDEA 2004. (Page 240)

DRS counselors will, at the time of application, gather information regarding an individual’s third party resources, including Medicaid. If it is determined that the individual receives Medicaid benefits, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual, regardless of that individual’s continued status with DRS. If an individual is approved to receive services from DRS, and begins to receive Medicaid benefits at a later time, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual from that time forward.

Individuals receiving services from BMS will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BMS expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time. Similarly, DRS consumers who are Medicaid–eligible will be referred to BMS.

DRS also maintains an MOU with the Division of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD), within the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF), the State agency with primary responsibility for providing services and supports for individuals with intellectual disabilities and individuals with developmental disabilities. DRS interacts with both BBHHF and its subsidiary, DIDD. (Page 249)

Another major theme from these comments included improvements in information sharing and awareness. This theme was multi–faceted, weaving through multiple types of information to be shared with various stakeholders, including consumers. Several CRPs/CSPs indicated that DRS counselors lacked awareness about services, while some made a recommendation for information–sharing meetings to serve as a remedy for such a deficiency. Other CRPs/CSPs provided comments indicating a need for more consumer–related awareness including greater consideration of the consumers’ needs when selecting services, more information about the consumers at the time of referral, and educating consumers about the effects that employment can have on their other benefits.

Funding, aside from the funding generated from an increase in referrals, was an additional theme found in the comments of CRPs regarding DRS improvement. These comments regarding funding varied, from requests for grant monies to increases in service fees. (Page 295)

  1. DETERMINE WHETHER COMPARABLE SERVICES AND BENEFITS ARE AVAILABLE TO THE INDIVIDUAL IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 101(A)(8) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  2. COMPLY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN INDIVIDUALIZED PLAN FOR EMPLOYMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 102(B) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  3. COMPLY WITH REQUIREMENTS REGARDING THE PROVISIONS OF INFORMED CHOICE FOR ALL APPLICANTS AND ELIGIBLE INDIVIDUALS IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 102(D) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  4. PROVIDE VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES TO AMERICAN INDIANS WHO ARE INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES RESIDING IN THE STATE, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 101(A)(13) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT. (Page 361)

Adherence to the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, which prohibits the exclusion, on the basis of disability, from participation in or denial of the benefits of services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any public entity.

Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements (29 CFR, Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98): WIOA funded grantees certify that it will prove a drug-free workplace by notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the workplace and specifying the actions taken against employees for violation of such prohibition. Grantees certify that it will make a good faith effort to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of 28 CFR Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98. (Page 373)

School to Work Transition

West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. A greater emphasis is now being placed for counselors to do outreach with these students and their parents/guardians during their sophomore year (rather than their junior year, as was formerly practiced) in order to maximize the counseling opportunities. (Page 156)

DRS offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Additionally, counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. In FY 2015, DRS re–structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre–employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities.(Page 232)

School (PETS) rehabilitation counselors also are invited to participate in IEP meetings. During these meetings the counselor describes DRS services, policies, and procedures as appropriate. The DRS counselor determines the student’s eligibility and order of selection category utilizing information generated from the school, the student, and DRS. Prior to or shortly after the student’s IEP transition meeting occurs, IPE development begins so both the student and counselor have an idea of what rehabilitation services will be necessary to meet the student’s vocational goal. Therefore, if the student needs additional training or assessment prior to vocational goal determination, this information is already collected so that planned rehabilitation services may begin. IPE development and approval for students with disabilities, including those able to be served if DRS is on an order of selection, will begin as early as appropriate during the transition process, but before the student, determined to be eligible, leaves the school setting. (Page 232)

Rehabilitation may be responsible for services that occur outside of the school environment that are vocationally oriented and are specifically intended to prepare the student for post–secondary training or work. Rehabilitation is not responsible for payment of any service that has not been directly agreed to during the development of a student’s IEP and is not included as a service on a student’s IPE for Rehabilitation services. Rehabilitation is not responsible for career development activities that are part of a School to Work initiative within the school system. The responsibility for implementing the requirements of Department of Education Policy 2510 remains with the school system.

The transference to the student of assistive technology devices that have been purchased by the Local Education Agency (LEA) will occur consistent with the surplus equipment policies and regulations in existence within each LEA. After the student has exited the school system, Rehabilitation may reimburse the LEA at a rate in accordance with the surplus equipment policy, dependent upon the student’s continued need or desire for the equipment, the condition of the equipment, and its future usefulness. (Page 240)

Teacher or aide who worked with them throughout high school. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities. STEP methodology allows students to build on previous success with someone they know and trust. In 2014, a Rehabilitation Services Specialist position was added to further expand the program throughout the state. This additional position has yielded excellent progress, with a substantial increase in the number of STEP vendors and increased communication with local school staff across the state in 2015. 

  • Continued to meet with WV Department of Education officials in an effort to develop a system to identify students with disabilities who are at high risk for dropping out of high school and provide information for the One Year Exit Survey.
  • DRS collaborated with WV Office of Institutional Education as well as the Division of Juvenile Services (DJS) to develop a cooperative agreement regarding the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to TY who are institutionalized. In 2015, DRS provided information to DJS staff regarding agency–offered services. (Page 346)
  1. West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council funds;
  2. West Virginia Title XIX––Home and Community–Based Waiver Program for intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) recipients; and
  3. Social Security Administration work incentives programs. 

In implementing school–to–work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks.

Through a combined effort with other disability organizations, $100,000 was appropriated by the West Virginia Legislature for supported employment follow–along services (extended supported employment services). DRS serves as the fiscal agent for these funds. DRS has created program guidelines governing the use of state–appropriated funds for extended services under the supported employment program created by state statute in 1993. The sole use of the state funds attached to this program is to provide extended services for individuals not eligible from any other funding source. All providers of supported employment services may access these funds for individuals who are eligible under the guidelines. At the end of FY 2015, DRS had sponsored 67 individuals in the extended supported employment program so they could maintain and retain their jobs within the community. This figure represents the cooperative efforts of 13 CRPs. (Page 243)

Data Collection

2. Is for the purpose of educational and career advancement. As part of the application process, the Office of Adult Education will collect basic information from the eligible provider (e.g., location, service area, scope of the program, demographics served, demonstrated need, data collection, and fiscal management procedures).

Additionally, each applicant will be required to submit a proposed budget and program design information.

Applicants will be expected to respond to Office of Adult Education priorities and the Title II considerations for funding Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) programs. (Page 189)

12.  Data Collection: The degree to which the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance.

13.  English Language Acquisition and Civics Education: The degree to which the eligible provider has a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs.

  1. Scope: Previously funded programs will be required to provide data demonstrating they have met previously proposed state targets for the required percent of students making a measureable academic gain. Programs must also provide data demonstrating successful transition to post-secondary education or employment by students. For programs not previously funded, programs with data demonstrating student learning gain and successful transition to post-secondary education or employment, especially for individuals with low-levels of literacy, will be given preference. Both measureable skill gain data and transition data must be disaggregated to demonstrate a history of success with students who have low levels of literacy, disabilities (including learning disabilities), or are English language learners. (Page 190)

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on: 

  • The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the fourth quarter after exit from the program;
  • The median earnings of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who obtain a recognized postsecondary credential, or a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, during participation in or within 1 year after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who, during a program year, are in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measurable skill gains toward such a credential or employment; (Page 308)

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on: (Page 327)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Again, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is already providing services that will allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work–based learning. We partner with employers to provide work–based training, and on the job training. This training is provided across all sectors of employment and ensures job–driven training rather than erroneous skills training.

Other:

  • Development of apprenticeship training programs
  • Alignment and expansion of entrepreneurship/start–up ventures
  • Promotion of youth entrepreneurship in our school system (Page 46)
Career Pathways

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development 

It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and training for skills that lead to quality employment in high–demand jobs or entry–level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low–skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth enter the labor force and/or advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. (Page 47)

  • The State will work with employer partnerships, community colleges, secondary and post–secondary certificate granting schools and LWDBs to establish micro– credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities. A component of this effort will include sharing best practices with the intent of scaling the effort statewide.
  • The State will promote the development of Registered Apprenticeship programs, with a focus on non–traditional industries and occupations. The state will also support efforts of existing Registered Apprenticeship programs to recruit female and minority apprentices. The Office of Apprenticeship will provide technical assistance to grantees and will promote the creation and growth of apprenticeship programs beyond the grantees. (Page 65)

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development 

It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and training for skills that lead to quality employment in high–demand jobs or entry–level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low–skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. 

  • The State will continue to refine the Sector Partnership program to ensure career pathways are aligned to occupations that are high–demand, have higher skill needs and are likely to pay family–sustaining wages. The State will consult with LWDBs and engage employers to accomplish this goal.
  • The State will also support placement of individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, into quality entry–level jobs that provide the work experience and non–technical skills necessary to lead to employment in high– demand jobs, and will consult with LWDBs and engage employers to identify the career pathways for which such quality entry–level jobs can serve as pre–bridge and bridge models. (Page 66)
Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 362)

Displaying 1 - 10 of 38

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WV Adult Ed Instructor Handbook 2017-18 Section 16 SPOKES Program - 07/27/2017

Intense Job Search (Job Development and Follow-up)

“A Career Development Consultant (CDC) may be available to a program to provide assistance with enhancing the learner’s job readiness skills, as well provide job development and follow-up. While participating in SPOKES, especially during this component, the CDC may direct and assist students in their job search activities where applicable. The Career Development Consultant may provide up to six months of follow-up activities for students who gain unsubsidized employment. When students are assigned job development activities outside of the class, the CDC may be officially responsible for these activities and class time is still maintained at the SPOKES class. Coordinated efforts between a CDC, the regional adult education coordinator or designee, and the SPOKES instructor(s) are vital during this component.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Policy 2419: Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities - 04/13/2017

“The West Virginia Procedures Manual for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities outlines the policies and procedures districts must follow in meeting the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), West Virginia State Code, Chapter 18, Article 20 and Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities (2419).

To receive federal funds available under IDEA 2004, districts must adopt and implement appropriate special education policies and procedures. These policies and procedures must be consistent with federal and state laws, rules, regulations and legal requirements and must be approved by the West Virginia Department of Education…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (2017) - 10/01/2016

The plan shall be reviewed and revised not less than once every three years, to ensure the existence of appropriate planning, financial support and coordination, and other assistance to appropriately address, on a statewide and comprehensive basis, the needs in the State for: – The provision of State independent living services; – The development and support of a statewide network of centers for independent living; and – Working relationships between programs providing independent living services and independent living centers, the vocational rehabilitation program established under title I, and other programs providing services for individuals with disabilities. 34 CFR 364.20(f)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2016 Vocational Rehabilitation Section of WOIA State Plan (Draft 12/2015) - 12/11/2015

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the DDPC meetings, WVDRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large…    The DIDD program manager and WVDRS will interact regularly as part of the WV Developmental Disability Planning Council (DDPC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, WVDRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Diversifying Perspectives Art Contest - 09/03/2015

“The artwork selected as the Grand Exhibitor has been incorporated into a poster promoting National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a national campaign that raises awareness about disability employment issues and celebrates the many and varied contributions of America's workers with disabilities. Held annually in October, this year's theme is ‘My disability is one part of who I am.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

West Virginia Code Chapter 18 Article 101: West Virginia Supported Employment Program

“This section of the WV Code establishes a supported employment program, to be administered by the Division of Rehabilitative Services, with the goal of increasing employment for people with severe disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 19

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WV Adult Ed Instructor Handbook 2017-18 Section 16 SPOKES Program - 07/27/2017

Intense Job Search (Job Development and Follow-up)

“A Career Development Consultant (CDC) may be available to a program to provide assistance with enhancing the learner’s job readiness skills, as well provide job development and follow-up. While participating in SPOKES, especially during this component, the CDC may direct and assist students in their job search activities where applicable. The Career Development Consultant may provide up to six months of follow-up activities for students who gain unsubsidized employment. When students are assigned job development activities outside of the class, the CDC may be officially responsible for these activities and class time is still maintained at the SPOKES class. Coordinated efforts between a CDC, the regional adult education coordinator or designee, and the SPOKES instructor(s) are vital during this component.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Policy 2419: Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities - 04/13/2017

“The West Virginia Procedures Manual for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities outlines the policies and procedures districts must follow in meeting the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), West Virginia State Code, Chapter 18, Article 20 and Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities (2419).

To receive federal funds available under IDEA 2004, districts must adopt and implement appropriate special education policies and procedures. These policies and procedures must be consistent with federal and state laws, rules, regulations and legal requirements and must be approved by the West Virginia Department of Education…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (2017) - 10/01/2016

The plan shall be reviewed and revised not less than once every three years, to ensure the existence of appropriate planning, financial support and coordination, and other assistance to appropriately address, on a statewide and comprehensive basis, the needs in the State for: – The provision of State independent living services; – The development and support of a statewide network of centers for independent living; and – Working relationships between programs providing independent living services and independent living centers, the vocational rehabilitation program established under title I, and other programs providing services for individuals with disabilities. 34 CFR 364.20(f)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2016 Vocational Rehabilitation Section of WOIA State Plan (Draft 12/2015) - 12/11/2015

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the DDPC meetings, WVDRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large…    The DIDD program manager and WVDRS will interact regularly as part of the WV Developmental Disability Planning Council (DDPC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, WVDRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Diversifying Perspectives Art Contest - 09/03/2015

“The artwork selected as the Grand Exhibitor has been incorporated into a poster promoting National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a national campaign that raises awareness about disability employment issues and celebrates the many and varied contributions of America's workers with disabilities. Held annually in October, this year's theme is ‘My disability is one part of who I am.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

DVRS Supported Employment definition - 09/01/2014

Supported employment enables clients with the most significant disabilities to enter or retain competitive employment in an integrated work setting. Individuals eligible for this program need intensive job site training/job coaching and ongoing support services in order to perform their work after job placement and case closure occurs. Supported employment services shall be purchased only from Division-acknowledged service providers in accordance with the Division’s fee schedule.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education

West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council Five Year State Plan FFY 2017-2021 - 12/30/2013

“The West Virginia Council coordinated activities during the Fall of 2015 and Spring of 2016 that encouraged people to provide their views on a wide range of issues affecting people with developmental disabilities and their families. Nearly six hundred (600) people participated in thirteen (13) public forums, eight (8) focus groups or completed the Council Service Needs Survey with approximately 70% people with I/DD or family members taking part in the needs gathering activities.

This Plan seeks to strengthen advocacy and self-advocacy coalitions; improve how public services are provided to people with I/DD and their families; provide greater assurances that people with I/DD will be protected from abuse, isolation and neglect; improve opportunities for children to be educated in inclusive classrooms; facilitate efforts to improve supports for people who want to work; and assist and support communities in welcoming people with I/DD.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Workforce West Virginia Interagency Collaborative Team Memorandum of Understanding 2016-2017 - 09/01/2014

 

“West Virginia state agencies effectively collaborating to define, build and sustain an integrated comprehensive workforce development system that: Ensures universal access; has the right agency doing the right job; focuses on meeting the customer requirements; is uniform, consistent and responsive; advances a seamless delivery system that maximizes resources; remains flexible, yet expandable to grow; and fosters a continuous improvement culture for quality and innovation.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding between the Division of Rehabilitative Services and Department of Education on Transition - 10/30/2012

“The cooperative agreement shall assure that each student with a disability in the state who needs special education and/or vocational rehabilitation services is promptly identified and the appropriate transition services are made available to the individual.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WV Student Transition to Employment Project - 09/01/2012

 

“The Student Transition to Employment (STEP) Project is designed to train special education teachers and aides to become vendors with the WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS). Working in close partnership with the WVDRS School Counselor, this unique project allows for individuals with disabilities who are graduating from high school to receive job placement and training from the teacher or aide who worked with them throughout their high school careers. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities… STEP was made possible thanks to funding received from the WV Developmental Disabilities Council and WVDRS.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

WV Comprehensive Employment Systems Infrastructure Development (CES-ID) Grant - 12/01/2006

 

“A diverse team of agency administrators, partner organizations, and technical assistance providers collaborated to begin the process of creating a comprehensive and coordinated statewide employment support system. This map is the first product of the process and identifies “enabling prerequisites” for creating a more detailed strategic plan. Ten goals are articulated as guidelines for further progress.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SSA Youth Transition Demonstration: West Virginia Youth Works

 

“Human Resource Development Foundation, Inc. and the West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities partner to administer West Virginia Youth Works, which provides customized services and supports to SSI recipients, ages 15 to 25, in 19 counties. Services include assessment, planning, work experiences, job development, job placement support, benefits planning and counseling, and job retention services. The project enrolled 404 youths. YTD services ended March 2012.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

 

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Money Follows the Person – Take me home

  “West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”   “West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who:  Are elderly (65 and older);  Have a physical disability, or ; Have a serious mental illness.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

West Virginia Department of Education: Career Technical Education for students with disability - 10/01/2013

Career technical education (CTE) programs in West Virginia are designed for all students and prepare them for entering post-secondary education, training or the workforce. CTE Content Skill Sets (CSSs) are based on national industry recognized accreditation and credentialing standards. Many students with disabilities achieve great success in career and technical education programs with minimal accommodations. It is essential that CTE instructors and special education (SE) case managers collaborate to develop coordinated plans to meet the needs of individual students as indicated in the Individualized Education Program (IEP)

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV Customized Employment Grant

 

“This funding announcement is intended to provide support to agencies that can work with employers in meeting their needs by finding, maintaining and improving the employment status of individuals with disabilities in competitive employment in each region of the state.”

 “When the ADA was passed in 1990, Congress announced four public policy goals for people with disabilities: 1) equality of opportunity; 2) full participation; 3) independent living; and 4) economic self-sufficiency. The Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF) works in collaboration with the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Bureau for Medical Services (BMS), the WV Department of Education (DOE), the West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council (WV DDC), West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities (WVCED), and other partners to promote these goals. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Olmstead Council Legislative Priorities for 2015

1. Implement the West Virginia Olmstead Plan to ensure compliance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). 2. Eliminate the institutional bias in West Virginia's long term care system. 3. Develop and maintain a statewide, comprehensive transition and diversion program. 4. Implement a formal plan to address the major barrier of affordable, accessible and integrated housing options for people with disabilities. 5. Ensure people with disabilities have opportunities for employment, transportation and meaningful participation in their community

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Methodology for West Virginia’s Waiver Transition Plan Application

West Virginia underwent the process of developing a transition plan pursuant to 42 CFR 441.301(c)(6) that contains the actions the state will take to bring all West Virginia waivers into compliance with requirements set forth in 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4-5). West Virginia intends to work with the various providers, participants, guardians, and other stakeholders engaged in HCBS to implement the proposed transition plan. This document summarizes the steps West Virginia’s Bureau for Medical Services (BMS) undertook to develop the transition plans as well as planned activities related to compliance.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan, Recent amendments.

Amendments to the State Plan are available by year on this page.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person – Take me home

“West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”

“West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who: Are elderly (65 and older); Have a physical disability, or Have a serious mental illness.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

WV Aged and Disabled Waiver Program

 

“Aged and Disabled Waiver Program (ADW) is a long-term care alternative that provides services that enable an individual to remain at or return home rater than receiving nursing home care. The goals and objectives of this program are focused on providing services that are person-centered, promote choice, independence, participant-direction, respect, and dignity and community integration.” 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Medicaid Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver

 

“The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) Waiver (formerly the MR/DD Waiver Program) provides services that instruct, train, support, supervise, and assist individuals who have intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities in achieving the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency possible in their lives. The I/DD Waiver Program provides services in natural settings, homes and communities where the member resides, works, and shops instead of ICF/MR facilities.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The Mountain State of West Virginia is "Open for Business", and as such is ripe for the benefits of Employment First systems-change efforts as a way to improve socioeconomic outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon West Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
-0.34%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,844,128
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-6.75%
Change from
2014 to 2015
187,077
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.49%
Change from
2014 to 2015
47,517
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-0.67%
Change from
2014 to 2015
25.40%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-1.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
69.75%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 1,854,304 1,850,326 1,844,128
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 205,141 199,707 187,077
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 51,995 51,074 47,517
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 655,158 647,970 643,270
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 25.35% 25.57% 25.40%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 70.63% 70.51% 69.75%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.70% 6.50% 6.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.20% 24.90% 22.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.00% 16.60% 16.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 187,342 179,417 182,889
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 181,641 183,030 168,797
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 349,810 344,523 335,192
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 9,501 11,408 10,904
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 2,345 3,018 2,234
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,748 747
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 432 1,018 598
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 7,351 3,584 3,792
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,154 2,054 2,070
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.70% 2.70% 2.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 95,060 93,837 91,995

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,992 2,375 8,465
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 19,002 12,220 14,965
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 38,749 19,557 40,645
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.50% 1,201.00% 20.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 0.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 10.00% 8.70% 10.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 1.10% 2.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A 1
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 3,723 3,852 2,228
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 395 466 565
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,673 2,694 2,647
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.03 0.03

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 13 8 13
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 9
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 54.00% 75.00% 69.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.38 0.32 0.49

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
5,082
3,801
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 163 187 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,702 920 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,614 1,107 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 934 874 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 618 636 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 51 77 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 50.70% 40.50% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 2,384 2,607
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 151,745 149,357
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 93 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 144 124 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A N/A $551,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A N/A $45,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A N/A $21,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A N/A $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 43.00% 41.00% 38.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A N/A 2,195
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A 11 19
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,464 1,238 1,360
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 51.80 47.40 44.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.90% 64.00% 63.88%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.70% 8.20% 8.03%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.70% 1.84% 1.74%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 90.50% 98.41% 96.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 15.00% 15.59% 13.65%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 49.30% 52.85% 44.25%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.70% 64.89% 67.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.30% 37.25% 30.60%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 979,277
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,319
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,851
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 313,739
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 315,590
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 254
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 294
AbilityOne wages (products). $11,625
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,283,821

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 18 8 8
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 18 8 8
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 809 276 276
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 809 276 276

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the WVDDC meetings, DRS participates in two subcommittees; Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the Bureau for Behavioral Health on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. These are often individuals that are also XIX Medicaid Waiver eligible. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

DRS counselors will, at the time of application, gather information regarding an individual’s third party resources, including Medicaid. If it is determined that the individual receives Medicaid benefits, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual, regardless of that individual’s continued status with DRS. If an individual is approved to receive services from DRS, and begins to receive Medicaid benefits at a later time, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual from that time forward. No specific disability related information found. (Page 249)

(WVDDC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs. (Page 250)

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the WVDDC meetings, DRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the Bureau for Behavioral Health on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. These are often individuals that are also XIX Medicaid Waiver eligible. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes. (Page 252)  

Customized Employment
  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs.
  • BBHHF and DRS will work together in mediating problems in cases being served jointly in the programs.
  • DRS will meet monthly with BBHHF staff to review applicants for an Unmet Needs funding program to foster assistance to IDD individuals where traditional funding sources do not provide needed supports.
  • Individuals receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time.
  • (Page 250)
  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs.
  • BBHHF and DRS will work together in mediating problems in cases being served jointly in the programs.
  • DRS will meet monthly with BBHHF staff to review applicants for an Unmet Needs funding program to foster assistance to IDD individuals where traditional funding sources do not provide needed supports.
  • Individuals receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time. 

In order to provide quality and timely vocational rehabilitation services to West Virginians with behavioral health conditions who qualify, DRS collaborates with the BBHHF and its partners. BBHHF is the federally designated Single State Authority for mental health and substance use disorders and operates under the auspices of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. The primary programs within BBHHF and their partners that DRS works with are as follows: 

  • The Office of Consumer Affairs and Community Outreach (CACO), is charged with providing collaborative support to the clinical section of the Office of Programs through the provision of legislative tracking, disaster coordination and response, development and operation of a Consumer Advisory Council, coordination of BBHHF training activities, researching and circulating information on evidence–based and emerging best practices, development of health promotion and wellness campaigns, researching and applying for high priority discretionary grants, and by providing a centralized response to requests for assistance and patient grievances. DRS maintains a relationship with this office and has worked together on anti–stigma campaigns, supporting recovery coaching and peer support, and training in the area of mental health first aid and medication assisted treatment. (Page 253)
Braiding/Blending Resources
  • Creating cross–system data capacity: using diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and also, the use performance data to assess the value of those investments.
  • Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. 

This State Plan provides the policy framework and direction for day–to–day operations of WIOA funded programs. The role of state agency and state department plan partners under this plan is to provide policy direction, program oversight, support, and technical assistance for and to local and regional service providers covered by the plan. State plan partners include the following: 

  • WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV)
  • West Virginia Workforce Development Board (WDB)
  • West Virginia Community and Technical College System (CTCS)
  • West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE)
  • West Virginia State Board of Education (SBE)
  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS)
  • West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR)
  • Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development (Page 51)
  • The braiding of WIOA Title I–B funded programs with other youth–directed state and local entities allows comprehensive services to be offered to all eligible low–income populations under WIOA. Available TANF funding will continue to support WIOA year–round services and summer employment activities.
  • Applicants for Title II funds are required to describe how they will align services with local workforce development plans and how they will coordinate with other available education, training, and social services in the community. Alignment with LWDB’s goals is required for funding.
  • Perkins postsecondary providers assist job seekers in identifying their interests and abilities and aligning these skills needs to training and financial resources to assist with training. Training is linked to the state’s high–demand jobs and is designed to lead to credential attainment. Both credential attainment and high–demand jobs alignment assist job seekers in securing employment with family–sustaining wages.(Page 72) 

DRS works with a variety of non–educational agencies serving out–of–school youth. The primary coordinated activities serving this population are with WIOA partners – WorkForce WV and the regional workforce development boards. DRS strives to coordinate referrals and services to eligible out–of–school youth served by the WIOA youth programs that are overseen by WorkForce WV and the regional workforce development boards. These partnerships allow for improved service delivery through the blending of resources and expertise among the agencies. For example, sharing costs allows DRS and other agencies to enhance outreach efforts, serve increased numbers of out–of–school youth, and improve outcomes for participants.

In addition to DRS’ reliance on WIOA partners in serving out–of–school youth, the agency continues to use community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) that have become a DRS–acknowledged vendor, to support the needs of this population across the state. (Page 228)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Section 188 of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act ensures nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for various categories of persons, including persons with disabilities, who apply for and participate in programs and activities operated by recipients of WIA Title I financial assistance. WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV) will use the "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: A Section 188 Disability Reference Guide” as a boilerplate in assuring compliance with Section 188 of WIOA. The Guide is designed to ensure meaningful participation of people with disabilities in programs and activities operated by recipients of financial assistance under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including those that are part of the One–Stop Center Network.

The Guide outlines promising practices in the provision of universal access and equal opportunity to programs and activities under WIOA. WorkForce West Virginia will use the Guide to monitor its own compliance, and that of its recipients, with the aspects of Section 188 and its implementing regulations that pertain to persons with disabilities. Through the monitoring process, WorkForce West Virginia can identify the disability–related requirements imposed by Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 38, to ensure equal access to programs and services under WIOA for people with disabilities. (Page 122)

7. The State has taken the appropriate action to be in compliance with WIOA section 188, Nondiscrimination, as applicable; Yes (Page 125)

Adherence to Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status and gender identity), national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or participation in any WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. By assuring adherence to Section 188 of WIOA, also assures acceptance to Title VI and title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; The Age Discrimination Act of 1975; Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

Adherence to the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, which prohibits the exclusion, on the basis of disability, from participation in or denial of the benefits of services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any public entity.

Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements (29 CFR, Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98): WIOA funded grantees certify that it will prove a drug-free workplace by notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the workplace and specifying the actions taken against employees for violation of such prohibition. Grantees certify that it will make a good faith effort to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of 28 CFR Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98. (Page 373)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

In addition to having a certified full–time WVABE SPOKES instructor, and in some cases a part time WVABE SPOKES instructor, the SPOKES program may have access to a career development consultant (CDC) and share a blended classroom with an ABE instructor.

Programs are encouraged to pilot and implement additional evidence and research–based strategies for college and career pathways that meet the goals of this plan.

Pursuant to WIOA, WorkForce West Virginia is required to allocate 75% of its local area youth funds to out–of–school youth. These funds are used to carry out programs that provide the following elements: (Page 162)

Other priorities for this funding cycle include facilitating the implementation of models for integrated education and training and continuing to grow the bridge and career pathways program models. Additionally, some funds will be used for the permissible activity of the development and implementation of a system to assist in the transition from adult education to post-secondary education and training, including linkages with postsecondary educational institutions or institutions of higher education, is another priority. The development and piloting of strategies for improving teacher quality and retention are critical to the long-term success of adult education, and best practices in these areas are provided through WV Adult Education Professional Development. The development and implementation of programs and services to meet the needs of adult learners with learning disabilities or English language learners, which may include new and promising assessment tools and strategies based on scientifically valid research, are included in the professional development activities provided to grant recipients. (Page 200)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

The group of 20 to 24 year olds contains an estimated number of 122,531. Of these, 66.9 percent are in the labor force with an estimated 58.4 percent employed. The corresponding unemployment rate is 12.6 percent. In 2014, 97 unemployed within the age range of 19 to 24 exhausted unemployment benefits. In 2015, that number had risen to 227.

The group of 25 to 44 year olds contains 447,092, the largest number among all age groups. Approximately 74.7 percent are in the labor force, with 69.0 percent employed. The unemployment rate for this group is 7.3 percent. In 2014, 931 unemployed within the age range of 25 to 44 exhausted unemployment benefits. That number rose to 1,652 in 2015. (Page 19)

The West Virginia population age 16 and over for whom the poverty status is determined during the 2014 survey is estimated to be 1,464,695, with 343,308 estimated to have a disability and 1,121,387 having no disability. Approximately 16.7 percent of this total civilian non–institutionalized population was below 100 percent of the poverty level. An estimated 24.0 percent of those having a disability are found in this group. Those at 100 to 149 percent of the poverty level registered at 10.2 percent. An estimated 14.6 percent of those with a disability are contained in this group. Persons at or above 150 percent of the poverty level are estimated at 73.1 percent. An estimated 61.4 percent of individuals with a disability are found in this group. In 2014, the number of unemployed with a disability who exhausted their unemployment benefits was 31. This number nearly doubled to 59 in 2015. (Page 20)

  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services strives to align its activities and services with other agencies, including WIOA partners. Because West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services provides services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), many alignment activities occur on the individual consumer level. West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services’ Client Services Manual Section 2501.3 requires VR counselors to assess and utilize, if appropriate, any third party comparable benefits and services. Furthermore, the Client Services Manual Section 3502.13 allows West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services consumers to request the VR counselor to participate in the arrangement and coordination of services not included in the IPE if those services are available from third party resources without cost to West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services and the VR counselor determines that the services would be appropriate to assist the individual in securing employment. One example of this alignment occurs with West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services consumers that choose to receive four–year and/or community college training; consumers must utilize grants and other non–loan resources prior to West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services providing financial support.
  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is mandated not only to coordinate services and resources with comparable services and benefits providers, but also to collect and report these data (any involvement with a comparable services benefits provider in relation to 33 service categories) to the federal Rehabilitation Services Administration at the individual consumer level. The collection, monitoring, and evaluation of these data allow West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services to ensure coordination and alignment is taking place across the state.  (Page 73)

Programs like these bring together employers, job seekers, and WIOA partner agencies. By identifying the needs of employers and sharing resources to train individuals, the state as a whole benefits from the West Virginia WDS. Community colleges and technical schools have a unique ability to specialize programs across the state depending on the demands of the local economy, including the needs of employers and job seekers. For example, in 2015, Proctor and Gamble announced a large production facility to be built in West Virginia; the facility will provide up to 700 jobs. From the Governor’s announcement about the project:

“These are good–paying jobs with great benefits,” Governor Tomblin said. “And P&G is a world–class company that’s committed to hiring skilled West Virginia workers. Through a partnership with Blue Ridge Community and Technical College, P&G is working hard to train its new employees and provide them with the skills they need to succeed in today’s jobs and those that will be available well into the future.” (page 78)

In serving veterans, DRS will continue to work closely with the Department of Education and student veteran organizations at colleges, universities, trade schools and other institutions of higher learning to create “veteran friendly” learning environments. The state will continue to support partners in education with focused outreach and coordination with community partners while supporting veterans and their family members to take full advantage of educational benefits that they have earned. This alignment of services will leverage these education and training platforms to focus on job skills that meet the needs of employers within the regions. Education will coordinate with partners to link employers to these educational institutions and programs to ensure that we graduate skilled applicants who have the greatest potential to move successfully into employment. (Page 82)

In addition, those selected to participate in UI Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) will receive all of the mandatory program components to include the creation of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) and additional services such as job search workshops, job search assistance or referrals to other partner programs. The RESEA workshop is designed to motivate and encourage those likely to exhaust benefits by exploring previous work experience, accomplishments and unique skill sets and how to effectively use while job searching. During the workshop individuals identify strengths and skill sets, set short and long term goals, begin developing a job search plan, and effectively network both in person and using social media. (Page 171)

DRS Response to Observation/Recommendation 4: DRS agrees with the importance of quality relationships with higher education institutions in better serving TY with disabilities. Several strategies to improve strategies to TY have been developed and utilized to establish and maintain working relationships with key stakeholders, including institutions of higher education. DRS works with secondary schools and institutions of higher education in many ways to form partnerships and better serve TY with disabilities. In addition to covering all high schools in the state, DRS has liaison counselors assigned to institutions of higher education including colleges, universities, and vocational/technical centers across the state. DRS staff members also attend and present at the annual West Virginia Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators Conference to increase awareness and knowledge of DRS services to higher education staff members statewide. To ensure DRS transition counselors are aware of changes in higher education, a representative from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission presented at the annual DRS Transition Conference. DRS will continue to explore this recommendation to assess the potential benefits and impact of a committee comprised of DRS staff, SRC members, educators, and other pertinent parties. DRS will also explore additional methods of information dissemination such as the use of its higher education liaisons and email list–servs. (Page 224)

DRS offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Additionally, counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. In FY 2015, DRS re–structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre–employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities. (Page 232)

  1. Obtain written parental consent; and
  2. Inform the parent that their refusal to permit the district to access the private insurance does not relieve the district of its responsibility to ensure that all required services are provided at no cost. 

Public Insurance Funds: Education may use the Medicaid or other public insurance benefits programs in which a student participates to provide or pay for services required. With regard to services required to provide FAPE to an eligible student under this part, Education may not: 

  1. Require parents to sign up for or enroll in public benefits or insurance programs in order for their child to receive FAPE under IDEA regulations;
  2. Require parents to incur an out–of–pocket expense, such as the payment of a deductible or co–pay incurred in filing a claim for services provided pursuant to this part, but may pay the cost that the parent otherwise would be required to pay; and
  3. Use a student’s benefits under a public benefits or insurance program if that use would
    1. decrease available lifetime coverage or any other insured benefit;
    2. result in the family paying for services that would otherwise be covered by the public benefits or insurance program and that are required for the child outside of the time the child is in school;
    3. increase premiums or lead to the discontinuation of benefits or insurance; or
    4. risk loss of eligibility for home and community–based waivers, based on aggregate health–related expenditures. (Page 239)

If education is unable to obtain parental consent to use the parent’s private insurance, or public benefits or insurance when the parents would incur a cost for a service specified on their child’s IEP, the district may use Part B funds to pay for services to ensure FAPE. To avoid financial cost to parents who otherwise would consent to use private insurance or public benefits or insurance if the parent would incur a cost, the district may use its Part B funds to pay the cost the parents otherwise would have to pay to use the parents’ benefits insurance (e.g., the deductible or co–pay amounts).

Proceeds from public or private insurance will not be treated as program income as pursuant to 34 CFR §80.25(2). If a district spends reimbursements from Federal funds (e.g., Medicaid) for services under this part, those funds will not be considered "State or local" funds for purposes of the maintenance of effort provisions of Part B of IDEA 2004. (Page 240)

DRS counselors will, at the time of application, gather information regarding an individual’s third party resources, including Medicaid. If it is determined that the individual receives Medicaid benefits, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual, regardless of that individual’s continued status with DRS. If an individual is approved to receive services from DRS, and begins to receive Medicaid benefits at a later time, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual from that time forward.

Individuals receiving services from BMS will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BMS expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time. Similarly, DRS consumers who are Medicaid–eligible will be referred to BMS.

DRS also maintains an MOU with the Division of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD), within the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF), the State agency with primary responsibility for providing services and supports for individuals with intellectual disabilities and individuals with developmental disabilities. DRS interacts with both BBHHF and its subsidiary, DIDD. (Page 249)

Another major theme from these comments included improvements in information sharing and awareness. This theme was multi–faceted, weaving through multiple types of information to be shared with various stakeholders, including consumers. Several CRPs/CSPs indicated that DRS counselors lacked awareness about services, while some made a recommendation for information–sharing meetings to serve as a remedy for such a deficiency. Other CRPs/CSPs provided comments indicating a need for more consumer–related awareness including greater consideration of the consumers’ needs when selecting services, more information about the consumers at the time of referral, and educating consumers about the effects that employment can have on their other benefits.

Funding, aside from the funding generated from an increase in referrals, was an additional theme found in the comments of CRPs regarding DRS improvement. These comments regarding funding varied, from requests for grant monies to increases in service fees. (Page 295)

  1. DETERMINE WHETHER COMPARABLE SERVICES AND BENEFITS ARE AVAILABLE TO THE INDIVIDUAL IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 101(A)(8) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  2. COMPLY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN INDIVIDUALIZED PLAN FOR EMPLOYMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 102(B) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  3. COMPLY WITH REQUIREMENTS REGARDING THE PROVISIONS OF INFORMED CHOICE FOR ALL APPLICANTS AND ELIGIBLE INDIVIDUALS IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 102(D) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  4. PROVIDE VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES TO AMERICAN INDIANS WHO ARE INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES RESIDING IN THE STATE, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 101(A)(13) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT. (Page 361)

Adherence to the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, which prohibits the exclusion, on the basis of disability, from participation in or denial of the benefits of services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any public entity.

Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements (29 CFR, Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98): WIOA funded grantees certify that it will prove a drug-free workplace by notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the workplace and specifying the actions taken against employees for violation of such prohibition. Grantees certify that it will make a good faith effort to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of 28 CFR Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98. (Page 373)

School to Work Transition

West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. A greater emphasis is now being placed for counselors to do outreach with these students and their parents/guardians during their sophomore year (rather than their junior year, as was formerly practiced) in order to maximize the counseling opportunities. (Page 156)

DRS offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Additionally, counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. In FY 2015, DRS re–structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre–employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities.(Page 232)

School (PETS) rehabilitation counselors also are invited to participate in IEP meetings. During these meetings the counselor describes DRS services, policies, and procedures as appropriate. The DRS counselor determines the student’s eligibility and order of selection category utilizing information generated from the school, the student, and DRS. Prior to or shortly after the student’s IEP transition meeting occurs, IPE development begins so both the student and counselor have an idea of what rehabilitation services will be necessary to meet the student’s vocational goal. Therefore, if the student needs additional training or assessment prior to vocational goal determination, this information is already collected so that planned rehabilitation services may begin. IPE development and approval for students with disabilities, including those able to be served if DRS is on an order of selection, will begin as early as appropriate during the transition process, but before the student, determined to be eligible, leaves the school setting. (Page 232)

Rehabilitation may be responsible for services that occur outside of the school environment that are vocationally oriented and are specifically intended to prepare the student for post–secondary training or work. Rehabilitation is not responsible for payment of any service that has not been directly agreed to during the development of a student’s IEP and is not included as a service on a student’s IPE for Rehabilitation services. Rehabilitation is not responsible for career development activities that are part of a School to Work initiative within the school system. The responsibility for implementing the requirements of Department of Education Policy 2510 remains with the school system.

The transference to the student of assistive technology devices that have been purchased by the Local Education Agency (LEA) will occur consistent with the surplus equipment policies and regulations in existence within each LEA. After the student has exited the school system, Rehabilitation may reimburse the LEA at a rate in accordance with the surplus equipment policy, dependent upon the student’s continued need or desire for the equipment, the condition of the equipment, and its future usefulness. (Page 240)

Teacher or aide who worked with them throughout high school. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities. STEP methodology allows students to build on previous success with someone they know and trust. In 2014, a Rehabilitation Services Specialist position was added to further expand the program throughout the state. This additional position has yielded excellent progress, with a substantial increase in the number of STEP vendors and increased communication with local school staff across the state in 2015. 

  • Continued to meet with WV Department of Education officials in an effort to develop a system to identify students with disabilities who are at high risk for dropping out of high school and provide information for the One Year Exit Survey.
  • DRS collaborated with WV Office of Institutional Education as well as the Division of Juvenile Services (DJS) to develop a cooperative agreement regarding the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to TY who are institutionalized. In 2015, DRS provided information to DJS staff regarding agency–offered services. (Page 346)
  1. West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council funds;
  2. West Virginia Title XIX––Home and Community–Based Waiver Program for intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) recipients; and
  3. Social Security Administration work incentives programs. 

In implementing school–to–work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks.

Through a combined effort with other disability organizations, $100,000 was appropriated by the West Virginia Legislature for supported employment follow–along services (extended supported employment services). DRS serves as the fiscal agent for these funds. DRS has created program guidelines governing the use of state–appropriated funds for extended services under the supported employment program created by state statute in 1993. The sole use of the state funds attached to this program is to provide extended services for individuals not eligible from any other funding source. All providers of supported employment services may access these funds for individuals who are eligible under the guidelines. At the end of FY 2015, DRS had sponsored 67 individuals in the extended supported employment program so they could maintain and retain their jobs within the community. This figure represents the cooperative efforts of 13 CRPs. (Page 243)

Data Collection

2. Is for the purpose of educational and career advancement. As part of the application process, the Office of Adult Education will collect basic information from the eligible provider (e.g., location, service area, scope of the program, demographics served, demonstrated need, data collection, and fiscal management procedures).

Additionally, each applicant will be required to submit a proposed budget and program design information.

Applicants will be expected to respond to Office of Adult Education priorities and the Title II considerations for funding Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) programs. (Page 189)

12.  Data Collection: The degree to which the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance.

13.  English Language Acquisition and Civics Education: The degree to which the eligible provider has a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs.

  1. Scope: Previously funded programs will be required to provide data demonstrating they have met previously proposed state targets for the required percent of students making a measureable academic gain. Programs must also provide data demonstrating successful transition to post-secondary education or employment by students. For programs not previously funded, programs with data demonstrating student learning gain and successful transition to post-secondary education or employment, especially for individuals with low-levels of literacy, will be given preference. Both measureable skill gain data and transition data must be disaggregated to demonstrate a history of success with students who have low levels of literacy, disabilities (including learning disabilities), or are English language learners. (Page 190)

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on: 

  • The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the fourth quarter after exit from the program;
  • The median earnings of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who obtain a recognized postsecondary credential, or a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, during participation in or within 1 year after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who, during a program year, are in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measurable skill gains toward such a credential or employment; (Page 308)

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on: (Page 327)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Again, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is already providing services that will allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work–based learning. We partner with employers to provide work–based training, and on the job training. This training is provided across all sectors of employment and ensures job–driven training rather than erroneous skills training.

Other:

  • Development of apprenticeship training programs
  • Alignment and expansion of entrepreneurship/start–up ventures
  • Promotion of youth entrepreneurship in our school system (Page 46)
Career Pathways

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development 

It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and training for skills that lead to quality employment in high–demand jobs or entry–level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low–skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth enter the labor force and/or advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. (Page 47)

  • The State will work with employer partnerships, community colleges, secondary and post–secondary certificate granting schools and LWDBs to establish micro– credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities. A component of this effort will include sharing best practices with the intent of scaling the effort statewide.
  • The State will promote the development of Registered Apprenticeship programs, with a focus on non–traditional industries and occupations. The state will also support efforts of existing Registered Apprenticeship programs to recruit female and minority apprentices. The Office of Apprenticeship will provide technical assistance to grantees and will promote the creation and growth of apprenticeship programs beyond the grantees. (Page 65)

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development 

It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and training for skills that lead to quality employment in high–demand jobs or entry–level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low–skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. 

  • The State will continue to refine the Sector Partnership program to ensure career pathways are aligned to occupations that are high–demand, have higher skill needs and are likely to pay family–sustaining wages. The State will consult with LWDBs and engage employers to accomplish this goal.
  • The State will also support placement of individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, into quality entry–level jobs that provide the work experience and non–technical skills necessary to lead to employment in high– demand jobs, and will consult with LWDBs and engage employers to identify the career pathways for which such quality entry–level jobs can serve as pre–bridge and bridge models. (Page 66)
Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 362)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 38

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WV Adult Ed Instructor Handbook 2017-18 Section 16 SPOKES Program - 07/27/2017

Intense Job Search (Job Development and Follow-up)

“A Career Development Consultant (CDC) may be available to a program to provide assistance with enhancing the learner’s job readiness skills, as well provide job development and follow-up. While participating in SPOKES, especially during this component, the CDC may direct and assist students in their job search activities where applicable. The Career Development Consultant may provide up to six months of follow-up activities for students who gain unsubsidized employment. When students are assigned job development activities outside of the class, the CDC may be officially responsible for these activities and class time is still maintained at the SPOKES class. Coordinated efforts between a CDC, the regional adult education coordinator or designee, and the SPOKES instructor(s) are vital during this component.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Policy 2419: Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities - 04/13/2017

“The West Virginia Procedures Manual for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities outlines the policies and procedures districts must follow in meeting the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), West Virginia State Code, Chapter 18, Article 20 and Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities (2419).

To receive federal funds available under IDEA 2004, districts must adopt and implement appropriate special education policies and procedures. These policies and procedures must be consistent with federal and state laws, rules, regulations and legal requirements and must be approved by the West Virginia Department of Education…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (2017) - 10/01/2016

The plan shall be reviewed and revised not less than once every three years, to ensure the existence of appropriate planning, financial support and coordination, and other assistance to appropriately address, on a statewide and comprehensive basis, the needs in the State for: – The provision of State independent living services; – The development and support of a statewide network of centers for independent living; and – Working relationships between programs providing independent living services and independent living centers, the vocational rehabilitation program established under title I, and other programs providing services for individuals with disabilities. 34 CFR 364.20(f)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2016 Vocational Rehabilitation Section of WOIA State Plan (Draft 12/2015) - 12/11/2015

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the DDPC meetings, WVDRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large…    The DIDD program manager and WVDRS will interact regularly as part of the WV Developmental Disability Planning Council (DDPC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, WVDRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Diversifying Perspectives Art Contest - 09/03/2015

“The artwork selected as the Grand Exhibitor has been incorporated into a poster promoting National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a national campaign that raises awareness about disability employment issues and celebrates the many and varied contributions of America's workers with disabilities. Held annually in October, this year's theme is ‘My disability is one part of who I am.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

West Virginia Code Chapter 18 Article 101: West Virginia Supported Employment Program

“This section of the WV Code establishes a supported employment program, to be administered by the Division of Rehabilitative Services, with the goal of increasing employment for people with severe disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 19

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WV Adult Ed Instructor Handbook 2017-18 Section 16 SPOKES Program - 07/27/2017

Intense Job Search (Job Development and Follow-up)

“A Career Development Consultant (CDC) may be available to a program to provide assistance with enhancing the learner’s job readiness skills, as well provide job development and follow-up. While participating in SPOKES, especially during this component, the CDC may direct and assist students in their job search activities where applicable. The Career Development Consultant may provide up to six months of follow-up activities for students who gain unsubsidized employment. When students are assigned job development activities outside of the class, the CDC may be officially responsible for these activities and class time is still maintained at the SPOKES class. Coordinated efforts between a CDC, the regional adult education coordinator or designee, and the SPOKES instructor(s) are vital during this component.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Policy 2419: Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities - 04/13/2017

“The West Virginia Procedures Manual for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities outlines the policies and procedures districts must follow in meeting the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), West Virginia State Code, Chapter 18, Article 20 and Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities (2419).

To receive federal funds available under IDEA 2004, districts must adopt and implement appropriate special education policies and procedures. These policies and procedures must be consistent with federal and state laws, rules, regulations and legal requirements and must be approved by the West Virginia Department of Education…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (2017) - 10/01/2016

The plan shall be reviewed and revised not less than once every three years, to ensure the existence of appropriate planning, financial support and coordination, and other assistance to appropriately address, on a statewide and comprehensive basis, the needs in the State for: – The provision of State independent living services; – The development and support of a statewide network of centers for independent living; and – Working relationships between programs providing independent living services and independent living centers, the vocational rehabilitation program established under title I, and other programs providing services for individuals with disabilities. 34 CFR 364.20(f)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2016 Vocational Rehabilitation Section of WOIA State Plan (Draft 12/2015) - 12/11/2015

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the DDPC meetings, WVDRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large…    The DIDD program manager and WVDRS will interact regularly as part of the WV Developmental Disability Planning Council (DDPC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, WVDRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Diversifying Perspectives Art Contest - 09/03/2015

“The artwork selected as the Grand Exhibitor has been incorporated into a poster promoting National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a national campaign that raises awareness about disability employment issues and celebrates the many and varied contributions of America's workers with disabilities. Held annually in October, this year's theme is ‘My disability is one part of who I am.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

DVRS Supported Employment definition - 09/01/2014

Supported employment enables clients with the most significant disabilities to enter or retain competitive employment in an integrated work setting. Individuals eligible for this program need intensive job site training/job coaching and ongoing support services in order to perform their work after job placement and case closure occurs. Supported employment services shall be purchased only from Division-acknowledged service providers in accordance with the Division’s fee schedule.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education

West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council Five Year State Plan FFY 2017-2021 - 12/30/2013

“The West Virginia Council coordinated activities during the Fall of 2015 and Spring of 2016 that encouraged people to provide their views on a wide range of issues affecting people with developmental disabilities and their families. Nearly six hundred (600) people participated in thirteen (13) public forums, eight (8) focus groups or completed the Council Service Needs Survey with approximately 70% people with I/DD or family members taking part in the needs gathering activities.

This Plan seeks to strengthen advocacy and self-advocacy coalitions; improve how public services are provided to people with I/DD and their families; provide greater assurances that people with I/DD will be protected from abuse, isolation and neglect; improve opportunities for children to be educated in inclusive classrooms; facilitate efforts to improve supports for people who want to work; and assist and support communities in welcoming people with I/DD.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Workforce West Virginia Interagency Collaborative Team Memorandum of Understanding 2016-2017 - 09/01/2014

 

“West Virginia state agencies effectively collaborating to define, build and sustain an integrated comprehensive workforce development system that: Ensures universal access; has the right agency doing the right job; focuses on meeting the customer requirements; is uniform, consistent and responsive; advances a seamless delivery system that maximizes resources; remains flexible, yet expandable to grow; and fosters a continuous improvement culture for quality and innovation.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding between the Division of Rehabilitative Services and Department of Education on Transition - 10/30/2012

“The cooperative agreement shall assure that each student with a disability in the state who needs special education and/or vocational rehabilitation services is promptly identified and the appropriate transition services are made available to the individual.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WV Student Transition to Employment Project - 09/01/2012

 

“The Student Transition to Employment (STEP) Project is designed to train special education teachers and aides to become vendors with the WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS). Working in close partnership with the WVDRS School Counselor, this unique project allows for individuals with disabilities who are graduating from high school to receive job placement and training from the teacher or aide who worked with them throughout their high school careers. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities… STEP was made possible thanks to funding received from the WV Developmental Disabilities Council and WVDRS.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

WV Comprehensive Employment Systems Infrastructure Development (CES-ID) Grant - 12/01/2006

 

“A diverse team of agency administrators, partner organizations, and technical assistance providers collaborated to begin the process of creating a comprehensive and coordinated statewide employment support system. This map is the first product of the process and identifies “enabling prerequisites” for creating a more detailed strategic plan. Ten goals are articulated as guidelines for further progress.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SSA Youth Transition Demonstration: West Virginia Youth Works

 

“Human Resource Development Foundation, Inc. and the West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities partner to administer West Virginia Youth Works, which provides customized services and supports to SSI recipients, ages 15 to 25, in 19 counties. Services include assessment, planning, work experiences, job development, job placement support, benefits planning and counseling, and job retention services. The project enrolled 404 youths. YTD services ended March 2012.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

 

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Money Follows the Person – Take me home

  “West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”   “West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who:  Are elderly (65 and older);  Have a physical disability, or ; Have a serious mental illness.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

West Virginia Department of Education: Career Technical Education for students with disability - 10/01/2013

Career technical education (CTE) programs in West Virginia are designed for all students and prepare them for entering post-secondary education, training or the workforce. CTE Content Skill Sets (CSSs) are based on national industry recognized accreditation and credentialing standards. Many students with disabilities achieve great success in career and technical education programs with minimal accommodations. It is essential that CTE instructors and special education (SE) case managers collaborate to develop coordinated plans to meet the needs of individual students as indicated in the Individualized Education Program (IEP)

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV Customized Employment Grant

 

“This funding announcement is intended to provide support to agencies that can work with employers in meeting their needs by finding, maintaining and improving the employment status of individuals with disabilities in competitive employment in each region of the state.”

 “When the ADA was passed in 1990, Congress announced four public policy goals for people with disabilities: 1) equality of opportunity; 2) full participation; 3) independent living; and 4) economic self-sufficiency. The Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF) works in collaboration with the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Bureau for Medical Services (BMS), the WV Department of Education (DOE), the West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council (WV DDC), West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities (WVCED), and other partners to promote these goals. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Olmstead Council Legislative Priorities for 2015

1. Implement the West Virginia Olmstead Plan to ensure compliance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). 2. Eliminate the institutional bias in West Virginia's long term care system. 3. Develop and maintain a statewide, comprehensive transition and diversion program. 4. Implement a formal plan to address the major barrier of affordable, accessible and integrated housing options for people with disabilities. 5. Ensure people with disabilities have opportunities for employment, transportation and meaningful participation in their community

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Methodology for West Virginia’s Waiver Transition Plan Application

West Virginia underwent the process of developing a transition plan pursuant to 42 CFR 441.301(c)(6) that contains the actions the state will take to bring all West Virginia waivers into compliance with requirements set forth in 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4-5). West Virginia intends to work with the various providers, participants, guardians, and other stakeholders engaged in HCBS to implement the proposed transition plan. This document summarizes the steps West Virginia’s Bureau for Medical Services (BMS) undertook to develop the transition plans as well as planned activities related to compliance.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan, Recent amendments.

Amendments to the State Plan are available by year on this page.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person – Take me home

“West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”

“West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who: Are elderly (65 and older); Have a physical disability, or Have a serious mental illness.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

WV Aged and Disabled Waiver Program

 

“Aged and Disabled Waiver Program (ADW) is a long-term care alternative that provides services that enable an individual to remain at or return home rater than receiving nursing home care. The goals and objectives of this program are focused on providing services that are person-centered, promote choice, independence, participant-direction, respect, and dignity and community integration.” 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Medicaid Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver

 

“The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) Waiver (formerly the MR/DD Waiver Program) provides services that instruct, train, support, supervise, and assist individuals who have intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities in achieving the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency possible in their lives. The I/DD Waiver Program provides services in natural settings, homes and communities where the member resides, works, and shops instead of ICF/MR facilities.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The Mountain State of West Virginia is "Open for Business", and as such is ripe for the benefits of Employment First systems-change efforts as a way to improve socioeconomic outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon West Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
-0.34%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,844,128
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-6.75%
Change from
2014 to 2015
187,077
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.49%
Change from
2014 to 2015
47,517
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-0.67%
Change from
2014 to 2015
25.40%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-1.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
69.75%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 1,854,304 1,850,326 1,844,128
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 205,141 199,707 187,077
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 51,995 51,074 47,517
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 655,158 647,970 643,270
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 25.35% 25.57% 25.40%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 70.63% 70.51% 69.75%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.70% 6.50% 6.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.20% 24.90% 22.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 17.00% 16.60% 16.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 187,342 179,417 182,889
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 181,641 183,030 168,797
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 349,810 344,523 335,192
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 9,501 11,408 10,904
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 2,345 3,018 2,234
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,748 747
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 432 1,018 598
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 7,351 3,584 3,792
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,154 2,054 2,070
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.70% 2.70% 2.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 95,060 93,837 91,995

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,992 2,375 8,465
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 19,002 12,220 14,965
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 38,749 19,557 40,645
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.50% 1,201.00% 20.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 0.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 10.00% 8.70% 10.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 1.10% 2.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A 1
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 3,723 3,852 2,228
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 395 466 565
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,673 2,694 2,647
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.03 0.03

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 13 8 13
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 9
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 54.00% 75.00% 69.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.38 0.32 0.49

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
5,082
3,801
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 163 187 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 1,702 920 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,614 1,107 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 934 874 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 618 636 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 51 77 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 50.70% 40.50% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 2,384 2,607
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 151,745 149,357
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 93 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 144 124 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. N/A N/A $551,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. N/A N/A $45,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A N/A $21,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. N/A N/A $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 43.00% 41.00% 38.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A N/A 2,195
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A 11 19
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,464 1,238 1,360
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 51.80 47.40 44.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.90% 64.00% 63.88%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.70% 8.20% 8.03%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.70% 1.84% 1.74%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 90.50% 98.41% 96.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 15.00% 15.59% 13.65%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 49.30% 52.85% 44.25%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 64.70% 64.89% 67.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.30% 37.25% 30.60%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 979,277
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,319
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,851
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 313,739
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 315,590
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 254
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 294
AbilityOne wages (products). $11,625
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,283,821

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 18 8 8
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 18 8 8
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 809 276 276
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 809 276 276

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the WVDDC meetings, DRS participates in two subcommittees; Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the Bureau for Behavioral Health on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. These are often individuals that are also XIX Medicaid Waiver eligible. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

DRS counselors will, at the time of application, gather information regarding an individual’s third party resources, including Medicaid. If it is determined that the individual receives Medicaid benefits, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual, regardless of that individual’s continued status with DRS. If an individual is approved to receive services from DRS, and begins to receive Medicaid benefits at a later time, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual from that time forward. No specific disability related information found. (Page 249)

(WVDDC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs. (Page 250)

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the WVDDC meetings, DRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the Bureau for Behavioral Health on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. These are often individuals that are also XIX Medicaid Waiver eligible. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes. (Page 252)  

Customized Employment
  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs.
  • BBHHF and DRS will work together in mediating problems in cases being served jointly in the programs.
  • DRS will meet monthly with BBHHF staff to review applicants for an Unmet Needs funding program to foster assistance to IDD individuals where traditional funding sources do not provide needed supports.
  • Individuals receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time.
  • (Page 250)
  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs.
  • BBHHF and DRS will work together in mediating problems in cases being served jointly in the programs.
  • DRS will meet monthly with BBHHF staff to review applicants for an Unmet Needs funding program to foster assistance to IDD individuals where traditional funding sources do not provide needed supports.
  • Individuals receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time. 

In order to provide quality and timely vocational rehabilitation services to West Virginians with behavioral health conditions who qualify, DRS collaborates with the BBHHF and its partners. BBHHF is the federally designated Single State Authority for mental health and substance use disorders and operates under the auspices of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. The primary programs within BBHHF and their partners that DRS works with are as follows: 

  • The Office of Consumer Affairs and Community Outreach (CACO), is charged with providing collaborative support to the clinical section of the Office of Programs through the provision of legislative tracking, disaster coordination and response, development and operation of a Consumer Advisory Council, coordination of BBHHF training activities, researching and circulating information on evidence–based and emerging best practices, development of health promotion and wellness campaigns, researching and applying for high priority discretionary grants, and by providing a centralized response to requests for assistance and patient grievances. DRS maintains a relationship with this office and has worked together on anti–stigma campaigns, supporting recovery coaching and peer support, and training in the area of mental health first aid and medication assisted treatment. (Page 253)
Braiding/Blending Resources
  • Creating cross–system data capacity: using diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and also, the use performance data to assess the value of those investments.
  • Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. 

This State Plan provides the policy framework and direction for day–to–day operations of WIOA funded programs. The role of state agency and state department plan partners under this plan is to provide policy direction, program oversight, support, and technical assistance for and to local and regional service providers covered by the plan. State plan partners include the following: 

  • WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV)
  • West Virginia Workforce Development Board (WDB)
  • West Virginia Community and Technical College System (CTCS)
  • West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE)
  • West Virginia State Board of Education (SBE)
  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS)
  • West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR)
  • Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development (Page 51)
  • The braiding of WIOA Title I–B funded programs with other youth–directed state and local entities allows comprehensive services to be offered to all eligible low–income populations under WIOA. Available TANF funding will continue to support WIOA year–round services and summer employment activities.
  • Applicants for Title II funds are required to describe how they will align services with local workforce development plans and how they will coordinate with other available education, training, and social services in the community. Alignment with LWDB’s goals is required for funding.
  • Perkins postsecondary providers assist job seekers in identifying their interests and abilities and aligning these skills needs to training and financial resources to assist with training. Training is linked to the state’s high–demand jobs and is designed to lead to credential attainment. Both credential attainment and high–demand jobs alignment assist job seekers in securing employment with family–sustaining wages.(Page 72) 

DRS works with a variety of non–educational agencies serving out–of–school youth. The primary coordinated activities serving this population are with WIOA partners – WorkForce WV and the regional workforce development boards. DRS strives to coordinate referrals and services to eligible out–of–school youth served by the WIOA youth programs that are overseen by WorkForce WV and the regional workforce development boards. These partnerships allow for improved service delivery through the blending of resources and expertise among the agencies. For example, sharing costs allows DRS and other agencies to enhance outreach efforts, serve increased numbers of out–of–school youth, and improve outcomes for participants.

In addition to DRS’ reliance on WIOA partners in serving out–of–school youth, the agency continues to use community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) that have become a DRS–acknowledged vendor, to support the needs of this population across the state. (Page 228)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Section 188 of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act ensures nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for various categories of persons, including persons with disabilities, who apply for and participate in programs and activities operated by recipients of WIA Title I financial assistance. WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV) will use the "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: A Section 188 Disability Reference Guide” as a boilerplate in assuring compliance with Section 188 of WIOA. The Guide is designed to ensure meaningful participation of people with disabilities in programs and activities operated by recipients of financial assistance under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including those that are part of the One–Stop Center Network.

The Guide outlines promising practices in the provision of universal access and equal opportunity to programs and activities under WIOA. WorkForce West Virginia will use the Guide to monitor its own compliance, and that of its recipients, with the aspects of Section 188 and its implementing regulations that pertain to persons with disabilities. Through the monitoring process, WorkForce West Virginia can identify the disability–related requirements imposed by Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 38, to ensure equal access to programs and services under WIOA for people with disabilities. (Page 122)

7. The State has taken the appropriate action to be in compliance with WIOA section 188, Nondiscrimination, as applicable; Yes (Page 125)

Adherence to Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status and gender identity), national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or participation in any WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. By assuring adherence to Section 188 of WIOA, also assures acceptance to Title VI and title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; The Age Discrimination Act of 1975; Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

Adherence to the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, which prohibits the exclusion, on the basis of disability, from participation in or denial of the benefits of services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any public entity.

Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements (29 CFR, Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98): WIOA funded grantees certify that it will prove a drug-free workplace by notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the workplace and specifying the actions taken against employees for violation of such prohibition. Grantees certify that it will make a good faith effort to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of 28 CFR Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98. (Page 373)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

In addition to having a certified full–time WVABE SPOKES instructor, and in some cases a part time WVABE SPOKES instructor, the SPOKES program may have access to a career development consultant (CDC) and share a blended classroom with an ABE instructor.

Programs are encouraged to pilot and implement additional evidence and research–based strategies for college and career pathways that meet the goals of this plan.

Pursuant to WIOA, WorkForce West Virginia is required to allocate 75% of its local area youth funds to out–of–school youth. These funds are used to carry out programs that provide the following elements: (Page 162)

Other priorities for this funding cycle include facilitating the implementation of models for integrated education and training and continuing to grow the bridge and career pathways program models. Additionally, some funds will be used for the permissible activity of the development and implementation of a system to assist in the transition from adult education to post-secondary education and training, including linkages with postsecondary educational institutions or institutions of higher education, is another priority. The development and piloting of strategies for improving teacher quality and retention are critical to the long-term success of adult education, and best practices in these areas are provided through WV Adult Education Professional Development. The development and implementation of programs and services to meet the needs of adult learners with learning disabilities or English language learners, which may include new and promising assessment tools and strategies based on scientifically valid research, are included in the professional development activities provided to grant recipients. (Page 200)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

The group of 20 to 24 year olds contains an estimated number of 122,531. Of these, 66.9 percent are in the labor force with an estimated 58.4 percent employed. The corresponding unemployment rate is 12.6 percent. In 2014, 97 unemployed within the age range of 19 to 24 exhausted unemployment benefits. In 2015, that number had risen to 227.

The group of 25 to 44 year olds contains 447,092, the largest number among all age groups. Approximately 74.7 percent are in the labor force, with 69.0 percent employed. The unemployment rate for this group is 7.3 percent. In 2014, 931 unemployed within the age range of 25 to 44 exhausted unemployment benefits. That number rose to 1,652 in 2015. (Page 19)

The West Virginia population age 16 and over for whom the poverty status is determined during the 2014 survey is estimated to be 1,464,695, with 343,308 estimated to have a disability and 1,121,387 having no disability. Approximately 16.7 percent of this total civilian non–institutionalized population was below 100 percent of the poverty level. An estimated 24.0 percent of those having a disability are found in this group. Those at 100 to 149 percent of the poverty level registered at 10.2 percent. An estimated 14.6 percent of those with a disability are contained in this group. Persons at or above 150 percent of the poverty level are estimated at 73.1 percent. An estimated 61.4 percent of individuals with a disability are found in this group. In 2014, the number of unemployed with a disability who exhausted their unemployment benefits was 31. This number nearly doubled to 59 in 2015. (Page 20)

  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services strives to align its activities and services with other agencies, including WIOA partners. Because West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services provides services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), many alignment activities occur on the individual consumer level. West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services’ Client Services Manual Section 2501.3 requires VR counselors to assess and utilize, if appropriate, any third party comparable benefits and services. Furthermore, the Client Services Manual Section 3502.13 allows West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services consumers to request the VR counselor to participate in the arrangement and coordination of services not included in the IPE if those services are available from third party resources without cost to West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services and the VR counselor determines that the services would be appropriate to assist the individual in securing employment. One example of this alignment occurs with West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services consumers that choose to receive four–year and/or community college training; consumers must utilize grants and other non–loan resources prior to West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services providing financial support.
  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is mandated not only to coordinate services and resources with comparable services and benefits providers, but also to collect and report these data (any involvement with a comparable services benefits provider in relation to 33 service categories) to the federal Rehabilitation Services Administration at the individual consumer level. The collection, monitoring, and evaluation of these data allow West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services to ensure coordination and alignment is taking place across the state.  (Page 73)

Programs like these bring together employers, job seekers, and WIOA partner agencies. By identifying the needs of employers and sharing resources to train individuals, the state as a whole benefits from the West Virginia WDS. Community colleges and technical schools have a unique ability to specialize programs across the state depending on the demands of the local economy, including the needs of employers and job seekers. For example, in 2015, Proctor and Gamble announced a large production facility to be built in West Virginia; the facility will provide up to 700 jobs. From the Governor’s announcement about the project:

“These are good–paying jobs with great benefits,” Governor Tomblin said. “And P&G is a world–class company that’s committed to hiring skilled West Virginia workers. Through a partnership with Blue Ridge Community and Technical College, P&G is working hard to train its new employees and provide them with the skills they need to succeed in today’s jobs and those that will be available well into the future.” (page 78)

In serving veterans, DRS will continue to work closely with the Department of Education and student veteran organizations at colleges, universities, trade schools and other institutions of higher learning to create “veteran friendly” learning environments. The state will continue to support partners in education with focused outreach and coordination with community partners while supporting veterans and their family members to take full advantage of educational benefits that they have earned. This alignment of services will leverage these education and training platforms to focus on job skills that meet the needs of employers within the regions. Education will coordinate with partners to link employers to these educational institutions and programs to ensure that we graduate skilled applicants who have the greatest potential to move successfully into employment. (Page 82)

In addition, those selected to participate in UI Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) will receive all of the mandatory program components to include the creation of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) and additional services such as job search workshops, job search assistance or referrals to other partner programs. The RESEA workshop is designed to motivate and encourage those likely to exhaust benefits by exploring previous work experience, accomplishments and unique skill sets and how to effectively use while job searching. During the workshop individuals identify strengths and skill sets, set short and long term goals, begin developing a job search plan, and effectively network both in person and using social media. (Page 171)

DRS Response to Observation/Recommendation 4: DRS agrees with the importance of quality relationships with higher education institutions in better serving TY with disabilities. Several strategies to improve strategies to TY have been developed and utilized to establish and maintain working relationships with key stakeholders, including institutions of higher education. DRS works with secondary schools and institutions of higher education in many ways to form partnerships and better serve TY with disabilities. In addition to covering all high schools in the state, DRS has liaison counselors assigned to institutions of higher education including colleges, universities, and vocational/technical centers across the state. DRS staff members also attend and present at the annual West Virginia Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators Conference to increase awareness and knowledge of DRS services to higher education staff members statewide. To ensure DRS transition counselors are aware of changes in higher education, a representative from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission presented at the annual DRS Transition Conference. DRS will continue to explore this recommendation to assess the potential benefits and impact of a committee comprised of DRS staff, SRC members, educators, and other pertinent parties. DRS will also explore additional methods of information dissemination such as the use of its higher education liaisons and email list–servs. (Page 224)

DRS offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Additionally, counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. In FY 2015, DRS re–structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre–employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities. (Page 232)

  1. Obtain written parental consent; and
  2. Inform the parent that their refusal to permit the district to access the private insurance does not relieve the district of its responsibility to ensure that all required services are provided at no cost. 

Public Insurance Funds: Education may use the Medicaid or other public insurance benefits programs in which a student participates to provide or pay for services required. With regard to services required to provide FAPE to an eligible student under this part, Education may not: 

  1. Require parents to sign up for or enroll in public benefits or insurance programs in order for their child to receive FAPE under IDEA regulations;
  2. Require parents to incur an out–of–pocket expense, such as the payment of a deductible or co–pay incurred in filing a claim for services provided pursuant to this part, but may pay the cost that the parent otherwise would be required to pay; and
  3. Use a student’s benefits under a public benefits or insurance program if that use would
    1. decrease available lifetime coverage or any other insured benefit;
    2. result in the family paying for services that would otherwise be covered by the public benefits or insurance program and that are required for the child outside of the time the child is in school;
    3. increase premiums or lead to the discontinuation of benefits or insurance; or
    4. risk loss of eligibility for home and community–based waivers, based on aggregate health–related expenditures. (Page 239)

If education is unable to obtain parental consent to use the parent’s private insurance, or public benefits or insurance when the parents would incur a cost for a service specified on their child’s IEP, the district may use Part B funds to pay for services to ensure FAPE. To avoid financial cost to parents who otherwise would consent to use private insurance or public benefits or insurance if the parent would incur a cost, the district may use its Part B funds to pay the cost the parents otherwise would have to pay to use the parents’ benefits insurance (e.g., the deductible or co–pay amounts).

Proceeds from public or private insurance will not be treated as program income as pursuant to 34 CFR §80.25(2). If a district spends reimbursements from Federal funds (e.g., Medicaid) for services under this part, those funds will not be considered "State or local" funds for purposes of the maintenance of effort provisions of Part B of IDEA 2004. (Page 240)

DRS counselors will, at the time of application, gather information regarding an individual’s third party resources, including Medicaid. If it is determined that the individual receives Medicaid benefits, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual, regardless of that individual’s continued status with DRS. If an individual is approved to receive services from DRS, and begins to receive Medicaid benefits at a later time, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual from that time forward.

Individuals receiving services from BMS will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BMS expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time. Similarly, DRS consumers who are Medicaid–eligible will be referred to BMS.

DRS also maintains an MOU with the Division of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD), within the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF), the State agency with primary responsibility for providing services and supports for individuals with intellectual disabilities and individuals with developmental disabilities. DRS interacts with both BBHHF and its subsidiary, DIDD. (Page 249)

Another major theme from these comments included improvements in information sharing and awareness. This theme was multi–faceted, weaving through multiple types of information to be shared with various stakeholders, including consumers. Several CRPs/CSPs indicated that DRS counselors lacked awareness about services, while some made a recommendation for information–sharing meetings to serve as a remedy for such a deficiency. Other CRPs/CSPs provided comments indicating a need for more consumer–related awareness including greater consideration of the consumers’ needs when selecting services, more information about the consumers at the time of referral, and educating consumers about the effects that employment can have on their other benefits.

Funding, aside from the funding generated from an increase in referrals, was an additional theme found in the comments of CRPs regarding DRS improvement. These comments regarding funding varied, from requests for grant monies to increases in service fees. (Page 295)

  1. DETERMINE WHETHER COMPARABLE SERVICES AND BENEFITS ARE AVAILABLE TO THE INDIVIDUAL IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 101(A)(8) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  2. COMPLY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN INDIVIDUALIZED PLAN FOR EMPLOYMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 102(B) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  3. COMPLY WITH REQUIREMENTS REGARDING THE PROVISIONS OF INFORMED CHOICE FOR ALL APPLICANTS AND ELIGIBLE INDIVIDUALS IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 102(D) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  4. PROVIDE VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES TO AMERICAN INDIANS WHO ARE INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES RESIDING IN THE STATE, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 101(A)(13) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT. (Page 361)

Adherence to the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, which prohibits the exclusion, on the basis of disability, from participation in or denial of the benefits of services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any public entity.

Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements (29 CFR, Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98): WIOA funded grantees certify that it will prove a drug-free workplace by notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the workplace and specifying the actions taken against employees for violation of such prohibition. Grantees certify that it will make a good faith effort to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of 28 CFR Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98. (Page 373)

School to Work Transition

West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. A greater emphasis is now being placed for counselors to do outreach with these students and their parents/guardians during their sophomore year (rather than their junior year, as was formerly practiced) in order to maximize the counseling opportunities. (Page 156)

DRS offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Additionally, counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. In FY 2015, DRS re–structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre–employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities.(Page 232)

School (PETS) rehabilitation counselors also are invited to participate in IEP meetings. During these meetings the counselor describes DRS services, policies, and procedures as appropriate. The DRS counselor determines the student’s eligibility and order of selection category utilizing information generated from the school, the student, and DRS. Prior to or shortly after the student’s IEP transition meeting occurs, IPE development begins so both the student and counselor have an idea of what rehabilitation services will be necessary to meet the student’s vocational goal. Therefore, if the student needs additional training or assessment prior to vocational goal determination, this information is already collected so that planned rehabilitation services may begin. IPE development and approval for students with disabilities, including those able to be served if DRS is on an order of selection, will begin as early as appropriate during the transition process, but before the student, determined to be eligible, leaves the school setting. (Page 232)

Rehabilitation may be responsible for services that occur outside of the school environment that are vocationally oriented and are specifically intended to prepare the student for post–secondary training or work. Rehabilitation is not responsible for payment of any service that has not been directly agreed to during the development of a student’s IEP and is not included as a service on a student’s IPE for Rehabilitation services. Rehabilitation is not responsible for career development activities that are part of a School to Work initiative within the school system. The responsibility for implementing the requirements of Department of Education Policy 2510 remains with the school system.

The transference to the student of assistive technology devices that have been purchased by the Local Education Agency (LEA) will occur consistent with the surplus equipment policies and regulations in existence within each LEA. After the student has exited the school system, Rehabilitation may reimburse the LEA at a rate in accordance with the surplus equipment policy, dependent upon the student’s continued need or desire for the equipment, the condition of the equipment, and its future usefulness. (Page 240)

Teacher or aide who worked with them throughout high school. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities. STEP methodology allows students to build on previous success with someone they know and trust. In 2014, a Rehabilitation Services Specialist position was added to further expand the program throughout the state. This additional position has yielded excellent progress, with a substantial increase in the number of STEP vendors and increased communication with local school staff across the state in 2015. 

  • Continued to meet with WV Department of Education officials in an effort to develop a system to identify students with disabilities who are at high risk for dropping out of high school and provide information for the One Year Exit Survey.
  • DRS collaborated with WV Office of Institutional Education as well as the Division of Juvenile Services (DJS) to develop a cooperative agreement regarding the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to TY who are institutionalized. In 2015, DRS provided information to DJS staff regarding agency–offered services. (Page 346)
  1. West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council funds;
  2. West Virginia Title XIX––Home and Community–Based Waiver Program for intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) recipients; and
  3. Social Security Administration work incentives programs. 

In implementing school–to–work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks.

Through a combined effort with other disability organizations, $100,000 was appropriated by the West Virginia Legislature for supported employment follow–along services (extended supported employment services). DRS serves as the fiscal agent for these funds. DRS has created program guidelines governing the use of state–appropriated funds for extended services under the supported employment program created by state statute in 1993. The sole use of the state funds attached to this program is to provide extended services for individuals not eligible from any other funding source. All providers of supported employment services may access these funds for individuals who are eligible under the guidelines. At the end of FY 2015, DRS had sponsored 67 individuals in the extended supported employment program so they could maintain and retain their jobs within the community. This figure represents the cooperative efforts of 13 CRPs. (Page 243)

Data Collection

2. Is for the purpose of educational and career advancement. As part of the application process, the Office of Adult Education will collect basic information from the eligible provider (e.g., location, service area, scope of the program, demographics served, demonstrated need, data collection, and fiscal management procedures).

Additionally, each applicant will be required to submit a proposed budget and program design information.

Applicants will be expected to respond to Office of Adult Education priorities and the Title II considerations for funding Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) programs. (Page 189)

12.  Data Collection: The degree to which the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance.

13.  English Language Acquisition and Civics Education: The degree to which the eligible provider has a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs.

  1. Scope: Previously funded programs will be required to provide data demonstrating they have met previously proposed state targets for the required percent of students making a measureable academic gain. Programs must also provide data demonstrating successful transition to post-secondary education or employment by students. For programs not previously funded, programs with data demonstrating student learning gain and successful transition to post-secondary education or employment, especially for individuals with low-levels of literacy, will be given preference. Both measureable skill gain data and transition data must be disaggregated to demonstrate a history of success with students who have low levels of literacy, disabilities (including learning disabilities), or are English language learners. (Page 190)

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on: 

  • The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the fourth quarter after exit from the program;
  • The median earnings of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who obtain a recognized postsecondary credential, or a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, during participation in or within 1 year after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who, during a program year, are in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measurable skill gains toward such a credential or employment; (Page 308)

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on: (Page 327)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Again, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is already providing services that will allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work–based learning. We partner with employers to provide work–based training, and on the job training. This training is provided across all sectors of employment and ensures job–driven training rather than erroneous skills training.

Other:

  • Development of apprenticeship training programs
  • Alignment and expansion of entrepreneurship/start–up ventures
  • Promotion of youth entrepreneurship in our school system (Page 46)
Career Pathways

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development 

It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and training for skills that lead to quality employment in high–demand jobs or entry–level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low–skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth enter the labor force and/or advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. (Page 47)

  • The State will work with employer partnerships, community colleges, secondary and post–secondary certificate granting schools and LWDBs to establish micro– credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities. A component of this effort will include sharing best practices with the intent of scaling the effort statewide.
  • The State will promote the development of Registered Apprenticeship programs, with a focus on non–traditional industries and occupations. The state will also support efforts of existing Registered Apprenticeship programs to recruit female and minority apprentices. The Office of Apprenticeship will provide technical assistance to grantees and will promote the creation and growth of apprenticeship programs beyond the grantees. (Page 65)

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development 

It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and training for skills that lead to quality employment in high–demand jobs or entry–level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low–skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. 

  • The State will continue to refine the Sector Partnership program to ensure career pathways are aligned to occupations that are high–demand, have higher skill needs and are likely to pay family–sustaining wages. The State will consult with LWDBs and engage employers to accomplish this goal.
  • The State will also support placement of individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, into quality entry–level jobs that provide the work experience and non–technical skills necessary to lead to employment in high– demand jobs, and will consult with LWDBs and engage employers to identify the career pathways for which such quality entry–level jobs can serve as pre–bridge and bridge models. (Page 66)
Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 362)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 38

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WV Adult Ed Instructor Handbook 2017-18 Section 16 SPOKES Program - 07/27/2017

Intense Job Search (Job Development and Follow-up)

“A Career Development Consultant (CDC) may be available to a program to provide assistance with enhancing the learner’s job readiness skills, as well provide job development and follow-up. While participating in SPOKES, especially during this component, the CDC may direct and assist students in their job search activities where applicable. The Career Development Consultant may provide up to six months of follow-up activities for students who gain unsubsidized employment. When students are assigned job development activities outside of the class, the CDC may be officially responsible for these activities and class time is still maintained at the SPOKES class. Coordinated efforts between a CDC, the regional adult education coordinator or designee, and the SPOKES instructor(s) are vital during this component.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Policy 2419: Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities - 04/13/2017

“The West Virginia Procedures Manual for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities outlines the policies and procedures districts must follow in meeting the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), West Virginia State Code, Chapter 18, Article 20 and Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities (2419).

To receive federal funds available under IDEA 2004, districts must adopt and implement appropriate special education policies and procedures. These policies and procedures must be consistent with federal and state laws, rules, regulations and legal requirements and must be approved by the West Virginia Department of Education…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (2017) - 10/01/2016

The plan shall be reviewed and revised not less than once every three years, to ensure the existence of appropriate planning, financial support and coordination, and other assistance to appropriately address, on a statewide and comprehensive basis, the needs in the State for: – The provision of State independent living services; – The development and support of a statewide network of centers for independent living; and – Working relationships between programs providing independent living services and independent living centers, the vocational rehabilitation program established under title I, and other programs providing services for individuals with disabilities. 34 CFR 364.20(f)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2016 Vocational Rehabilitation Section of WOIA State Plan (Draft 12/2015) - 12/11/2015

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the DDPC meetings, WVDRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large…    The DIDD program manager and WVDRS will interact regularly as part of the WV Developmental Disability Planning Council (DDPC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, WVDRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Diversifying Perspectives Art Contest - 09/03/2015

“The artwork selected as the Grand Exhibitor has been incorporated into a poster promoting National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a national campaign that raises awareness about disability employment issues and celebrates the many and varied contributions of America's workers with disabilities. Held annually in October, this year's theme is ‘My disability is one part of who I am.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

West Virginia Code Chapter 18 Article 101: West Virginia Supported Employment Program

“This section of the WV Code establishes a supported employment program, to be administered by the Division of Rehabilitative Services, with the goal of increasing employment for people with severe disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 19

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WV Adult Ed Instructor Handbook 2017-18 Section 16 SPOKES Program - 07/27/2017

Intense Job Search (Job Development and Follow-up)

“A Career Development Consultant (CDC) may be available to a program to provide assistance with enhancing the learner’s job readiness skills, as well provide job development and follow-up. While participating in SPOKES, especially during this component, the CDC may direct and assist students in their job search activities where applicable. The Career Development Consultant may provide up to six months of follow-up activities for students who gain unsubsidized employment. When students are assigned job development activities outside of the class, the CDC may be officially responsible for these activities and class time is still maintained at the SPOKES class. Coordinated efforts between a CDC, the regional adult education coordinator or designee, and the SPOKES instructor(s) are vital during this component.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Policy 2419: Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities - 04/13/2017

“The West Virginia Procedures Manual for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities outlines the policies and procedures districts must follow in meeting the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), West Virginia State Code, Chapter 18, Article 20 and Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities (2419).

To receive federal funds available under IDEA 2004, districts must adopt and implement appropriate special education policies and procedures. These policies and procedures must be consistent with federal and state laws, rules, regulations and legal requirements and must be approved by the West Virginia Department of Education…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (2017) - 10/01/2016

The plan shall be reviewed and revised not less than once every three years, to ensure the existence of appropriate planning, financial support and coordination, and other assistance to appropriately address, on a statewide and comprehensive basis, the needs in the State for: – The provision of State independent living services; – The development and support of a statewide network of centers for independent living; and – Working relationships between programs providing independent living services and independent living centers, the vocational rehabilitation program established under title I, and other programs providing services for individuals with disabilities. 34 CFR 364.20(f)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2016 Vocational Rehabilitation Section of WOIA State Plan (Draft 12/2015) - 12/11/2015

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the DDPC meetings, WVDRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large…    The DIDD program manager and WVDRS will interact regularly as part of the WV Developmental Disability Planning Council (DDPC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, WVDRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Diversifying Perspectives Art Contest - 09/03/2015

“The artwork selected as the Grand Exhibitor has been incorporated into a poster promoting National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a national campaign that raises awareness about disability employment issues and celebrates the many and varied contributions of America's workers with disabilities. Held annually in October, this year's theme is ‘My disability is one part of who I am.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

DVRS Supported Employment definition - 09/01/2014

Supported employment enables clients with the most significant disabilities to enter or retain competitive employment in an integrated work setting. Individuals eligible for this program need intensive job site training/job coaching and ongoing support services in order to perform their work after job placement and case closure occurs. Supported employment services shall be purchased only from Division-acknowledged service providers in accordance with the Division’s fee schedule.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education

West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council Five Year State Plan FFY 2017-2021 - 12/30/2013

“The West Virginia Council coordinated activities during the Fall of 2015 and Spring of 2016 that encouraged people to provide their views on a wide range of issues affecting people with developmental disabilities and their families. Nearly six hundred (600) people participated in thirteen (13) public forums, eight (8) focus groups or completed the Council Service Needs Survey with approximately 70% people with I/DD or family members taking part in the needs gathering activities.

This Plan seeks to strengthen advocacy and self-advocacy coalitions; improve how public services are provided to people with I/DD and their families; provide greater assurances that people with I/DD will be protected from abuse, isolation and neglect; improve opportunities for children to be educated in inclusive classrooms; facilitate efforts to improve supports for people who want to work; and assist and support communities in welcoming people with I/DD.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Workforce West Virginia Interagency Collaborative Team Memorandum of Understanding 2016-2017 - 09/01/2014

 

“West Virginia state agencies effectively collaborating to define, build and sustain an integrated comprehensive workforce development system that: Ensures universal access; has the right agency doing the right job; focuses on meeting the customer requirements; is uniform, consistent and responsive; advances a seamless delivery system that maximizes resources; remains flexible, yet expandable to grow; and fosters a continuous improvement culture for quality and innovation.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding between the Division of Rehabilitative Services and Department of Education on Transition - 10/30/2012

“The cooperative agreement shall assure that each student with a disability in the state who needs special education and/or vocational rehabilitation services is promptly identified and the appropriate transition services are made available to the individual.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WV Student Transition to Employment Project - 09/01/2012

 

“The Student Transition to Employment (STEP) Project is designed to train special education teachers and aides to become vendors with the WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS). Working in close partnership with the WVDRS School Counselor, this unique project allows for individuals with disabilities who are graduating from high school to receive job placement and training from the teacher or aide who worked with them throughout their high school careers. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities… STEP was made possible thanks to funding received from the WV Developmental Disabilities Council and WVDRS.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

WV Comprehensive Employment Systems Infrastructure Development (CES-ID) Grant - 12/01/2006

 

“A diverse team of agency administrators, partner organizations, and technical assistance providers collaborated to begin the process of creating a comprehensive and coordinated statewide employment support system. This map is the first product of the process and identifies “enabling prerequisites” for creating a more detailed strategic plan. Ten goals are articulated as guidelines for further progress.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SSA Youth Transition Demonstration: West Virginia Youth Works

 

“Human Resource Development Foundation, Inc. and the West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities partner to administer West Virginia Youth Works, which provides customized services and supports to SSI recipients, ages 15 to 25, in 19 counties. Services include assessment, planning, work experiences, job development, job placement support, benefits planning and counseling, and job retention services. The project enrolled 404 youths. YTD services ended March 2012.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

 

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Money Follows the Person – Take me home

  “West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”   “West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who:  Are elderly (65 and older);  Have a physical disability, or ; Have a serious mental illness.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

West Virginia Department of Education: Career Technical Education for students with disability - 10/01/2013

Career technical education (CTE) programs in West Virginia are designed for all students and prepare them for entering post-secondary education, training or the workforce. CTE Content Skill Sets (CSSs) are based on national industry recognized accreditation and credentialing standards. Many students with disabilities achieve great success in career and technical education programs with minimal accommodations. It is essential that CTE instructors and special education (SE) case managers collaborate to develop coordinated plans to meet the needs of individual students as indicated in the Individualized Education Program (IEP)

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV Customized Employment Grant

 

“This funding announcement is intended to provide support to agencies that can work with employers in meeting their needs by finding, maintaining and improving the employment status of individuals with disabilities in competitive employment in each region of the state.”

 “When the ADA was passed in 1990, Congress announced four public policy goals for people with disabilities: 1) equality of opportunity; 2) full participation; 3) independent living; and 4) economic self-sufficiency. The Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF) works in collaboration with the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Bureau for Medical Services (BMS), the WV Department of Education (DOE), the West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council (WV DDC), West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities (WVCED), and other partners to promote these goals. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Olmstead Council Legislative Priorities for 2015

1. Implement the West Virginia Olmstead Plan to ensure compliance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). 2. Eliminate the institutional bias in West Virginia's long term care system. 3. Develop and maintain a statewide, comprehensive transition and diversion program. 4. Implement a formal plan to address the major barrier of affordable, accessible and integrated housing options for people with disabilities. 5. Ensure people with disabilities have opportunities for employment, transportation and meaningful participation in their community

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Methodology for West Virginia’s Waiver Transition Plan Application

West Virginia underwent the process of developing a transition plan pursuant to 42 CFR 441.301(c)(6) that contains the actions the state will take to bring all West Virginia waivers into compliance with requirements set forth in 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4-5). West Virginia intends to work with the various providers, participants, guardians, and other stakeholders engaged in HCBS to implement the proposed transition plan. This document summarizes the steps West Virginia’s Bureau for Medical Services (BMS) undertook to develop the transition plans as well as planned activities related to compliance.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan, Recent amendments.

Amendments to the State Plan are available by year on this page.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person – Take me home

“West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”

“West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who: Are elderly (65 and older); Have a physical disability, or Have a serious mental illness.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

WV Aged and Disabled Waiver Program

 

“Aged and Disabled Waiver Program (ADW) is a long-term care alternative that provides services that enable an individual to remain at or return home rater than receiving nursing home care. The goals and objectives of this program are focused on providing services that are person-centered, promote choice, independence, participant-direction, respect, and dignity and community integration.” 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Medicaid Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver

 

“The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) Waiver (formerly the MR/DD Waiver Program) provides services that instruct, train, support, supervise, and assist individuals who have intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities in achieving the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency possible in their lives. The I/DD Waiver Program provides services in natural settings, homes and communities where the member resides, works, and shops instead of ICF/MR facilities.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The Mountain State of West Virginia is "Open for Business", and as such is ripe for the benefits of Employment First systems-change efforts as a way to improve socioeconomic outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon West Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
-0.34%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,844,128
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-6.75%
Change from
2014 to 2015
187,077
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.49%
Change from
2014 to 2015
47,517
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-0.67%
Change from
2014 to 2015
25.40%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-1.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
69.75%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 1,844,128
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 187,077
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 47,517
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 643,270
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 25.40%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 69.75%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 182,889
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 168,797
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 335,192
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 10,904
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 2,234
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 747
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 598
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 3,792
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,070
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 91,995

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,465
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 14,965
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 40,645
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 10.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,228
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 565
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,647
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 13
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 9
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 69.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.49

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,607
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 149,357
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $551,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $45,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $21,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 38.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,195
Number of people served in facility based work. 19
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,360
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 44.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.88%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.03%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.74%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 13.65%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 44.25%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.60%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 979,277
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,319
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,851
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 313,739
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 315,590
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 254
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 294
AbilityOne wages (products). $11,625
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,283,821

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 276
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 276

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the WVDDC meetings, DRS participates in two subcommittees; Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the Bureau for Behavioral Health on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. These are often individuals that are also XIX Medicaid Waiver eligible. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

DRS counselors will, at the time of application, gather information regarding an individual’s third party resources, including Medicaid. If it is determined that the individual receives Medicaid benefits, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual, regardless of that individual’s continued status with DRS. If an individual is approved to receive services from DRS, and begins to receive Medicaid benefits at a later time, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual from that time forward. No specific disability related information found. (Page 249)

(WVDDC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs. (Page 250)

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the WVDDC meetings, DRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the Bureau for Behavioral Health on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. These are often individuals that are also XIX Medicaid Waiver eligible. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes. (Page 252)  

Customized Employment
  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs.
  • BBHHF and DRS will work together in mediating problems in cases being served jointly in the programs.
  • DRS will meet monthly with BBHHF staff to review applicants for an Unmet Needs funding program to foster assistance to IDD individuals where traditional funding sources do not provide needed supports.
  • Individuals receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time.
  • (Page 250)
  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs.
  • BBHHF and DRS will work together in mediating problems in cases being served jointly in the programs.
  • DRS will meet monthly with BBHHF staff to review applicants for an Unmet Needs funding program to foster assistance to IDD individuals where traditional funding sources do not provide needed supports.
  • Individuals receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time. 

In order to provide quality and timely vocational rehabilitation services to West Virginians with behavioral health conditions who qualify, DRS collaborates with the BBHHF and its partners. BBHHF is the federally designated Single State Authority for mental health and substance use disorders and operates under the auspices of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. The primary programs within BBHHF and their partners that DRS works with are as follows: 

  • The Office of Consumer Affairs and Community Outreach (CACO), is charged with providing collaborative support to the clinical section of the Office of Programs through the provision of legislative tracking, disaster coordination and response, development and operation of a Consumer Advisory Council, coordination of BBHHF training activities, researching and circulating information on evidence–based and emerging best practices, development of health promotion and wellness campaigns, researching and applying for high priority discretionary grants, and by providing a centralized response to requests for assistance and patient grievances. DRS maintains a relationship with this office and has worked together on anti–stigma campaigns, supporting recovery coaching and peer support, and training in the area of mental health first aid and medication assisted treatment. (Page 253)
Braiding/Blending Resources
  • Creating cross–system data capacity: using diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and also, the use performance data to assess the value of those investments.
  • Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. 

This State Plan provides the policy framework and direction for day–to–day operations of WIOA funded programs. The role of state agency and state department plan partners under this plan is to provide policy direction, program oversight, support, and technical assistance for and to local and regional service providers covered by the plan. State plan partners include the following: 

  • WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV)
  • West Virginia Workforce Development Board (WDB)
  • West Virginia Community and Technical College System (CTCS)
  • West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE)
  • West Virginia State Board of Education (SBE)
  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS)
  • West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR)
  • Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development (Page 51)
  • The braiding of WIOA Title I–B funded programs with other youth–directed state and local entities allows comprehensive services to be offered to all eligible low–income populations under WIOA. Available TANF funding will continue to support WIOA year–round services and summer employment activities.
  • Applicants for Title II funds are required to describe how they will align services with local workforce development plans and how they will coordinate with other available education, training, and social services in the community. Alignment with LWDB’s goals is required for funding.
  • Perkins postsecondary providers assist job seekers in identifying their interests and abilities and aligning these skills needs to training and financial resources to assist with training. Training is linked to the state’s high–demand jobs and is designed to lead to credential attainment. Both credential attainment and high–demand jobs alignment assist job seekers in securing employment with family–sustaining wages.(Page 72) 

DRS works with a variety of non–educational agencies serving out–of–school youth. The primary coordinated activities serving this population are with WIOA partners – WorkForce WV and the regional workforce development boards. DRS strives to coordinate referrals and services to eligible out–of–school youth served by the WIOA youth programs that are overseen by WorkForce WV and the regional workforce development boards. These partnerships allow for improved service delivery through the blending of resources and expertise among the agencies. For example, sharing costs allows DRS and other agencies to enhance outreach efforts, serve increased numbers of out–of–school youth, and improve outcomes for participants.

In addition to DRS’ reliance on WIOA partners in serving out–of–school youth, the agency continues to use community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) that have become a DRS–acknowledged vendor, to support the needs of this population across the state. (Page 228)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Section 188 of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act ensures nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for various categories of persons, including persons with disabilities, who apply for and participate in programs and activities operated by recipients of WIA Title I financial assistance. WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV) will use the "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: A Section 188 Disability Reference Guide” as a boilerplate in assuring compliance with Section 188 of WIOA. The Guide is designed to ensure meaningful participation of people with disabilities in programs and activities operated by recipients of financial assistance under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including those that are part of the One–Stop Center Network.

The Guide outlines promising practices in the provision of universal access and equal opportunity to programs and activities under WIOA. WorkForce West Virginia will use the Guide to monitor its own compliance, and that of its recipients, with the aspects of Section 188 and its implementing regulations that pertain to persons with disabilities. Through the monitoring process, WorkForce West Virginia can identify the disability–related requirements imposed by Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 38, to ensure equal access to programs and services under WIOA for people with disabilities. (Page 122)

7. The State has taken the appropriate action to be in compliance with WIOA section 188, Nondiscrimination, as applicable; Yes (Page 125)

Adherence to Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status and gender identity), national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or participation in any WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. By assuring adherence to Section 188 of WIOA, also assures acceptance to Title VI and title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; The Age Discrimination Act of 1975; Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

Adherence to the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, which prohibits the exclusion, on the basis of disability, from participation in or denial of the benefits of services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any public entity.

Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements (29 CFR, Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98): WIOA funded grantees certify that it will prove a drug-free workplace by notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the workplace and specifying the actions taken against employees for violation of such prohibition. Grantees certify that it will make a good faith effort to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of 28 CFR Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98. (Page 373)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

In addition to having a certified full–time WVABE SPOKES instructor, and in some cases a part time WVABE SPOKES instructor, the SPOKES program may have access to a career development consultant (CDC) and share a blended classroom with an ABE instructor.

Programs are encouraged to pilot and implement additional evidence and research–based strategies for college and career pathways that meet the goals of this plan.

Pursuant to WIOA, WorkForce West Virginia is required to allocate 75% of its local area youth funds to out–of–school youth. These funds are used to carry out programs that provide the following elements: (Page 162)

Other priorities for this funding cycle include facilitating the implementation of models for integrated education and training and continuing to grow the bridge and career pathways program models. Additionally, some funds will be used for the permissible activity of the development and implementation of a system to assist in the transition from adult education to post-secondary education and training, including linkages with postsecondary educational institutions or institutions of higher education, is another priority. The development and piloting of strategies for improving teacher quality and retention are critical to the long-term success of adult education, and best practices in these areas are provided through WV Adult Education Professional Development. The development and implementation of programs and services to meet the needs of adult learners with learning disabilities or English language learners, which may include new and promising assessment tools and strategies based on scientifically valid research, are included in the professional development activities provided to grant recipients. (Page 200)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

The group of 20 to 24 year olds contains an estimated number of 122,531. Of these, 66.9 percent are in the labor force with an estimated 58.4 percent employed. The corresponding unemployment rate is 12.6 percent. In 2014, 97 unemployed within the age range of 19 to 24 exhausted unemployment benefits. In 2015, that number had risen to 227.

The group of 25 to 44 year olds contains 447,092, the largest number among all age groups. Approximately 74.7 percent are in the labor force, with 69.0 percent employed. The unemployment rate for this group is 7.3 percent. In 2014, 931 unemployed within the age range of 25 to 44 exhausted unemployment benefits. That number rose to 1,652 in 2015. (Page 19)

The West Virginia population age 16 and over for whom the poverty status is determined during the 2014 survey is estimated to be 1,464,695, with 343,308 estimated to have a disability and 1,121,387 having no disability. Approximately 16.7 percent of this total civilian non–institutionalized population was below 100 percent of the poverty level. An estimated 24.0 percent of those having a disability are found in this group. Those at 100 to 149 percent of the poverty level registered at 10.2 percent. An estimated 14.6 percent of those with a disability are contained in this group. Persons at or above 150 percent of the poverty level are estimated at 73.1 percent. An estimated 61.4 percent of individuals with a disability are found in this group. In 2014, the number of unemployed with a disability who exhausted their unemployment benefits was 31. This number nearly doubled to 59 in 2015. (Page 20)

  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services strives to align its activities and services with other agencies, including WIOA partners. Because West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services provides services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), many alignment activities occur on the individual consumer level. West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services’ Client Services Manual Section 2501.3 requires VR counselors to assess and utilize, if appropriate, any third party comparable benefits and services. Furthermore, the Client Services Manual Section 3502.13 allows West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services consumers to request the VR counselor to participate in the arrangement and coordination of services not included in the IPE if those services are available from third party resources without cost to West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services and the VR counselor determines that the services would be appropriate to assist the individual in securing employment. One example of this alignment occurs with West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services consumers that choose to receive four–year and/or community college training; consumers must utilize grants and other non–loan resources prior to West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services providing financial support.
  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is mandated not only to coordinate services and resources with comparable services and benefits providers, but also to collect and report these data (any involvement with a comparable services benefits provider in relation to 33 service categories) to the federal Rehabilitation Services Administration at the individual consumer level. The collection, monitoring, and evaluation of these data allow West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services to ensure coordination and alignment is taking place across the state.  (Page 73)

Programs like these bring together employers, job seekers, and WIOA partner agencies. By identifying the needs of employers and sharing resources to train individuals, the state as a whole benefits from the West Virginia WDS. Community colleges and technical schools have a unique ability to specialize programs across the state depending on the demands of the local economy, including the needs of employers and job seekers. For example, in 2015, Proctor and Gamble announced a large production facility to be built in West Virginia; the facility will provide up to 700 jobs. From the Governor’s announcement about the project:

“These are good–paying jobs with great benefits,” Governor Tomblin said. “And P&G is a world–class company that’s committed to hiring skilled West Virginia workers. Through a partnership with Blue Ridge Community and Technical College, P&G is working hard to train its new employees and provide them with the skills they need to succeed in today’s jobs and those that will be available well into the future.” (page 78)

In serving veterans, DRS will continue to work closely with the Department of Education and student veteran organizations at colleges, universities, trade schools and other institutions of higher learning to create “veteran friendly” learning environments. The state will continue to support partners in education with focused outreach and coordination with community partners while supporting veterans and their family members to take full advantage of educational benefits that they have earned. This alignment of services will leverage these education and training platforms to focus on job skills that meet the needs of employers within the regions. Education will coordinate with partners to link employers to these educational institutions and programs to ensure that we graduate skilled applicants who have the greatest potential to move successfully into employment. (Page 82)

In addition, those selected to participate in UI Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) will receive all of the mandatory program components to include the creation of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) and additional services such as job search workshops, job search assistance or referrals to other partner programs. The RESEA workshop is designed to motivate and encourage those likely to exhaust benefits by exploring previous work experience, accomplishments and unique skill sets and how to effectively use while job searching. During the workshop individuals identify strengths and skill sets, set short and long term goals, begin developing a job search plan, and effectively network both in person and using social media. (Page 171)

DRS Response to Observation/Recommendation 4: DRS agrees with the importance of quality relationships with higher education institutions in better serving TY with disabilities. Several strategies to improve strategies to TY have been developed and utilized to establish and maintain working relationships with key stakeholders, including institutions of higher education. DRS works with secondary schools and institutions of higher education in many ways to form partnerships and better serve TY with disabilities. In addition to covering all high schools in the state, DRS has liaison counselors assigned to institutions of higher education including colleges, universities, and vocational/technical centers across the state. DRS staff members also attend and present at the annual West Virginia Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators Conference to increase awareness and knowledge of DRS services to higher education staff members statewide. To ensure DRS transition counselors are aware of changes in higher education, a representative from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission presented at the annual DRS Transition Conference. DRS will continue to explore this recommendation to assess the potential benefits and impact of a committee comprised of DRS staff, SRC members, educators, and other pertinent parties. DRS will also explore additional methods of information dissemination such as the use of its higher education liaisons and email list–servs. (Page 224)

DRS offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Additionally, counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. In FY 2015, DRS re–structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre–employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities. (Page 232)

  1. Obtain written parental consent; and
  2. Inform the parent that their refusal to permit the district to access the private insurance does not relieve the district of its responsibility to ensure that all required services are provided at no cost. 

Public Insurance Funds: Education may use the Medicaid or other public insurance benefits programs in which a student participates to provide or pay for services required. With regard to services required to provide FAPE to an eligible student under this part, Education may not: 

  1. Require parents to sign up for or enroll in public benefits or insurance programs in order for their child to receive FAPE under IDEA regulations;
  2. Require parents to incur an out–of–pocket expense, such as the payment of a deductible or co–pay incurred in filing a claim for services provided pursuant to this part, but may pay the cost that the parent otherwise would be required to pay; and
  3. Use a student’s benefits under a public benefits or insurance program if that use would
    1. decrease available lifetime coverage or any other insured benefit;
    2. result in the family paying for services that would otherwise be covered by the public benefits or insurance program and that are required for the child outside of the time the child is in school;
    3. increase premiums or lead to the discontinuation of benefits or insurance; or
    4. risk loss of eligibility for home and community–based waivers, based on aggregate health–related expenditures. (Page 239)

If education is unable to obtain parental consent to use the parent’s private insurance, or public benefits or insurance when the parents would incur a cost for a service specified on their child’s IEP, the district may use Part B funds to pay for services to ensure FAPE. To avoid financial cost to parents who otherwise would consent to use private insurance or public benefits or insurance if the parent would incur a cost, the district may use its Part B funds to pay the cost the parents otherwise would have to pay to use the parents’ benefits insurance (e.g., the deductible or co–pay amounts).

Proceeds from public or private insurance will not be treated as program income as pursuant to 34 CFR §80.25(2). If a district spends reimbursements from Federal funds (e.g., Medicaid) for services under this part, those funds will not be considered "State or local" funds for purposes of the maintenance of effort provisions of Part B of IDEA 2004. (Page 240)

DRS counselors will, at the time of application, gather information regarding an individual’s third party resources, including Medicaid. If it is determined that the individual receives Medicaid benefits, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual, regardless of that individual’s continued status with DRS. If an individual is approved to receive services from DRS, and begins to receive Medicaid benefits at a later time, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual from that time forward.

Individuals receiving services from BMS will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BMS expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time. Similarly, DRS consumers who are Medicaid–eligible will be referred to BMS.

DRS also maintains an MOU with the Division of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD), within the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF), the State agency with primary responsibility for providing services and supports for individuals with intellectual disabilities and individuals with developmental disabilities. DRS interacts with both BBHHF and its subsidiary, DIDD. (Page 249)

Another major theme from these comments included improvements in information sharing and awareness. This theme was multi–faceted, weaving through multiple types of information to be shared with various stakeholders, including consumers. Several CRPs/CSPs indicated that DRS counselors lacked awareness about services, while some made a recommendation for information–sharing meetings to serve as a remedy for such a deficiency. Other CRPs/CSPs provided comments indicating a need for more consumer–related awareness including greater consideration of the consumers’ needs when selecting services, more information about the consumers at the time of referral, and educating consumers about the effects that employment can have on their other benefits.

Funding, aside from the funding generated from an increase in referrals, was an additional theme found in the comments of CRPs regarding DRS improvement. These comments regarding funding varied, from requests for grant monies to increases in service fees. (Page 295)

  1. DETERMINE WHETHER COMPARABLE SERVICES AND BENEFITS ARE AVAILABLE TO THE INDIVIDUAL IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 101(A)(8) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  2. COMPLY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN INDIVIDUALIZED PLAN FOR EMPLOYMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 102(B) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  3. COMPLY WITH REQUIREMENTS REGARDING THE PROVISIONS OF INFORMED CHOICE FOR ALL APPLICANTS AND ELIGIBLE INDIVIDUALS IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 102(D) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  4. PROVIDE VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES TO AMERICAN INDIANS WHO ARE INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES RESIDING IN THE STATE, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 101(A)(13) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT. (Page 361)

Adherence to the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, which prohibits the exclusion, on the basis of disability, from participation in or denial of the benefits of services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any public entity.

Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements (29 CFR, Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98): WIOA funded grantees certify that it will prove a drug-free workplace by notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the workplace and specifying the actions taken against employees for violation of such prohibition. Grantees certify that it will make a good faith effort to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of 28 CFR Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98. (Page 373)

School to Work Transition

West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. A greater emphasis is now being placed for counselors to do outreach with these students and their parents/guardians during their sophomore year (rather than their junior year, as was formerly practiced) in order to maximize the counseling opportunities. (Page 156)

DRS offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Additionally, counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. In FY 2015, DRS re–structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre–employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities.(Page 232)

School (PETS) rehabilitation counselors also are invited to participate in IEP meetings. During these meetings the counselor describes DRS services, policies, and procedures as appropriate. The DRS counselor determines the student’s eligibility and order of selection category utilizing information generated from the school, the student, and DRS. Prior to or shortly after the student’s IEP transition meeting occurs, IPE development begins so both the student and counselor have an idea of what rehabilitation services will be necessary to meet the student’s vocational goal. Therefore, if the student needs additional training or assessment prior to vocational goal determination, this information is already collected so that planned rehabilitation services may begin. IPE development and approval for students with disabilities, including those able to be served if DRS is on an order of selection, will begin as early as appropriate during the transition process, but before the student, determined to be eligible, leaves the school setting. (Page 232)

Rehabilitation may be responsible for services that occur outside of the school environment that are vocationally oriented and are specifically intended to prepare the student for post–secondary training or work. Rehabilitation is not responsible for payment of any service that has not been directly agreed to during the development of a student’s IEP and is not included as a service on a student’s IPE for Rehabilitation services. Rehabilitation is not responsible for career development activities that are part of a School to Work initiative within the school system. The responsibility for implementing the requirements of Department of Education Policy 2510 remains with the school system.

The transference to the student of assistive technology devices that have been purchased by the Local Education Agency (LEA) will occur consistent with the surplus equipment policies and regulations in existence within each LEA. After the student has exited the school system, Rehabilitation may reimburse the LEA at a rate in accordance with the surplus equipment policy, dependent upon the student’s continued need or desire for the equipment, the condition of the equipment, and its future usefulness. (Page 240)

Teacher or aide who worked with them throughout high school. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities. STEP methodology allows students to build on previous success with someone they know and trust. In 2014, a Rehabilitation Services Specialist position was added to further expand the program throughout the state. This additional position has yielded excellent progress, with a substantial increase in the number of STEP vendors and increased communication with local school staff across the state in 2015. 

  • Continued to meet with WV Department of Education officials in an effort to develop a system to identify students with disabilities who are at high risk for dropping out of high school and provide information for the One Year Exit Survey.
  • DRS collaborated with WV Office of Institutional Education as well as the Division of Juvenile Services (DJS) to develop a cooperative agreement regarding the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to TY who are institutionalized. In 2015, DRS provided information to DJS staff regarding agency–offered services. (Page 346)
  1. West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council funds;
  2. West Virginia Title XIX––Home and Community–Based Waiver Program for intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) recipients; and
  3. Social Security Administration work incentives programs. 

In implementing school–to–work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks.

Through a combined effort with other disability organizations, $100,000 was appropriated by the West Virginia Legislature for supported employment follow–along services (extended supported employment services). DRS serves as the fiscal agent for these funds. DRS has created program guidelines governing the use of state–appropriated funds for extended services under the supported employment program created by state statute in 1993. The sole use of the state funds attached to this program is to provide extended services for individuals not eligible from any other funding source. All providers of supported employment services may access these funds for individuals who are eligible under the guidelines. At the end of FY 2015, DRS had sponsored 67 individuals in the extended supported employment program so they could maintain and retain their jobs within the community. This figure represents the cooperative efforts of 13 CRPs. (Page 243)

Data Collection

2. Is for the purpose of educational and career advancement. As part of the application process, the Office of Adult Education will collect basic information from the eligible provider (e.g., location, service area, scope of the program, demographics served, demonstrated need, data collection, and fiscal management procedures).

Additionally, each applicant will be required to submit a proposed budget and program design information.

Applicants will be expected to respond to Office of Adult Education priorities and the Title II considerations for funding Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) programs. (Page 189)

12.  Data Collection: The degree to which the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance.

13.  English Language Acquisition and Civics Education: The degree to which the eligible provider has a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs.

  1. Scope: Previously funded programs will be required to provide data demonstrating they have met previously proposed state targets for the required percent of students making a measureable academic gain. Programs must also provide data demonstrating successful transition to post-secondary education or employment by students. For programs not previously funded, programs with data demonstrating student learning gain and successful transition to post-secondary education or employment, especially for individuals with low-levels of literacy, will be given preference. Both measureable skill gain data and transition data must be disaggregated to demonstrate a history of success with students who have low levels of literacy, disabilities (including learning disabilities), or are English language learners. (Page 190)

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on: 

  • The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the fourth quarter after exit from the program;
  • The median earnings of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who obtain a recognized postsecondary credential, or a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, during participation in or within 1 year after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who, during a program year, are in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measurable skill gains toward such a credential or employment; (Page 308)

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on: (Page 327)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Again, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is already providing services that will allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work–based learning. We partner with employers to provide work–based training, and on the job training. This training is provided across all sectors of employment and ensures job–driven training rather than erroneous skills training.

Other:

  • Development of apprenticeship training programs
  • Alignment and expansion of entrepreneurship/start–up ventures
  • Promotion of youth entrepreneurship in our school system (Page 46)
Career Pathways

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development 

It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and training for skills that lead to quality employment in high–demand jobs or entry–level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low–skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth enter the labor force and/or advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. (Page 47)

  • The State will work with employer partnerships, community colleges, secondary and post–secondary certificate granting schools and LWDBs to establish micro– credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities. A component of this effort will include sharing best practices with the intent of scaling the effort statewide.
  • The State will promote the development of Registered Apprenticeship programs, with a focus on non–traditional industries and occupations. The state will also support efforts of existing Registered Apprenticeship programs to recruit female and minority apprentices. The Office of Apprenticeship will provide technical assistance to grantees and will promote the creation and growth of apprenticeship programs beyond the grantees. (Page 65)

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development 

It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and training for skills that lead to quality employment in high–demand jobs or entry–level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low–skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. 

  • The State will continue to refine the Sector Partnership program to ensure career pathways are aligned to occupations that are high–demand, have higher skill needs and are likely to pay family–sustaining wages. The State will consult with LWDBs and engage employers to accomplish this goal.
  • The State will also support placement of individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, into quality entry–level jobs that provide the work experience and non–technical skills necessary to lead to employment in high– demand jobs, and will consult with LWDBs and engage employers to identify the career pathways for which such quality entry–level jobs can serve as pre–bridge and bridge models. (Page 66)
Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 362)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 38

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WV Adult Ed Instructor Handbook 2017-18 Section 16 SPOKES Program - 07/27/2017

Intense Job Search (Job Development and Follow-up)

“A Career Development Consultant (CDC) may be available to a program to provide assistance with enhancing the learner’s job readiness skills, as well provide job development and follow-up. While participating in SPOKES, especially during this component, the CDC may direct and assist students in their job search activities where applicable. The Career Development Consultant may provide up to six months of follow-up activities for students who gain unsubsidized employment. When students are assigned job development activities outside of the class, the CDC may be officially responsible for these activities and class time is still maintained at the SPOKES class. Coordinated efforts between a CDC, the regional adult education coordinator or designee, and the SPOKES instructor(s) are vital during this component.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Policy 2419: Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities - 04/13/2017

“The West Virginia Procedures Manual for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities outlines the policies and procedures districts must follow in meeting the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), West Virginia State Code, Chapter 18, Article 20 and Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities (2419).

To receive federal funds available under IDEA 2004, districts must adopt and implement appropriate special education policies and procedures. These policies and procedures must be consistent with federal and state laws, rules, regulations and legal requirements and must be approved by the West Virginia Department of Education…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (2017) - 10/01/2016

The plan shall be reviewed and revised not less than once every three years, to ensure the existence of appropriate planning, financial support and coordination, and other assistance to appropriately address, on a statewide and comprehensive basis, the needs in the State for: – The provision of State independent living services; – The development and support of a statewide network of centers for independent living; and – Working relationships between programs providing independent living services and independent living centers, the vocational rehabilitation program established under title I, and other programs providing services for individuals with disabilities. 34 CFR 364.20(f)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2016 Vocational Rehabilitation Section of WOIA State Plan (Draft 12/2015) - 12/11/2015

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the DDPC meetings, WVDRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large…    The DIDD program manager and WVDRS will interact regularly as part of the WV Developmental Disability Planning Council (DDPC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, WVDRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Diversifying Perspectives Art Contest - 09/03/2015

“The artwork selected as the Grand Exhibitor has been incorporated into a poster promoting National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a national campaign that raises awareness about disability employment issues and celebrates the many and varied contributions of America's workers with disabilities. Held annually in October, this year's theme is ‘My disability is one part of who I am.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

West Virginia Code Chapter 18 Article 101: West Virginia Supported Employment Program

“This section of the WV Code establishes a supported employment program, to be administered by the Division of Rehabilitative Services, with the goal of increasing employment for people with severe disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 19

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WV Adult Ed Instructor Handbook 2017-18 Section 16 SPOKES Program - 07/27/2017

Intense Job Search (Job Development and Follow-up)

“A Career Development Consultant (CDC) may be available to a program to provide assistance with enhancing the learner’s job readiness skills, as well provide job development and follow-up. While participating in SPOKES, especially during this component, the CDC may direct and assist students in their job search activities where applicable. The Career Development Consultant may provide up to six months of follow-up activities for students who gain unsubsidized employment. When students are assigned job development activities outside of the class, the CDC may be officially responsible for these activities and class time is still maintained at the SPOKES class. Coordinated efforts between a CDC, the regional adult education coordinator or designee, and the SPOKES instructor(s) are vital during this component.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Policy 2419: Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities - 04/13/2017

“The West Virginia Procedures Manual for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities outlines the policies and procedures districts must follow in meeting the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), West Virginia State Code, Chapter 18, Article 20 and Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities (2419).

To receive federal funds available under IDEA 2004, districts must adopt and implement appropriate special education policies and procedures. These policies and procedures must be consistent with federal and state laws, rules, regulations and legal requirements and must be approved by the West Virginia Department of Education…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (2017) - 10/01/2016

The plan shall be reviewed and revised not less than once every three years, to ensure the existence of appropriate planning, financial support and coordination, and other assistance to appropriately address, on a statewide and comprehensive basis, the needs in the State for: – The provision of State independent living services; – The development and support of a statewide network of centers for independent living; and – Working relationships between programs providing independent living services and independent living centers, the vocational rehabilitation program established under title I, and other programs providing services for individuals with disabilities. 34 CFR 364.20(f)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2016 Vocational Rehabilitation Section of WOIA State Plan (Draft 12/2015) - 12/11/2015

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the DDPC meetings, WVDRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large…    The DIDD program manager and WVDRS will interact regularly as part of the WV Developmental Disability Planning Council (DDPC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, WVDRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Diversifying Perspectives Art Contest - 09/03/2015

“The artwork selected as the Grand Exhibitor has been incorporated into a poster promoting National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a national campaign that raises awareness about disability employment issues and celebrates the many and varied contributions of America's workers with disabilities. Held annually in October, this year's theme is ‘My disability is one part of who I am.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

DVRS Supported Employment definition - 09/01/2014

Supported employment enables clients with the most significant disabilities to enter or retain competitive employment in an integrated work setting. Individuals eligible for this program need intensive job site training/job coaching and ongoing support services in order to perform their work after job placement and case closure occurs. Supported employment services shall be purchased only from Division-acknowledged service providers in accordance with the Division’s fee schedule.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education

West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council Five Year State Plan FFY 2017-2021 - 12/30/2013

“The West Virginia Council coordinated activities during the Fall of 2015 and Spring of 2016 that encouraged people to provide their views on a wide range of issues affecting people with developmental disabilities and their families. Nearly six hundred (600) people participated in thirteen (13) public forums, eight (8) focus groups or completed the Council Service Needs Survey with approximately 70% people with I/DD or family members taking part in the needs gathering activities.

This Plan seeks to strengthen advocacy and self-advocacy coalitions; improve how public services are provided to people with I/DD and their families; provide greater assurances that people with I/DD will be protected from abuse, isolation and neglect; improve opportunities for children to be educated in inclusive classrooms; facilitate efforts to improve supports for people who want to work; and assist and support communities in welcoming people with I/DD.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Workforce West Virginia Interagency Collaborative Team Memorandum of Understanding 2016-2017 - 09/01/2014

 

“West Virginia state agencies effectively collaborating to define, build and sustain an integrated comprehensive workforce development system that: Ensures universal access; has the right agency doing the right job; focuses on meeting the customer requirements; is uniform, consistent and responsive; advances a seamless delivery system that maximizes resources; remains flexible, yet expandable to grow; and fosters a continuous improvement culture for quality and innovation.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding between the Division of Rehabilitative Services and Department of Education on Transition - 10/30/2012

“The cooperative agreement shall assure that each student with a disability in the state who needs special education and/or vocational rehabilitation services is promptly identified and the appropriate transition services are made available to the individual.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WV Student Transition to Employment Project - 09/01/2012

 

“The Student Transition to Employment (STEP) Project is designed to train special education teachers and aides to become vendors with the WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS). Working in close partnership with the WVDRS School Counselor, this unique project allows for individuals with disabilities who are graduating from high school to receive job placement and training from the teacher or aide who worked with them throughout their high school careers. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities… STEP was made possible thanks to funding received from the WV Developmental Disabilities Council and WVDRS.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

WV Comprehensive Employment Systems Infrastructure Development (CES-ID) Grant - 12/01/2006

 

“A diverse team of agency administrators, partner organizations, and technical assistance providers collaborated to begin the process of creating a comprehensive and coordinated statewide employment support system. This map is the first product of the process and identifies “enabling prerequisites” for creating a more detailed strategic plan. Ten goals are articulated as guidelines for further progress.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SSA Youth Transition Demonstration: West Virginia Youth Works

 

“Human Resource Development Foundation, Inc. and the West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities partner to administer West Virginia Youth Works, which provides customized services and supports to SSI recipients, ages 15 to 25, in 19 counties. Services include assessment, planning, work experiences, job development, job placement support, benefits planning and counseling, and job retention services. The project enrolled 404 youths. YTD services ended March 2012.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

 

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Money Follows the Person – Take me home

  “West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”   “West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who:  Are elderly (65 and older);  Have a physical disability, or ; Have a serious mental illness.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

West Virginia Department of Education: Career Technical Education for students with disability - 10/01/2013

Career technical education (CTE) programs in West Virginia are designed for all students and prepare them for entering post-secondary education, training or the workforce. CTE Content Skill Sets (CSSs) are based on national industry recognized accreditation and credentialing standards. Many students with disabilities achieve great success in career and technical education programs with minimal accommodations. It is essential that CTE instructors and special education (SE) case managers collaborate to develop coordinated plans to meet the needs of individual students as indicated in the Individualized Education Program (IEP)

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV Customized Employment Grant

 

“This funding announcement is intended to provide support to agencies that can work with employers in meeting their needs by finding, maintaining and improving the employment status of individuals with disabilities in competitive employment in each region of the state.”

 “When the ADA was passed in 1990, Congress announced four public policy goals for people with disabilities: 1) equality of opportunity; 2) full participation; 3) independent living; and 4) economic self-sufficiency. The Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF) works in collaboration with the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Bureau for Medical Services (BMS), the WV Department of Education (DOE), the West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council (WV DDC), West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities (WVCED), and other partners to promote these goals. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Olmstead Council Legislative Priorities for 2015

1. Implement the West Virginia Olmstead Plan to ensure compliance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). 2. Eliminate the institutional bias in West Virginia's long term care system. 3. Develop and maintain a statewide, comprehensive transition and diversion program. 4. Implement a formal plan to address the major barrier of affordable, accessible and integrated housing options for people with disabilities. 5. Ensure people with disabilities have opportunities for employment, transportation and meaningful participation in their community

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Methodology for West Virginia’s Waiver Transition Plan Application

West Virginia underwent the process of developing a transition plan pursuant to 42 CFR 441.301(c)(6) that contains the actions the state will take to bring all West Virginia waivers into compliance with requirements set forth in 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4-5). West Virginia intends to work with the various providers, participants, guardians, and other stakeholders engaged in HCBS to implement the proposed transition plan. This document summarizes the steps West Virginia’s Bureau for Medical Services (BMS) undertook to develop the transition plans as well as planned activities related to compliance.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan, Recent amendments.

Amendments to the State Plan are available by year on this page.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person – Take me home

“West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”

“West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who: Are elderly (65 and older); Have a physical disability, or Have a serious mental illness.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

WV Aged and Disabled Waiver Program

 

“Aged and Disabled Waiver Program (ADW) is a long-term care alternative that provides services that enable an individual to remain at or return home rater than receiving nursing home care. The goals and objectives of this program are focused on providing services that are person-centered, promote choice, independence, participant-direction, respect, and dignity and community integration.” 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Medicaid Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver

 

“The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) Waiver (formerly the MR/DD Waiver Program) provides services that instruct, train, support, supervise, and assist individuals who have intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities in achieving the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency possible in their lives. The I/DD Waiver Program provides services in natural settings, homes and communities where the member resides, works, and shops instead of ICF/MR facilities.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

The Mountain State of West Virginia is "Open for Business", and as such is ripe for the benefits of Employment First systems-change efforts as a way to improve socioeconomic outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon West Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
-0.34%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,844,128
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-6.75%
Change from
2014 to 2015
187,077
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.49%
Change from
2014 to 2015
47,517
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-0.67%
Change from
2014 to 2015
25.40%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-1.09%
Change from
2014 to 2015
69.75%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 1,844,128
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 187,077
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 47,517
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 643,270
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 25.40%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 69.75%
Overall unemployment rate. 6.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.80%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 182,889
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 168,797
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 335,192
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 10,904
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 2,234
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 747
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 598
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 3,792
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). N/A

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,070
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.80%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 91,995

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,465
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 14,965
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 40,645
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 10.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.60%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,228
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 565
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,647
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.03

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 13
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 9
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 69.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.49

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,607
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 149,357
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $551,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $45,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $21,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 38.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,195
Number of people served in facility based work. 19
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,360
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 44.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.88%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.03%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.74%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 13.65%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 44.25%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 67.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.60%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 979,277
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,319
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,851
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 313,739
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 315,590
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 40
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 254
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 294
AbilityOne wages (products). $11,625
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,283,821

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 8
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 8
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 276
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 276

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the WVDDC meetings, DRS participates in two subcommittees; Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the Bureau for Behavioral Health on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. These are often individuals that are also XIX Medicaid Waiver eligible. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

DRS counselors will, at the time of application, gather information regarding an individual’s third party resources, including Medicaid. If it is determined that the individual receives Medicaid benefits, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual, regardless of that individual’s continued status with DRS. If an individual is approved to receive services from DRS, and begins to receive Medicaid benefits at a later time, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual from that time forward. No specific disability related information found. (Page 249)

(WVDDC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs. (Page 250)

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the WVDDC meetings, DRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the Bureau for Behavioral Health on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. These are often individuals that are also XIX Medicaid Waiver eligible. On both of these committees, DRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes. (Page 252)  

Customized Employment
  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs.
  • BBHHF and DRS will work together in mediating problems in cases being served jointly in the programs.
  • DRS will meet monthly with BBHHF staff to review applicants for an Unmet Needs funding program to foster assistance to IDD individuals where traditional funding sources do not provide needed supports.
  • Individuals receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time.
  • (Page 250)
  • The BBHHF administers several Customized Employment grants with vendors of DRS. BBHHF and DRS will jointly train the Community Rehabilitation Programs receiving these grants as well as DRS staff working with these programs.
  • BBHHF and DRS will work together in mediating problems in cases being served jointly in the programs.
  • DRS will meet monthly with BBHHF staff to review applicants for an Unmet Needs funding program to foster assistance to IDD individuals where traditional funding sources do not provide needed supports.
  • Individuals receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BBHHF or DIDD expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time. 

In order to provide quality and timely vocational rehabilitation services to West Virginians with behavioral health conditions who qualify, DRS collaborates with the BBHHF and its partners. BBHHF is the federally designated Single State Authority for mental health and substance use disorders and operates under the auspices of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. The primary programs within BBHHF and their partners that DRS works with are as follows: 

  • The Office of Consumer Affairs and Community Outreach (CACO), is charged with providing collaborative support to the clinical section of the Office of Programs through the provision of legislative tracking, disaster coordination and response, development and operation of a Consumer Advisory Council, coordination of BBHHF training activities, researching and circulating information on evidence–based and emerging best practices, development of health promotion and wellness campaigns, researching and applying for high priority discretionary grants, and by providing a centralized response to requests for assistance and patient grievances. DRS maintains a relationship with this office and has worked together on anti–stigma campaigns, supporting recovery coaching and peer support, and training in the area of mental health first aid and medication assisted treatment. (Page 253)
Braiding/Blending Resources
  • Creating cross–system data capacity: using diagnostic labor market data to assess where to invest, and also, the use performance data to assess the value of those investments.
  • Integrated service delivery: braiding resources and coordinating services at the local level to meet client needs. 

This State Plan provides the policy framework and direction for day–to–day operations of WIOA funded programs. The role of state agency and state department plan partners under this plan is to provide policy direction, program oversight, support, and technical assistance for and to local and regional service providers covered by the plan. State plan partners include the following: 

  • WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV)
  • West Virginia Workforce Development Board (WDB)
  • West Virginia Community and Technical College System (CTCS)
  • West Virginia Department of Education (WVDE)
  • West Virginia State Board of Education (SBE)
  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS)
  • West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR)
  • Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development (Page 51)
  • The braiding of WIOA Title I–B funded programs with other youth–directed state and local entities allows comprehensive services to be offered to all eligible low–income populations under WIOA. Available TANF funding will continue to support WIOA year–round services and summer employment activities.
  • Applicants for Title II funds are required to describe how they will align services with local workforce development plans and how they will coordinate with other available education, training, and social services in the community. Alignment with LWDB’s goals is required for funding.
  • Perkins postsecondary providers assist job seekers in identifying their interests and abilities and aligning these skills needs to training and financial resources to assist with training. Training is linked to the state’s high–demand jobs and is designed to lead to credential attainment. Both credential attainment and high–demand jobs alignment assist job seekers in securing employment with family–sustaining wages.(Page 72) 

DRS works with a variety of non–educational agencies serving out–of–school youth. The primary coordinated activities serving this population are with WIOA partners – WorkForce WV and the regional workforce development boards. DRS strives to coordinate referrals and services to eligible out–of–school youth served by the WIOA youth programs that are overseen by WorkForce WV and the regional workforce development boards. These partnerships allow for improved service delivery through the blending of resources and expertise among the agencies. For example, sharing costs allows DRS and other agencies to enhance outreach efforts, serve increased numbers of out–of–school youth, and improve outcomes for participants.

In addition to DRS’ reliance on WIOA partners in serving out–of–school youth, the agency continues to use community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) that have become a DRS–acknowledged vendor, to support the needs of this population across the state. (Page 228)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Section 188 of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act ensures nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for various categories of persons, including persons with disabilities, who apply for and participate in programs and activities operated by recipients of WIA Title I financial assistance. WorkForce West Virginia (WFWV) will use the "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: A Section 188 Disability Reference Guide” as a boilerplate in assuring compliance with Section 188 of WIOA. The Guide is designed to ensure meaningful participation of people with disabilities in programs and activities operated by recipients of financial assistance under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including those that are part of the One–Stop Center Network.

The Guide outlines promising practices in the provision of universal access and equal opportunity to programs and activities under WIOA. WorkForce West Virginia will use the Guide to monitor its own compliance, and that of its recipients, with the aspects of Section 188 and its implementing regulations that pertain to persons with disabilities. Through the monitoring process, WorkForce West Virginia can identify the disability–related requirements imposed by Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 38, to ensure equal access to programs and services under WIOA for people with disabilities. (Page 122)

7. The State has taken the appropriate action to be in compliance with WIOA section 188, Nondiscrimination, as applicable; Yes (Page 125)

Adherence to Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status and gender identity), national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or participation in any WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. By assuring adherence to Section 188 of WIOA, also assures acceptance to Title VI and title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; The Age Discrimination Act of 1975; Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

Adherence to the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, which prohibits the exclusion, on the basis of disability, from participation in or denial of the benefits of services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any public entity.

Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements (29 CFR, Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98): WIOA funded grantees certify that it will prove a drug-free workplace by notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the workplace and specifying the actions taken against employees for violation of such prohibition. Grantees certify that it will make a good faith effort to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of 28 CFR Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98. (Page 373)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

In addition to having a certified full–time WVABE SPOKES instructor, and in some cases a part time WVABE SPOKES instructor, the SPOKES program may have access to a career development consultant (CDC) and share a blended classroom with an ABE instructor.

Programs are encouraged to pilot and implement additional evidence and research–based strategies for college and career pathways that meet the goals of this plan.

Pursuant to WIOA, WorkForce West Virginia is required to allocate 75% of its local area youth funds to out–of–school youth. These funds are used to carry out programs that provide the following elements: (Page 162)

Other priorities for this funding cycle include facilitating the implementation of models for integrated education and training and continuing to grow the bridge and career pathways program models. Additionally, some funds will be used for the permissible activity of the development and implementation of a system to assist in the transition from adult education to post-secondary education and training, including linkages with postsecondary educational institutions or institutions of higher education, is another priority. The development and piloting of strategies for improving teacher quality and retention are critical to the long-term success of adult education, and best practices in these areas are provided through WV Adult Education Professional Development. The development and implementation of programs and services to meet the needs of adult learners with learning disabilities or English language learners, which may include new and promising assessment tools and strategies based on scientifically valid research, are included in the professional development activities provided to grant recipients. (Page 200)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

The group of 20 to 24 year olds contains an estimated number of 122,531. Of these, 66.9 percent are in the labor force with an estimated 58.4 percent employed. The corresponding unemployment rate is 12.6 percent. In 2014, 97 unemployed within the age range of 19 to 24 exhausted unemployment benefits. In 2015, that number had risen to 227.

The group of 25 to 44 year olds contains 447,092, the largest number among all age groups. Approximately 74.7 percent are in the labor force, with 69.0 percent employed. The unemployment rate for this group is 7.3 percent. In 2014, 931 unemployed within the age range of 25 to 44 exhausted unemployment benefits. That number rose to 1,652 in 2015. (Page 19)

The West Virginia population age 16 and over for whom the poverty status is determined during the 2014 survey is estimated to be 1,464,695, with 343,308 estimated to have a disability and 1,121,387 having no disability. Approximately 16.7 percent of this total civilian non–institutionalized population was below 100 percent of the poverty level. An estimated 24.0 percent of those having a disability are found in this group. Those at 100 to 149 percent of the poverty level registered at 10.2 percent. An estimated 14.6 percent of those with a disability are contained in this group. Persons at or above 150 percent of the poverty level are estimated at 73.1 percent. An estimated 61.4 percent of individuals with a disability are found in this group. In 2014, the number of unemployed with a disability who exhausted their unemployment benefits was 31. This number nearly doubled to 59 in 2015. (Page 20)

  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services strives to align its activities and services with other agencies, including WIOA partners. Because West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services provides services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), many alignment activities occur on the individual consumer level. West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services’ Client Services Manual Section 2501.3 requires VR counselors to assess and utilize, if appropriate, any third party comparable benefits and services. Furthermore, the Client Services Manual Section 3502.13 allows West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services consumers to request the VR counselor to participate in the arrangement and coordination of services not included in the IPE if those services are available from third party resources without cost to West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services and the VR counselor determines that the services would be appropriate to assist the individual in securing employment. One example of this alignment occurs with West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services consumers that choose to receive four–year and/or community college training; consumers must utilize grants and other non–loan resources prior to West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services providing financial support.
  • West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is mandated not only to coordinate services and resources with comparable services and benefits providers, but also to collect and report these data (any involvement with a comparable services benefits provider in relation to 33 service categories) to the federal Rehabilitation Services Administration at the individual consumer level. The collection, monitoring, and evaluation of these data allow West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services to ensure coordination and alignment is taking place across the state.  (Page 73)

Programs like these bring together employers, job seekers, and WIOA partner agencies. By identifying the needs of employers and sharing resources to train individuals, the state as a whole benefits from the West Virginia WDS. Community colleges and technical schools have a unique ability to specialize programs across the state depending on the demands of the local economy, including the needs of employers and job seekers. For example, in 2015, Proctor and Gamble announced a large production facility to be built in West Virginia; the facility will provide up to 700 jobs. From the Governor’s announcement about the project:

“These are good–paying jobs with great benefits,” Governor Tomblin said. “And P&G is a world–class company that’s committed to hiring skilled West Virginia workers. Through a partnership with Blue Ridge Community and Technical College, P&G is working hard to train its new employees and provide them with the skills they need to succeed in today’s jobs and those that will be available well into the future.” (page 78)

In serving veterans, DRS will continue to work closely with the Department of Education and student veteran organizations at colleges, universities, trade schools and other institutions of higher learning to create “veteran friendly” learning environments. The state will continue to support partners in education with focused outreach and coordination with community partners while supporting veterans and their family members to take full advantage of educational benefits that they have earned. This alignment of services will leverage these education and training platforms to focus on job skills that meet the needs of employers within the regions. Education will coordinate with partners to link employers to these educational institutions and programs to ensure that we graduate skilled applicants who have the greatest potential to move successfully into employment. (Page 82)

In addition, those selected to participate in UI Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) will receive all of the mandatory program components to include the creation of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP) and additional services such as job search workshops, job search assistance or referrals to other partner programs. The RESEA workshop is designed to motivate and encourage those likely to exhaust benefits by exploring previous work experience, accomplishments and unique skill sets and how to effectively use while job searching. During the workshop individuals identify strengths and skill sets, set short and long term goals, begin developing a job search plan, and effectively network both in person and using social media. (Page 171)

DRS Response to Observation/Recommendation 4: DRS agrees with the importance of quality relationships with higher education institutions in better serving TY with disabilities. Several strategies to improve strategies to TY have been developed and utilized to establish and maintain working relationships with key stakeholders, including institutions of higher education. DRS works with secondary schools and institutions of higher education in many ways to form partnerships and better serve TY with disabilities. In addition to covering all high schools in the state, DRS has liaison counselors assigned to institutions of higher education including colleges, universities, and vocational/technical centers across the state. DRS staff members also attend and present at the annual West Virginia Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators Conference to increase awareness and knowledge of DRS services to higher education staff members statewide. To ensure DRS transition counselors are aware of changes in higher education, a representative from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission presented at the annual DRS Transition Conference. DRS will continue to explore this recommendation to assess the potential benefits and impact of a committee comprised of DRS staff, SRC members, educators, and other pertinent parties. DRS will also explore additional methods of information dissemination such as the use of its higher education liaisons and email list–servs. (Page 224)

DRS offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Additionally, counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. In FY 2015, DRS re–structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre–employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities. (Page 232)

  1. Obtain written parental consent; and
  2. Inform the parent that their refusal to permit the district to access the private insurance does not relieve the district of its responsibility to ensure that all required services are provided at no cost. 

Public Insurance Funds: Education may use the Medicaid or other public insurance benefits programs in which a student participates to provide or pay for services required. With regard to services required to provide FAPE to an eligible student under this part, Education may not: 

  1. Require parents to sign up for or enroll in public benefits or insurance programs in order for their child to receive FAPE under IDEA regulations;
  2. Require parents to incur an out–of–pocket expense, such as the payment of a deductible or co–pay incurred in filing a claim for services provided pursuant to this part, but may pay the cost that the parent otherwise would be required to pay; and
  3. Use a student’s benefits under a public benefits or insurance program if that use would
    1. decrease available lifetime coverage or any other insured benefit;
    2. result in the family paying for services that would otherwise be covered by the public benefits or insurance program and that are required for the child outside of the time the child is in school;
    3. increase premiums or lead to the discontinuation of benefits or insurance; or
    4. risk loss of eligibility for home and community–based waivers, based on aggregate health–related expenditures. (Page 239)

If education is unable to obtain parental consent to use the parent’s private insurance, or public benefits or insurance when the parents would incur a cost for a service specified on their child’s IEP, the district may use Part B funds to pay for services to ensure FAPE. To avoid financial cost to parents who otherwise would consent to use private insurance or public benefits or insurance if the parent would incur a cost, the district may use its Part B funds to pay the cost the parents otherwise would have to pay to use the parents’ benefits insurance (e.g., the deductible or co–pay amounts).

Proceeds from public or private insurance will not be treated as program income as pursuant to 34 CFR §80.25(2). If a district spends reimbursements from Federal funds (e.g., Medicaid) for services under this part, those funds will not be considered "State or local" funds for purposes of the maintenance of effort provisions of Part B of IDEA 2004. (Page 240)

DRS counselors will, at the time of application, gather information regarding an individual’s third party resources, including Medicaid. If it is determined that the individual receives Medicaid benefits, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual, regardless of that individual’s continued status with DRS. If an individual is approved to receive services from DRS, and begins to receive Medicaid benefits at a later time, BMS will provide all Medicaid–covered services to the individual from that time forward.

Individuals receiving services from BMS will receive information on the eligibility requirements for DRS and the services DRS provides. If an individual receiving services from BMS expresses a desire to work, he or she will be referred to DRS at that time. Similarly, DRS consumers who are Medicaid–eligible will be referred to BMS.

DRS also maintains an MOU with the Division of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD), within the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF), the State agency with primary responsibility for providing services and supports for individuals with intellectual disabilities and individuals with developmental disabilities. DRS interacts with both BBHHF and its subsidiary, DIDD. (Page 249)

Another major theme from these comments included improvements in information sharing and awareness. This theme was multi–faceted, weaving through multiple types of information to be shared with various stakeholders, including consumers. Several CRPs/CSPs indicated that DRS counselors lacked awareness about services, while some made a recommendation for information–sharing meetings to serve as a remedy for such a deficiency. Other CRPs/CSPs provided comments indicating a need for more consumer–related awareness including greater consideration of the consumers’ needs when selecting services, more information about the consumers at the time of referral, and educating consumers about the effects that employment can have on their other benefits.

Funding, aside from the funding generated from an increase in referrals, was an additional theme found in the comments of CRPs regarding DRS improvement. These comments regarding funding varied, from requests for grant monies to increases in service fees. (Page 295)

  1. DETERMINE WHETHER COMPARABLE SERVICES AND BENEFITS ARE AVAILABLE TO THE INDIVIDUAL IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 101(A)(8) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  2. COMPLY WITH THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN INDIVIDUALIZED PLAN FOR EMPLOYMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 102(B) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  3. COMPLY WITH REQUIREMENTS REGARDING THE PROVISIONS OF INFORMED CHOICE FOR ALL APPLICANTS AND ELIGIBLE INDIVIDUALS IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 102(D) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT.
  4. PROVIDE VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES TO AMERICAN INDIANS WHO ARE INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES RESIDING IN THE STATE, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 101(A)(13) OF THE REHABILITATION ACT. (Page 361)

Adherence to the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, which prohibits the exclusion, on the basis of disability, from participation in or denial of the benefits of services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any public entity.

Certification Regarding Drug-Free Workplace Requirements (29 CFR, Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98): WIOA funded grantees certify that it will prove a drug-free workplace by notifying employees that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the workplace and specifying the actions taken against employees for violation of such prohibition. Grantees certify that it will make a good faith effort to maintain a drug-free workplace through implementation of paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), and (f) of 28 CFR Subtitle A, Appendix C to Part 98. (Page 373)

School to Work Transition

West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. A greater emphasis is now being placed for counselors to do outreach with these students and their parents/guardians during their sophomore year (rather than their junior year, as was formerly practiced) in order to maximize the counseling opportunities. (Page 156)

DRS offices are located in some of the state’s largest schools. Additionally, counselors visit every high school in the state to initiate rehabilitation services needed for transition from school to work. This allows the counselor to develop a collaborative relationship and assist the student in identifying goals, services, and service providers related to employment options prior to transition. In FY 2015, DRS re–structured its counselor assignments to increase service availability to students with disabilities. There are now 44 rehabilitation counselors assigned to work with the state’s 55 local education agencies and the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind. DRS’ school counselors specialize in providing pre–employment transition services (PETS) to students with disabilities. Of these 44 PETS counselors, 43 work solely with high school students and have no other assignments. Expected benefits include increased counselor presence in schools, increased IEP meeting attendance, increased provision of PETS, and an increase in outreach and awareness of VR services to high school students with disabilities.(Page 232)

School (PETS) rehabilitation counselors also are invited to participate in IEP meetings. During these meetings the counselor describes DRS services, policies, and procedures as appropriate. The DRS counselor determines the student’s eligibility and order of selection category utilizing information generated from the school, the student, and DRS. Prior to or shortly after the student’s IEP transition meeting occurs, IPE development begins so both the student and counselor have an idea of what rehabilitation services will be necessary to meet the student’s vocational goal. Therefore, if the student needs additional training or assessment prior to vocational goal determination, this information is already collected so that planned rehabilitation services may begin. IPE development and approval for students with disabilities, including those able to be served if DRS is on an order of selection, will begin as early as appropriate during the transition process, but before the student, determined to be eligible, leaves the school setting. (Page 232)

Rehabilitation may be responsible for services that occur outside of the school environment that are vocationally oriented and are specifically intended to prepare the student for post–secondary training or work. Rehabilitation is not responsible for payment of any service that has not been directly agreed to during the development of a student’s IEP and is not included as a service on a student’s IPE for Rehabilitation services. Rehabilitation is not responsible for career development activities that are part of a School to Work initiative within the school system. The responsibility for implementing the requirements of Department of Education Policy 2510 remains with the school system.

The transference to the student of assistive technology devices that have been purchased by the Local Education Agency (LEA) will occur consistent with the surplus equipment policies and regulations in existence within each LEA. After the student has exited the school system, Rehabilitation may reimburse the LEA at a rate in accordance with the surplus equipment policy, dependent upon the student’s continued need or desire for the equipment, the condition of the equipment, and its future usefulness. (Page 240)

Teacher or aide who worked with them throughout high school. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities. STEP methodology allows students to build on previous success with someone they know and trust. In 2014, a Rehabilitation Services Specialist position was added to further expand the program throughout the state. This additional position has yielded excellent progress, with a substantial increase in the number of STEP vendors and increased communication with local school staff across the state in 2015. 

  • Continued to meet with WV Department of Education officials in an effort to develop a system to identify students with disabilities who are at high risk for dropping out of high school and provide information for the One Year Exit Survey.
  • DRS collaborated with WV Office of Institutional Education as well as the Division of Juvenile Services (DJS) to develop a cooperative agreement regarding the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to TY who are institutionalized. In 2015, DRS provided information to DJS staff regarding agency–offered services. (Page 346)
  1. West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council funds;
  2. West Virginia Title XIX––Home and Community–Based Waiver Program for intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) recipients; and
  3. Social Security Administration work incentives programs. 

In implementing school–to–work transition services for individuals exiting the school system, DRS also collaborates with family resource networks.

Through a combined effort with other disability organizations, $100,000 was appropriated by the West Virginia Legislature for supported employment follow–along services (extended supported employment services). DRS serves as the fiscal agent for these funds. DRS has created program guidelines governing the use of state–appropriated funds for extended services under the supported employment program created by state statute in 1993. The sole use of the state funds attached to this program is to provide extended services for individuals not eligible from any other funding source. All providers of supported employment services may access these funds for individuals who are eligible under the guidelines. At the end of FY 2015, DRS had sponsored 67 individuals in the extended supported employment program so they could maintain and retain their jobs within the community. This figure represents the cooperative efforts of 13 CRPs. (Page 243)

Data Collection

2. Is for the purpose of educational and career advancement. As part of the application process, the Office of Adult Education will collect basic information from the eligible provider (e.g., location, service area, scope of the program, demographics served, demonstrated need, data collection, and fiscal management procedures).

Additionally, each applicant will be required to submit a proposed budget and program design information.

Applicants will be expected to respond to Office of Adult Education priorities and the Title II considerations for funding Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) programs. (Page 189)

12.  Data Collection: The degree to which the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance.

13.  English Language Acquisition and Civics Education: The degree to which the eligible provider has a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs.

  1. Scope: Previously funded programs will be required to provide data demonstrating they have met previously proposed state targets for the required percent of students making a measureable academic gain. Programs must also provide data demonstrating successful transition to post-secondary education or employment by students. For programs not previously funded, programs with data demonstrating student learning gain and successful transition to post-secondary education or employment, especially for individuals with low-levels of literacy, will be given preference. Both measureable skill gain data and transition data must be disaggregated to demonstrate a history of success with students who have low levels of literacy, disabilities (including learning disabilities), or are English language learners. (Page 190)

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on: 

  • The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the fourth quarter after exit from the program;
  • The median earnings of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who obtain a recognized postsecondary credential, or a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent, during participation in or within 1 year after exit from the program;
  • The percentage of program participants who, during a program year, are in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measurable skill gains toward such a credential or employment; (Page 308)

DRS acknowledges the legal requirement to report on the performance accountability indicators under Section 116 of WIOA. However, data collection on the performance accountability indicators is only beginning, making a report of DRS performance impossible at this time. As DRS moves forward in its task to place individuals with disabilities into competitive, integrated employment in program year (PY) 2016, it will collect and monitor participant data in order to generate reports on: (Page 327)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

Again, the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services is already providing services that will allow individuals with disabilities to avail themselves of work–based learning. We partner with employers to provide work–based training, and on the job training. This training is provided across all sectors of employment and ensures job–driven training rather than erroneous skills training.

Other:

  • Development of apprenticeship training programs
  • Alignment and expansion of entrepreneurship/start–up ventures
  • Promotion of youth entrepreneurship in our school system (Page 46)
Career Pathways

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development 

It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and training for skills that lead to quality employment in high–demand jobs or entry–level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low–skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth enter the labor force and/or advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. (Page 47)

  • The State will work with employer partnerships, community colleges, secondary and post–secondary certificate granting schools and LWDBs to establish micro– credentials that demonstrate job readiness, the attainment of employability skills and measurable skill gains aligned to career pathways for individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities. A component of this effort will include sharing best practices with the intent of scaling the effort statewide.
  • The State will promote the development of Registered Apprenticeship programs, with a focus on non–traditional industries and occupations. The state will also support efforts of existing Registered Apprenticeship programs to recruit female and minority apprentices. The Office of Apprenticeship will provide technical assistance to grantees and will promote the creation and growth of apprenticeship programs beyond the grantees. (Page 65)

Goal 3: Career Pathways Development 

It is imperative that the workforce development system provide education and training for skills that lead to quality employment in high–demand jobs or entry–level occupations that lead to high demand jobs. Career pathways must be diverse with multiple entry and exit points allowing individuals of varying abilities, including low–skilled adults and youth with multiple barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, to have realistic access to pathways. The State will support career pathways that help adults and youth advance among multiple occupations, advance within an occupation or move to a new occupation that has similar skills to a previous occupation. 

  • The State will continue to refine the Sector Partnership program to ensure career pathways are aligned to occupations that are high–demand, have higher skill needs and are likely to pay family–sustaining wages. The State will consult with LWDBs and engage employers to accomplish this goal.
  • The State will also support placement of individuals with barriers to employment, especially those with disabilities, into quality entry–level jobs that provide the work experience and non–technical skills necessary to lead to employment in high– demand jobs, and will consult with LWDBs and engage employers to identify the career pathways for which such quality entry–level jobs can serve as pre–bridge and bridge models. (Page 66)
Employment Networks

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 362)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 38

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WV Adult Ed Instructor Handbook 2017-18 Section 16 SPOKES Program - 07/27/2017

Intense Job Search (Job Development and Follow-up)

“A Career Development Consultant (CDC) may be available to a program to provide assistance with enhancing the learner’s job readiness skills, as well provide job development and follow-up. While participating in SPOKES, especially during this component, the CDC may direct and assist students in their job search activities where applicable. The Career Development Consultant may provide up to six months of follow-up activities for students who gain unsubsidized employment. When students are assigned job development activities outside of the class, the CDC may be officially responsible for these activities and class time is still maintained at the SPOKES class. Coordinated efforts between a CDC, the regional adult education coordinator or designee, and the SPOKES instructor(s) are vital during this component.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Policy 2419: Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities - 04/13/2017

“The West Virginia Procedures Manual for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities outlines the policies and procedures districts must follow in meeting the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), West Virginia State Code, Chapter 18, Article 20 and Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities (2419).

To receive federal funds available under IDEA 2004, districts must adopt and implement appropriate special education policies and procedures. These policies and procedures must be consistent with federal and state laws, rules, regulations and legal requirements and must be approved by the West Virginia Department of Education…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (2017) - 10/01/2016

The plan shall be reviewed and revised not less than once every three years, to ensure the existence of appropriate planning, financial support and coordination, and other assistance to appropriately address, on a statewide and comprehensive basis, the needs in the State for: – The provision of State independent living services; – The development and support of a statewide network of centers for independent living; and – Working relationships between programs providing independent living services and independent living centers, the vocational rehabilitation program established under title I, and other programs providing services for individuals with disabilities. 34 CFR 364.20(f)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2016 Vocational Rehabilitation Section of WOIA State Plan (Draft 12/2015) - 12/11/2015

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the DDPC meetings, WVDRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large…    The DIDD program manager and WVDRS will interact regularly as part of the WV Developmental Disability Planning Council (DDPC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, WVDRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Diversifying Perspectives Art Contest - 09/03/2015

“The artwork selected as the Grand Exhibitor has been incorporated into a poster promoting National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a national campaign that raises awareness about disability employment issues and celebrates the many and varied contributions of America's workers with disabilities. Held annually in October, this year's theme is ‘My disability is one part of who I am.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

West Virginia HB 2902 (ABLE Act) - 03/31/2015

"AN ACT to amend of the Code of West Virginia, 1931, as amended, by adding thereto a new article, designated §16-46-1, §16-46-2, §16-46-3, §16-46-4, §16-46-5, §16-46-6, §16-46-7 and §16-46-8, all relating to providing for the establishment of a program to allow savings accounts for individuals with a disability and their families to save private funds to support the individual with a disability, to be known as the West Virginia ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] Act."

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

West Virginia Code Chapter 18 Article 101: West Virginia Supported Employment Program

“This section of the WV Code establishes a supported employment program, to be administered by the Division of Rehabilitative Services, with the goal of increasing employment for people with severe disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 19

Working in West Virginia - 10/13/2017

“October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month and we are celebrating those who are working in West Virginia…..

The Work Incentives, Planning, and Assistance (WIPA) program is a Social Security funded program that helps to explain how working will affect a person’s Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Staff work with clients through all stages of employment to understand their options and share resources. For more info, visit wipa.cedwvu.org or call 304-293-4692.”

Systems
  • Other

West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities - 10/13/2017

“The West Virginia Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities is the federally designated State Authority for mental health and substance abuse, as well as the lead agency for intellectual and developmental disabilities and provides planning, direction, training and funding for prevention, treatment and recovery services throughout the state.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

West Virginia Uniform Application FY 2018/2019- State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/03/2017

“1. Does the state have policies for addressing early serious mental illness (ESMI)?

2. Has the state implemented any evidence based practices (EBPs) for those with ESMI?...

WV has a pilot program with Youth Service System (YSS) to address FEP (ESMI), First Episodes psychosis.  The program as YSS is called Quiet Minds.  The purpose is through the model know as Coordinated Specialty Care utilizing OnTrak NY as the model that fit best with West Virginia as our guide. Here is the list of … service types:

Coordination/case management services Supported employment/education Low dose medication treatment Individual therapy Social skills training Peer support Family support/education services Specialized services such as trauma therapy and multifamily therapy will be offered.”
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

WV Adult Ed Instructor Handbook 2017-18 Section 16 SPOKES Program - 07/27/2017

Intense Job Search (Job Development and Follow-up)

“A Career Development Consultant (CDC) may be available to a program to provide assistance with enhancing the learner’s job readiness skills, as well provide job development and follow-up. While participating in SPOKES, especially during this component, the CDC may direct and assist students in their job search activities where applicable. The Career Development Consultant may provide up to six months of follow-up activities for students who gain unsubsidized employment. When students are assigned job development activities outside of the class, the CDC may be officially responsible for these activities and class time is still maintained at the SPOKES class. Coordinated efforts between a CDC, the regional adult education coordinator or designee, and the SPOKES instructor(s) are vital during this component.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

West Virginia Policy 2419: Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities - 04/13/2017

“The West Virginia Procedures Manual for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities outlines the policies and procedures districts must follow in meeting the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), West Virginia State Code, Chapter 18, Article 20 and Regulations for the Education of Students with Exceptionalities (2419).

To receive federal funds available under IDEA 2004, districts must adopt and implement appropriate special education policies and procedures. These policies and procedures must be consistent with federal and state laws, rules, regulations and legal requirements and must be approved by the West Virginia Department of Education…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State Plan for Independent Living (2017) - 10/01/2016

The plan shall be reviewed and revised not less than once every three years, to ensure the existence of appropriate planning, financial support and coordination, and other assistance to appropriately address, on a statewide and comprehensive basis, the needs in the State for: – The provision of State independent living services; – The development and support of a statewide network of centers for independent living; and – Working relationships between programs providing independent living services and independent living centers, the vocational rehabilitation program established under title I, and other programs providing services for individuals with disabilities. 34 CFR 364.20(f)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

FY 2016 Vocational Rehabilitation Section of WOIA State Plan (Draft 12/2015) - 12/11/2015

In addition to interacting with XIX Medicaid Waiver staff as part of the DDPC meetings, WVDRS participates in two subcommittees, Employment First and Medley Management. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for intellectually/developmentally disabled (IDD) individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large…    The DIDD program manager and WVDRS will interact regularly as part of the WV Developmental Disability Planning Council (DDPC) meetings, as well as the Employment First and Medley Management committees. The Employment First committee focuses on promoting employment for IDD individuals as a first option among services providers, legislators, state policy makers, and the community at large. The Medley Management committee provides oversight and advice to the BBHHF on the state’s Medley program, which serves a specific group of IDD individuals that are at risk of institutionalization. On both of these committees, WVDRS promotes a focus on competitive, integrated employment outcomes.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Diversifying Perspectives Art Contest - 09/03/2015

“The artwork selected as the Grand Exhibitor has been incorporated into a poster promoting National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a national campaign that raises awareness about disability employment issues and celebrates the many and varied contributions of America's workers with disabilities. Held annually in October, this year's theme is ‘My disability is one part of who I am.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

DVRS Supported Employment definition - 09/01/2014

Supported employment enables clients with the most significant disabilities to enter or retain competitive employment in an integrated work setting. Individuals eligible for this program need intensive job site training/job coaching and ongoing support services in order to perform their work after job placement and case closure occurs. Supported employment services shall be purchased only from Division-acknowledged service providers in accordance with the Division’s fee schedule.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education

West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council Five Year State Plan FFY 2017-2021 - 12/30/2013

“The West Virginia Council coordinated activities during the Fall of 2015 and Spring of 2016 that encouraged people to provide their views on a wide range of issues affecting people with developmental disabilities and their families. Nearly six hundred (600) people participated in thirteen (13) public forums, eight (8) focus groups or completed the Council Service Needs Survey with approximately 70% people with I/DD or family members taking part in the needs gathering activities.

This Plan seeks to strengthen advocacy and self-advocacy coalitions; improve how public services are provided to people with I/DD and their families; provide greater assurances that people with I/DD will be protected from abuse, isolation and neglect; improve opportunities for children to be educated in inclusive classrooms; facilitate efforts to improve supports for people who want to work; and assist and support communities in welcoming people with I/DD.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Workforce West Virginia Interagency Collaborative Team Memorandum of Understanding 2016-2017 - 09/01/2014

 

“West Virginia state agencies effectively collaborating to define, build and sustain an integrated comprehensive workforce development system that: Ensures universal access; has the right agency doing the right job; focuses on meeting the customer requirements; is uniform, consistent and responsive; advances a seamless delivery system that maximizes resources; remains flexible, yet expandable to grow; and fosters a continuous improvement culture for quality and innovation.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding between the Division of Rehabilitative Services and Department of Education on Transition - 10/30/2012

“The cooperative agreement shall assure that each student with a disability in the state who needs special education and/or vocational rehabilitation services is promptly identified and the appropriate transition services are made available to the individual.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WV Student Transition to Employment Project - 09/01/2012

 

“The Student Transition to Employment (STEP) Project is designed to train special education teachers and aides to become vendors with the WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS). Working in close partnership with the WVDRS School Counselor, this unique project allows for individuals with disabilities who are graduating from high school to receive job placement and training from the teacher or aide who worked with them throughout their high school careers. The purpose of STEP is to provide a more seamless transition from school to work for students with disabilities… STEP was made possible thanks to funding received from the WV Developmental Disabilities Council and WVDRS.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

WV Comprehensive Employment Systems Infrastructure Development (CES-ID) Grant - 12/01/2006

 

“A diverse team of agency administrators, partner organizations, and technical assistance providers collaborated to begin the process of creating a comprehensive and coordinated statewide employment support system. This map is the first product of the process and identifies “enabling prerequisites” for creating a more detailed strategic plan. Ten goals are articulated as guidelines for further progress.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

SSA Youth Transition Demonstration: West Virginia Youth Works

 

“Human Resource Development Foundation, Inc. and the West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities partner to administer West Virginia Youth Works, which provides customized services and supports to SSI recipients, ages 15 to 25, in 19 counties. Services include assessment, planning, work experiences, job development, job placement support, benefits planning and counseling, and job retention services. The project enrolled 404 youths. YTD services ended March 2012.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

 

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Money Follows the Person – Take me home

  “West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”   “West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who:  Are elderly (65 and older);  Have a physical disability, or ; Have a serious mental illness.”  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

West Virginia Department of Education: Career Technical Education for students with disability - 10/01/2013

Career technical education (CTE) programs in West Virginia are designed for all students and prepare them for entering post-secondary education, training or the workforce. CTE Content Skill Sets (CSSs) are based on national industry recognized accreditation and credentialing standards. Many students with disabilities achieve great success in career and technical education programs with minimal accommodations. It is essential that CTE instructors and special education (SE) case managers collaborate to develop coordinated plans to meet the needs of individual students as indicated in the Individualized Education Program (IEP)

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

WV Customized Employment Grant

 

“This funding announcement is intended to provide support to agencies that can work with employers in meeting their needs by finding, maintaining and improving the employment status of individuals with disabilities in competitive employment in each region of the state.”

 “When the ADA was passed in 1990, Congress announced four public policy goals for people with disabilities: 1) equality of opportunity; 2) full participation; 3) independent living; and 4) economic self-sufficiency. The Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF) works in collaboration with the West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), the Bureau for Medical Services (BMS), the WV Department of Education (DOE), the West Virginia Developmental Disabilities Council (WV DDC), West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities (WVCED), and other partners to promote these goals. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan - 09/20/2017

The West Virginia Medicaid State Plan may be accessed from this page. It is available in sections in pdf. Format.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Olmstead Council Legislative Priorities for 2015

1. Implement the West Virginia Olmstead Plan to ensure compliance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). 2. Eliminate the institutional bias in West Virginia's long term care system. 3. Develop and maintain a statewide, comprehensive transition and diversion program. 4. Implement a formal plan to address the major barrier of affordable, accessible and integrated housing options for people with disabilities. 5. Ensure people with disabilities have opportunities for employment, transportation and meaningful participation in their community

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Methodology for West Virginia’s Waiver Transition Plan Application

West Virginia underwent the process of developing a transition plan pursuant to 42 CFR 441.301(c)(6) that contains the actions the state will take to bring all West Virginia waivers into compliance with requirements set forth in 42 CFR 441.301(c)(4-5). West Virginia intends to work with the various providers, participants, guardians, and other stakeholders engaged in HCBS to implement the proposed transition plan. This document summarizes the steps West Virginia’s Bureau for Medical Services (BMS) undertook to develop the transition plans as well as planned activities related to compliance.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

West Virginia Medicaid State Plan, Recent amendments.

Amendments to the State Plan are available by year on this page.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

M-WIN (Medicaid Work Incentive Network)

“M-WIN is a work incentive for people with disabilities or chronic health conditions. It allows individuals who work, to pay a monthly premium and keep or obtain Medicaid healthcare coverage. M-WIN eliminates a major barrier to employment - losing current healthcare benefits when an individual with a disability returns to work. It also creates an incentive for individuals with disabilities to obtain employment and earn health care coverage. M-WIN members can earn more money and save more money than Medicaid normally allows. Hundreds of West Virginians with disabilities are benefiting from M-WIN.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person – Take me home

“West Virginia was awarded a Money Follows the Person (MFP) Rebalancing Demonstration Grant by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in 2011… The purpose of the MFP initiative is to support state Medicaid programs in providing people with long-term care needs a greater choice of where to live and receive needed services and supports.”

“West Virginia’s Money Follows the Person initiative is called Take Me Home, West Virginia. The Program expects to transition at least 600 individuals from facility-based living to their own homes and communities over the demonstration period. The Program targets Medicaid beneficiaries who: Are elderly (65 and older); Have a physical disability, or Have a serious mental illness.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

WV Aged and Disabled Waiver Program

 

“Aged and Disabled Waiver Program (ADW) is a long-term care alternative that provides services that enable an individual to remain at or return home rater than receiving nursing home care. The goals and objectives of this program are focused on providing services that are person-centered, promote choice, independence, participant-direction, respect, and dignity and community integration.” 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WV Medicaid Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver

 

“The Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) Waiver (formerly the MR/DD Waiver Program) provides services that instruct, train, support, supervise, and assist individuals who have intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities in achieving the highest level of independence and self-sufficiency possible in their lives. The I/DD Waiver Program provides services in natural settings, homes and communities where the member resides, works, and shops instead of ICF/MR facilities.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)