Arizona

States - Big Screen

In the Grand Canyon State of Arizona, people appreciate the value of independence, so the need to promote career success is the top priority for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Arizona's VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
2.17%
Change from
2017 to 2018
7,171,646
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.63%
Change from
2017 to 2018
449,009
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.35%
Change from
2017 to 2018
173,613
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
9.15%
Change from
2017 to 2018
38.67%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.49%
Change from
2017 to 2018
75.68%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 6,931,071 7,016,270 7,171,646
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 432,087 428,198 449,009
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 150,434 150,434 173,613
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,684,035 2,757,032 2,822,052
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.82% 35.13% 38.67%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.47% 75.31% 75.68%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.30% 4.90% 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.00% 18.40% 18.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.80% 14.40% 13.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 445,060 451,180 471,575
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 451,859 448,637 465,829
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 723,614 728,348 761,990
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 37,528 35,260 40,732
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 202,584 200,428 218,760
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 40,201 46,132 47,536
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 15,069 18,590 18,420
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,459 1,302 621
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,048 31,892 29,136
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 52,000 38,293 38,969

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,424 4,559 4,753
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.30% 4.40% 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 154,824 153,257 151,124

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 23,063 26,938 29,931
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 54,724 56,501 62,009
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 106,445 105,496 113,259
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.70% 25.50% 26.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 23.50% 14.80% 23.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.40% 3.80% 5.20%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 10,400 6,870 11,694
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,396 1,778 2,551
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,446 3,321 3,586
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 60 50 72
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 35 30 39
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 60.00% 54.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.53 0.44 0.57

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,513
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 198 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 235 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 601 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,150 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,121 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 208 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 18.40% 22.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,921 6,025 5,501
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 229,585 230,232 228,210
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 27 33 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 113 95 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $19,952,000 $21,986,000 $24,550,418
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $6,248,000 $6,357,000 $6,321,775
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $106,125,000 $112,052,000 $119,308,256
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 20.00% 14.00% 19.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,347 1,090 1,223
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 7,088 10,306 10,784
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 30.80 27.50 33.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.94% 65.76% 66.57%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.76% 14.74% 14.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.11% 1.99% 2.33%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.39% 85.61% 83.96%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.36% 22.79% 21.51%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.34% 63.55% 61.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 74.98% 77.66% 75.27%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 38.98% 40.76% 39.66%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,177,897
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,735
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 15,781
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 599,746
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 615,527
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 10
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 755
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 765
AbilityOne wages (products). $157,071
AbilityOne wages (services). $6,995,048

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 1 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 0 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 43 38 26
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 44 40 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 4
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 15 0 28
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 999 1,979 1,093
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 26 26
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,014 2,005 1,151

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~DES/VR program staff is working cooperatively with Division of Developmental Disability staff and Employment First committee representatives to introduce systems change training to DES/VR and DD staff. The training will focus on the importance of providing the opportunity to work in a competitive integrated setting and developing supports within the employment setting to facilitate successful employment retention. Additionally, DES/VR and DD staff will be working with the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center to pilot supported employment opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities in Program Year 2018. (Page 202) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~An Intergovernmental Agreement between DES/Rehabilitation Services and the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services exists to coordinate services to mutual clients. VR counselors are assigned to work with behavioral health clinical teams throughout the state in order to enhance service delivery and customer satisfaction in the provision of customized employment and vocational services. (Page 175) Title I

Persons with Developmental Disabilities within the Foster Care System: Rehabilitation Services and DDD have a Memorandum of Understanding to enhance program delivery methods and provide customized employment services to mutual clients within the foster care system. Coordination, cooperation and collaboration between agencies will be facilitated by dedicated staff positions in an effort to provide and expand a continuum of comprehensive vocational services to the identified population. (Page 175) Title I

Rehabilitation Services and DDD have a Memorandum of Understanding to enhance program delivery methods and provide customized employment services to mutual clients within the foster care system. Coordination, cooperation and collaboration between agencies will be facilitated by dedicated staff positions in an effort to provide and expand a continuum of comprehensive vocational services to the identified population. (Page 176) Title I

IDENTIFY THE STRATEGIES THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE ACHIEVEMENT OF THE GOALS.
• Engaged Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to assist in identifying employers who are willing to customize employment for individuals with disabilities.
• Continued collaboration with the Division of Developmental Disabilities and Behavioral Health Services to effectively serve individuals with supported employment needs.
• Increased employer engagement activities through Employer Coordinators and connection with workforce development system. (Page 203) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~The VR program prepares persons with disabilities to be competitive in the labor market by offering services such as occupational/vocational training as well as undergraduate and advanced degrees. The VR program has the unique ability to support individuals in attending specialized or out-of-state schools for disability-related reasons, and Arizona VR clients have graduated from schools such as the Rochester Institute of Technology for the Deaf and Gallaudet University in New York. Education and training support services vary based on student need but many individuals receive tutoring, assistive technology, supplies/tools, and assistance arranging accommodations with the school’s Disability Resource Center. In Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2015, 1,470 individuals participated in a plan of services and received educational training supported by the VR program, and a total of $5,826,857 was spent to fund these educational endeavors. (Page 44) Title I

The Employer Coordinators facilitate networking meetings between employers and educational transition partners to provide employment and pre—employment transition services to youth with disabilities. Instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students with disabilities regarding employer engagement, opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, and secondary education resources, such as disability resource centers continue to be provided by Employer Coordinators throughout the state. (Page 181) Title IV
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.

DES/Rehabilitation Services is part of a multiagency Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) that encourages and facilitates the cooperation and collaboration between Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD), and the Public Education Agencies (PEA) represented by the ADE. The vision for the IGA is “to ensure a smooth and successful transition of students with disabilities to meaningful, gainful, and sustained employment, education, and community living.” (Page 176) Title IV

Under the umbrella of the IGA, DES/Rehabilitation Services provides coordinated transition services to 22 schools throughout the state. DES/Rehabilitation Services has 22 Third Party Cooperative Arrangements (TPCA) with PEAs to provide enhanced transition services. The TPCAs are commonly known as Transition from School to Work (TSW) programs. (Page 177) Title IV

Students who are able to participate in the Transition School to Work (TSW) program through a Third Party Cooperative Agreement (TPCA) are afforded the opportunity to participate in a structured program of services which integrates vocational rehabilitation services into the classroom environment. These services are provided by both the local PEA staff and VR staff. Involvement in these enhanced services are intended to allow the student to learn skills necessary to ameliorate disability related barriers to achieving their postsecondary goals. PEA and VR staff will continue to develop and coordinate new transition services and expand or modify existing services to accommodate the needs of students with disabilities. (Page 178) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services Employer Coordinators partner with secondary education schools, employers, and workforce development programs to provide pre—employment transition services and employment encounters for students and youth with disabilities across the state. Employer Coordinators partner with high school transition programs, VR transition counselors, and school and program administrators to facilitate job fairs, pre—employment workshops, apprenticeship opportunities, and employer panels at local high schools.

The Employer Coordinators facilitate networking meetings between employers and educational transition partners to provide employment and pre—employment transition services to youth with disabilities. Instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students with disabilities regarding employer engagement, opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, and secondary education resources, such as disability resource centers continue to be provided by Employer Coordinators throughout the state. (Page 181) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services works closely with the ADE Exceptional Student Services to provide opportunities to remain current in transition policies and procedures. An Intergovernmental Agreement exists that outlines cross training opportunities between partners. DES/Rehabilitation Services and ADE collaborate annually to provide a transition conference which serves to bring the community of providers together to learn about national policies, trends and best practices in serving youth with disabilities. Additionally, DES/Rehabilitation Services partners with ADE in providing a web based career information system named Arizona Career Information System (AzCIS) which allows students, families, education professionals, and VR staff to collaboratively assist students in developing appropriate and viable career goals. (Page 189) Title IV

Youth with disabilities continue to be an underserved population. Survey data reveals that Arizona DES/VR program is reaching about 20 percent of the total youth and students with disabilities. The education system in Arizona is complex. The Arizona Department of Education, the State Board of Education, 15 County Education Agencies and hundreds of district and charter governing boards oversee 230 discrete school districts, 406 charter holders and 13 Joint Technological Education Districts. Within these districts there are over 2000 public schools, including over 1500 district schools and over 500 charter schools. Reaching out to each of the districts and communicating the DES/VR program services has been challenging considering the multitude of individuals involved in the provision of services to students and youth with disabilities. Individuals with physical disabilities are also identified as being underserved by the DES/VR program. Less than 10 percent of the total VR population reports a disability which has physical limitations as a primary disability. It is difficult to discern if individuals are reporting other disability categories thus, the lower number or if individuals with physical disabilities are not aware or taking advantage of VR services. (Page 191) Title IV

Arizona VR is currently under an order of selection and is serving only the most significantly disabled individuals. Often, students with learning disabilities are made eligible but not considered to be most significantly disabled. Additionally, it is noted that students who receive special education services through the high school based on a 504 plan are not often referred to VR. Arizona VR is working closely with ADE to encourage the school system to refer not only those students with learning disabilities, but all students with disabilities who receive services through and Individualized Education Plan or a 504 plan. (Page 191-192) Title IV

When asked what other pre-employment transition services would be beneficial in assisting youth and students with disabilities, respondents listed transportation, community based work opportunities and job readiness skill development as identified service needs. (Page 192) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Focus on strategies targeting job seekers with barriers, including disabilities, ensuring that individuals with barriers are provided informed customer choice and appropriate assessments. This will include effective career pathways with multiple entry and exit points, including entry for individuals with low skills levels or other barriers and expansion of work-based learning opportunities, such as apprenticeship and on-the-job training (OJT), which may be suitable to individuals with limited work experience, low skills and/or academic credentials. (Page 55) Title I

Under WIOA, Arizona recognizes the need to expand opportunities statewide and develop robust career pathways that allow individuals with barriers and disabilities to participate and gain industry recognized credentials. Arizona will develop career pathways that include multiple aligned programs with funding by a variety of sources and driven by industry needs as defined through sector strategies and partnerships. Arizona chose the U.S. DOL’s Career Pathways Toolkit and the Shared Vision, Strong Systems Framework (CLASP, June 2014) as resources to develop an Arizona-specific definition that aligns with the WIOA definition and requirements for career pathways. This definition will serve as a foundation for the development of a state process for recognizing and evaluating career pathway programs. Implementation will focus on:
o Career pathways in specific occupations for each geographic area, including pathways that begin at lower educational attainment levels to provide opportunities for individuals with barriers and disabilities (Page 61) Title I

OJT will be utilized by the LWDAs to provide participants work experience, new transferable skills, and job placement upon successful completion of the training program. These opportunities are ideal for individuals with barriers, which can include disabilities. (Page 126) Title I

o Career Pathways: Develop robust career pathways that include multiple aligned programs with funding by a variety of sources and driven by industry needs as defined through sector strategies and partnerships. Entry points on these pathways must extend to adult learners with barriers such as disabilities, low basic skills, lack of a secondary diploma, and lack of English language skills. (Page 162) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

There is no linear progression from a single training event to lifelong self-sufficiency. The workforce system realizes that employment readiness, education, training, and continuous employment require repeated interaction with the workforce development and education systems. Job seekers enter the system with different levels of skills and readiness, and the system must provide an array of education and training models and modes. Work-based training, such as registered apprenticeship programs or OJT, can offer a supportive environment to individuals, including individuals with barriers and disabilities. Implementation will focus on: o Work-based training opportunities, including registered apprenticeship programs o Secondary education combined with career preparation o Outreach to targeted populations, such as veterans, individuals with disabilities, and disconnected youth o Exploration of possible incentives for employers to expand on-the-job training opportunities (Page 62) Title I

DES/Rehabilitation Services Employer Coordinators partner with secondary education schools, employers, and workforce development programs to provide pre—employment transition services and employment encounters for students and youth with disabilities across the state. Employer Coordinators partner with high school transition programs, VR transition counselors, and school and program administrators to facilitate job fairs, pre—employment workshops, apprenticeship opportunities, and employer panels at local high schools. (Page 181) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.
 

Employer/ Business

~~Untapped Arizona (UAZ) was established to support Arizona businesses meet their inclusive workforce needs by tapping into the labor pool of individuals with disabilities. UAZ is led by business leaders who are diversifying their own workforces by recruiting, hiring, retaining, and advancing workers with disabilities and actively encouraging other Arizona businesses to do the same. UAZ focuses on identifying and engaging the entire talent pool of individuals with disabilities regardless of whether or not they have a disability determination and/or are served by a government system. UAZ does not serve the job seeker customer, but rather the business customer, recognizing there are already systems, agencies, and services in place to support the job seeker to prepare for and find employment.

UAZ business leaders represent Arizona’s key industry sectors—information technology and related manufacturing, aerospace and defense, health care, and energy— and speak to the current and future labor needs of their sector. UAZ collaborates with employment service provider agencies to ensure they assist in driving the talent pool of individuals with disabilities to the AJC system, the state labor exchange system, to connect with qualified job candidates with disabilities. (Page 75) Title I

DES/Rehabilitation Services continues to review and enhance its relationships with local CRP providers as valued partners through quarterly CRP meetings. CRP meetings include review of various scopes of work, identification of and information about employer engagement opportunities, updated program information, and the opportunity for vendors to receive answers to questions, or bring issues to the attention of Rehabilitation Services management. These meetings are intended to further relationships and partnerships between DES/Rehabilitation Services and the CRP providers. To further enhance our working relationships with our community partners, each VR office has a representative staff attend the CRP meetings to ask questions, provide feedback, and develop a cooperative understanding of services for job seekers. (Page 179) Title IV

Employer Coordinators, in collaboration with other federal and state workforce agencies, county programs, and Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP) providers offer employer engagement opportunities to provide education and information about the qualified applicants available for hire. Monthly employer connection opportunities for community partners, VR counselors, and contracted vendors via teleconferences continue to be provided by the Employer Coordinators. VR has sponsored or co—sponsored educational events geared specifically for employers to include information on federal Schedule A hiring practices, tax credits or deductions, disability awareness training and other resources for education on hiring individuals with a disability. The provision of these training and informational sessions to employers has provided the opportunity to develop stronger partnerships with the employer community and has enhanced employment options for individuals with disabilities who are seeking employment. (Page 181) Title IV

The Employer Coordinators facilitate networking meetings between employers and educational transition partners to provide employment and pre—employment transition services to youth with disabilities. Instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students with disabilities regarding employer engagement, opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, and secondary education resources, such as disability resource centers continue to be provided by Employer Coordinators throughout the state. (Page 181) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services supports the continuous professional development of professional and paraprofessional staff through the provision of numerous training and educational opportunities throughout the year. Staff is presented with opportunities to participate in in-house trainings, webinars, conferences, community events, employer engagement presentations, and graduate level coursework necessary to meet qualified staff standards. These professional development opportunities focus on content areas such as assessment, ethics, vocational counseling, motivational interviewing, job development and placement, assistive technology, case management, case documentation, Traumatic Brain Injury, transition, and other specialty areas. Continuing education is available for those who are maintaining licensure or accreditation. (Page 188) Title IV

Data Collection

DES/VR began a systematic release of clients from Priority Category II in November 2016. Based on current activity, it is expected that the OOS will continue to experience a negative gain in Priority II with more clients being released or closed than determined eligible and Priority II. VR estimates that 1,113 clients will remain on the OOS in Priority II as of FFY 2019. VR will continue to develop methods for data collection and fiscal forecasting in order to continue a systematic release of clients from the waitlist. (Page 197) Title IV

In FFY 2019, the number of individuals who will be determined eligible but placed in Priority II or Priority III waitlist is 1,113 and 567 respectively. DES/VR does not expect to have the ability to serve all individuals in Priority Category II or any individuals in Priority Category III, but will continue to develop methods for fiscal forecasting and data collection in order to continue a systematic release of clients from Priority II. (Page 197) Title IV

The DES/VR case management system has been modified to include the WIOA data elements needed to collect Common Performance Measure data. In July 2017, the VR program started collecting data and submitting quarterly reports. The DES/VR program will utilize the data gathered each quarter to begin the process of measuring current to baseline current performance and gather enough data to inform the statistical adjustment model to negotiate target performance. (Page 201) Title IV

The DES/VR program engaged with several federally funded technical assistance centers to support the innovation and expansion activities allowable under WIOA. An intensive agreement was developed with the Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center to improve VR service delivery, integrate into the workforce development system, and transition to the common performance accountability system. Agreements with the National Technical Assistance Center of Transition and Youth Technical Assistance Center were also developed to improve and expand service delivery to potentially eligible students and youth with disabilities. (Page 202) Title IV

DES/VR is actively engaged in conversations with core partners and System 7, Libera case management system developers to develop effective and accurate data management processes which will allow DES/VR to report performance on the new common performance measures as prescribed in the WIOA. (Page 203) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

DES is responsible for the monitoring of workforce programs under Title I and Title III. Staff reviews client files and data entry for accuracy and compliance with policy. Annual site visits include the monitoring of physical accessibility as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act and Equal Employment Opportunity Act. Fiscal staff reviews the use of funds and compliance with policies and “Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements” issued by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in December 2013. Programs that do not meet requirements are put on a corrective action plan. All LWDAs use the AJC data system to record client data, allowing DES to prepare quarterly and annual reports as required by U.S. DOL. (Page 37) Titles I & III

The Workforce Administration has a primary focus on engaging and readying all job seekers for employment and will work toward aligning workforce programs for a seamless and accessible workforce system that is inclusive of all job seekers, connecting job seekers with in-demand jobs, and supporting equal access to services and employment opportunities for all job seekers, including those with barriers and disabilities. Active and strategic engagement and partnerships with educational partners and institutions in coordination with economic development agencies will further support positive outcomes for the employer, as the job creator, and the job seeker. (Page 65) Title I

To support this strategy, VR has facilitated continued education on accessibility issues though the funding of Disability Awareness/Sensitivity trainings as requested by ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers. The request for the local trainings are often one product of the accessibility discussions occurring in the LWDAs. In addition, VR local board representatives have provided guidance and insight with regards to physical access and various assistive technology needs of disabled individuals. (Page 67) Title IV

One-Stop Certification: This policy, effective August of 2017, establishes statewide objective criteria and procedures for use by local workforce development boards to certify ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers. The criteria is in adherence to WIOA requirements related to the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility, and continuous improvement, as well as measuring the local area’s progress in achieving the statewide vision for the ARIZONA@WORK Job Center delivery system outlined in the One-Stop Delivery System policy. LWDBs must certify to be eligible to use infrastructure funds in the State funding mechanism. This policy applies to ARIZONA@WORK Job Center comprehensive, affiliate and specialized sites. (Page 92) Title I

The Council is the leading body in implementing and monitoring the State Unified Plan, providing statewide policy direction, building collaborative relationships, and coordinating resources. The Council oversees the efficiency, accessibility and continuous improvement of Arizona’s workforce system. (Page 94) Title I

ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers are overseen by DES and monitored annually to ensure accessibility for individuals with disabilities. The State is committed to making all services, facilities and information accessible for individuals with disabilities. This applies to all programs, activities, and services provided by or made available to potential employees, volunteers, contractors, service providers, licensees, clients, and potential clients within the ARIZONA@WORK system. To reinforce this commitment, all recipients and service providers are required to provide written assurance in their agreements, grants and contracts that they are committed to and will comply with the requirements of the Workforce Innovative & Opportunity Act (WIOA) Section 188, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and with 29 CFR Part 32 and Part 38. The State WIOA EO Officer utilizes the ADA Checklist for Existing Facilities 2010 to review all ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers for accessibility. The Non-Discrimination Plan (NDP) directs all EO officers in the LWDA to ensure that the written assurances of the sub-recipients are followed and in compliance with the ADA requirements for both facility and activity accessibility for individuals with disabilities. (Page 116) Title I

Non-Discrimination Policy: The Arizona Department of Education (ADE) is committed to a work environment in which all individuals are treated with respect and dignity. Each individual has the right to work in a professional atmosphere that promotes equal employment opportunity and prohibits discriminatory practices, including harassment. Therefore, the Arizona Department of Education commits itself to a policy of Non-Discrimination. • ADE has developed this policy to ensure that all its employees can work in an environment free from harassment, discrimination and retaliation. • ADE will make every reasonable effort to ensure that all concerned are familiar with this policy and aware that any complaint of violation of such policies will be investigated and resolved appropriately. • ADE will post the Equal Opportunity Policy Statement at the following locations- o Public Website- https://www.azed.gov/hr/ o ADE Internal Website for employees o Employee bulletin boards at the four worksites (1535 W. Jefferson, Phoenix, AZ; 3300 N. Central, Phoenix, AZ; 3100 N. West Street, Flagstaff, AZ; 400 W. Congress St., Tucson, AZ) • All employment announcements shall include the phrase, “The Arizona Department of Education is an EOE/ADA Reasonable Accommodation Employer.” (Page 170) Title II

Vets

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Mental Health

~~The purpose of the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program is to provide persons with disabilities with the services and supports they need to overcome disability-related barriers to employment and become an integral part of the workforce. VR services are provided statewide through a comprehensive network of staff and contracted service providers who are trained to meet the unique needs of persons with disabilities, including those who are visually impaired or blind, hard of hearing or deaf, who have experienced a traumatic brain or spinal cord injury, have a mental health diagnosis or are a youth with a disability. The VR program utilizes Employer Coordinators to collaborate with local businesses and increase awareness of the large, often over-looked, talent pool of people with disabilities. Employer needs are addressed and employment opportunities for persons with disabilities are enhanced through activities such as coordinated job fairs, job preparation seminars, and employer panels. (Page 43) Title I

The VR program employs staff statewide and has specialty counselors trained to meet the unique needs of persons who are visually impaired or blind, hard of hearing or deaf, who have experienced a traumatic brain or spinal cord injury, have a mental health diagnosis or are a youth with a disability. Specialty comprehensive contracts and agreements have been developed to provide enhanced services to meet the training and employment needs of these populations. (Page 46) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) has developed and maintained multiple cooperative agreements to provide enhanced services to mutual clients of diverse systems. These agreements encompass a diverse population base and exist to provide enhanced services to clients while maximizing the expertise and funding of separate funding sources. VR has worked collaboratively with the following entities:
o Division of Behavioral Health Services to support individuals with Serious Mental Illness (Page 74) Title IV

An Intergovernmental Agreement between DES/Rehabilitation Services and the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services exists to coordinate services to mutual clients. VR counselors are assigned to work with behavioral health clinical teams throughout the state in order to enhance service delivery and customer satisfaction in the provision of customized employment and vocational services. (Page 175) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services has had longstanding agreements with the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS), Division of Behavioral Health Services (DBHS) and the DES Division of Developmental Disabilities to pay for extended support services. These agreements and combination of funding has permitted a greater number of joint clients to benefit from supported employment services. To the extent possible, DES/Rehabilitation Services works to create a seamless transition from VR supported employment services to extended supported employment services paid by or through other agencies. (Page 180) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services has a cooperative Intergovernmental Agreement with the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services to detail the provision of supported employment services to individuals with Serious Mental Illness (SMI). This agreement coordinates services to mutual clients, assigning VR counselors to work with behavioral health clinical teams throughout the state in order to enhance service delivery, customer satisfaction, and successful outcomes through the provision of vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services. (Page 180) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services have maintained an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) with the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services (DBHS) to provide enhanced vocational rehabilitation services to individuals determined to have a Serious Mental Illness (SMI) since 1992. DES/Rehabilitation Services works with DBHS to amend the IGA on a yearly basis in order to modify the agreement to maintain the partnership and enhance the services provided to individuals determined to have a serious mental illness. Each Regional Behavioral Health Authority (RBHA) contracted with DBHS uses the IGA to develop a collaborative protocol to establish specific service delivery responsibilities as well as the roles and responsibilities for VR and RBHA provider staff.

Per the IGA, each RBHA provider site is assigned a VR counselor to work with mutual and prospective clients. The VR counselor acts as the vocational consultant for the clinical team, attends meetings related to the mutual client’s vocational services, and provides Individual Service Plan recommendations for each client related to the VR program. VR staff conducts VR orientations at each clinic at least one time per month, and are provided with functional workspace to conduct client meetings.

To ensure continuous and streamlined communication, DES/Rehabilitation Services, ADHS/DBHS and each RBHA coordinate quarterly meetings for all Behavioral Health VR counselors, VR supervisors, RBHA clinical representatives and mutual provider agencies. Staff is given the opportunity to discuss concerns related to the IGA and is provided with program updates and information on available resources. DES/Rehabilitation Services and ADHS/DBHS also coordinate a biannual IGA Advisory meeting to discuss any IGA related changes, staff or agency concerns, as well as program accomplishments. (Page 182-183) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 57

Executive order No. 2020-04 Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council - 01/15/2020

“WHEREAS, it is important for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to have a forum to discuss issues important to them, to identify concerns, gaps and duplications in available services and programs, and to build capacity for system change when needed; and

WHEREAS, individuals with developmental disabilities and their families, state agencies, protection and advocacy organizations, local and non-governmental agencies and private and non­profit groups serving individuals with developmental disabilities all play important roles in facilitating advocacy, capacity building and system change activities for individuals with developmental disabilities…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of Arizona by the Arizona Constitution and Laws of Arizona, hereby reauthorize the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council…”

Systems
  • Other
Attachments

EXECUTIVE ORDER 2020-03: Emphasizing the Role of the Department of Corrections in Rehabilitation and Reentry - 01/13/2020

“WHEREAS, studies have shown that education programs, job training programs, and substance abuse treatment provided in correctional settings reduce recidivism rates; and

WHEREAS, many individual who are released from custody face significant barriers to obtaining employment and housing, including lack of in-demand job skills, lack of a high school degree, substance abuse disorder and mental illness…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging
Attachments

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Arizona Association of Community Health Centers (AACHC), d.b.a. Arizona Alliance for Community Health Centers was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind” population, specifically, service-industry workers, variable-income and seasonal workers, and self-employed individuals.  Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are El Rio Community Health Center, Asian Pacific Community in Action, Helping Families in Need, and Keogh Health Connection. They will partner with   Cover Arizona (statewide coalition of 600+ organizations), Cover Kids Coalition,  AZ Dept. of Insurance, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations,  Small business owners,  Hospitality employers,  Southern AZ hospitals,  AZ Dept. of Health, AZ Public Health Association, and Food Bank Association .  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.:Tara PleasePhone: (602) 288-7547Email: Tarap@aachc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transition Conference & Directors' Institute - Phoenix, AZ - 08/19/2019

~~“The Arizona Department of Education, Exceptional Student Services is pleased to present the opening of registration for Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, and the Arizona Directors’ Institute, Building Success: One Collaboration at a Time! New for 2019, these conferences are being held back-to-back from August 19 – 23 at the JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Developmental Disabilities Policies - 05/22/2019

~~“Welcome to the DDD policy page.

DDD develops policies that conform to state, federal, and contractual requirements. DDD has five policy manuals, which include the Operations, Medical, Eligibility, Behavior Supports, and Provider manuals. Changes in policy are communicated to contracted DDD providers via electronic policy notifications, which are also sent to all DDD employees, Providers, Administrative Services Subcontractors, and individuals who have opted to receive notifications.”

This page has links to each of the policy manuals.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona Resources - 04/29/2019

~~“Here you will find a list of Arizona organizations that provide assistive technology (AT) and related services. If you can’t find the information you are looking for, please contct us for assistance:  602-728-9534, askAzTAP@nau.edu.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Employment Services - 04/06/2019

~~“Pima County One-Stop opened the Kino Veterans’ Workforce Center, 2801 E. Ajo Way, to help military veterans find jobs and get training, benefits and support services; and to help employers hire veterans.

One-Stop’s partners in the Center include the U.S. Departments of Labor, Defense and Veterans Affairs; the Arizona Departments of Veterans Services and Economic Security; Pima Community College; Community Partnership of Southern Arizona and Rally Point; CODAC/Comin’ Home; Tucson Veterans Serving Veterans; Salvation Army; Old Pueblo Community Services; Primavera Foundation; the Arizona Veterans Commission; SER Jobs for Progress; and local employers. Peer support, drop-in and welcome”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Project To Create 500 Jobs For Arizonans With Disabilities - 02/05/2019

~“Governor Doug Ducey today joined The Precisionist Inc. (TPI) to announce the creation of over 500 jobs for individuals with a broad range of disabilities. Through an innovative partnership with Arizona businesses, known as the “Phoenix Precision Project,” participants in the program will receive training and employment opportunities in a broad range of fields such as software development, database analytics, accounting, data entry and more.

The program is a collaboration between the Governor’s Office, TPI, Salt River Project, the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) and First Place® AZ, a Phoenix community offering housing, education and training to adults with autism. It is expected to create more than 500 Arizona jobs for adults with autism and other special abilities within the next three to five years—and about 1,000 total by 2025.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference Call for Papers/Call for Brochure Artwork Information - 01/30/2019

~“Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, is being held August 19-21, 2019 at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge in Phoenix. The Transition Planning Committee is looking for Secondary Transition Stakeholders providing innovative programs, promising practices, inspiring collaborations, and motivational students or personnel to present at the conference. The form is at this link. The deadline for proposals is March 1, 2019.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Opportunities for Arizonans with Disabilities - 01/29/2019

~“Employers who hire people with disabilities not only benefit from a more inclusive workplace, but also a team of eager workers who often bring innovative perspectives and an expanded customer-base of clients who prefer to patronize inclusive businesses. Since employees with disabilities tend to stay employed with the same company longer, employers also save on training and recruitment costs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Arizona House Concurrent Resolution 2029 - 03/30/2015

Whereas, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination in employment against qualified individuals on the basis of disability, which the ADA defines as a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity, such as hearing, seeing, speaking, walking, breathing, performing manual tasks, caring for oneself, learning or working; and Whereas, an employer is required to provide a reasonable accommodation to an employee with a disability unless the accommodation would be an undue hardship that would require significant difficultly or expense; and Whereas, many unemployed individuals with disabilities are ready, able and willing to work. Therefore Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Arizona, the Senate concurring: That the Members of the Legislature support the employment of persons with disabilities and encourage Arizona businesses to hire persons with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Executive order No. 2020-04 Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council - 01/15/2020

“WHEREAS, it is important for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to have a forum to discuss issues important to them, to identify concerns, gaps and duplications in available services and programs, and to build capacity for system change when needed; and

WHEREAS, individuals with developmental disabilities and their families, state agencies, protection and advocacy organizations, local and non-governmental agencies and private and non­profit groups serving individuals with developmental disabilities all play important roles in facilitating advocacy, capacity building and system change activities for individuals with developmental disabilities…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of Arizona by the Arizona Constitution and Laws of Arizona, hereby reauthorize the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council…”

Systems
  • Other
Attachments

EXECUTIVE ORDER 2020-03: Emphasizing the Role of the Department of Corrections in Rehabilitation and Reentry - 01/13/2020

“WHEREAS, studies have shown that education programs, job training programs, and substance abuse treatment provided in correctional settings reduce recidivism rates; and

WHEREAS, many individual who are released from custody face significant barriers to obtaining employment and housing, including lack of in-demand job skills, lack of a high school degree, substance abuse disorder and mental illness…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging
Attachments

Arizona Employment First Joins Effort to Observe National Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/05/2018

~“Arizona Employment First announced its participation in National Disability Employment Awareness Month, an annual awareness campaign that takes place each October. Governor Doug Ducey has issued a proclamation recognizing October as Disability Employment Awareness Month, encouraging all Arizonans to recognize the strengths that people with disabilities bring to the workforce, community and our state as a whole.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 2017-08 The Establishment of Arizona as an Employment First State - 11/15/2017

~~WHEREAS, Arizonans who have disabilities are valued members of society; and

WHEREAS, opportunity for all includes ensuring opportunity for individuals who have disabilities; and

WHEREAS, there is a dignity in work that provides individuals not only a source of income, but also a source of pride, sense of accomplishment, and opportunities for social interaction; and

WHEREAS, every Arizonan should have the opportunity to participate in the workforce, including those who have disabilities; and

WHEREAS, an estimated 418,000 individuals in Arizona have some form of disability; and

WHEREAS, the employment gap between individuals with and without disabilities in Arizona has been between forty and fifty percentage points over the last several years; and

WHEREAS, opportunities for meaningful and competitive employment will improve the individuals' quality of life, increase community participation, and empower them to make their own choices in life; and

WHEREAS, individuals who have disabilities can be dedicated and productive members of the workforce; and

WHEREAS, in 2014, only 14% of Arizona's developmental disability funding spent on day and employment services went to integrated employment; and

WHEREAS, an inclusive and diverse workforce will help erase the stigma attached to those who have disabilities; and

WHEREAS, Arizona seeks to improve and coordinate efforts to increase community employment opportunities for Arizonans who have disabilities.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and Laws of the State of Arizona hereby declare the following:1. All state agencies that provide services and support to persons who have disabilities shall implement Employment First in Arizona and shall coordinate efforts to improve employment opportunities for working-age adults who have disabilities. Such efforts shall include:     a. In collaboration with stakeholders, review and alignment of policies and services for individuals who have disabilities to increase opportunities for community employment;     b. In collaboration with stakeholders, identify best practices, effective partnerships, sources of available federal funds, opportunities for shared services among existing providers, and the means to expand model programs to increase community employment opportunities;     c. Establish interagency agreements to improve coordination of services and allow for data sharing as appropriate;....

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order No. 93-13: Governor's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

"I, Fife Symington, Governor of the State of Arizona, do hereby create a new Executive Order for the permanent establishment of the Governor’s committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities and delineate herein its purpose, structure and function….The Governor’s Committee On the Employment of People with Disabilities is established to promote the employment of people with disabilities; to promote the implementation of the Americans With Disabilities Act; and to promote a better quality of life for people with disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 21

Developmental Disabilities Policies - 05/22/2019

~~“Welcome to the DDD policy page.

DDD develops policies that conform to state, federal, and contractual requirements. DDD has five policy manuals, which include the Operations, Medical, Eligibility, Behavior Supports, and Provider manuals. Changes in policy are communicated to contracted DDD providers via electronic policy notifications, which are also sent to all DDD employees, Providers, Administrative Services Subcontractors, and individuals who have opted to receive notifications.”

This page has links to each of the policy manuals.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Employment Services - 04/06/2019

~~“Pima County One-Stop opened the Kino Veterans’ Workforce Center, 2801 E. Ajo Way, to help military veterans find jobs and get training, benefits and support services; and to help employers hire veterans.

One-Stop’s partners in the Center include the U.S. Departments of Labor, Defense and Veterans Affairs; the Arizona Departments of Veterans Services and Economic Security; Pima Community College; Community Partnership of Southern Arizona and Rally Point; CODAC/Comin’ Home; Tucson Veterans Serving Veterans; Salvation Army; Old Pueblo Community Services; Primavera Foundation; the Arizona Veterans Commission; SER Jobs for Progress; and local employers. Peer support, drop-in and welcome”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference Call for Papers/Call for Brochure Artwork Information - 01/30/2019

~“Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, is being held August 19-21, 2019 at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge in Phoenix. The Transition Planning Committee is looking for Secondary Transition Stakeholders providing innovative programs, promising practices, inspiring collaborations, and motivational students or personnel to present at the conference. The form is at this link. The deadline for proposals is March 1, 2019.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Opportunities for Arizonans with Disabilities - 01/29/2019

~“Employers who hire people with disabilities not only benefit from a more inclusive workplace, but also a team of eager workers who often bring innovative perspectives and an expanded customer-base of clients who prefer to patronize inclusive businesses. Since employees with disabilities tend to stay employed with the same company longer, employers also save on training and recruitment costs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council - 11/20/2018

~“The Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council (DDAC) is an advisory council to the Assistant Director of the Division of Developmental Disabilities on a wide variety of matters relating to the Division. Council members are appointed by the Arizona Governor to three year terms. Membership is comprised of seventeen individuals from a cross-section of the community including parents of a person with a developmental disabilitiy, service providers, members serviced by the Division of Developmental Disabilities, and other community stakeholders.

The mission of the DDAC is to provide, in partnership with the Division of Developmental Disabilities, advisory oversight on behalf of consumers, families, and providers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Ultimate Dream Job: National Apprenticeship Week 2018 - 11/16/2018

~“The Arizona Apprenticeship Office under the Arizona Department of Economic Security (DES) is continuously expanding the number of registered apprenticeship opportunities available to its residents. Apprenticeships, which were once only available in trades such as manufacturing and construction, are now emerging in fields including cyber and information technology (IT), healthcare, sales, professional services, and more. This year kicks-off the apprenticeship journey for Arizona barber, Lana Cantrell, and her first apprentice.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Helping the "Perfectly Imperfect Child" - 07/25/2018

~~“Pre-ETS is a program that is offered in collaboration with the Division of Employment and Rehabilitation Services (DERS). The Pre-ETS program helps students with disabilities prepare for future employment through a series of workshops that provide job exploration counseling, work-based learning and other work readiness training.  The program is available to youth with any kind of disability who are between the ages of 14 and 22. Group workshops make up the majority of the program. However, customized one-on-one workshops will be made available for those who qualify, such as Kendrick, who uses an augmentative communications device.

 “The new Pre-ETS program is a requirement under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. It is also in alignment with Governor Ducey’s Employment First(link is external) policy.” The Employment First initiative was established by executive order to expand career opportunities for all Arizonans.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Mental Health Block Grant - 06/19/2018

~~“Through the 10% set-aside, MHBG funds for FEP can be used for the following: • Treatment of members determined to have experienced a first episode of psychosis; • Expansion of Evidence-Based Practices in Supported Employment or wrap around services for individuals living in Permanent Supported Housing; • Programmatic / treatment related services for members enrolled in FEP programs; • Salaries of employees that work in administrative, supervisory and directly in a treatment capacity with FEP members; • Promotion of the current and effective treatment model; and • General startup costs such as planning administration and training related to establishing and providing services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

DES Helps Adults with Autism Thrive through Fulfilling Employment - 04/13/2018

~~“For many adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), networking with potential employers and finding gainful employment can be a challenge. Roughly 60-80% of the adults with ASD in Arizona are currently unemployed. To address this growing concern, the Department of Economic Security (DES) collaborates with key community partners to host customized Autism Job Fairs to educate and connect adult job seekers with ASD to viable and fulfilling employment in their communities.

Before networking at the Autism Job Fairs begins, Dr. James B. Adams of the ASU Autism/Asperger’s Research Program, offers two enlightening workshops: one tailored to teach job seekers with ASD soft skills required to land and keep a job, and the other directed to the employers to help them understand what to expect when interviewing and employing an adult with autism.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AZ ABLE - Achieving a Better Life Experience - 03/18/2018

~~“Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) account programs are investment programs that offer persons with disabilities, their family and friends, the option to contribute to a tax-exempt savings account for disability-related expenses. As of March 5, 2018, AZ ABLE accounts are open for enrollment.

Learn more about the AZ ABLE account program, such as eligibility, investment options, and other information at the AZ ABLE website(link is external).

Benefits of Opening an AZ ABLE Account•Money saved does not affect SNAP•Money saved does not affect Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) Medicaid•Money saved only suspends SSI if account balance reaches over $100,000•Provides financial freedom for people with disabilities•Account is owned by the individual with the disability•Dramatically increases ability to save•Before ABLE, individuals with disabilities could only save around $2,000 of their own money before risking loss of health care and other benefits•Provides a new investment opportunity•Includes tax free earnings”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Arizona Resources - 04/29/2019

~~“Here you will find a list of Arizona organizations that provide assistive technology (AT) and related services. If you can’t find the information you are looking for, please contct us for assistance:  602-728-9534, askAzTAP@nau.edu.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Project To Create 500 Jobs For Arizonans With Disabilities - 02/05/2019

~“Governor Doug Ducey today joined The Precisionist Inc. (TPI) to announce the creation of over 500 jobs for individuals with a broad range of disabilities. Through an innovative partnership with Arizona businesses, known as the “Phoenix Precision Project,” participants in the program will receive training and employment opportunities in a broad range of fields such as software development, database analytics, accounting, data entry and more.

The program is a collaboration between the Governor’s Office, TPI, Salt River Project, the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) and First Place® AZ, a Phoenix community offering housing, education and training to adults with autism. It is expected to create more than 500 Arizona jobs for adults with autism and other special abilities within the next three to five years—and about 1,000 total by 2025.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Skilled Trades Workforce Development in Arizona - 11/18/2018

~“AZAGC’s intention is to have the information in this resource guide expand to include as many relavent organizations as possible so our members and others in the industry have a comprehensive resource to assist them in connecting with future employees and in developing and sustatinig their company’s workforce strategy”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Ability360 Employment Services - 07/07/2018

~~Did you know you can work even if you have a disability and receive Social Security benefits?  Most people with disabilities can do some work and many can work again full time.  Don’t let fear stand in your way.  If you are tired of worrying about money and are tired of being bored, please continue reading.  If you currently receive SSDI or SSI benefits you are eligible for programs and work incentives that can help you to get a job and manage your benefits.  As a recipient of Social Security benefits you qualify for a number of work incentives and a program called Ticket to Work.

ABIL Employment Services has been providing assistance and support to persons with disabilities seeking employment through the Ticket to Work program since 2002.  We are recognized as one of the largest and most successful organizations providing services through the Ticket program in the entire country

Systems
  • Other

Untapped Arizona - 08/04/2017

~~“Employers in Arizona—including businesses, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies— recognize that a diverse and inclusive workplace benefits everyone, and they are actively recruiting and hiring people with disabilities. Untapped Arizona assists businesses in meeting their workforce needs by providing tools and information to support their efforts to recruit, hire, and develop workers with disabilities. We also partner with workforce-related networks, initiatives, and coalitions to support increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Partnering with employment service providers….”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

“DES Spotlight: Mental Health Disorders and Job Placement Through Vocational Rehabilitation” - 02/02/2017

~~“According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness(link is external), approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experiences mental illness in a given year and approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S. experiences a serious mental illness in a given year that substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.

There are those who suffer from psychiatric issues every day, yet still function in society and even manage to hold down jobs. Studies have suggested that of 25 chronic physical and mental issues, depression has the most financial impact on employers, even outweighing medical and pharmacy costs for employees.

As one of the State's largest agencies, the Department of Economic Security (DES) serves approximately 2.2 million people a year, with job services being a major component. One of the ways DES can assist those with mental health disorders, particularly those applying for jobs, is by simply trying to understand life from their perspective”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health

Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) - 01/05/2017

~~“The Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) is a committee dedicated to improving collaboration among secondary transition planning partners.On this page you will find information on each community partner as well as a link to our monthly communique. If you are interested in more information on the AZCoPT or to set up your own local community of practice please email AZCoPT.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arizona Department of Economic Security & Arizona Department of Health Services Agreement - 03/16/2012

This contract between the Arizona Department of Economic Security (ADES) and the Arizona Department of Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services (ADHS/ DBHS) serves to promotes the increased employment of people with disabilities in integrated, community settings

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (ADDPC) - 07/01/2009

~~“A staff of six assists the all-volunteer Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council, which is made up of individuals with disabilities, family members, professional stakeholders and state agency representatives appointed by the Governor of Arizona. The 23-member Council meets at least four times a year to discuss issues and vote on which projects to support by allocating our federal funds.We were created on July 1, 2009 as a successor organization to the former Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities.

OUR MISSION:  We want to develop and support capacity building and systemic change to increase inclusion and involvement of persons with developmental disabilities in their communities through the promotion of self-determination, independence and dignity in all aspects of life.OUR VISION:  The vision of the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council is one community working together to achieve full inclusion and participation of persons with developmental disabilities."

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ADDPC - 2014 Employment Options for People with IDD

“Several initiatives are also underway to support adults, youth and their families to make informed decisions about work or to consider a progressive move into a more integrated working environment and/or increase earnings:   Employment Summit for Transition-Age Youth: Representatives … are part of a collaborative work group to plan for a Summit geared toward promoting employment among transition age youth with developmental disabilities.   Disability Benefits 101 Online Tool: Many people with disabilities are afraid to consider employment or a progressive move because they are uninformed about the work and healthcare incentives that can assist them to make the transition. In 2012, the Arizona Disability Benefits 101 online tool will be available to support individuals with disabilities to plan for employment, learn how work and benefits go together and make informed decisions about going to work or accepting a job offer.   Untapped Arizona: A new employer engagement collaborative, Untapped Arizona, was created to support the business community in meeting their workforce needs by including individuals with disabilities in their hiring practices. Untapped Arizona has developed a system to connect employers with qualified job seekers with disabilities. Additionally, Untapped Arizona has a network of partners who can provide technical assistance and support to employers pertaining to hiring, legal issues, reasonable accommodations and employee retention.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Arizona Uniform Application FY 2018-2019 State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/16/2017

~~Transition Planning.“3. Vocational/EmploymentAn important component of transitioning to adulthood includes vocational goals that lead to employment or other types of meaningful activity. While a job can provide financial support, personal fulfillment, and social opportunities, other activities such as an internship or volunteering in an area of special interest to the young adult can also provide personal satisfaction and an opportunity to engage socially with others.  The CFT along with involved system partners work together to prepare the young adult for employment or other vocational endeavors…”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council “2017 Self-advocacy grant” - 03/02/2017

~~“One of the main purposes of the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council is to issue competitive grants based on the goals of our Five-Year State Plan: Self-advocacy, Integrated Employment and Inclusion. In addition, the ADDPC follows a process for soliciting, reviewing and awarding grant applications consistent with state laws, administrative rules and regulations for grants, and procurement administration.  If you have any specific questions related to a grant, please reach out to us and we can help answer your inquiries.

Please note that ADDPC grants cannot be used to provide individual direct support; visit the Grant FAQs tab in this section for more information.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“DES Spotlight: Mental Health Disorders and Job Placement Through Vocational Rehabilitation” - 02/02/2017

~~“According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness(link is external), approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experiences mental illness in a given year and approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S. experiences a serious mental illness in a given year that substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.

There are those who suffer from psychiatric issues every day, yet still function in society and even manage to hold down jobs. Studies have suggested that of 25 chronic physical and mental issues, depression has the most financial impact on employers, even outweighing medical and pharmacy costs for employees.

As one of the State's largest agencies, the Department of Economic Security (DES) serves approximately 2.2 million people a year, with job services being a major component. One of the ways DES can assist those with mental health disorders, particularly those applying for jobs, is by simply trying to understand life from their perspective”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health

Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) - 01/01/2017

~"The Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) is a committee dedicated to improving collaboration among secondary transition planning partners.

On this page you will find information on each community partner as well as a link to our monthly communique. If you are interested in more information on the AZCoPT or to set up your own local community of practice please email AZCoPT."

.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Arizona Association of Community Health Centers (AACHC), d.b.a. Arizona Alliance for Community Health Centers was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind” population, specifically, service-industry workers, variable-income and seasonal workers, and self-employed individuals.  Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are El Rio Community Health Center, Asian Pacific Community in Action, Helping Families in Need, and Keogh Health Connection. They will partner with   Cover Arizona (statewide coalition of 600+ organizations), Cover Kids Coalition,  AZ Dept. of Insurance, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations,  Small business owners,  Hospitality employers,  Southern AZ hospitals,  AZ Dept. of Health, AZ Public Health Association, and Food Bank Association .  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.:Tara PleasePhone: (602) 288-7547Email: Tarap@aachc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transition Conference & Directors' Institute - Phoenix, AZ - 08/19/2019

~~“The Arizona Department of Education, Exceptional Student Services is pleased to present the opening of registration for Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, and the Arizona Directors’ Institute, Building Success: One Collaboration at a Time! New for 2019, these conferences are being held back-to-back from August 19 – 23 at the JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

EVIDENCE FOR SUCCESS 2019 Combined Disability Conference - 04/24/2018

~~Evidence for Success Disability Conference June 7-9, 2020

We-Ko-Pa Resort and Conference Center

Scottsdale / Fountain Hills, AZ

 AT  •   EBP  •   AIVRTTAC One Conference – Three Different Focus Areas!

If you work with or support people with disabilities, the 2020 Evidence for Success Disability Conference is designed to foster the knowledge and skills necessary to facilitate access, change attitudes and promote inclusion in education, employment and community living so that people with disabilities will fully participate in all life experiences.

The conference format integrates three of the Institute for Human Development’s (IHD) project areas into one super educational event:

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY (AT)  – celebrating 20 years as Arizona’s largest, most comprehensive Assistive Technology Conference; featuring Therese Willkomm at the AT Makers Preconference Workshop and Monday Featured Speaker.

EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICES IN DISABILITY DISCIPLINES (EBP) – bridging the research-to-practice gap to help professionals implement evidence based practices.

AMERICAN INDIAN VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION TRAINING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CENTER (AIVRTTAC) – supporting positive outcomes for Tribal members receiving vocational rehabilitation services."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Navigating the System: A Guide for Individuals and Families - 02/01/2018

~~“The mission of Arizona’s Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (ADDPC) is to develop and support capacity building and systemic change to increase inclusion and involvement of persons with developmental disabilities in their communities through the promotion of self-determination, independence and dignity in all aspects of life.What do they do?The ADDPC serves residents with developmental disabilities along with their families. They provide support to projects for three current goals that are in their state plan:•  Increasing employment opportunities•  Encouraging individuals to advocate for themselves•  Empowering those individuals with informationThe ADDPC has a calendar for future conferences and events. They have  meetings that are open to the public.  They have articles on subjects such as employment, education and other related topics. In addition,ADDPC has updates on proposed laws that may affect people with developmental disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Social Security's Ticket to Work Program: The Basics - 12/31/2016

~~“The Ticket to Work Program is a federal program that helps Social Security beneficiaries with a disability reach their employment goals. Designed for beneficiaries aged 18 – 64 who get Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), Ticket to Work offers a variety of services to help you get a job. These services can include:• Vocational rehabilitation• Training• Referrals• Job coaching• Job counseling• Placement servicesThe services offered through the Ticket to Work Program help you to find and apply for jobs that already exist in the marketplace—it is not linked to special jobs for Social Security beneficiaries.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Arizona Eighteenth Annual Transition Conference - 08/29/2016

~~The Arizona Department of Education, Exceptional Student Services is pleased to present:Arizona’s Annual Transition ConferenceBuilding Success: One Transition at a TimeAugust 19-21, 2019

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

AZ Disability Benefits 101 - Finding the Right Job for You: The Details - 06/21/2016

This webpage serves as a guide for people with disabilities in Arizona to understand their various employment options. It includes traditional work options, self-employment, temporary employment, customized employment and telecommuting or telework.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Arizona’s Transition Conference - 08/01/2015

Arizona’s Fifteenth Annual Transition Conference, Connecting for Success: Shared Expectations, Responsibilities, and Outcomes, is a collaborative, cross-stakeholder professional development event aimed at providing meaningful and pertinent information needed in the transition planning process for youth and young adults with disabilities. This annual conference provides a dynamic array of national speakers, state level experts, and includes participation of youth, young adults, and family members. Session content is structured around three topical strands: (1) connecting with youth, (2) connecting with families, and (3) connecting with agency and community partners.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona Employment First Webinar - 06/27/2014

Arizona is planning its course to become number twenty-seven. Please join us for the national perspective on employment first, including the forces pushing behind employment first and Arizona's current and future efforts to enhance employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. WHO should participate? People with disabilities and their families, educators, transition specialists, service providers, employers and other interested individuals are invited to join the discussion about integrated employment for people with disabilities. HOW can you help? Participate in this Employment First Webinar and provide your input. Become part of the planning process and help us advance integrated employment as the first option for people with disabilities in Arizona.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training for Vendors Qualified to Provide Services through

~~DDD’s Training Unit provides the following training, free of charge, in order to support statewide providers and caregivers that best serve DDD members.

Contact Us•Email: dddstatewidetraining@azdes.gov•Phone: (602) 771-8125

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Arizona Demonstration Fact Sheet - 01/01/2018

~~“Date Extension Application Submitted: September 30, 2015Date Extension Application Approved: September 30, 2016Date Implemented:  October 1, 2016Date Expires: September 30, 2021

In addition, outside this demonstration, the state aims to encourage employment through referrals to a new state-only work search and job training program called AHCCCS Works.  This program, which will help connect beneficiaries to employment supports, is available for AHCCCS CARE beneficiaries who choose to participate.  Health coverage provided by the Medicaid program and this demonstration will not be affected by this state initiative.”  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona’s Eligibility Policy Manual for Medical, Nutrition and Cash Assistance “Medicaid Buy-in” - 07/14/2016

Medicare beneficiaries are eligible for State buy-in or buy-out depending on their income. 1) Buy-in It normally takes three months after approval of AHCCCS Medicare Savings Program (MSP) benefits or certain Medicaid programs for the Social Security Administration (SSA) to stop taking the Part B premium amount out of the beneficiary's SSA check. Services covered: “AHCCCS covers habilitation services for Arizona Long Term Care System (ALTCS) members through its Managed Care Contractors or the FFS program. The service known as “Day Treatment and Training”, also known as developmentally disabled daycare, is included under the habilitation services. Services are designed to assist individuals in acquiring, retaining and improving the self -help, socialization and adaptive skills necessary to reside successfully in Home and Community Based (HCB) settings. The services the provision of training in independent living skills or special developmental skills, orientation and mobility training, sensory-motor development, supported employment and intensive behavioral intervention for individuals with a diagnosis of autism when specific criteria are satisfied.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona’s 1115 Waiver - 07/01/2016

~~“With over 1.6 million Arizonans enrolled in AHCCCS, Medicaid has a far greater responsibility for impacting population health. Despite past innovation, we have an opportunity and obligation to do more. The goals of Modernizing Arizona Medicaid are to: (1) Engage Arizonans to take charge of their health; (2) Make Medicaid a temporary option; and (3) Promote a quality product at the most affordable price.AHCCCS will seek waiver authority to implement new programs and processes to carry this momentum forward to meet future challenges and respond to current economic realities through the AHCCCS CARE plan.”. The Waiver allows Arizona to run its unique and successful managed care model and exempts Arizona from certain provisions of the Social Security Act. It also includes expenditure authority for costs not otherwise matched by the federal government. Waiver programs are required to be budget neutral for the federal government − not cost more federal dollars than without a waiver. Specifically, the Waiver allows Arizona to:•Mandate managed care;•Provide Long Term Care Services in home and community-based settings rather than more costly institutions; and•Implement administrative simplifications.” 

 

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona HCBS Transition Plan Review - 11/25/2015

Arizona submitted its STP to CMS on October 20, 2015. CMS has completed the initial review of the STP and has some questions and requests regarding the transition timeframe, the public notice processes, public comments described in the STP, and the person-centered planning process described in the STP. C MS is continuing with a more in -depth review of the STP and will be providing additional detailed feedback.  This document includes a summary of current ssues.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona Medicaid State Plan - 01/15/1990

The Arizona Medicaid state plan details the a state and Federal government Medicaid implementation agreement.  It describes how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs. It also describes how the state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

In the Grand Canyon State of Arizona, people appreciate the value of independence, so the need to promote career success is the top priority for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Arizona's VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
2.17%
Change from
2017 to 2018
7,171,646
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.63%
Change from
2017 to 2018
449,009
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.35%
Change from
2017 to 2018
173,613
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
9.15%
Change from
2017 to 2018
38.67%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.49%
Change from
2017 to 2018
75.68%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 6,931,071 7,016,270 7,171,646
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 432,087 428,198 449,009
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 150,434 150,434 173,613
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,684,035 2,757,032 2,822,052
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.82% 35.13% 38.67%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.47% 75.31% 75.68%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.30% 4.90% 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.00% 18.40% 18.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.80% 14.40% 13.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 445,060 451,180 471,575
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 451,859 448,637 465,829
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 723,614 728,348 761,990
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 37,528 35,260 40,732
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 202,584 200,428 218,760
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 40,201 46,132 47,536
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 15,069 18,590 18,420
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,459 1,302 621
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,048 31,892 29,136
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 52,000 38,293 38,969

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,424 4,559 4,753
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.30% 4.40% 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 154,824 153,257 151,124

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 23,063 26,938 29,931
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 54,724 56,501 62,009
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 106,445 105,496 113,259
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.70% 25.50% 26.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 23.50% 14.80% 23.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.40% 3.80% 5.20%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 10,400 6,870 11,694
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,396 1,778 2,551
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,446 3,321 3,586
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 60 50 72
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 35 30 39
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 60.00% 54.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.53 0.44 0.57

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,513
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 198 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 235 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 601 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,150 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,121 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 208 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 18.40% 22.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,921 6,025 5,501
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 229,585 230,232 228,210
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 27 33 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 113 95 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $19,952,000 $21,986,000 $24,550,418
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $6,248,000 $6,357,000 $6,321,775
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $106,125,000 $112,052,000 $119,308,256
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 20.00% 14.00% 19.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,347 1,090 1,223
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 7,088 10,306 10,784
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 30.80 27.50 33.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.94% 65.76% 66.57%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.76% 14.74% 14.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.11% 1.99% 2.33%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.39% 85.61% 83.96%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.36% 22.79% 21.51%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.34% 63.55% 61.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 74.98% 77.66% 75.27%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 38.98% 40.76% 39.66%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,177,897
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,735
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 15,781
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 599,746
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 615,527
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 10
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 755
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 765
AbilityOne wages (products). $157,071
AbilityOne wages (services). $6,995,048

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 1 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 0 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 43 38 26
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 44 40 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 4
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 15 0 28
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 999 1,979 1,093
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 26 26
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,014 2,005 1,151

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~DES/VR program staff is working cooperatively with Division of Developmental Disability staff and Employment First committee representatives to introduce systems change training to DES/VR and DD staff. The training will focus on the importance of providing the opportunity to work in a competitive integrated setting and developing supports within the employment setting to facilitate successful employment retention. Additionally, DES/VR and DD staff will be working with the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center to pilot supported employment opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities in Program Year 2018. (Page 202) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~An Intergovernmental Agreement between DES/Rehabilitation Services and the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services exists to coordinate services to mutual clients. VR counselors are assigned to work with behavioral health clinical teams throughout the state in order to enhance service delivery and customer satisfaction in the provision of customized employment and vocational services. (Page 175) Title I

Persons with Developmental Disabilities within the Foster Care System: Rehabilitation Services and DDD have a Memorandum of Understanding to enhance program delivery methods and provide customized employment services to mutual clients within the foster care system. Coordination, cooperation and collaboration between agencies will be facilitated by dedicated staff positions in an effort to provide and expand a continuum of comprehensive vocational services to the identified population. (Page 175) Title I

Rehabilitation Services and DDD have a Memorandum of Understanding to enhance program delivery methods and provide customized employment services to mutual clients within the foster care system. Coordination, cooperation and collaboration between agencies will be facilitated by dedicated staff positions in an effort to provide and expand a continuum of comprehensive vocational services to the identified population. (Page 176) Title I

IDENTIFY THE STRATEGIES THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE ACHIEVEMENT OF THE GOALS.
• Engaged Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to assist in identifying employers who are willing to customize employment for individuals with disabilities.
• Continued collaboration with the Division of Developmental Disabilities and Behavioral Health Services to effectively serve individuals with supported employment needs.
• Increased employer engagement activities through Employer Coordinators and connection with workforce development system. (Page 203) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~The VR program prepares persons with disabilities to be competitive in the labor market by offering services such as occupational/vocational training as well as undergraduate and advanced degrees. The VR program has the unique ability to support individuals in attending specialized or out-of-state schools for disability-related reasons, and Arizona VR clients have graduated from schools such as the Rochester Institute of Technology for the Deaf and Gallaudet University in New York. Education and training support services vary based on student need but many individuals receive tutoring, assistive technology, supplies/tools, and assistance arranging accommodations with the school’s Disability Resource Center. In Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2015, 1,470 individuals participated in a plan of services and received educational training supported by the VR program, and a total of $5,826,857 was spent to fund these educational endeavors. (Page 44) Title I

The Employer Coordinators facilitate networking meetings between employers and educational transition partners to provide employment and pre—employment transition services to youth with disabilities. Instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students with disabilities regarding employer engagement, opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, and secondary education resources, such as disability resource centers continue to be provided by Employer Coordinators throughout the state. (Page 181) Title IV
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.

DES/Rehabilitation Services is part of a multiagency Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) that encourages and facilitates the cooperation and collaboration between Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD), and the Public Education Agencies (PEA) represented by the ADE. The vision for the IGA is “to ensure a smooth and successful transition of students with disabilities to meaningful, gainful, and sustained employment, education, and community living.” (Page 176) Title IV

Under the umbrella of the IGA, DES/Rehabilitation Services provides coordinated transition services to 22 schools throughout the state. DES/Rehabilitation Services has 22 Third Party Cooperative Arrangements (TPCA) with PEAs to provide enhanced transition services. The TPCAs are commonly known as Transition from School to Work (TSW) programs. (Page 177) Title IV

Students who are able to participate in the Transition School to Work (TSW) program through a Third Party Cooperative Agreement (TPCA) are afforded the opportunity to participate in a structured program of services which integrates vocational rehabilitation services into the classroom environment. These services are provided by both the local PEA staff and VR staff. Involvement in these enhanced services are intended to allow the student to learn skills necessary to ameliorate disability related barriers to achieving their postsecondary goals. PEA and VR staff will continue to develop and coordinate new transition services and expand or modify existing services to accommodate the needs of students with disabilities. (Page 178) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services Employer Coordinators partner with secondary education schools, employers, and workforce development programs to provide pre—employment transition services and employment encounters for students and youth with disabilities across the state. Employer Coordinators partner with high school transition programs, VR transition counselors, and school and program administrators to facilitate job fairs, pre—employment workshops, apprenticeship opportunities, and employer panels at local high schools.

The Employer Coordinators facilitate networking meetings between employers and educational transition partners to provide employment and pre—employment transition services to youth with disabilities. Instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students with disabilities regarding employer engagement, opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, and secondary education resources, such as disability resource centers continue to be provided by Employer Coordinators throughout the state. (Page 181) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services works closely with the ADE Exceptional Student Services to provide opportunities to remain current in transition policies and procedures. An Intergovernmental Agreement exists that outlines cross training opportunities between partners. DES/Rehabilitation Services and ADE collaborate annually to provide a transition conference which serves to bring the community of providers together to learn about national policies, trends and best practices in serving youth with disabilities. Additionally, DES/Rehabilitation Services partners with ADE in providing a web based career information system named Arizona Career Information System (AzCIS) which allows students, families, education professionals, and VR staff to collaboratively assist students in developing appropriate and viable career goals. (Page 189) Title IV

Youth with disabilities continue to be an underserved population. Survey data reveals that Arizona DES/VR program is reaching about 20 percent of the total youth and students with disabilities. The education system in Arizona is complex. The Arizona Department of Education, the State Board of Education, 15 County Education Agencies and hundreds of district and charter governing boards oversee 230 discrete school districts, 406 charter holders and 13 Joint Technological Education Districts. Within these districts there are over 2000 public schools, including over 1500 district schools and over 500 charter schools. Reaching out to each of the districts and communicating the DES/VR program services has been challenging considering the multitude of individuals involved in the provision of services to students and youth with disabilities. Individuals with physical disabilities are also identified as being underserved by the DES/VR program. Less than 10 percent of the total VR population reports a disability which has physical limitations as a primary disability. It is difficult to discern if individuals are reporting other disability categories thus, the lower number or if individuals with physical disabilities are not aware or taking advantage of VR services. (Page 191) Title IV

Arizona VR is currently under an order of selection and is serving only the most significantly disabled individuals. Often, students with learning disabilities are made eligible but not considered to be most significantly disabled. Additionally, it is noted that students who receive special education services through the high school based on a 504 plan are not often referred to VR. Arizona VR is working closely with ADE to encourage the school system to refer not only those students with learning disabilities, but all students with disabilities who receive services through and Individualized Education Plan or a 504 plan. (Page 191-192) Title IV

When asked what other pre-employment transition services would be beneficial in assisting youth and students with disabilities, respondents listed transportation, community based work opportunities and job readiness skill development as identified service needs. (Page 192) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Focus on strategies targeting job seekers with barriers, including disabilities, ensuring that individuals with barriers are provided informed customer choice and appropriate assessments. This will include effective career pathways with multiple entry and exit points, including entry for individuals with low skills levels or other barriers and expansion of work-based learning opportunities, such as apprenticeship and on-the-job training (OJT), which may be suitable to individuals with limited work experience, low skills and/or academic credentials. (Page 55) Title I

Under WIOA, Arizona recognizes the need to expand opportunities statewide and develop robust career pathways that allow individuals with barriers and disabilities to participate and gain industry recognized credentials. Arizona will develop career pathways that include multiple aligned programs with funding by a variety of sources and driven by industry needs as defined through sector strategies and partnerships. Arizona chose the U.S. DOL’s Career Pathways Toolkit and the Shared Vision, Strong Systems Framework (CLASP, June 2014) as resources to develop an Arizona-specific definition that aligns with the WIOA definition and requirements for career pathways. This definition will serve as a foundation for the development of a state process for recognizing and evaluating career pathway programs. Implementation will focus on:
o Career pathways in specific occupations for each geographic area, including pathways that begin at lower educational attainment levels to provide opportunities for individuals with barriers and disabilities (Page 61) Title I

OJT will be utilized by the LWDAs to provide participants work experience, new transferable skills, and job placement upon successful completion of the training program. These opportunities are ideal for individuals with barriers, which can include disabilities. (Page 126) Title I

o Career Pathways: Develop robust career pathways that include multiple aligned programs with funding by a variety of sources and driven by industry needs as defined through sector strategies and partnerships. Entry points on these pathways must extend to adult learners with barriers such as disabilities, low basic skills, lack of a secondary diploma, and lack of English language skills. (Page 162) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

There is no linear progression from a single training event to lifelong self-sufficiency. The workforce system realizes that employment readiness, education, training, and continuous employment require repeated interaction with the workforce development and education systems. Job seekers enter the system with different levels of skills and readiness, and the system must provide an array of education and training models and modes. Work-based training, such as registered apprenticeship programs or OJT, can offer a supportive environment to individuals, including individuals with barriers and disabilities. Implementation will focus on: o Work-based training opportunities, including registered apprenticeship programs o Secondary education combined with career preparation o Outreach to targeted populations, such as veterans, individuals with disabilities, and disconnected youth o Exploration of possible incentives for employers to expand on-the-job training opportunities (Page 62) Title I

DES/Rehabilitation Services Employer Coordinators partner with secondary education schools, employers, and workforce development programs to provide pre—employment transition services and employment encounters for students and youth with disabilities across the state. Employer Coordinators partner with high school transition programs, VR transition counselors, and school and program administrators to facilitate job fairs, pre—employment workshops, apprenticeship opportunities, and employer panels at local high schools. (Page 181) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.
 

Employer/ Business

~~Untapped Arizona (UAZ) was established to support Arizona businesses meet their inclusive workforce needs by tapping into the labor pool of individuals with disabilities. UAZ is led by business leaders who are diversifying their own workforces by recruiting, hiring, retaining, and advancing workers with disabilities and actively encouraging other Arizona businesses to do the same. UAZ focuses on identifying and engaging the entire talent pool of individuals with disabilities regardless of whether or not they have a disability determination and/or are served by a government system. UAZ does not serve the job seeker customer, but rather the business customer, recognizing there are already systems, agencies, and services in place to support the job seeker to prepare for and find employment.

UAZ business leaders represent Arizona’s key industry sectors—information technology and related manufacturing, aerospace and defense, health care, and energy— and speak to the current and future labor needs of their sector. UAZ collaborates with employment service provider agencies to ensure they assist in driving the talent pool of individuals with disabilities to the AJC system, the state labor exchange system, to connect with qualified job candidates with disabilities. (Page 75) Title I

DES/Rehabilitation Services continues to review and enhance its relationships with local CRP providers as valued partners through quarterly CRP meetings. CRP meetings include review of various scopes of work, identification of and information about employer engagement opportunities, updated program information, and the opportunity for vendors to receive answers to questions, or bring issues to the attention of Rehabilitation Services management. These meetings are intended to further relationships and partnerships between DES/Rehabilitation Services and the CRP providers. To further enhance our working relationships with our community partners, each VR office has a representative staff attend the CRP meetings to ask questions, provide feedback, and develop a cooperative understanding of services for job seekers. (Page 179) Title IV

Employer Coordinators, in collaboration with other federal and state workforce agencies, county programs, and Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP) providers offer employer engagement opportunities to provide education and information about the qualified applicants available for hire. Monthly employer connection opportunities for community partners, VR counselors, and contracted vendors via teleconferences continue to be provided by the Employer Coordinators. VR has sponsored or co—sponsored educational events geared specifically for employers to include information on federal Schedule A hiring practices, tax credits or deductions, disability awareness training and other resources for education on hiring individuals with a disability. The provision of these training and informational sessions to employers has provided the opportunity to develop stronger partnerships with the employer community and has enhanced employment options for individuals with disabilities who are seeking employment. (Page 181) Title IV

The Employer Coordinators facilitate networking meetings between employers and educational transition partners to provide employment and pre—employment transition services to youth with disabilities. Instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students with disabilities regarding employer engagement, opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, and secondary education resources, such as disability resource centers continue to be provided by Employer Coordinators throughout the state. (Page 181) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services supports the continuous professional development of professional and paraprofessional staff through the provision of numerous training and educational opportunities throughout the year. Staff is presented with opportunities to participate in in-house trainings, webinars, conferences, community events, employer engagement presentations, and graduate level coursework necessary to meet qualified staff standards. These professional development opportunities focus on content areas such as assessment, ethics, vocational counseling, motivational interviewing, job development and placement, assistive technology, case management, case documentation, Traumatic Brain Injury, transition, and other specialty areas. Continuing education is available for those who are maintaining licensure or accreditation. (Page 188) Title IV

Data Collection

DES/VR began a systematic release of clients from Priority Category II in November 2016. Based on current activity, it is expected that the OOS will continue to experience a negative gain in Priority II with more clients being released or closed than determined eligible and Priority II. VR estimates that 1,113 clients will remain on the OOS in Priority II as of FFY 2019. VR will continue to develop methods for data collection and fiscal forecasting in order to continue a systematic release of clients from the waitlist. (Page 197) Title IV

In FFY 2019, the number of individuals who will be determined eligible but placed in Priority II or Priority III waitlist is 1,113 and 567 respectively. DES/VR does not expect to have the ability to serve all individuals in Priority Category II or any individuals in Priority Category III, but will continue to develop methods for fiscal forecasting and data collection in order to continue a systematic release of clients from Priority II. (Page 197) Title IV

The DES/VR case management system has been modified to include the WIOA data elements needed to collect Common Performance Measure data. In July 2017, the VR program started collecting data and submitting quarterly reports. The DES/VR program will utilize the data gathered each quarter to begin the process of measuring current to baseline current performance and gather enough data to inform the statistical adjustment model to negotiate target performance. (Page 201) Title IV

The DES/VR program engaged with several federally funded technical assistance centers to support the innovation and expansion activities allowable under WIOA. An intensive agreement was developed with the Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center to improve VR service delivery, integrate into the workforce development system, and transition to the common performance accountability system. Agreements with the National Technical Assistance Center of Transition and Youth Technical Assistance Center were also developed to improve and expand service delivery to potentially eligible students and youth with disabilities. (Page 202) Title IV

DES/VR is actively engaged in conversations with core partners and System 7, Libera case management system developers to develop effective and accurate data management processes which will allow DES/VR to report performance on the new common performance measures as prescribed in the WIOA. (Page 203) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

DES is responsible for the monitoring of workforce programs under Title I and Title III. Staff reviews client files and data entry for accuracy and compliance with policy. Annual site visits include the monitoring of physical accessibility as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act and Equal Employment Opportunity Act. Fiscal staff reviews the use of funds and compliance with policies and “Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements” issued by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in December 2013. Programs that do not meet requirements are put on a corrective action plan. All LWDAs use the AJC data system to record client data, allowing DES to prepare quarterly and annual reports as required by U.S. DOL. (Page 37) Titles I & III

The Workforce Administration has a primary focus on engaging and readying all job seekers for employment and will work toward aligning workforce programs for a seamless and accessible workforce system that is inclusive of all job seekers, connecting job seekers with in-demand jobs, and supporting equal access to services and employment opportunities for all job seekers, including those with barriers and disabilities. Active and strategic engagement and partnerships with educational partners and institutions in coordination with economic development agencies will further support positive outcomes for the employer, as the job creator, and the job seeker. (Page 65) Title I

To support this strategy, VR has facilitated continued education on accessibility issues though the funding of Disability Awareness/Sensitivity trainings as requested by ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers. The request for the local trainings are often one product of the accessibility discussions occurring in the LWDAs. In addition, VR local board representatives have provided guidance and insight with regards to physical access and various assistive technology needs of disabled individuals. (Page 67) Title IV

One-Stop Certification: This policy, effective August of 2017, establishes statewide objective criteria and procedures for use by local workforce development boards to certify ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers. The criteria is in adherence to WIOA requirements related to the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility, and continuous improvement, as well as measuring the local area’s progress in achieving the statewide vision for the ARIZONA@WORK Job Center delivery system outlined in the One-Stop Delivery System policy. LWDBs must certify to be eligible to use infrastructure funds in the State funding mechanism. This policy applies to ARIZONA@WORK Job Center comprehensive, affiliate and specialized sites. (Page 92) Title I

The Council is the leading body in implementing and monitoring the State Unified Plan, providing statewide policy direction, building collaborative relationships, and coordinating resources. The Council oversees the efficiency, accessibility and continuous improvement of Arizona’s workforce system. (Page 94) Title I

ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers are overseen by DES and monitored annually to ensure accessibility for individuals with disabilities. The State is committed to making all services, facilities and information accessible for individuals with disabilities. This applies to all programs, activities, and services provided by or made available to potential employees, volunteers, contractors, service providers, licensees, clients, and potential clients within the ARIZONA@WORK system. To reinforce this commitment, all recipients and service providers are required to provide written assurance in their agreements, grants and contracts that they are committed to and will comply with the requirements of the Workforce Innovative & Opportunity Act (WIOA) Section 188, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and with 29 CFR Part 32 and Part 38. The State WIOA EO Officer utilizes the ADA Checklist for Existing Facilities 2010 to review all ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers for accessibility. The Non-Discrimination Plan (NDP) directs all EO officers in the LWDA to ensure that the written assurances of the sub-recipients are followed and in compliance with the ADA requirements for both facility and activity accessibility for individuals with disabilities. (Page 116) Title I

Non-Discrimination Policy: The Arizona Department of Education (ADE) is committed to a work environment in which all individuals are treated with respect and dignity. Each individual has the right to work in a professional atmosphere that promotes equal employment opportunity and prohibits discriminatory practices, including harassment. Therefore, the Arizona Department of Education commits itself to a policy of Non-Discrimination. • ADE has developed this policy to ensure that all its employees can work in an environment free from harassment, discrimination and retaliation. • ADE will make every reasonable effort to ensure that all concerned are familiar with this policy and aware that any complaint of violation of such policies will be investigated and resolved appropriately. • ADE will post the Equal Opportunity Policy Statement at the following locations- o Public Website- https://www.azed.gov/hr/ o ADE Internal Website for employees o Employee bulletin boards at the four worksites (1535 W. Jefferson, Phoenix, AZ; 3300 N. Central, Phoenix, AZ; 3100 N. West Street, Flagstaff, AZ; 400 W. Congress St., Tucson, AZ) • All employment announcements shall include the phrase, “The Arizona Department of Education is an EOE/ADA Reasonable Accommodation Employer.” (Page 170) Title II

Vets

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Mental Health

~~The purpose of the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program is to provide persons with disabilities with the services and supports they need to overcome disability-related barriers to employment and become an integral part of the workforce. VR services are provided statewide through a comprehensive network of staff and contracted service providers who are trained to meet the unique needs of persons with disabilities, including those who are visually impaired or blind, hard of hearing or deaf, who have experienced a traumatic brain or spinal cord injury, have a mental health diagnosis or are a youth with a disability. The VR program utilizes Employer Coordinators to collaborate with local businesses and increase awareness of the large, often over-looked, talent pool of people with disabilities. Employer needs are addressed and employment opportunities for persons with disabilities are enhanced through activities such as coordinated job fairs, job preparation seminars, and employer panels. (Page 43) Title I

The VR program employs staff statewide and has specialty counselors trained to meet the unique needs of persons who are visually impaired or blind, hard of hearing or deaf, who have experienced a traumatic brain or spinal cord injury, have a mental health diagnosis or are a youth with a disability. Specialty comprehensive contracts and agreements have been developed to provide enhanced services to meet the training and employment needs of these populations. (Page 46) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) has developed and maintained multiple cooperative agreements to provide enhanced services to mutual clients of diverse systems. These agreements encompass a diverse population base and exist to provide enhanced services to clients while maximizing the expertise and funding of separate funding sources. VR has worked collaboratively with the following entities:
o Division of Behavioral Health Services to support individuals with Serious Mental Illness (Page 74) Title IV

An Intergovernmental Agreement between DES/Rehabilitation Services and the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services exists to coordinate services to mutual clients. VR counselors are assigned to work with behavioral health clinical teams throughout the state in order to enhance service delivery and customer satisfaction in the provision of customized employment and vocational services. (Page 175) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services has had longstanding agreements with the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS), Division of Behavioral Health Services (DBHS) and the DES Division of Developmental Disabilities to pay for extended support services. These agreements and combination of funding has permitted a greater number of joint clients to benefit from supported employment services. To the extent possible, DES/Rehabilitation Services works to create a seamless transition from VR supported employment services to extended supported employment services paid by or through other agencies. (Page 180) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services has a cooperative Intergovernmental Agreement with the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services to detail the provision of supported employment services to individuals with Serious Mental Illness (SMI). This agreement coordinates services to mutual clients, assigning VR counselors to work with behavioral health clinical teams throughout the state in order to enhance service delivery, customer satisfaction, and successful outcomes through the provision of vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services. (Page 180) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services have maintained an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) with the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services (DBHS) to provide enhanced vocational rehabilitation services to individuals determined to have a Serious Mental Illness (SMI) since 1992. DES/Rehabilitation Services works with DBHS to amend the IGA on a yearly basis in order to modify the agreement to maintain the partnership and enhance the services provided to individuals determined to have a serious mental illness. Each Regional Behavioral Health Authority (RBHA) contracted with DBHS uses the IGA to develop a collaborative protocol to establish specific service delivery responsibilities as well as the roles and responsibilities for VR and RBHA provider staff.

Per the IGA, each RBHA provider site is assigned a VR counselor to work with mutual and prospective clients. The VR counselor acts as the vocational consultant for the clinical team, attends meetings related to the mutual client’s vocational services, and provides Individual Service Plan recommendations for each client related to the VR program. VR staff conducts VR orientations at each clinic at least one time per month, and are provided with functional workspace to conduct client meetings.

To ensure continuous and streamlined communication, DES/Rehabilitation Services, ADHS/DBHS and each RBHA coordinate quarterly meetings for all Behavioral Health VR counselors, VR supervisors, RBHA clinical representatives and mutual provider agencies. Staff is given the opportunity to discuss concerns related to the IGA and is provided with program updates and information on available resources. DES/Rehabilitation Services and ADHS/DBHS also coordinate a biannual IGA Advisory meeting to discuss any IGA related changes, staff or agency concerns, as well as program accomplishments. (Page 182-183) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 57

Executive order No. 2020-04 Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council - 01/15/2020

“WHEREAS, it is important for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to have a forum to discuss issues important to them, to identify concerns, gaps and duplications in available services and programs, and to build capacity for system change when needed; and

WHEREAS, individuals with developmental disabilities and their families, state agencies, protection and advocacy organizations, local and non-governmental agencies and private and non­profit groups serving individuals with developmental disabilities all play important roles in facilitating advocacy, capacity building and system change activities for individuals with developmental disabilities…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of Arizona by the Arizona Constitution and Laws of Arizona, hereby reauthorize the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council…”

Systems
  • Other
Attachments

EXECUTIVE ORDER 2020-03: Emphasizing the Role of the Department of Corrections in Rehabilitation and Reentry - 01/13/2020

“WHEREAS, studies have shown that education programs, job training programs, and substance abuse treatment provided in correctional settings reduce recidivism rates; and

WHEREAS, many individual who are released from custody face significant barriers to obtaining employment and housing, including lack of in-demand job skills, lack of a high school degree, substance abuse disorder and mental illness…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging
Attachments

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Arizona Association of Community Health Centers (AACHC), d.b.a. Arizona Alliance for Community Health Centers was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind” population, specifically, service-industry workers, variable-income and seasonal workers, and self-employed individuals.  Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are El Rio Community Health Center, Asian Pacific Community in Action, Helping Families in Need, and Keogh Health Connection. They will partner with   Cover Arizona (statewide coalition of 600+ organizations), Cover Kids Coalition,  AZ Dept. of Insurance, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations,  Small business owners,  Hospitality employers,  Southern AZ hospitals,  AZ Dept. of Health, AZ Public Health Association, and Food Bank Association .  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.:Tara PleasePhone: (602) 288-7547Email: Tarap@aachc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transition Conference & Directors' Institute - Phoenix, AZ - 08/19/2019

~~“The Arizona Department of Education, Exceptional Student Services is pleased to present the opening of registration for Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, and the Arizona Directors’ Institute, Building Success: One Collaboration at a Time! New for 2019, these conferences are being held back-to-back from August 19 – 23 at the JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Developmental Disabilities Policies - 05/22/2019

~~“Welcome to the DDD policy page.

DDD develops policies that conform to state, federal, and contractual requirements. DDD has five policy manuals, which include the Operations, Medical, Eligibility, Behavior Supports, and Provider manuals. Changes in policy are communicated to contracted DDD providers via electronic policy notifications, which are also sent to all DDD employees, Providers, Administrative Services Subcontractors, and individuals who have opted to receive notifications.”

This page has links to each of the policy manuals.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona Resources - 04/29/2019

~~“Here you will find a list of Arizona organizations that provide assistive technology (AT) and related services. If you can’t find the information you are looking for, please contct us for assistance:  602-728-9534, askAzTAP@nau.edu.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Employment Services - 04/06/2019

~~“Pima County One-Stop opened the Kino Veterans’ Workforce Center, 2801 E. Ajo Way, to help military veterans find jobs and get training, benefits and support services; and to help employers hire veterans.

One-Stop’s partners in the Center include the U.S. Departments of Labor, Defense and Veterans Affairs; the Arizona Departments of Veterans Services and Economic Security; Pima Community College; Community Partnership of Southern Arizona and Rally Point; CODAC/Comin’ Home; Tucson Veterans Serving Veterans; Salvation Army; Old Pueblo Community Services; Primavera Foundation; the Arizona Veterans Commission; SER Jobs for Progress; and local employers. Peer support, drop-in and welcome”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Project To Create 500 Jobs For Arizonans With Disabilities - 02/05/2019

~“Governor Doug Ducey today joined The Precisionist Inc. (TPI) to announce the creation of over 500 jobs for individuals with a broad range of disabilities. Through an innovative partnership with Arizona businesses, known as the “Phoenix Precision Project,” participants in the program will receive training and employment opportunities in a broad range of fields such as software development, database analytics, accounting, data entry and more.

The program is a collaboration between the Governor’s Office, TPI, Salt River Project, the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) and First Place® AZ, a Phoenix community offering housing, education and training to adults with autism. It is expected to create more than 500 Arizona jobs for adults with autism and other special abilities within the next three to five years—and about 1,000 total by 2025.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference Call for Papers/Call for Brochure Artwork Information - 01/30/2019

~“Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, is being held August 19-21, 2019 at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge in Phoenix. The Transition Planning Committee is looking for Secondary Transition Stakeholders providing innovative programs, promising practices, inspiring collaborations, and motivational students or personnel to present at the conference. The form is at this link. The deadline for proposals is March 1, 2019.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Opportunities for Arizonans with Disabilities - 01/29/2019

~“Employers who hire people with disabilities not only benefit from a more inclusive workplace, but also a team of eager workers who often bring innovative perspectives and an expanded customer-base of clients who prefer to patronize inclusive businesses. Since employees with disabilities tend to stay employed with the same company longer, employers also save on training and recruitment costs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Arizona House Concurrent Resolution 2029 - 03/30/2015

Whereas, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination in employment against qualified individuals on the basis of disability, which the ADA defines as a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity, such as hearing, seeing, speaking, walking, breathing, performing manual tasks, caring for oneself, learning or working; and Whereas, an employer is required to provide a reasonable accommodation to an employee with a disability unless the accommodation would be an undue hardship that would require significant difficultly or expense; and Whereas, many unemployed individuals with disabilities are ready, able and willing to work. Therefore Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Arizona, the Senate concurring: That the Members of the Legislature support the employment of persons with disabilities and encourage Arizona businesses to hire persons with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Executive order No. 2020-04 Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council - 01/15/2020

“WHEREAS, it is important for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to have a forum to discuss issues important to them, to identify concerns, gaps and duplications in available services and programs, and to build capacity for system change when needed; and

WHEREAS, individuals with developmental disabilities and their families, state agencies, protection and advocacy organizations, local and non-governmental agencies and private and non­profit groups serving individuals with developmental disabilities all play important roles in facilitating advocacy, capacity building and system change activities for individuals with developmental disabilities…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of Arizona by the Arizona Constitution and Laws of Arizona, hereby reauthorize the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council…”

Systems
  • Other
Attachments

EXECUTIVE ORDER 2020-03: Emphasizing the Role of the Department of Corrections in Rehabilitation and Reentry - 01/13/2020

“WHEREAS, studies have shown that education programs, job training programs, and substance abuse treatment provided in correctional settings reduce recidivism rates; and

WHEREAS, many individual who are released from custody face significant barriers to obtaining employment and housing, including lack of in-demand job skills, lack of a high school degree, substance abuse disorder and mental illness…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging
Attachments

Arizona Employment First Joins Effort to Observe National Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/05/2018

~“Arizona Employment First announced its participation in National Disability Employment Awareness Month, an annual awareness campaign that takes place each October. Governor Doug Ducey has issued a proclamation recognizing October as Disability Employment Awareness Month, encouraging all Arizonans to recognize the strengths that people with disabilities bring to the workforce, community and our state as a whole.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 2017-08 The Establishment of Arizona as an Employment First State - 11/15/2017

~~WHEREAS, Arizonans who have disabilities are valued members of society; and

WHEREAS, opportunity for all includes ensuring opportunity for individuals who have disabilities; and

WHEREAS, there is a dignity in work that provides individuals not only a source of income, but also a source of pride, sense of accomplishment, and opportunities for social interaction; and

WHEREAS, every Arizonan should have the opportunity to participate in the workforce, including those who have disabilities; and

WHEREAS, an estimated 418,000 individuals in Arizona have some form of disability; and

WHEREAS, the employment gap between individuals with and without disabilities in Arizona has been between forty and fifty percentage points over the last several years; and

WHEREAS, opportunities for meaningful and competitive employment will improve the individuals' quality of life, increase community participation, and empower them to make their own choices in life; and

WHEREAS, individuals who have disabilities can be dedicated and productive members of the workforce; and

WHEREAS, in 2014, only 14% of Arizona's developmental disability funding spent on day and employment services went to integrated employment; and

WHEREAS, an inclusive and diverse workforce will help erase the stigma attached to those who have disabilities; and

WHEREAS, Arizona seeks to improve and coordinate efforts to increase community employment opportunities for Arizonans who have disabilities.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and Laws of the State of Arizona hereby declare the following:1. All state agencies that provide services and support to persons who have disabilities shall implement Employment First in Arizona and shall coordinate efforts to improve employment opportunities for working-age adults who have disabilities. Such efforts shall include:     a. In collaboration with stakeholders, review and alignment of policies and services for individuals who have disabilities to increase opportunities for community employment;     b. In collaboration with stakeholders, identify best practices, effective partnerships, sources of available federal funds, opportunities for shared services among existing providers, and the means to expand model programs to increase community employment opportunities;     c. Establish interagency agreements to improve coordination of services and allow for data sharing as appropriate;....

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order No. 93-13: Governor's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

"I, Fife Symington, Governor of the State of Arizona, do hereby create a new Executive Order for the permanent establishment of the Governor’s committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities and delineate herein its purpose, structure and function….The Governor’s Committee On the Employment of People with Disabilities is established to promote the employment of people with disabilities; to promote the implementation of the Americans With Disabilities Act; and to promote a better quality of life for people with disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 21

Developmental Disabilities Policies - 05/22/2019

~~“Welcome to the DDD policy page.

DDD develops policies that conform to state, federal, and contractual requirements. DDD has five policy manuals, which include the Operations, Medical, Eligibility, Behavior Supports, and Provider manuals. Changes in policy are communicated to contracted DDD providers via electronic policy notifications, which are also sent to all DDD employees, Providers, Administrative Services Subcontractors, and individuals who have opted to receive notifications.”

This page has links to each of the policy manuals.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Employment Services - 04/06/2019

~~“Pima County One-Stop opened the Kino Veterans’ Workforce Center, 2801 E. Ajo Way, to help military veterans find jobs and get training, benefits and support services; and to help employers hire veterans.

One-Stop’s partners in the Center include the U.S. Departments of Labor, Defense and Veterans Affairs; the Arizona Departments of Veterans Services and Economic Security; Pima Community College; Community Partnership of Southern Arizona and Rally Point; CODAC/Comin’ Home; Tucson Veterans Serving Veterans; Salvation Army; Old Pueblo Community Services; Primavera Foundation; the Arizona Veterans Commission; SER Jobs for Progress; and local employers. Peer support, drop-in and welcome”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference Call for Papers/Call for Brochure Artwork Information - 01/30/2019

~“Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, is being held August 19-21, 2019 at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge in Phoenix. The Transition Planning Committee is looking for Secondary Transition Stakeholders providing innovative programs, promising practices, inspiring collaborations, and motivational students or personnel to present at the conference. The form is at this link. The deadline for proposals is March 1, 2019.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Opportunities for Arizonans with Disabilities - 01/29/2019

~“Employers who hire people with disabilities not only benefit from a more inclusive workplace, but also a team of eager workers who often bring innovative perspectives and an expanded customer-base of clients who prefer to patronize inclusive businesses. Since employees with disabilities tend to stay employed with the same company longer, employers also save on training and recruitment costs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council - 11/20/2018

~“The Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council (DDAC) is an advisory council to the Assistant Director of the Division of Developmental Disabilities on a wide variety of matters relating to the Division. Council members are appointed by the Arizona Governor to three year terms. Membership is comprised of seventeen individuals from a cross-section of the community including parents of a person with a developmental disabilitiy, service providers, members serviced by the Division of Developmental Disabilities, and other community stakeholders.

The mission of the DDAC is to provide, in partnership with the Division of Developmental Disabilities, advisory oversight on behalf of consumers, families, and providers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Ultimate Dream Job: National Apprenticeship Week 2018 - 11/16/2018

~“The Arizona Apprenticeship Office under the Arizona Department of Economic Security (DES) is continuously expanding the number of registered apprenticeship opportunities available to its residents. Apprenticeships, which were once only available in trades such as manufacturing and construction, are now emerging in fields including cyber and information technology (IT), healthcare, sales, professional services, and more. This year kicks-off the apprenticeship journey for Arizona barber, Lana Cantrell, and her first apprentice.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Helping the "Perfectly Imperfect Child" - 07/25/2018

~~“Pre-ETS is a program that is offered in collaboration with the Division of Employment and Rehabilitation Services (DERS). The Pre-ETS program helps students with disabilities prepare for future employment through a series of workshops that provide job exploration counseling, work-based learning and other work readiness training.  The program is available to youth with any kind of disability who are between the ages of 14 and 22. Group workshops make up the majority of the program. However, customized one-on-one workshops will be made available for those who qualify, such as Kendrick, who uses an augmentative communications device.

 “The new Pre-ETS program is a requirement under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. It is also in alignment with Governor Ducey’s Employment First(link is external) policy.” The Employment First initiative was established by executive order to expand career opportunities for all Arizonans.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Mental Health Block Grant - 06/19/2018

~~“Through the 10% set-aside, MHBG funds for FEP can be used for the following: • Treatment of members determined to have experienced a first episode of psychosis; • Expansion of Evidence-Based Practices in Supported Employment or wrap around services for individuals living in Permanent Supported Housing; • Programmatic / treatment related services for members enrolled in FEP programs; • Salaries of employees that work in administrative, supervisory and directly in a treatment capacity with FEP members; • Promotion of the current and effective treatment model; and • General startup costs such as planning administration and training related to establishing and providing services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

DES Helps Adults with Autism Thrive through Fulfilling Employment - 04/13/2018

~~“For many adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), networking with potential employers and finding gainful employment can be a challenge. Roughly 60-80% of the adults with ASD in Arizona are currently unemployed. To address this growing concern, the Department of Economic Security (DES) collaborates with key community partners to host customized Autism Job Fairs to educate and connect adult job seekers with ASD to viable and fulfilling employment in their communities.

Before networking at the Autism Job Fairs begins, Dr. James B. Adams of the ASU Autism/Asperger’s Research Program, offers two enlightening workshops: one tailored to teach job seekers with ASD soft skills required to land and keep a job, and the other directed to the employers to help them understand what to expect when interviewing and employing an adult with autism.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AZ ABLE - Achieving a Better Life Experience - 03/18/2018

~~“Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) account programs are investment programs that offer persons with disabilities, their family and friends, the option to contribute to a tax-exempt savings account for disability-related expenses. As of March 5, 2018, AZ ABLE accounts are open for enrollment.

Learn more about the AZ ABLE account program, such as eligibility, investment options, and other information at the AZ ABLE website(link is external).

Benefits of Opening an AZ ABLE Account•Money saved does not affect SNAP•Money saved does not affect Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) Medicaid•Money saved only suspends SSI if account balance reaches over $100,000•Provides financial freedom for people with disabilities•Account is owned by the individual with the disability•Dramatically increases ability to save•Before ABLE, individuals with disabilities could only save around $2,000 of their own money before risking loss of health care and other benefits•Provides a new investment opportunity•Includes tax free earnings”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Arizona Resources - 04/29/2019

~~“Here you will find a list of Arizona organizations that provide assistive technology (AT) and related services. If you can’t find the information you are looking for, please contct us for assistance:  602-728-9534, askAzTAP@nau.edu.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Project To Create 500 Jobs For Arizonans With Disabilities - 02/05/2019

~“Governor Doug Ducey today joined The Precisionist Inc. (TPI) to announce the creation of over 500 jobs for individuals with a broad range of disabilities. Through an innovative partnership with Arizona businesses, known as the “Phoenix Precision Project,” participants in the program will receive training and employment opportunities in a broad range of fields such as software development, database analytics, accounting, data entry and more.

The program is a collaboration between the Governor’s Office, TPI, Salt River Project, the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) and First Place® AZ, a Phoenix community offering housing, education and training to adults with autism. It is expected to create more than 500 Arizona jobs for adults with autism and other special abilities within the next three to five years—and about 1,000 total by 2025.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Skilled Trades Workforce Development in Arizona - 11/18/2018

~“AZAGC’s intention is to have the information in this resource guide expand to include as many relavent organizations as possible so our members and others in the industry have a comprehensive resource to assist them in connecting with future employees and in developing and sustatinig their company’s workforce strategy”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Ability360 Employment Services - 07/07/2018

~~Did you know you can work even if you have a disability and receive Social Security benefits?  Most people with disabilities can do some work and many can work again full time.  Don’t let fear stand in your way.  If you are tired of worrying about money and are tired of being bored, please continue reading.  If you currently receive SSDI or SSI benefits you are eligible for programs and work incentives that can help you to get a job and manage your benefits.  As a recipient of Social Security benefits you qualify for a number of work incentives and a program called Ticket to Work.

ABIL Employment Services has been providing assistance and support to persons with disabilities seeking employment through the Ticket to Work program since 2002.  We are recognized as one of the largest and most successful organizations providing services through the Ticket program in the entire country

Systems
  • Other

Untapped Arizona - 08/04/2017

~~“Employers in Arizona—including businesses, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies— recognize that a diverse and inclusive workplace benefits everyone, and they are actively recruiting and hiring people with disabilities. Untapped Arizona assists businesses in meeting their workforce needs by providing tools and information to support their efforts to recruit, hire, and develop workers with disabilities. We also partner with workforce-related networks, initiatives, and coalitions to support increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Partnering with employment service providers….”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

“DES Spotlight: Mental Health Disorders and Job Placement Through Vocational Rehabilitation” - 02/02/2017

~~“According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness(link is external), approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experiences mental illness in a given year and approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S. experiences a serious mental illness in a given year that substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.

There are those who suffer from psychiatric issues every day, yet still function in society and even manage to hold down jobs. Studies have suggested that of 25 chronic physical and mental issues, depression has the most financial impact on employers, even outweighing medical and pharmacy costs for employees.

As one of the State's largest agencies, the Department of Economic Security (DES) serves approximately 2.2 million people a year, with job services being a major component. One of the ways DES can assist those with mental health disorders, particularly those applying for jobs, is by simply trying to understand life from their perspective”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health

Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) - 01/05/2017

~~“The Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) is a committee dedicated to improving collaboration among secondary transition planning partners.On this page you will find information on each community partner as well as a link to our monthly communique. If you are interested in more information on the AZCoPT or to set up your own local community of practice please email AZCoPT.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arizona Department of Economic Security & Arizona Department of Health Services Agreement - 03/16/2012

This contract between the Arizona Department of Economic Security (ADES) and the Arizona Department of Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services (ADHS/ DBHS) serves to promotes the increased employment of people with disabilities in integrated, community settings

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (ADDPC) - 07/01/2009

~~“A staff of six assists the all-volunteer Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council, which is made up of individuals with disabilities, family members, professional stakeholders and state agency representatives appointed by the Governor of Arizona. The 23-member Council meets at least four times a year to discuss issues and vote on which projects to support by allocating our federal funds.We were created on July 1, 2009 as a successor organization to the former Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities.

OUR MISSION:  We want to develop and support capacity building and systemic change to increase inclusion and involvement of persons with developmental disabilities in their communities through the promotion of self-determination, independence and dignity in all aspects of life.OUR VISION:  The vision of the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council is one community working together to achieve full inclusion and participation of persons with developmental disabilities."

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ADDPC - 2014 Employment Options for People with IDD

“Several initiatives are also underway to support adults, youth and their families to make informed decisions about work or to consider a progressive move into a more integrated working environment and/or increase earnings:   Employment Summit for Transition-Age Youth: Representatives … are part of a collaborative work group to plan for a Summit geared toward promoting employment among transition age youth with developmental disabilities.   Disability Benefits 101 Online Tool: Many people with disabilities are afraid to consider employment or a progressive move because they are uninformed about the work and healthcare incentives that can assist them to make the transition. In 2012, the Arizona Disability Benefits 101 online tool will be available to support individuals with disabilities to plan for employment, learn how work and benefits go together and make informed decisions about going to work or accepting a job offer.   Untapped Arizona: A new employer engagement collaborative, Untapped Arizona, was created to support the business community in meeting their workforce needs by including individuals with disabilities in their hiring practices. Untapped Arizona has developed a system to connect employers with qualified job seekers with disabilities. Additionally, Untapped Arizona has a network of partners who can provide technical assistance and support to employers pertaining to hiring, legal issues, reasonable accommodations and employee retention.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Arizona Uniform Application FY 2018-2019 State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/16/2017

~~Transition Planning.“3. Vocational/EmploymentAn important component of transitioning to adulthood includes vocational goals that lead to employment or other types of meaningful activity. While a job can provide financial support, personal fulfillment, and social opportunities, other activities such as an internship or volunteering in an area of special interest to the young adult can also provide personal satisfaction and an opportunity to engage socially with others.  The CFT along with involved system partners work together to prepare the young adult for employment or other vocational endeavors…”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council “2017 Self-advocacy grant” - 03/02/2017

~~“One of the main purposes of the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council is to issue competitive grants based on the goals of our Five-Year State Plan: Self-advocacy, Integrated Employment and Inclusion. In addition, the ADDPC follows a process for soliciting, reviewing and awarding grant applications consistent with state laws, administrative rules and regulations for grants, and procurement administration.  If you have any specific questions related to a grant, please reach out to us and we can help answer your inquiries.

Please note that ADDPC grants cannot be used to provide individual direct support; visit the Grant FAQs tab in this section for more information.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“DES Spotlight: Mental Health Disorders and Job Placement Through Vocational Rehabilitation” - 02/02/2017

~~“According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness(link is external), approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experiences mental illness in a given year and approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S. experiences a serious mental illness in a given year that substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.

There are those who suffer from psychiatric issues every day, yet still function in society and even manage to hold down jobs. Studies have suggested that of 25 chronic physical and mental issues, depression has the most financial impact on employers, even outweighing medical and pharmacy costs for employees.

As one of the State's largest agencies, the Department of Economic Security (DES) serves approximately 2.2 million people a year, with job services being a major component. One of the ways DES can assist those with mental health disorders, particularly those applying for jobs, is by simply trying to understand life from their perspective”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health

Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) - 01/01/2017

~"The Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) is a committee dedicated to improving collaboration among secondary transition planning partners.

On this page you will find information on each community partner as well as a link to our monthly communique. If you are interested in more information on the AZCoPT or to set up your own local community of practice please email AZCoPT."

.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Arizona Association of Community Health Centers (AACHC), d.b.a. Arizona Alliance for Community Health Centers was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind” population, specifically, service-industry workers, variable-income and seasonal workers, and self-employed individuals.  Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are El Rio Community Health Center, Asian Pacific Community in Action, Helping Families in Need, and Keogh Health Connection. They will partner with   Cover Arizona (statewide coalition of 600+ organizations), Cover Kids Coalition,  AZ Dept. of Insurance, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations,  Small business owners,  Hospitality employers,  Southern AZ hospitals,  AZ Dept. of Health, AZ Public Health Association, and Food Bank Association .  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.:Tara PleasePhone: (602) 288-7547Email: Tarap@aachc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transition Conference & Directors' Institute - Phoenix, AZ - 08/19/2019

~~“The Arizona Department of Education, Exceptional Student Services is pleased to present the opening of registration for Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, and the Arizona Directors’ Institute, Building Success: One Collaboration at a Time! New for 2019, these conferences are being held back-to-back from August 19 – 23 at the JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

EVIDENCE FOR SUCCESS 2019 Combined Disability Conference - 04/24/2018

~~Evidence for Success Disability Conference June 7-9, 2020

We-Ko-Pa Resort and Conference Center

Scottsdale / Fountain Hills, AZ

 AT  •   EBP  •   AIVRTTAC One Conference – Three Different Focus Areas!

If you work with or support people with disabilities, the 2020 Evidence for Success Disability Conference is designed to foster the knowledge and skills necessary to facilitate access, change attitudes and promote inclusion in education, employment and community living so that people with disabilities will fully participate in all life experiences.

The conference format integrates three of the Institute for Human Development’s (IHD) project areas into one super educational event:

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY (AT)  – celebrating 20 years as Arizona’s largest, most comprehensive Assistive Technology Conference; featuring Therese Willkomm at the AT Makers Preconference Workshop and Monday Featured Speaker.

EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICES IN DISABILITY DISCIPLINES (EBP) – bridging the research-to-practice gap to help professionals implement evidence based practices.

AMERICAN INDIAN VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION TRAINING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CENTER (AIVRTTAC) – supporting positive outcomes for Tribal members receiving vocational rehabilitation services."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Navigating the System: A Guide for Individuals and Families - 02/01/2018

~~“The mission of Arizona’s Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (ADDPC) is to develop and support capacity building and systemic change to increase inclusion and involvement of persons with developmental disabilities in their communities through the promotion of self-determination, independence and dignity in all aspects of life.What do they do?The ADDPC serves residents with developmental disabilities along with their families. They provide support to projects for three current goals that are in their state plan:•  Increasing employment opportunities•  Encouraging individuals to advocate for themselves•  Empowering those individuals with informationThe ADDPC has a calendar for future conferences and events. They have  meetings that are open to the public.  They have articles on subjects such as employment, education and other related topics. In addition,ADDPC has updates on proposed laws that may affect people with developmental disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Social Security's Ticket to Work Program: The Basics - 12/31/2016

~~“The Ticket to Work Program is a federal program that helps Social Security beneficiaries with a disability reach their employment goals. Designed for beneficiaries aged 18 – 64 who get Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), Ticket to Work offers a variety of services to help you get a job. These services can include:• Vocational rehabilitation• Training• Referrals• Job coaching• Job counseling• Placement servicesThe services offered through the Ticket to Work Program help you to find and apply for jobs that already exist in the marketplace—it is not linked to special jobs for Social Security beneficiaries.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Arizona Eighteenth Annual Transition Conference - 08/29/2016

~~The Arizona Department of Education, Exceptional Student Services is pleased to present:Arizona’s Annual Transition ConferenceBuilding Success: One Transition at a TimeAugust 19-21, 2019

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

AZ Disability Benefits 101 - Finding the Right Job for You: The Details - 06/21/2016

This webpage serves as a guide for people with disabilities in Arizona to understand their various employment options. It includes traditional work options, self-employment, temporary employment, customized employment and telecommuting or telework.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Arizona’s Transition Conference - 08/01/2015

Arizona’s Fifteenth Annual Transition Conference, Connecting for Success: Shared Expectations, Responsibilities, and Outcomes, is a collaborative, cross-stakeholder professional development event aimed at providing meaningful and pertinent information needed in the transition planning process for youth and young adults with disabilities. This annual conference provides a dynamic array of national speakers, state level experts, and includes participation of youth, young adults, and family members. Session content is structured around three topical strands: (1) connecting with youth, (2) connecting with families, and (3) connecting with agency and community partners.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona Employment First Webinar - 06/27/2014

Arizona is planning its course to become number twenty-seven. Please join us for the national perspective on employment first, including the forces pushing behind employment first and Arizona's current and future efforts to enhance employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. WHO should participate? People with disabilities and their families, educators, transition specialists, service providers, employers and other interested individuals are invited to join the discussion about integrated employment for people with disabilities. HOW can you help? Participate in this Employment First Webinar and provide your input. Become part of the planning process and help us advance integrated employment as the first option for people with disabilities in Arizona.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training for Vendors Qualified to Provide Services through

~~DDD’s Training Unit provides the following training, free of charge, in order to support statewide providers and caregivers that best serve DDD members.

Contact Us•Email: dddstatewidetraining@azdes.gov•Phone: (602) 771-8125

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Arizona Demonstration Fact Sheet - 01/01/2018

~~“Date Extension Application Submitted: September 30, 2015Date Extension Application Approved: September 30, 2016Date Implemented:  October 1, 2016Date Expires: September 30, 2021

In addition, outside this demonstration, the state aims to encourage employment through referrals to a new state-only work search and job training program called AHCCCS Works.  This program, which will help connect beneficiaries to employment supports, is available for AHCCCS CARE beneficiaries who choose to participate.  Health coverage provided by the Medicaid program and this demonstration will not be affected by this state initiative.”  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona’s Eligibility Policy Manual for Medical, Nutrition and Cash Assistance “Medicaid Buy-in” - 07/14/2016

Medicare beneficiaries are eligible for State buy-in or buy-out depending on their income. 1) Buy-in It normally takes three months after approval of AHCCCS Medicare Savings Program (MSP) benefits or certain Medicaid programs for the Social Security Administration (SSA) to stop taking the Part B premium amount out of the beneficiary's SSA check. Services covered: “AHCCCS covers habilitation services for Arizona Long Term Care System (ALTCS) members through its Managed Care Contractors or the FFS program. The service known as “Day Treatment and Training”, also known as developmentally disabled daycare, is included under the habilitation services. Services are designed to assist individuals in acquiring, retaining and improving the self -help, socialization and adaptive skills necessary to reside successfully in Home and Community Based (HCB) settings. The services the provision of training in independent living skills or special developmental skills, orientation and mobility training, sensory-motor development, supported employment and intensive behavioral intervention for individuals with a diagnosis of autism when specific criteria are satisfied.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona’s 1115 Waiver - 07/01/2016

~~“With over 1.6 million Arizonans enrolled in AHCCCS, Medicaid has a far greater responsibility for impacting population health. Despite past innovation, we have an opportunity and obligation to do more. The goals of Modernizing Arizona Medicaid are to: (1) Engage Arizonans to take charge of their health; (2) Make Medicaid a temporary option; and (3) Promote a quality product at the most affordable price.AHCCCS will seek waiver authority to implement new programs and processes to carry this momentum forward to meet future challenges and respond to current economic realities through the AHCCCS CARE plan.”. The Waiver allows Arizona to run its unique and successful managed care model and exempts Arizona from certain provisions of the Social Security Act. It also includes expenditure authority for costs not otherwise matched by the federal government. Waiver programs are required to be budget neutral for the federal government − not cost more federal dollars than without a waiver. Specifically, the Waiver allows Arizona to:•Mandate managed care;•Provide Long Term Care Services in home and community-based settings rather than more costly institutions; and•Implement administrative simplifications.” 

 

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona HCBS Transition Plan Review - 11/25/2015

Arizona submitted its STP to CMS on October 20, 2015. CMS has completed the initial review of the STP and has some questions and requests regarding the transition timeframe, the public notice processes, public comments described in the STP, and the person-centered planning process described in the STP. C MS is continuing with a more in -depth review of the STP and will be providing additional detailed feedback.  This document includes a summary of current ssues.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona Medicaid State Plan - 01/15/1990

The Arizona Medicaid state plan details the a state and Federal government Medicaid implementation agreement.  It describes how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs. It also describes how the state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

In the Grand Canyon State of Arizona, people appreciate the value of independence, so the need to promote career success is the top priority for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Arizona's VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
2.17%
Change from
2017 to 2018
7,171,646
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.63%
Change from
2017 to 2018
449,009
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.35%
Change from
2017 to 2018
173,613
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
9.15%
Change from
2017 to 2018
38.67%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.49%
Change from
2017 to 2018
75.68%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 6,931,071 7,016,270 7,171,646
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 432,087 428,198 449,009
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 150,434 150,434 173,613
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,684,035 2,757,032 2,822,052
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.82% 35.13% 38.67%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.47% 75.31% 75.68%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.30% 4.90% 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.00% 18.40% 18.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.80% 14.40% 13.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 445,060 451,180 471,575
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 451,859 448,637 465,829
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 723,614 728,348 761,990
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 37,528 35,260 40,732
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 202,584 200,428 218,760
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 40,201 46,132 47,536
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 15,069 18,590 18,420
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,459 1,302 621
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,048 31,892 29,136
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 52,000 38,293 38,969

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,424 4,559 4,753
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.30% 4.40% 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 154,824 153,257 151,124

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 23,063 26,938 29,931
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 54,724 56,501 62,009
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 106,445 105,496 113,259
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.70% 25.50% 26.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 23.50% 14.80% 23.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.40% 3.80% 5.20%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 10,400 6,870 11,694
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,396 1,778 2,551
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,446 3,321 3,586
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 60 50 72
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 35 30 39
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 60.00% 54.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.53 0.44 0.57

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,513
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 198 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 235 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 601 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,150 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,121 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 208 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 18.40% 22.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,921 6,025 5,501
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 229,585 230,232 228,210
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 27 33 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 113 95 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $19,952,000 $21,986,000 $24,550,418
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $6,248,000 $6,357,000 $6,321,775
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $106,125,000 $112,052,000 $119,308,256
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 20.00% 14.00% 19.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,347 1,090 1,223
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 7,088 10,306 10,784
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 30.80 27.50 33.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.94% 65.76% 66.57%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.76% 14.74% 14.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.11% 1.99% 2.33%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.39% 85.61% 83.96%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.36% 22.79% 21.51%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.34% 63.55% 61.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 74.98% 77.66% 75.27%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 38.98% 40.76% 39.66%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,177,897
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,735
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 15,781
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 599,746
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 615,527
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 10
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 755
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 765
AbilityOne wages (products). $157,071
AbilityOne wages (services). $6,995,048

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 1 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1 0 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 43 38 26
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 44 40 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 4
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 15 0 28
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 999 1,979 1,093
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 26 26
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,014 2,005 1,151

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~DES/VR program staff is working cooperatively with Division of Developmental Disability staff and Employment First committee representatives to introduce systems change training to DES/VR and DD staff. The training will focus on the importance of providing the opportunity to work in a competitive integrated setting and developing supports within the employment setting to facilitate successful employment retention. Additionally, DES/VR and DD staff will be working with the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center to pilot supported employment opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities in Program Year 2018. (Page 202) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~An Intergovernmental Agreement between DES/Rehabilitation Services and the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services exists to coordinate services to mutual clients. VR counselors are assigned to work with behavioral health clinical teams throughout the state in order to enhance service delivery and customer satisfaction in the provision of customized employment and vocational services. (Page 175) Title I

Persons with Developmental Disabilities within the Foster Care System: Rehabilitation Services and DDD have a Memorandum of Understanding to enhance program delivery methods and provide customized employment services to mutual clients within the foster care system. Coordination, cooperation and collaboration between agencies will be facilitated by dedicated staff positions in an effort to provide and expand a continuum of comprehensive vocational services to the identified population. (Page 175) Title I

Rehabilitation Services and DDD have a Memorandum of Understanding to enhance program delivery methods and provide customized employment services to mutual clients within the foster care system. Coordination, cooperation and collaboration between agencies will be facilitated by dedicated staff positions in an effort to provide and expand a continuum of comprehensive vocational services to the identified population. (Page 176) Title I

IDENTIFY THE STRATEGIES THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE ACHIEVEMENT OF THE GOALS.
• Engaged Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to assist in identifying employers who are willing to customize employment for individuals with disabilities.
• Continued collaboration with the Division of Developmental Disabilities and Behavioral Health Services to effectively serve individuals with supported employment needs.
• Increased employer engagement activities through Employer Coordinators and connection with workforce development system. (Page 203) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~The VR program prepares persons with disabilities to be competitive in the labor market by offering services such as occupational/vocational training as well as undergraduate and advanced degrees. The VR program has the unique ability to support individuals in attending specialized or out-of-state schools for disability-related reasons, and Arizona VR clients have graduated from schools such as the Rochester Institute of Technology for the Deaf and Gallaudet University in New York. Education and training support services vary based on student need but many individuals receive tutoring, assistive technology, supplies/tools, and assistance arranging accommodations with the school’s Disability Resource Center. In Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2015, 1,470 individuals participated in a plan of services and received educational training supported by the VR program, and a total of $5,826,857 was spent to fund these educational endeavors. (Page 44) Title I

The Employer Coordinators facilitate networking meetings between employers and educational transition partners to provide employment and pre—employment transition services to youth with disabilities. Instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students with disabilities regarding employer engagement, opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, and secondary education resources, such as disability resource centers continue to be provided by Employer Coordinators throughout the state. (Page 181) Title IV
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.

DES/Rehabilitation Services is part of a multiagency Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) that encourages and facilitates the cooperation and collaboration between Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD), and the Public Education Agencies (PEA) represented by the ADE. The vision for the IGA is “to ensure a smooth and successful transition of students with disabilities to meaningful, gainful, and sustained employment, education, and community living.” (Page 176) Title IV

Under the umbrella of the IGA, DES/Rehabilitation Services provides coordinated transition services to 22 schools throughout the state. DES/Rehabilitation Services has 22 Third Party Cooperative Arrangements (TPCA) with PEAs to provide enhanced transition services. The TPCAs are commonly known as Transition from School to Work (TSW) programs. (Page 177) Title IV

Students who are able to participate in the Transition School to Work (TSW) program through a Third Party Cooperative Agreement (TPCA) are afforded the opportunity to participate in a structured program of services which integrates vocational rehabilitation services into the classroom environment. These services are provided by both the local PEA staff and VR staff. Involvement in these enhanced services are intended to allow the student to learn skills necessary to ameliorate disability related barriers to achieving their postsecondary goals. PEA and VR staff will continue to develop and coordinate new transition services and expand or modify existing services to accommodate the needs of students with disabilities. (Page 178) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services Employer Coordinators partner with secondary education schools, employers, and workforce development programs to provide pre—employment transition services and employment encounters for students and youth with disabilities across the state. Employer Coordinators partner with high school transition programs, VR transition counselors, and school and program administrators to facilitate job fairs, pre—employment workshops, apprenticeship opportunities, and employer panels at local high schools.

The Employer Coordinators facilitate networking meetings between employers and educational transition partners to provide employment and pre—employment transition services to youth with disabilities. Instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students with disabilities regarding employer engagement, opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, and secondary education resources, such as disability resource centers continue to be provided by Employer Coordinators throughout the state. (Page 181) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services works closely with the ADE Exceptional Student Services to provide opportunities to remain current in transition policies and procedures. An Intergovernmental Agreement exists that outlines cross training opportunities between partners. DES/Rehabilitation Services and ADE collaborate annually to provide a transition conference which serves to bring the community of providers together to learn about national policies, trends and best practices in serving youth with disabilities. Additionally, DES/Rehabilitation Services partners with ADE in providing a web based career information system named Arizona Career Information System (AzCIS) which allows students, families, education professionals, and VR staff to collaboratively assist students in developing appropriate and viable career goals. (Page 189) Title IV

Youth with disabilities continue to be an underserved population. Survey data reveals that Arizona DES/VR program is reaching about 20 percent of the total youth and students with disabilities. The education system in Arizona is complex. The Arizona Department of Education, the State Board of Education, 15 County Education Agencies and hundreds of district and charter governing boards oversee 230 discrete school districts, 406 charter holders and 13 Joint Technological Education Districts. Within these districts there are over 2000 public schools, including over 1500 district schools and over 500 charter schools. Reaching out to each of the districts and communicating the DES/VR program services has been challenging considering the multitude of individuals involved in the provision of services to students and youth with disabilities. Individuals with physical disabilities are also identified as being underserved by the DES/VR program. Less than 10 percent of the total VR population reports a disability which has physical limitations as a primary disability. It is difficult to discern if individuals are reporting other disability categories thus, the lower number or if individuals with physical disabilities are not aware or taking advantage of VR services. (Page 191) Title IV

Arizona VR is currently under an order of selection and is serving only the most significantly disabled individuals. Often, students with learning disabilities are made eligible but not considered to be most significantly disabled. Additionally, it is noted that students who receive special education services through the high school based on a 504 plan are not often referred to VR. Arizona VR is working closely with ADE to encourage the school system to refer not only those students with learning disabilities, but all students with disabilities who receive services through and Individualized Education Plan or a 504 plan. (Page 191-192) Title IV

When asked what other pre-employment transition services would be beneficial in assisting youth and students with disabilities, respondents listed transportation, community based work opportunities and job readiness skill development as identified service needs. (Page 192) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Focus on strategies targeting job seekers with barriers, including disabilities, ensuring that individuals with barriers are provided informed customer choice and appropriate assessments. This will include effective career pathways with multiple entry and exit points, including entry for individuals with low skills levels or other barriers and expansion of work-based learning opportunities, such as apprenticeship and on-the-job training (OJT), which may be suitable to individuals with limited work experience, low skills and/or academic credentials. (Page 55) Title I

Under WIOA, Arizona recognizes the need to expand opportunities statewide and develop robust career pathways that allow individuals with barriers and disabilities to participate and gain industry recognized credentials. Arizona will develop career pathways that include multiple aligned programs with funding by a variety of sources and driven by industry needs as defined through sector strategies and partnerships. Arizona chose the U.S. DOL’s Career Pathways Toolkit and the Shared Vision, Strong Systems Framework (CLASP, June 2014) as resources to develop an Arizona-specific definition that aligns with the WIOA definition and requirements for career pathways. This definition will serve as a foundation for the development of a state process for recognizing and evaluating career pathway programs. Implementation will focus on:
o Career pathways in specific occupations for each geographic area, including pathways that begin at lower educational attainment levels to provide opportunities for individuals with barriers and disabilities (Page 61) Title I

OJT will be utilized by the LWDAs to provide participants work experience, new transferable skills, and job placement upon successful completion of the training program. These opportunities are ideal for individuals with barriers, which can include disabilities. (Page 126) Title I

o Career Pathways: Develop robust career pathways that include multiple aligned programs with funding by a variety of sources and driven by industry needs as defined through sector strategies and partnerships. Entry points on these pathways must extend to adult learners with barriers such as disabilities, low basic skills, lack of a secondary diploma, and lack of English language skills. (Page 162) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

There is no linear progression from a single training event to lifelong self-sufficiency. The workforce system realizes that employment readiness, education, training, and continuous employment require repeated interaction with the workforce development and education systems. Job seekers enter the system with different levels of skills and readiness, and the system must provide an array of education and training models and modes. Work-based training, such as registered apprenticeship programs or OJT, can offer a supportive environment to individuals, including individuals with barriers and disabilities. Implementation will focus on: o Work-based training opportunities, including registered apprenticeship programs o Secondary education combined with career preparation o Outreach to targeted populations, such as veterans, individuals with disabilities, and disconnected youth o Exploration of possible incentives for employers to expand on-the-job training opportunities (Page 62) Title I

DES/Rehabilitation Services Employer Coordinators partner with secondary education schools, employers, and workforce development programs to provide pre—employment transition services and employment encounters for students and youth with disabilities across the state. Employer Coordinators partner with high school transition programs, VR transition counselors, and school and program administrators to facilitate job fairs, pre—employment workshops, apprenticeship opportunities, and employer panels at local high schools. (Page 181) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.
 

Employer/ Business

~~Untapped Arizona (UAZ) was established to support Arizona businesses meet their inclusive workforce needs by tapping into the labor pool of individuals with disabilities. UAZ is led by business leaders who are diversifying their own workforces by recruiting, hiring, retaining, and advancing workers with disabilities and actively encouraging other Arizona businesses to do the same. UAZ focuses on identifying and engaging the entire talent pool of individuals with disabilities regardless of whether or not they have a disability determination and/or are served by a government system. UAZ does not serve the job seeker customer, but rather the business customer, recognizing there are already systems, agencies, and services in place to support the job seeker to prepare for and find employment.

UAZ business leaders represent Arizona’s key industry sectors—information technology and related manufacturing, aerospace and defense, health care, and energy— and speak to the current and future labor needs of their sector. UAZ collaborates with employment service provider agencies to ensure they assist in driving the talent pool of individuals with disabilities to the AJC system, the state labor exchange system, to connect with qualified job candidates with disabilities. (Page 75) Title I

DES/Rehabilitation Services continues to review and enhance its relationships with local CRP providers as valued partners through quarterly CRP meetings. CRP meetings include review of various scopes of work, identification of and information about employer engagement opportunities, updated program information, and the opportunity for vendors to receive answers to questions, or bring issues to the attention of Rehabilitation Services management. These meetings are intended to further relationships and partnerships between DES/Rehabilitation Services and the CRP providers. To further enhance our working relationships with our community partners, each VR office has a representative staff attend the CRP meetings to ask questions, provide feedback, and develop a cooperative understanding of services for job seekers. (Page 179) Title IV

Employer Coordinators, in collaboration with other federal and state workforce agencies, county programs, and Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP) providers offer employer engagement opportunities to provide education and information about the qualified applicants available for hire. Monthly employer connection opportunities for community partners, VR counselors, and contracted vendors via teleconferences continue to be provided by the Employer Coordinators. VR has sponsored or co—sponsored educational events geared specifically for employers to include information on federal Schedule A hiring practices, tax credits or deductions, disability awareness training and other resources for education on hiring individuals with a disability. The provision of these training and informational sessions to employers has provided the opportunity to develop stronger partnerships with the employer community and has enhanced employment options for individuals with disabilities who are seeking employment. (Page 181) Title IV

The Employer Coordinators facilitate networking meetings between employers and educational transition partners to provide employment and pre—employment transition services to youth with disabilities. Instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students with disabilities regarding employer engagement, opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, and secondary education resources, such as disability resource centers continue to be provided by Employer Coordinators throughout the state. (Page 181) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services supports the continuous professional development of professional and paraprofessional staff through the provision of numerous training and educational opportunities throughout the year. Staff is presented with opportunities to participate in in-house trainings, webinars, conferences, community events, employer engagement presentations, and graduate level coursework necessary to meet qualified staff standards. These professional development opportunities focus on content areas such as assessment, ethics, vocational counseling, motivational interviewing, job development and placement, assistive technology, case management, case documentation, Traumatic Brain Injury, transition, and other specialty areas. Continuing education is available for those who are maintaining licensure or accreditation. (Page 188) Title IV

Data Collection

DES/VR began a systematic release of clients from Priority Category II in November 2016. Based on current activity, it is expected that the OOS will continue to experience a negative gain in Priority II with more clients being released or closed than determined eligible and Priority II. VR estimates that 1,113 clients will remain on the OOS in Priority II as of FFY 2019. VR will continue to develop methods for data collection and fiscal forecasting in order to continue a systematic release of clients from the waitlist. (Page 197) Title IV

In FFY 2019, the number of individuals who will be determined eligible but placed in Priority II or Priority III waitlist is 1,113 and 567 respectively. DES/VR does not expect to have the ability to serve all individuals in Priority Category II or any individuals in Priority Category III, but will continue to develop methods for fiscal forecasting and data collection in order to continue a systematic release of clients from Priority II. (Page 197) Title IV

The DES/VR case management system has been modified to include the WIOA data elements needed to collect Common Performance Measure data. In July 2017, the VR program started collecting data and submitting quarterly reports. The DES/VR program will utilize the data gathered each quarter to begin the process of measuring current to baseline current performance and gather enough data to inform the statistical adjustment model to negotiate target performance. (Page 201) Title IV

The DES/VR program engaged with several federally funded technical assistance centers to support the innovation and expansion activities allowable under WIOA. An intensive agreement was developed with the Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center to improve VR service delivery, integrate into the workforce development system, and transition to the common performance accountability system. Agreements with the National Technical Assistance Center of Transition and Youth Technical Assistance Center were also developed to improve and expand service delivery to potentially eligible students and youth with disabilities. (Page 202) Title IV

DES/VR is actively engaged in conversations with core partners and System 7, Libera case management system developers to develop effective and accurate data management processes which will allow DES/VR to report performance on the new common performance measures as prescribed in the WIOA. (Page 203) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

DES is responsible for the monitoring of workforce programs under Title I and Title III. Staff reviews client files and data entry for accuracy and compliance with policy. Annual site visits include the monitoring of physical accessibility as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act and Equal Employment Opportunity Act. Fiscal staff reviews the use of funds and compliance with policies and “Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements” issued by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in December 2013. Programs that do not meet requirements are put on a corrective action plan. All LWDAs use the AJC data system to record client data, allowing DES to prepare quarterly and annual reports as required by U.S. DOL. (Page 37) Titles I & III

The Workforce Administration has a primary focus on engaging and readying all job seekers for employment and will work toward aligning workforce programs for a seamless and accessible workforce system that is inclusive of all job seekers, connecting job seekers with in-demand jobs, and supporting equal access to services and employment opportunities for all job seekers, including those with barriers and disabilities. Active and strategic engagement and partnerships with educational partners and institutions in coordination with economic development agencies will further support positive outcomes for the employer, as the job creator, and the job seeker. (Page 65) Title I

To support this strategy, VR has facilitated continued education on accessibility issues though the funding of Disability Awareness/Sensitivity trainings as requested by ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers. The request for the local trainings are often one product of the accessibility discussions occurring in the LWDAs. In addition, VR local board representatives have provided guidance and insight with regards to physical access and various assistive technology needs of disabled individuals. (Page 67) Title IV

One-Stop Certification: This policy, effective August of 2017, establishes statewide objective criteria and procedures for use by local workforce development boards to certify ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers. The criteria is in adherence to WIOA requirements related to the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility, and continuous improvement, as well as measuring the local area’s progress in achieving the statewide vision for the ARIZONA@WORK Job Center delivery system outlined in the One-Stop Delivery System policy. LWDBs must certify to be eligible to use infrastructure funds in the State funding mechanism. This policy applies to ARIZONA@WORK Job Center comprehensive, affiliate and specialized sites. (Page 92) Title I

The Council is the leading body in implementing and monitoring the State Unified Plan, providing statewide policy direction, building collaborative relationships, and coordinating resources. The Council oversees the efficiency, accessibility and continuous improvement of Arizona’s workforce system. (Page 94) Title I

ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers are overseen by DES and monitored annually to ensure accessibility for individuals with disabilities. The State is committed to making all services, facilities and information accessible for individuals with disabilities. This applies to all programs, activities, and services provided by or made available to potential employees, volunteers, contractors, service providers, licensees, clients, and potential clients within the ARIZONA@WORK system. To reinforce this commitment, all recipients and service providers are required to provide written assurance in their agreements, grants and contracts that they are committed to and will comply with the requirements of the Workforce Innovative & Opportunity Act (WIOA) Section 188, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and with 29 CFR Part 32 and Part 38. The State WIOA EO Officer utilizes the ADA Checklist for Existing Facilities 2010 to review all ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers for accessibility. The Non-Discrimination Plan (NDP) directs all EO officers in the LWDA to ensure that the written assurances of the sub-recipients are followed and in compliance with the ADA requirements for both facility and activity accessibility for individuals with disabilities. (Page 116) Title I

Non-Discrimination Policy: The Arizona Department of Education (ADE) is committed to a work environment in which all individuals are treated with respect and dignity. Each individual has the right to work in a professional atmosphere that promotes equal employment opportunity and prohibits discriminatory practices, including harassment. Therefore, the Arizona Department of Education commits itself to a policy of Non-Discrimination. • ADE has developed this policy to ensure that all its employees can work in an environment free from harassment, discrimination and retaliation. • ADE will make every reasonable effort to ensure that all concerned are familiar with this policy and aware that any complaint of violation of such policies will be investigated and resolved appropriately. • ADE will post the Equal Opportunity Policy Statement at the following locations- o Public Website- https://www.azed.gov/hr/ o ADE Internal Website for employees o Employee bulletin boards at the four worksites (1535 W. Jefferson, Phoenix, AZ; 3300 N. Central, Phoenix, AZ; 3100 N. West Street, Flagstaff, AZ; 400 W. Congress St., Tucson, AZ) • All employment announcements shall include the phrase, “The Arizona Department of Education is an EOE/ADA Reasonable Accommodation Employer.” (Page 170) Title II

Vets

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Mental Health

~~The purpose of the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program is to provide persons with disabilities with the services and supports they need to overcome disability-related barriers to employment and become an integral part of the workforce. VR services are provided statewide through a comprehensive network of staff and contracted service providers who are trained to meet the unique needs of persons with disabilities, including those who are visually impaired or blind, hard of hearing or deaf, who have experienced a traumatic brain or spinal cord injury, have a mental health diagnosis or are a youth with a disability. The VR program utilizes Employer Coordinators to collaborate with local businesses and increase awareness of the large, often over-looked, talent pool of people with disabilities. Employer needs are addressed and employment opportunities for persons with disabilities are enhanced through activities such as coordinated job fairs, job preparation seminars, and employer panels. (Page 43) Title I

The VR program employs staff statewide and has specialty counselors trained to meet the unique needs of persons who are visually impaired or blind, hard of hearing or deaf, who have experienced a traumatic brain or spinal cord injury, have a mental health diagnosis or are a youth with a disability. Specialty comprehensive contracts and agreements have been developed to provide enhanced services to meet the training and employment needs of these populations. (Page 46) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) has developed and maintained multiple cooperative agreements to provide enhanced services to mutual clients of diverse systems. These agreements encompass a diverse population base and exist to provide enhanced services to clients while maximizing the expertise and funding of separate funding sources. VR has worked collaboratively with the following entities:
o Division of Behavioral Health Services to support individuals with Serious Mental Illness (Page 74) Title IV

An Intergovernmental Agreement between DES/Rehabilitation Services and the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services exists to coordinate services to mutual clients. VR counselors are assigned to work with behavioral health clinical teams throughout the state in order to enhance service delivery and customer satisfaction in the provision of customized employment and vocational services. (Page 175) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services has had longstanding agreements with the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS), Division of Behavioral Health Services (DBHS) and the DES Division of Developmental Disabilities to pay for extended support services. These agreements and combination of funding has permitted a greater number of joint clients to benefit from supported employment services. To the extent possible, DES/Rehabilitation Services works to create a seamless transition from VR supported employment services to extended supported employment services paid by or through other agencies. (Page 180) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services has a cooperative Intergovernmental Agreement with the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services to detail the provision of supported employment services to individuals with Serious Mental Illness (SMI). This agreement coordinates services to mutual clients, assigning VR counselors to work with behavioral health clinical teams throughout the state in order to enhance service delivery, customer satisfaction, and successful outcomes through the provision of vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services. (Page 180) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services have maintained an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) with the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services (DBHS) to provide enhanced vocational rehabilitation services to individuals determined to have a Serious Mental Illness (SMI) since 1992. DES/Rehabilitation Services works with DBHS to amend the IGA on a yearly basis in order to modify the agreement to maintain the partnership and enhance the services provided to individuals determined to have a serious mental illness. Each Regional Behavioral Health Authority (RBHA) contracted with DBHS uses the IGA to develop a collaborative protocol to establish specific service delivery responsibilities as well as the roles and responsibilities for VR and RBHA provider staff.

Per the IGA, each RBHA provider site is assigned a VR counselor to work with mutual and prospective clients. The VR counselor acts as the vocational consultant for the clinical team, attends meetings related to the mutual client’s vocational services, and provides Individual Service Plan recommendations for each client related to the VR program. VR staff conducts VR orientations at each clinic at least one time per month, and are provided with functional workspace to conduct client meetings.

To ensure continuous and streamlined communication, DES/Rehabilitation Services, ADHS/DBHS and each RBHA coordinate quarterly meetings for all Behavioral Health VR counselors, VR supervisors, RBHA clinical representatives and mutual provider agencies. Staff is given the opportunity to discuss concerns related to the IGA and is provided with program updates and information on available resources. DES/Rehabilitation Services and ADHS/DBHS also coordinate a biannual IGA Advisory meeting to discuss any IGA related changes, staff or agency concerns, as well as program accomplishments. (Page 182-183) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 57

Executive order No. 2020-04 Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council - 01/15/2020

“WHEREAS, it is important for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to have a forum to discuss issues important to them, to identify concerns, gaps and duplications in available services and programs, and to build capacity for system change when needed; and

WHEREAS, individuals with developmental disabilities and their families, state agencies, protection and advocacy organizations, local and non-governmental agencies and private and non­profit groups serving individuals with developmental disabilities all play important roles in facilitating advocacy, capacity building and system change activities for individuals with developmental disabilities…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of Arizona by the Arizona Constitution and Laws of Arizona, hereby reauthorize the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council…”

Systems
  • Other
Attachments

EXECUTIVE ORDER 2020-03: Emphasizing the Role of the Department of Corrections in Rehabilitation and Reentry - 01/13/2020

“WHEREAS, studies have shown that education programs, job training programs, and substance abuse treatment provided in correctional settings reduce recidivism rates; and

WHEREAS, many individual who are released from custody face significant barriers to obtaining employment and housing, including lack of in-demand job skills, lack of a high school degree, substance abuse disorder and mental illness…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging
Attachments

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Arizona Association of Community Health Centers (AACHC), d.b.a. Arizona Alliance for Community Health Centers was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind” population, specifically, service-industry workers, variable-income and seasonal workers, and self-employed individuals.  Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are El Rio Community Health Center, Asian Pacific Community in Action, Helping Families in Need, and Keogh Health Connection. They will partner with   Cover Arizona (statewide coalition of 600+ organizations), Cover Kids Coalition,  AZ Dept. of Insurance, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations,  Small business owners,  Hospitality employers,  Southern AZ hospitals,  AZ Dept. of Health, AZ Public Health Association, and Food Bank Association .  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.:Tara PleasePhone: (602) 288-7547Email: Tarap@aachc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transition Conference & Directors' Institute - Phoenix, AZ - 08/19/2019

~~“The Arizona Department of Education, Exceptional Student Services is pleased to present the opening of registration for Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, and the Arizona Directors’ Institute, Building Success: One Collaboration at a Time! New for 2019, these conferences are being held back-to-back from August 19 – 23 at the JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Developmental Disabilities Policies - 05/22/2019

~~“Welcome to the DDD policy page.

DDD develops policies that conform to state, federal, and contractual requirements. DDD has five policy manuals, which include the Operations, Medical, Eligibility, Behavior Supports, and Provider manuals. Changes in policy are communicated to contracted DDD providers via electronic policy notifications, which are also sent to all DDD employees, Providers, Administrative Services Subcontractors, and individuals who have opted to receive notifications.”

This page has links to each of the policy manuals.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona Resources - 04/29/2019

~~“Here you will find a list of Arizona organizations that provide assistive technology (AT) and related services. If you can’t find the information you are looking for, please contct us for assistance:  602-728-9534, askAzTAP@nau.edu.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Employment Services - 04/06/2019

~~“Pima County One-Stop opened the Kino Veterans’ Workforce Center, 2801 E. Ajo Way, to help military veterans find jobs and get training, benefits and support services; and to help employers hire veterans.

One-Stop’s partners in the Center include the U.S. Departments of Labor, Defense and Veterans Affairs; the Arizona Departments of Veterans Services and Economic Security; Pima Community College; Community Partnership of Southern Arizona and Rally Point; CODAC/Comin’ Home; Tucson Veterans Serving Veterans; Salvation Army; Old Pueblo Community Services; Primavera Foundation; the Arizona Veterans Commission; SER Jobs for Progress; and local employers. Peer support, drop-in and welcome”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Project To Create 500 Jobs For Arizonans With Disabilities - 02/05/2019

~“Governor Doug Ducey today joined The Precisionist Inc. (TPI) to announce the creation of over 500 jobs for individuals with a broad range of disabilities. Through an innovative partnership with Arizona businesses, known as the “Phoenix Precision Project,” participants in the program will receive training and employment opportunities in a broad range of fields such as software development, database analytics, accounting, data entry and more.

The program is a collaboration between the Governor’s Office, TPI, Salt River Project, the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) and First Place® AZ, a Phoenix community offering housing, education and training to adults with autism. It is expected to create more than 500 Arizona jobs for adults with autism and other special abilities within the next three to five years—and about 1,000 total by 2025.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference Call for Papers/Call for Brochure Artwork Information - 01/30/2019

~“Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, is being held August 19-21, 2019 at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge in Phoenix. The Transition Planning Committee is looking for Secondary Transition Stakeholders providing innovative programs, promising practices, inspiring collaborations, and motivational students or personnel to present at the conference. The form is at this link. The deadline for proposals is March 1, 2019.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Opportunities for Arizonans with Disabilities - 01/29/2019

~“Employers who hire people with disabilities not only benefit from a more inclusive workplace, but also a team of eager workers who often bring innovative perspectives and an expanded customer-base of clients who prefer to patronize inclusive businesses. Since employees with disabilities tend to stay employed with the same company longer, employers also save on training and recruitment costs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Arizona House Concurrent Resolution 2029 - 03/30/2015

Whereas, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination in employment against qualified individuals on the basis of disability, which the ADA defines as a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity, such as hearing, seeing, speaking, walking, breathing, performing manual tasks, caring for oneself, learning or working; and Whereas, an employer is required to provide a reasonable accommodation to an employee with a disability unless the accommodation would be an undue hardship that would require significant difficultly or expense; and Whereas, many unemployed individuals with disabilities are ready, able and willing to work. Therefore Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Arizona, the Senate concurring: That the Members of the Legislature support the employment of persons with disabilities and encourage Arizona businesses to hire persons with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Executive order No. 2020-04 Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council - 01/15/2020

“WHEREAS, it is important for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to have a forum to discuss issues important to them, to identify concerns, gaps and duplications in available services and programs, and to build capacity for system change when needed; and

WHEREAS, individuals with developmental disabilities and their families, state agencies, protection and advocacy organizations, local and non-governmental agencies and private and non­profit groups serving individuals with developmental disabilities all play important roles in facilitating advocacy, capacity building and system change activities for individuals with developmental disabilities…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of Arizona by the Arizona Constitution and Laws of Arizona, hereby reauthorize the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council…”

Systems
  • Other
Attachments

EXECUTIVE ORDER 2020-03: Emphasizing the Role of the Department of Corrections in Rehabilitation and Reentry - 01/13/2020

“WHEREAS, studies have shown that education programs, job training programs, and substance abuse treatment provided in correctional settings reduce recidivism rates; and

WHEREAS, many individual who are released from custody face significant barriers to obtaining employment and housing, including lack of in-demand job skills, lack of a high school degree, substance abuse disorder and mental illness…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging
Attachments

Arizona Employment First Joins Effort to Observe National Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/05/2018

~“Arizona Employment First announced its participation in National Disability Employment Awareness Month, an annual awareness campaign that takes place each October. Governor Doug Ducey has issued a proclamation recognizing October as Disability Employment Awareness Month, encouraging all Arizonans to recognize the strengths that people with disabilities bring to the workforce, community and our state as a whole.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 2017-08 The Establishment of Arizona as an Employment First State - 11/15/2017

~~WHEREAS, Arizonans who have disabilities are valued members of society; and

WHEREAS, opportunity for all includes ensuring opportunity for individuals who have disabilities; and

WHEREAS, there is a dignity in work that provides individuals not only a source of income, but also a source of pride, sense of accomplishment, and opportunities for social interaction; and

WHEREAS, every Arizonan should have the opportunity to participate in the workforce, including those who have disabilities; and

WHEREAS, an estimated 418,000 individuals in Arizona have some form of disability; and

WHEREAS, the employment gap between individuals with and without disabilities in Arizona has been between forty and fifty percentage points over the last several years; and

WHEREAS, opportunities for meaningful and competitive employment will improve the individuals' quality of life, increase community participation, and empower them to make their own choices in life; and

WHEREAS, individuals who have disabilities can be dedicated and productive members of the workforce; and

WHEREAS, in 2014, only 14% of Arizona's developmental disability funding spent on day and employment services went to integrated employment; and

WHEREAS, an inclusive and diverse workforce will help erase the stigma attached to those who have disabilities; and

WHEREAS, Arizona seeks to improve and coordinate efforts to increase community employment opportunities for Arizonans who have disabilities.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and Laws of the State of Arizona hereby declare the following:1. All state agencies that provide services and support to persons who have disabilities shall implement Employment First in Arizona and shall coordinate efforts to improve employment opportunities for working-age adults who have disabilities. Such efforts shall include:     a. In collaboration with stakeholders, review and alignment of policies and services for individuals who have disabilities to increase opportunities for community employment;     b. In collaboration with stakeholders, identify best practices, effective partnerships, sources of available federal funds, opportunities for shared services among existing providers, and the means to expand model programs to increase community employment opportunities;     c. Establish interagency agreements to improve coordination of services and allow for data sharing as appropriate;....

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order No. 93-13: Governor's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

"I, Fife Symington, Governor of the State of Arizona, do hereby create a new Executive Order for the permanent establishment of the Governor’s committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities and delineate herein its purpose, structure and function….The Governor’s Committee On the Employment of People with Disabilities is established to promote the employment of people with disabilities; to promote the implementation of the Americans With Disabilities Act; and to promote a better quality of life for people with disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 21

Developmental Disabilities Policies - 05/22/2019

~~“Welcome to the DDD policy page.

DDD develops policies that conform to state, federal, and contractual requirements. DDD has five policy manuals, which include the Operations, Medical, Eligibility, Behavior Supports, and Provider manuals. Changes in policy are communicated to contracted DDD providers via electronic policy notifications, which are also sent to all DDD employees, Providers, Administrative Services Subcontractors, and individuals who have opted to receive notifications.”

This page has links to each of the policy manuals.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Employment Services - 04/06/2019

~~“Pima County One-Stop opened the Kino Veterans’ Workforce Center, 2801 E. Ajo Way, to help military veterans find jobs and get training, benefits and support services; and to help employers hire veterans.

One-Stop’s partners in the Center include the U.S. Departments of Labor, Defense and Veterans Affairs; the Arizona Departments of Veterans Services and Economic Security; Pima Community College; Community Partnership of Southern Arizona and Rally Point; CODAC/Comin’ Home; Tucson Veterans Serving Veterans; Salvation Army; Old Pueblo Community Services; Primavera Foundation; the Arizona Veterans Commission; SER Jobs for Progress; and local employers. Peer support, drop-in and welcome”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference Call for Papers/Call for Brochure Artwork Information - 01/30/2019

~“Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, is being held August 19-21, 2019 at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge in Phoenix. The Transition Planning Committee is looking for Secondary Transition Stakeholders providing innovative programs, promising practices, inspiring collaborations, and motivational students or personnel to present at the conference. The form is at this link. The deadline for proposals is March 1, 2019.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Opportunities for Arizonans with Disabilities - 01/29/2019

~“Employers who hire people with disabilities not only benefit from a more inclusive workplace, but also a team of eager workers who often bring innovative perspectives and an expanded customer-base of clients who prefer to patronize inclusive businesses. Since employees with disabilities tend to stay employed with the same company longer, employers also save on training and recruitment costs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council - 11/20/2018

~“The Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council (DDAC) is an advisory council to the Assistant Director of the Division of Developmental Disabilities on a wide variety of matters relating to the Division. Council members are appointed by the Arizona Governor to three year terms. Membership is comprised of seventeen individuals from a cross-section of the community including parents of a person with a developmental disabilitiy, service providers, members serviced by the Division of Developmental Disabilities, and other community stakeholders.

The mission of the DDAC is to provide, in partnership with the Division of Developmental Disabilities, advisory oversight on behalf of consumers, families, and providers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Ultimate Dream Job: National Apprenticeship Week 2018 - 11/16/2018

~“The Arizona Apprenticeship Office under the Arizona Department of Economic Security (DES) is continuously expanding the number of registered apprenticeship opportunities available to its residents. Apprenticeships, which were once only available in trades such as manufacturing and construction, are now emerging in fields including cyber and information technology (IT), healthcare, sales, professional services, and more. This year kicks-off the apprenticeship journey for Arizona barber, Lana Cantrell, and her first apprentice.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Helping the "Perfectly Imperfect Child" - 07/25/2018

~~“Pre-ETS is a program that is offered in collaboration with the Division of Employment and Rehabilitation Services (DERS). The Pre-ETS program helps students with disabilities prepare for future employment through a series of workshops that provide job exploration counseling, work-based learning and other work readiness training.  The program is available to youth with any kind of disability who are between the ages of 14 and 22. Group workshops make up the majority of the program. However, customized one-on-one workshops will be made available for those who qualify, such as Kendrick, who uses an augmentative communications device.

 “The new Pre-ETS program is a requirement under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. It is also in alignment with Governor Ducey’s Employment First(link is external) policy.” The Employment First initiative was established by executive order to expand career opportunities for all Arizonans.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Mental Health Block Grant - 06/19/2018

~~“Through the 10% set-aside, MHBG funds for FEP can be used for the following: • Treatment of members determined to have experienced a first episode of psychosis; • Expansion of Evidence-Based Practices in Supported Employment or wrap around services for individuals living in Permanent Supported Housing; • Programmatic / treatment related services for members enrolled in FEP programs; • Salaries of employees that work in administrative, supervisory and directly in a treatment capacity with FEP members; • Promotion of the current and effective treatment model; and • General startup costs such as planning administration and training related to establishing and providing services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

DES Helps Adults with Autism Thrive through Fulfilling Employment - 04/13/2018

~~“For many adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), networking with potential employers and finding gainful employment can be a challenge. Roughly 60-80% of the adults with ASD in Arizona are currently unemployed. To address this growing concern, the Department of Economic Security (DES) collaborates with key community partners to host customized Autism Job Fairs to educate and connect adult job seekers with ASD to viable and fulfilling employment in their communities.

Before networking at the Autism Job Fairs begins, Dr. James B. Adams of the ASU Autism/Asperger’s Research Program, offers two enlightening workshops: one tailored to teach job seekers with ASD soft skills required to land and keep a job, and the other directed to the employers to help them understand what to expect when interviewing and employing an adult with autism.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AZ ABLE - Achieving a Better Life Experience - 03/18/2018

~~“Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) account programs are investment programs that offer persons with disabilities, their family and friends, the option to contribute to a tax-exempt savings account for disability-related expenses. As of March 5, 2018, AZ ABLE accounts are open for enrollment.

Learn more about the AZ ABLE account program, such as eligibility, investment options, and other information at the AZ ABLE website(link is external).

Benefits of Opening an AZ ABLE Account•Money saved does not affect SNAP•Money saved does not affect Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) Medicaid•Money saved only suspends SSI if account balance reaches over $100,000•Provides financial freedom for people with disabilities•Account is owned by the individual with the disability•Dramatically increases ability to save•Before ABLE, individuals with disabilities could only save around $2,000 of their own money before risking loss of health care and other benefits•Provides a new investment opportunity•Includes tax free earnings”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Arizona Resources - 04/29/2019

~~“Here you will find a list of Arizona organizations that provide assistive technology (AT) and related services. If you can’t find the information you are looking for, please contct us for assistance:  602-728-9534, askAzTAP@nau.edu.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Project To Create 500 Jobs For Arizonans With Disabilities - 02/05/2019

~“Governor Doug Ducey today joined The Precisionist Inc. (TPI) to announce the creation of over 500 jobs for individuals with a broad range of disabilities. Through an innovative partnership with Arizona businesses, known as the “Phoenix Precision Project,” participants in the program will receive training and employment opportunities in a broad range of fields such as software development, database analytics, accounting, data entry and more.

The program is a collaboration between the Governor’s Office, TPI, Salt River Project, the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) and First Place® AZ, a Phoenix community offering housing, education and training to adults with autism. It is expected to create more than 500 Arizona jobs for adults with autism and other special abilities within the next three to five years—and about 1,000 total by 2025.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Skilled Trades Workforce Development in Arizona - 11/18/2018

~“AZAGC’s intention is to have the information in this resource guide expand to include as many relavent organizations as possible so our members and others in the industry have a comprehensive resource to assist them in connecting with future employees and in developing and sustatinig their company’s workforce strategy”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Ability360 Employment Services - 07/07/2018

~~Did you know you can work even if you have a disability and receive Social Security benefits?  Most people with disabilities can do some work and many can work again full time.  Don’t let fear stand in your way.  If you are tired of worrying about money and are tired of being bored, please continue reading.  If you currently receive SSDI or SSI benefits you are eligible for programs and work incentives that can help you to get a job and manage your benefits.  As a recipient of Social Security benefits you qualify for a number of work incentives and a program called Ticket to Work.

ABIL Employment Services has been providing assistance and support to persons with disabilities seeking employment through the Ticket to Work program since 2002.  We are recognized as one of the largest and most successful organizations providing services through the Ticket program in the entire country

Systems
  • Other

Untapped Arizona - 08/04/2017

~~“Employers in Arizona—including businesses, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies— recognize that a diverse and inclusive workplace benefits everyone, and they are actively recruiting and hiring people with disabilities. Untapped Arizona assists businesses in meeting their workforce needs by providing tools and information to support their efforts to recruit, hire, and develop workers with disabilities. We also partner with workforce-related networks, initiatives, and coalitions to support increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Partnering with employment service providers….”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

“DES Spotlight: Mental Health Disorders and Job Placement Through Vocational Rehabilitation” - 02/02/2017

~~“According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness(link is external), approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experiences mental illness in a given year and approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S. experiences a serious mental illness in a given year that substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.

There are those who suffer from psychiatric issues every day, yet still function in society and even manage to hold down jobs. Studies have suggested that of 25 chronic physical and mental issues, depression has the most financial impact on employers, even outweighing medical and pharmacy costs for employees.

As one of the State's largest agencies, the Department of Economic Security (DES) serves approximately 2.2 million people a year, with job services being a major component. One of the ways DES can assist those with mental health disorders, particularly those applying for jobs, is by simply trying to understand life from their perspective”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health

Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) - 01/05/2017

~~“The Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) is a committee dedicated to improving collaboration among secondary transition planning partners.On this page you will find information on each community partner as well as a link to our monthly communique. If you are interested in more information on the AZCoPT or to set up your own local community of practice please email AZCoPT.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arizona Department of Economic Security & Arizona Department of Health Services Agreement - 03/16/2012

This contract between the Arizona Department of Economic Security (ADES) and the Arizona Department of Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services (ADHS/ DBHS) serves to promotes the increased employment of people with disabilities in integrated, community settings

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (ADDPC) - 07/01/2009

~~“A staff of six assists the all-volunteer Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council, which is made up of individuals with disabilities, family members, professional stakeholders and state agency representatives appointed by the Governor of Arizona. The 23-member Council meets at least four times a year to discuss issues and vote on which projects to support by allocating our federal funds.We were created on July 1, 2009 as a successor organization to the former Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities.

OUR MISSION:  We want to develop and support capacity building and systemic change to increase inclusion and involvement of persons with developmental disabilities in their communities through the promotion of self-determination, independence and dignity in all aspects of life.OUR VISION:  The vision of the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council is one community working together to achieve full inclusion and participation of persons with developmental disabilities."

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ADDPC - 2014 Employment Options for People with IDD

“Several initiatives are also underway to support adults, youth and their families to make informed decisions about work or to consider a progressive move into a more integrated working environment and/or increase earnings:   Employment Summit for Transition-Age Youth: Representatives … are part of a collaborative work group to plan for a Summit geared toward promoting employment among transition age youth with developmental disabilities.   Disability Benefits 101 Online Tool: Many people with disabilities are afraid to consider employment or a progressive move because they are uninformed about the work and healthcare incentives that can assist them to make the transition. In 2012, the Arizona Disability Benefits 101 online tool will be available to support individuals with disabilities to plan for employment, learn how work and benefits go together and make informed decisions about going to work or accepting a job offer.   Untapped Arizona: A new employer engagement collaborative, Untapped Arizona, was created to support the business community in meeting their workforce needs by including individuals with disabilities in their hiring practices. Untapped Arizona has developed a system to connect employers with qualified job seekers with disabilities. Additionally, Untapped Arizona has a network of partners who can provide technical assistance and support to employers pertaining to hiring, legal issues, reasonable accommodations and employee retention.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Arizona Uniform Application FY 2018-2019 State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/16/2017

~~Transition Planning.“3. Vocational/EmploymentAn important component of transitioning to adulthood includes vocational goals that lead to employment or other types of meaningful activity. While a job can provide financial support, personal fulfillment, and social opportunities, other activities such as an internship or volunteering in an area of special interest to the young adult can also provide personal satisfaction and an opportunity to engage socially with others.  The CFT along with involved system partners work together to prepare the young adult for employment or other vocational endeavors…”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council “2017 Self-advocacy grant” - 03/02/2017

~~“One of the main purposes of the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council is to issue competitive grants based on the goals of our Five-Year State Plan: Self-advocacy, Integrated Employment and Inclusion. In addition, the ADDPC follows a process for soliciting, reviewing and awarding grant applications consistent with state laws, administrative rules and regulations for grants, and procurement administration.  If you have any specific questions related to a grant, please reach out to us and we can help answer your inquiries.

Please note that ADDPC grants cannot be used to provide individual direct support; visit the Grant FAQs tab in this section for more information.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“DES Spotlight: Mental Health Disorders and Job Placement Through Vocational Rehabilitation” - 02/02/2017

~~“According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness(link is external), approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experiences mental illness in a given year and approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S. experiences a serious mental illness in a given year that substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.

There are those who suffer from psychiatric issues every day, yet still function in society and even manage to hold down jobs. Studies have suggested that of 25 chronic physical and mental issues, depression has the most financial impact on employers, even outweighing medical and pharmacy costs for employees.

As one of the State's largest agencies, the Department of Economic Security (DES) serves approximately 2.2 million people a year, with job services being a major component. One of the ways DES can assist those with mental health disorders, particularly those applying for jobs, is by simply trying to understand life from their perspective”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health

Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) - 01/01/2017

~"The Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) is a committee dedicated to improving collaboration among secondary transition planning partners.

On this page you will find information on each community partner as well as a link to our monthly communique. If you are interested in more information on the AZCoPT or to set up your own local community of practice please email AZCoPT."

.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Arizona Association of Community Health Centers (AACHC), d.b.a. Arizona Alliance for Community Health Centers was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind” population, specifically, service-industry workers, variable-income and seasonal workers, and self-employed individuals.  Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are El Rio Community Health Center, Asian Pacific Community in Action, Helping Families in Need, and Keogh Health Connection. They will partner with   Cover Arizona (statewide coalition of 600+ organizations), Cover Kids Coalition,  AZ Dept. of Insurance, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations,  Small business owners,  Hospitality employers,  Southern AZ hospitals,  AZ Dept. of Health, AZ Public Health Association, and Food Bank Association .  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.:Tara PleasePhone: (602) 288-7547Email: Tarap@aachc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transition Conference & Directors' Institute - Phoenix, AZ - 08/19/2019

~~“The Arizona Department of Education, Exceptional Student Services is pleased to present the opening of registration for Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, and the Arizona Directors’ Institute, Building Success: One Collaboration at a Time! New for 2019, these conferences are being held back-to-back from August 19 – 23 at the JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

EVIDENCE FOR SUCCESS 2019 Combined Disability Conference - 04/24/2018

~~Evidence for Success Disability Conference June 7-9, 2020

We-Ko-Pa Resort and Conference Center

Scottsdale / Fountain Hills, AZ

 AT  •   EBP  •   AIVRTTAC One Conference – Three Different Focus Areas!

If you work with or support people with disabilities, the 2020 Evidence for Success Disability Conference is designed to foster the knowledge and skills necessary to facilitate access, change attitudes and promote inclusion in education, employment and community living so that people with disabilities will fully participate in all life experiences.

The conference format integrates three of the Institute for Human Development’s (IHD) project areas into one super educational event:

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY (AT)  – celebrating 20 years as Arizona’s largest, most comprehensive Assistive Technology Conference; featuring Therese Willkomm at the AT Makers Preconference Workshop and Monday Featured Speaker.

EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICES IN DISABILITY DISCIPLINES (EBP) – bridging the research-to-practice gap to help professionals implement evidence based practices.

AMERICAN INDIAN VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION TRAINING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CENTER (AIVRTTAC) – supporting positive outcomes for Tribal members receiving vocational rehabilitation services."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Navigating the System: A Guide for Individuals and Families - 02/01/2018

~~“The mission of Arizona’s Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (ADDPC) is to develop and support capacity building and systemic change to increase inclusion and involvement of persons with developmental disabilities in their communities through the promotion of self-determination, independence and dignity in all aspects of life.What do they do?The ADDPC serves residents with developmental disabilities along with their families. They provide support to projects for three current goals that are in their state plan:•  Increasing employment opportunities•  Encouraging individuals to advocate for themselves•  Empowering those individuals with informationThe ADDPC has a calendar for future conferences and events. They have  meetings that are open to the public.  They have articles on subjects such as employment, education and other related topics. In addition,ADDPC has updates on proposed laws that may affect people with developmental disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Social Security's Ticket to Work Program: The Basics - 12/31/2016

~~“The Ticket to Work Program is a federal program that helps Social Security beneficiaries with a disability reach their employment goals. Designed for beneficiaries aged 18 – 64 who get Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), Ticket to Work offers a variety of services to help you get a job. These services can include:• Vocational rehabilitation• Training• Referrals• Job coaching• Job counseling• Placement servicesThe services offered through the Ticket to Work Program help you to find and apply for jobs that already exist in the marketplace—it is not linked to special jobs for Social Security beneficiaries.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Arizona Eighteenth Annual Transition Conference - 08/29/2016

~~The Arizona Department of Education, Exceptional Student Services is pleased to present:Arizona’s Annual Transition ConferenceBuilding Success: One Transition at a TimeAugust 19-21, 2019

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

AZ Disability Benefits 101 - Finding the Right Job for You: The Details - 06/21/2016

This webpage serves as a guide for people with disabilities in Arizona to understand their various employment options. It includes traditional work options, self-employment, temporary employment, customized employment and telecommuting or telework.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Arizona’s Transition Conference - 08/01/2015

Arizona’s Fifteenth Annual Transition Conference, Connecting for Success: Shared Expectations, Responsibilities, and Outcomes, is a collaborative, cross-stakeholder professional development event aimed at providing meaningful and pertinent information needed in the transition planning process for youth and young adults with disabilities. This annual conference provides a dynamic array of national speakers, state level experts, and includes participation of youth, young adults, and family members. Session content is structured around three topical strands: (1) connecting with youth, (2) connecting with families, and (3) connecting with agency and community partners.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona Employment First Webinar - 06/27/2014

Arizona is planning its course to become number twenty-seven. Please join us for the national perspective on employment first, including the forces pushing behind employment first and Arizona's current and future efforts to enhance employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. WHO should participate? People with disabilities and their families, educators, transition specialists, service providers, employers and other interested individuals are invited to join the discussion about integrated employment for people with disabilities. HOW can you help? Participate in this Employment First Webinar and provide your input. Become part of the planning process and help us advance integrated employment as the first option for people with disabilities in Arizona.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training for Vendors Qualified to Provide Services through

~~DDD’s Training Unit provides the following training, free of charge, in order to support statewide providers and caregivers that best serve DDD members.

Contact Us•Email: dddstatewidetraining@azdes.gov•Phone: (602) 771-8125

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Arizona Demonstration Fact Sheet - 01/01/2018

~~“Date Extension Application Submitted: September 30, 2015Date Extension Application Approved: September 30, 2016Date Implemented:  October 1, 2016Date Expires: September 30, 2021

In addition, outside this demonstration, the state aims to encourage employment through referrals to a new state-only work search and job training program called AHCCCS Works.  This program, which will help connect beneficiaries to employment supports, is available for AHCCCS CARE beneficiaries who choose to participate.  Health coverage provided by the Medicaid program and this demonstration will not be affected by this state initiative.”  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona’s Eligibility Policy Manual for Medical, Nutrition and Cash Assistance “Medicaid Buy-in” - 07/14/2016

Medicare beneficiaries are eligible for State buy-in or buy-out depending on their income. 1) Buy-in It normally takes three months after approval of AHCCCS Medicare Savings Program (MSP) benefits or certain Medicaid programs for the Social Security Administration (SSA) to stop taking the Part B premium amount out of the beneficiary's SSA check. Services covered: “AHCCCS covers habilitation services for Arizona Long Term Care System (ALTCS) members through its Managed Care Contractors or the FFS program. The service known as “Day Treatment and Training”, also known as developmentally disabled daycare, is included under the habilitation services. Services are designed to assist individuals in acquiring, retaining and improving the self -help, socialization and adaptive skills necessary to reside successfully in Home and Community Based (HCB) settings. The services the provision of training in independent living skills or special developmental skills, orientation and mobility training, sensory-motor development, supported employment and intensive behavioral intervention for individuals with a diagnosis of autism when specific criteria are satisfied.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona’s 1115 Waiver - 07/01/2016

~~“With over 1.6 million Arizonans enrolled in AHCCCS, Medicaid has a far greater responsibility for impacting population health. Despite past innovation, we have an opportunity and obligation to do more. The goals of Modernizing Arizona Medicaid are to: (1) Engage Arizonans to take charge of their health; (2) Make Medicaid a temporary option; and (3) Promote a quality product at the most affordable price.AHCCCS will seek waiver authority to implement new programs and processes to carry this momentum forward to meet future challenges and respond to current economic realities through the AHCCCS CARE plan.”. The Waiver allows Arizona to run its unique and successful managed care model and exempts Arizona from certain provisions of the Social Security Act. It also includes expenditure authority for costs not otherwise matched by the federal government. Waiver programs are required to be budget neutral for the federal government − not cost more federal dollars than without a waiver. Specifically, the Waiver allows Arizona to:•Mandate managed care;•Provide Long Term Care Services in home and community-based settings rather than more costly institutions; and•Implement administrative simplifications.” 

 

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona HCBS Transition Plan Review - 11/25/2015

Arizona submitted its STP to CMS on October 20, 2015. CMS has completed the initial review of the STP and has some questions and requests regarding the transition timeframe, the public notice processes, public comments described in the STP, and the person-centered planning process described in the STP. C MS is continuing with a more in -depth review of the STP and will be providing additional detailed feedback.  This document includes a summary of current ssues.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona Medicaid State Plan - 01/15/1990

The Arizona Medicaid state plan details the a state and Federal government Medicaid implementation agreement.  It describes how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs. It also describes how the state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

In the Grand Canyon State of Arizona, people appreciate the value of independence, so the need to promote career success is the top priority for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Arizona's VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
2.17%
Change from
2017 to 2018
7,171,646
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.63%
Change from
2017 to 2018
449,009
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.35%
Change from
2017 to 2018
173,613
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
9.15%
Change from
2017 to 2018
38.67%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.49%
Change from
2017 to 2018
75.68%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 7,171,646
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 449,009
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 173,613
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,822,052
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 38.67%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.68%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 471,575
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 465,829
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 761,990
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 40,732
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 218,760
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 47,536
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 18,420
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 621
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 29,136
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 38,969

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,753
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 151,124

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 29,931
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 62,009
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 113,259
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 26.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 23.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.20%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 11,694
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,551
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 3,586
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 72
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 39
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 54.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.57

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,501
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 228,210
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $24,550,418
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $6,321,775
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $119,308,256
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 19.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 0
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,223
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 10,784
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 33.20

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.57%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.33%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 83.96%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 21.51%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 75.27%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 39.66%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,177,897
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,735
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 15,781
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 599,746
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 615,527
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 10
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 755
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 765
AbilityOne wages (products). $157,071
AbilityOne wages (services). $6,995,048

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 26
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 4
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 28
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,093
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 26
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,151

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~DES/VR program staff is working cooperatively with Division of Developmental Disability staff and Employment First committee representatives to introduce systems change training to DES/VR and DD staff. The training will focus on the importance of providing the opportunity to work in a competitive integrated setting and developing supports within the employment setting to facilitate successful employment retention. Additionally, DES/VR and DD staff will be working with the Workforce Innovation and Technical Assistance Center to pilot supported employment opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities in Program Year 2018. (Page 202) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~An Intergovernmental Agreement between DES/Rehabilitation Services and the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services exists to coordinate services to mutual clients. VR counselors are assigned to work with behavioral health clinical teams throughout the state in order to enhance service delivery and customer satisfaction in the provision of customized employment and vocational services. (Page 175) Title I

Persons with Developmental Disabilities within the Foster Care System: Rehabilitation Services and DDD have a Memorandum of Understanding to enhance program delivery methods and provide customized employment services to mutual clients within the foster care system. Coordination, cooperation and collaboration between agencies will be facilitated by dedicated staff positions in an effort to provide and expand a continuum of comprehensive vocational services to the identified population. (Page 175) Title I

Rehabilitation Services and DDD have a Memorandum of Understanding to enhance program delivery methods and provide customized employment services to mutual clients within the foster care system. Coordination, cooperation and collaboration between agencies will be facilitated by dedicated staff positions in an effort to provide and expand a continuum of comprehensive vocational services to the identified population. (Page 176) Title I

IDENTIFY THE STRATEGIES THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE ACHIEVEMENT OF THE GOALS.
• Engaged Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to assist in identifying employers who are willing to customize employment for individuals with disabilities.
• Continued collaboration with the Division of Developmental Disabilities and Behavioral Health Services to effectively serve individuals with supported employment needs.
• Increased employer engagement activities through Employer Coordinators and connection with workforce development system. (Page 203) Title IV
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~The VR program prepares persons with disabilities to be competitive in the labor market by offering services such as occupational/vocational training as well as undergraduate and advanced degrees. The VR program has the unique ability to support individuals in attending specialized or out-of-state schools for disability-related reasons, and Arizona VR clients have graduated from schools such as the Rochester Institute of Technology for the Deaf and Gallaudet University in New York. Education and training support services vary based on student need but many individuals receive tutoring, assistive technology, supplies/tools, and assistance arranging accommodations with the school’s Disability Resource Center. In Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2015, 1,470 individuals participated in a plan of services and received educational training supported by the VR program, and a total of $5,826,857 was spent to fund these educational endeavors. (Page 44) Title I

The Employer Coordinators facilitate networking meetings between employers and educational transition partners to provide employment and pre—employment transition services to youth with disabilities. Instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students with disabilities regarding employer engagement, opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, and secondary education resources, such as disability resource centers continue to be provided by Employer Coordinators throughout the state. (Page 181) Title IV
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.

DES/Rehabilitation Services is part of a multiagency Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) that encourages and facilitates the cooperation and collaboration between Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD), and the Public Education Agencies (PEA) represented by the ADE. The vision for the IGA is “to ensure a smooth and successful transition of students with disabilities to meaningful, gainful, and sustained employment, education, and community living.” (Page 176) Title IV

Under the umbrella of the IGA, DES/Rehabilitation Services provides coordinated transition services to 22 schools throughout the state. DES/Rehabilitation Services has 22 Third Party Cooperative Arrangements (TPCA) with PEAs to provide enhanced transition services. The TPCAs are commonly known as Transition from School to Work (TSW) programs. (Page 177) Title IV

Students who are able to participate in the Transition School to Work (TSW) program through a Third Party Cooperative Agreement (TPCA) are afforded the opportunity to participate in a structured program of services which integrates vocational rehabilitation services into the classroom environment. These services are provided by both the local PEA staff and VR staff. Involvement in these enhanced services are intended to allow the student to learn skills necessary to ameliorate disability related barriers to achieving their postsecondary goals. PEA and VR staff will continue to develop and coordinate new transition services and expand or modify existing services to accommodate the needs of students with disabilities. (Page 178) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services Employer Coordinators partner with secondary education schools, employers, and workforce development programs to provide pre—employment transition services and employment encounters for students and youth with disabilities across the state. Employer Coordinators partner with high school transition programs, VR transition counselors, and school and program administrators to facilitate job fairs, pre—employment workshops, apprenticeship opportunities, and employer panels at local high schools.

The Employer Coordinators facilitate networking meetings between employers and educational transition partners to provide employment and pre—employment transition services to youth with disabilities. Instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students with disabilities regarding employer engagement, opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, and secondary education resources, such as disability resource centers continue to be provided by Employer Coordinators throughout the state. (Page 181) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services works closely with the ADE Exceptional Student Services to provide opportunities to remain current in transition policies and procedures. An Intergovernmental Agreement exists that outlines cross training opportunities between partners. DES/Rehabilitation Services and ADE collaborate annually to provide a transition conference which serves to bring the community of providers together to learn about national policies, trends and best practices in serving youth with disabilities. Additionally, DES/Rehabilitation Services partners with ADE in providing a web based career information system named Arizona Career Information System (AzCIS) which allows students, families, education professionals, and VR staff to collaboratively assist students in developing appropriate and viable career goals. (Page 189) Title IV

Youth with disabilities continue to be an underserved population. Survey data reveals that Arizona DES/VR program is reaching about 20 percent of the total youth and students with disabilities. The education system in Arizona is complex. The Arizona Department of Education, the State Board of Education, 15 County Education Agencies and hundreds of district and charter governing boards oversee 230 discrete school districts, 406 charter holders and 13 Joint Technological Education Districts. Within these districts there are over 2000 public schools, including over 1500 district schools and over 500 charter schools. Reaching out to each of the districts and communicating the DES/VR program services has been challenging considering the multitude of individuals involved in the provision of services to students and youth with disabilities. Individuals with physical disabilities are also identified as being underserved by the DES/VR program. Less than 10 percent of the total VR population reports a disability which has physical limitations as a primary disability. It is difficult to discern if individuals are reporting other disability categories thus, the lower number or if individuals with physical disabilities are not aware or taking advantage of VR services. (Page 191) Title IV

Arizona VR is currently under an order of selection and is serving only the most significantly disabled individuals. Often, students with learning disabilities are made eligible but not considered to be most significantly disabled. Additionally, it is noted that students who receive special education services through the high school based on a 504 plan are not often referred to VR. Arizona VR is working closely with ADE to encourage the school system to refer not only those students with learning disabilities, but all students with disabilities who receive services through and Individualized Education Plan or a 504 plan. (Page 191-192) Title IV

When asked what other pre-employment transition services would be beneficial in assisting youth and students with disabilities, respondents listed transportation, community based work opportunities and job readiness skill development as identified service needs. (Page 192) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Focus on strategies targeting job seekers with barriers, including disabilities, ensuring that individuals with barriers are provided informed customer choice and appropriate assessments. This will include effective career pathways with multiple entry and exit points, including entry for individuals with low skills levels or other barriers and expansion of work-based learning opportunities, such as apprenticeship and on-the-job training (OJT), which may be suitable to individuals with limited work experience, low skills and/or academic credentials. (Page 55) Title I

Under WIOA, Arizona recognizes the need to expand opportunities statewide and develop robust career pathways that allow individuals with barriers and disabilities to participate and gain industry recognized credentials. Arizona will develop career pathways that include multiple aligned programs with funding by a variety of sources and driven by industry needs as defined through sector strategies and partnerships. Arizona chose the U.S. DOL’s Career Pathways Toolkit and the Shared Vision, Strong Systems Framework (CLASP, June 2014) as resources to develop an Arizona-specific definition that aligns with the WIOA definition and requirements for career pathways. This definition will serve as a foundation for the development of a state process for recognizing and evaluating career pathway programs. Implementation will focus on:
o Career pathways in specific occupations for each geographic area, including pathways that begin at lower educational attainment levels to provide opportunities for individuals with barriers and disabilities (Page 61) Title I

OJT will be utilized by the LWDAs to provide participants work experience, new transferable skills, and job placement upon successful completion of the training program. These opportunities are ideal for individuals with barriers, which can include disabilities. (Page 126) Title I

o Career Pathways: Develop robust career pathways that include multiple aligned programs with funding by a variety of sources and driven by industry needs as defined through sector strategies and partnerships. Entry points on these pathways must extend to adult learners with barriers such as disabilities, low basic skills, lack of a secondary diploma, and lack of English language skills. (Page 162) Title I
 

Apprenticeship

There is no linear progression from a single training event to lifelong self-sufficiency. The workforce system realizes that employment readiness, education, training, and continuous employment require repeated interaction with the workforce development and education systems. Job seekers enter the system with different levels of skills and readiness, and the system must provide an array of education and training models and modes. Work-based training, such as registered apprenticeship programs or OJT, can offer a supportive environment to individuals, including individuals with barriers and disabilities. Implementation will focus on: o Work-based training opportunities, including registered apprenticeship programs o Secondary education combined with career preparation o Outreach to targeted populations, such as veterans, individuals with disabilities, and disconnected youth o Exploration of possible incentives for employers to expand on-the-job training opportunities (Page 62) Title I

DES/Rehabilitation Services Employer Coordinators partner with secondary education schools, employers, and workforce development programs to provide pre—employment transition services and employment encounters for students and youth with disabilities across the state. Employer Coordinators partner with high school transition programs, VR transition counselors, and school and program administrators to facilitate job fairs, pre—employment workshops, apprenticeship opportunities, and employer panels at local high schools. (Page 181) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.
 

Employer/ Business

~~Untapped Arizona (UAZ) was established to support Arizona businesses meet their inclusive workforce needs by tapping into the labor pool of individuals with disabilities. UAZ is led by business leaders who are diversifying their own workforces by recruiting, hiring, retaining, and advancing workers with disabilities and actively encouraging other Arizona businesses to do the same. UAZ focuses on identifying and engaging the entire talent pool of individuals with disabilities regardless of whether or not they have a disability determination and/or are served by a government system. UAZ does not serve the job seeker customer, but rather the business customer, recognizing there are already systems, agencies, and services in place to support the job seeker to prepare for and find employment.

UAZ business leaders represent Arizona’s key industry sectors—information technology and related manufacturing, aerospace and defense, health care, and energy— and speak to the current and future labor needs of their sector. UAZ collaborates with employment service provider agencies to ensure they assist in driving the talent pool of individuals with disabilities to the AJC system, the state labor exchange system, to connect with qualified job candidates with disabilities. (Page 75) Title I

DES/Rehabilitation Services continues to review and enhance its relationships with local CRP providers as valued partners through quarterly CRP meetings. CRP meetings include review of various scopes of work, identification of and information about employer engagement opportunities, updated program information, and the opportunity for vendors to receive answers to questions, or bring issues to the attention of Rehabilitation Services management. These meetings are intended to further relationships and partnerships between DES/Rehabilitation Services and the CRP providers. To further enhance our working relationships with our community partners, each VR office has a representative staff attend the CRP meetings to ask questions, provide feedback, and develop a cooperative understanding of services for job seekers. (Page 179) Title IV

Employer Coordinators, in collaboration with other federal and state workforce agencies, county programs, and Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP) providers offer employer engagement opportunities to provide education and information about the qualified applicants available for hire. Monthly employer connection opportunities for community partners, VR counselors, and contracted vendors via teleconferences continue to be provided by the Employer Coordinators. VR has sponsored or co—sponsored educational events geared specifically for employers to include information on federal Schedule A hiring practices, tax credits or deductions, disability awareness training and other resources for education on hiring individuals with a disability. The provision of these training and informational sessions to employers has provided the opportunity to develop stronger partnerships with the employer community and has enhanced employment options for individuals with disabilities who are seeking employment. (Page 181) Title IV

The Employer Coordinators facilitate networking meetings between employers and educational transition partners to provide employment and pre—employment transition services to youth with disabilities. Instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students with disabilities regarding employer engagement, opportunities for apprenticeships, internships, and secondary education resources, such as disability resource centers continue to be provided by Employer Coordinators throughout the state. (Page 181) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services supports the continuous professional development of professional and paraprofessional staff through the provision of numerous training and educational opportunities throughout the year. Staff is presented with opportunities to participate in in-house trainings, webinars, conferences, community events, employer engagement presentations, and graduate level coursework necessary to meet qualified staff standards. These professional development opportunities focus on content areas such as assessment, ethics, vocational counseling, motivational interviewing, job development and placement, assistive technology, case management, case documentation, Traumatic Brain Injury, transition, and other specialty areas. Continuing education is available for those who are maintaining licensure or accreditation. (Page 188) Title IV

Data Collection

DES/VR began a systematic release of clients from Priority Category II in November 2016. Based on current activity, it is expected that the OOS will continue to experience a negative gain in Priority II with more clients being released or closed than determined eligible and Priority II. VR estimates that 1,113 clients will remain on the OOS in Priority II as of FFY 2019. VR will continue to develop methods for data collection and fiscal forecasting in order to continue a systematic release of clients from the waitlist. (Page 197) Title IV

In FFY 2019, the number of individuals who will be determined eligible but placed in Priority II or Priority III waitlist is 1,113 and 567 respectively. DES/VR does not expect to have the ability to serve all individuals in Priority Category II or any individuals in Priority Category III, but will continue to develop methods for fiscal forecasting and data collection in order to continue a systematic release of clients from Priority II. (Page 197) Title IV

The DES/VR case management system has been modified to include the WIOA data elements needed to collect Common Performance Measure data. In July 2017, the VR program started collecting data and submitting quarterly reports. The DES/VR program will utilize the data gathered each quarter to begin the process of measuring current to baseline current performance and gather enough data to inform the statistical adjustment model to negotiate target performance. (Page 201) Title IV

The DES/VR program engaged with several federally funded technical assistance centers to support the innovation and expansion activities allowable under WIOA. An intensive agreement was developed with the Workforce Innovation Technical Assistance Center to improve VR service delivery, integrate into the workforce development system, and transition to the common performance accountability system. Agreements with the National Technical Assistance Center of Transition and Youth Technical Assistance Center were also developed to improve and expand service delivery to potentially eligible students and youth with disabilities. (Page 202) Title IV

DES/VR is actively engaged in conversations with core partners and System 7, Libera case management system developers to develop effective and accurate data management processes which will allow DES/VR to report performance on the new common performance measures as prescribed in the WIOA. (Page 203) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

DES is responsible for the monitoring of workforce programs under Title I and Title III. Staff reviews client files and data entry for accuracy and compliance with policy. Annual site visits include the monitoring of physical accessibility as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act and Equal Employment Opportunity Act. Fiscal staff reviews the use of funds and compliance with policies and “Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements” issued by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in December 2013. Programs that do not meet requirements are put on a corrective action plan. All LWDAs use the AJC data system to record client data, allowing DES to prepare quarterly and annual reports as required by U.S. DOL. (Page 37) Titles I & III

The Workforce Administration has a primary focus on engaging and readying all job seekers for employment and will work toward aligning workforce programs for a seamless and accessible workforce system that is inclusive of all job seekers, connecting job seekers with in-demand jobs, and supporting equal access to services and employment opportunities for all job seekers, including those with barriers and disabilities. Active and strategic engagement and partnerships with educational partners and institutions in coordination with economic development agencies will further support positive outcomes for the employer, as the job creator, and the job seeker. (Page 65) Title I

To support this strategy, VR has facilitated continued education on accessibility issues though the funding of Disability Awareness/Sensitivity trainings as requested by ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers. The request for the local trainings are often one product of the accessibility discussions occurring in the LWDAs. In addition, VR local board representatives have provided guidance and insight with regards to physical access and various assistive technology needs of disabled individuals. (Page 67) Title IV

One-Stop Certification: This policy, effective August of 2017, establishes statewide objective criteria and procedures for use by local workforce development boards to certify ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers. The criteria is in adherence to WIOA requirements related to the effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility, and continuous improvement, as well as measuring the local area’s progress in achieving the statewide vision for the ARIZONA@WORK Job Center delivery system outlined in the One-Stop Delivery System policy. LWDBs must certify to be eligible to use infrastructure funds in the State funding mechanism. This policy applies to ARIZONA@WORK Job Center comprehensive, affiliate and specialized sites. (Page 92) Title I

The Council is the leading body in implementing and monitoring the State Unified Plan, providing statewide policy direction, building collaborative relationships, and coordinating resources. The Council oversees the efficiency, accessibility and continuous improvement of Arizona’s workforce system. (Page 94) Title I

ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers are overseen by DES and monitored annually to ensure accessibility for individuals with disabilities. The State is committed to making all services, facilities and information accessible for individuals with disabilities. This applies to all programs, activities, and services provided by or made available to potential employees, volunteers, contractors, service providers, licensees, clients, and potential clients within the ARIZONA@WORK system. To reinforce this commitment, all recipients and service providers are required to provide written assurance in their agreements, grants and contracts that they are committed to and will comply with the requirements of the Workforce Innovative & Opportunity Act (WIOA) Section 188, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and with 29 CFR Part 32 and Part 38. The State WIOA EO Officer utilizes the ADA Checklist for Existing Facilities 2010 to review all ARIZONA@WORK Job Centers for accessibility. The Non-Discrimination Plan (NDP) directs all EO officers in the LWDA to ensure that the written assurances of the sub-recipients are followed and in compliance with the ADA requirements for both facility and activity accessibility for individuals with disabilities. (Page 116) Title I

Non-Discrimination Policy: The Arizona Department of Education (ADE) is committed to a work environment in which all individuals are treated with respect and dignity. Each individual has the right to work in a professional atmosphere that promotes equal employment opportunity and prohibits discriminatory practices, including harassment. Therefore, the Arizona Department of Education commits itself to a policy of Non-Discrimination. • ADE has developed this policy to ensure that all its employees can work in an environment free from harassment, discrimination and retaliation. • ADE will make every reasonable effort to ensure that all concerned are familiar with this policy and aware that any complaint of violation of such policies will be investigated and resolved appropriately. • ADE will post the Equal Opportunity Policy Statement at the following locations- o Public Website- https://www.azed.gov/hr/ o ADE Internal Website for employees o Employee bulletin boards at the four worksites (1535 W. Jefferson, Phoenix, AZ; 3300 N. Central, Phoenix, AZ; 3100 N. West Street, Flagstaff, AZ; 400 W. Congress St., Tucson, AZ) • All employment announcements shall include the phrase, “The Arizona Department of Education is an EOE/ADA Reasonable Accommodation Employer.” (Page 170) Title II

Vets

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Mental Health

~~The purpose of the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program is to provide persons with disabilities with the services and supports they need to overcome disability-related barriers to employment and become an integral part of the workforce. VR services are provided statewide through a comprehensive network of staff and contracted service providers who are trained to meet the unique needs of persons with disabilities, including those who are visually impaired or blind, hard of hearing or deaf, who have experienced a traumatic brain or spinal cord injury, have a mental health diagnosis or are a youth with a disability. The VR program utilizes Employer Coordinators to collaborate with local businesses and increase awareness of the large, often over-looked, talent pool of people with disabilities. Employer needs are addressed and employment opportunities for persons with disabilities are enhanced through activities such as coordinated job fairs, job preparation seminars, and employer panels. (Page 43) Title I

The VR program employs staff statewide and has specialty counselors trained to meet the unique needs of persons who are visually impaired or blind, hard of hearing or deaf, who have experienced a traumatic brain or spinal cord injury, have a mental health diagnosis or are a youth with a disability. Specialty comprehensive contracts and agreements have been developed to provide enhanced services to meet the training and employment needs of these populations. (Page 46) Title I

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) has developed and maintained multiple cooperative agreements to provide enhanced services to mutual clients of diverse systems. These agreements encompass a diverse population base and exist to provide enhanced services to clients while maximizing the expertise and funding of separate funding sources. VR has worked collaboratively with the following entities:
o Division of Behavioral Health Services to support individuals with Serious Mental Illness (Page 74) Title IV

An Intergovernmental Agreement between DES/Rehabilitation Services and the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services exists to coordinate services to mutual clients. VR counselors are assigned to work with behavioral health clinical teams throughout the state in order to enhance service delivery and customer satisfaction in the provision of customized employment and vocational services. (Page 175) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services has had longstanding agreements with the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS), Division of Behavioral Health Services (DBHS) and the DES Division of Developmental Disabilities to pay for extended support services. These agreements and combination of funding has permitted a greater number of joint clients to benefit from supported employment services. To the extent possible, DES/Rehabilitation Services works to create a seamless transition from VR supported employment services to extended supported employment services paid by or through other agencies. (Page 180) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services has a cooperative Intergovernmental Agreement with the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services to detail the provision of supported employment services to individuals with Serious Mental Illness (SMI). This agreement coordinates services to mutual clients, assigning VR counselors to work with behavioral health clinical teams throughout the state in order to enhance service delivery, customer satisfaction, and successful outcomes through the provision of vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services. (Page 180) Title IV

DES/Rehabilitation Services have maintained an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) with the Arizona Department of Health Services/Division of Behavioral Health Services (DBHS) to provide enhanced vocational rehabilitation services to individuals determined to have a Serious Mental Illness (SMI) since 1992. DES/Rehabilitation Services works with DBHS to amend the IGA on a yearly basis in order to modify the agreement to maintain the partnership and enhance the services provided to individuals determined to have a serious mental illness. Each Regional Behavioral Health Authority (RBHA) contracted with DBHS uses the IGA to develop a collaborative protocol to establish specific service delivery responsibilities as well as the roles and responsibilities for VR and RBHA provider staff.

Per the IGA, each RBHA provider site is assigned a VR counselor to work with mutual and prospective clients. The VR counselor acts as the vocational consultant for the clinical team, attends meetings related to the mutual client’s vocational services, and provides Individual Service Plan recommendations for each client related to the VR program. VR staff conducts VR orientations at each clinic at least one time per month, and are provided with functional workspace to conduct client meetings.

To ensure continuous and streamlined communication, DES/Rehabilitation Services, ADHS/DBHS and each RBHA coordinate quarterly meetings for all Behavioral Health VR counselors, VR supervisors, RBHA clinical representatives and mutual provider agencies. Staff is given the opportunity to discuss concerns related to the IGA and is provided with program updates and information on available resources. DES/Rehabilitation Services and ADHS/DBHS also coordinate a biannual IGA Advisory meeting to discuss any IGA related changes, staff or agency concerns, as well as program accomplishments. (Page 182-183) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 57

Executive order No. 2020-04 Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council - 01/15/2020

“WHEREAS, it is important for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to have a forum to discuss issues important to them, to identify concerns, gaps and duplications in available services and programs, and to build capacity for system change when needed; and

WHEREAS, individuals with developmental disabilities and their families, state agencies, protection and advocacy organizations, local and non-governmental agencies and private and non­profit groups serving individuals with developmental disabilities all play important roles in facilitating advocacy, capacity building and system change activities for individuals with developmental disabilities…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of Arizona by the Arizona Constitution and Laws of Arizona, hereby reauthorize the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council…”

Systems
  • Other
Attachments

EXECUTIVE ORDER 2020-03: Emphasizing the Role of the Department of Corrections in Rehabilitation and Reentry - 01/13/2020

“WHEREAS, studies have shown that education programs, job training programs, and substance abuse treatment provided in correctional settings reduce recidivism rates; and

WHEREAS, many individual who are released from custody face significant barriers to obtaining employment and housing, including lack of in-demand job skills, lack of a high school degree, substance abuse disorder and mental illness…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging
Attachments

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Arizona Association of Community Health Centers (AACHC), d.b.a. Arizona Alliance for Community Health Centers was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind” population, specifically, service-industry workers, variable-income and seasonal workers, and self-employed individuals.  Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are El Rio Community Health Center, Asian Pacific Community in Action, Helping Families in Need, and Keogh Health Connection. They will partner with   Cover Arizona (statewide coalition of 600+ organizations), Cover Kids Coalition,  AZ Dept. of Insurance, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations,  Small business owners,  Hospitality employers,  Southern AZ hospitals,  AZ Dept. of Health, AZ Public Health Association, and Food Bank Association .  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.:Tara PleasePhone: (602) 288-7547Email: Tarap@aachc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transition Conference & Directors' Institute - Phoenix, AZ - 08/19/2019

~~“The Arizona Department of Education, Exceptional Student Services is pleased to present the opening of registration for Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, and the Arizona Directors’ Institute, Building Success: One Collaboration at a Time! New for 2019, these conferences are being held back-to-back from August 19 – 23 at the JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Developmental Disabilities Policies - 05/22/2019

~~“Welcome to the DDD policy page.

DDD develops policies that conform to state, federal, and contractual requirements. DDD has five policy manuals, which include the Operations, Medical, Eligibility, Behavior Supports, and Provider manuals. Changes in policy are communicated to contracted DDD providers via electronic policy notifications, which are also sent to all DDD employees, Providers, Administrative Services Subcontractors, and individuals who have opted to receive notifications.”

This page has links to each of the policy manuals.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona Resources - 04/29/2019

~~“Here you will find a list of Arizona organizations that provide assistive technology (AT) and related services. If you can’t find the information you are looking for, please contct us for assistance:  602-728-9534, askAzTAP@nau.edu.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Employment Services - 04/06/2019

~~“Pima County One-Stop opened the Kino Veterans’ Workforce Center, 2801 E. Ajo Way, to help military veterans find jobs and get training, benefits and support services; and to help employers hire veterans.

One-Stop’s partners in the Center include the U.S. Departments of Labor, Defense and Veterans Affairs; the Arizona Departments of Veterans Services and Economic Security; Pima Community College; Community Partnership of Southern Arizona and Rally Point; CODAC/Comin’ Home; Tucson Veterans Serving Veterans; Salvation Army; Old Pueblo Community Services; Primavera Foundation; the Arizona Veterans Commission; SER Jobs for Progress; and local employers. Peer support, drop-in and welcome”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Project To Create 500 Jobs For Arizonans With Disabilities - 02/05/2019

~“Governor Doug Ducey today joined The Precisionist Inc. (TPI) to announce the creation of over 500 jobs for individuals with a broad range of disabilities. Through an innovative partnership with Arizona businesses, known as the “Phoenix Precision Project,” participants in the program will receive training and employment opportunities in a broad range of fields such as software development, database analytics, accounting, data entry and more.

The program is a collaboration between the Governor’s Office, TPI, Salt River Project, the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) and First Place® AZ, a Phoenix community offering housing, education and training to adults with autism. It is expected to create more than 500 Arizona jobs for adults with autism and other special abilities within the next three to five years—and about 1,000 total by 2025.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference Call for Papers/Call for Brochure Artwork Information - 01/30/2019

~“Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, is being held August 19-21, 2019 at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge in Phoenix. The Transition Planning Committee is looking for Secondary Transition Stakeholders providing innovative programs, promising practices, inspiring collaborations, and motivational students or personnel to present at the conference. The form is at this link. The deadline for proposals is March 1, 2019.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Opportunities for Arizonans with Disabilities - 01/29/2019

~“Employers who hire people with disabilities not only benefit from a more inclusive workplace, but also a team of eager workers who often bring innovative perspectives and an expanded customer-base of clients who prefer to patronize inclusive businesses. Since employees with disabilities tend to stay employed with the same company longer, employers also save on training and recruitment costs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Arizona House Concurrent Resolution 2029 - 03/30/2015

Whereas, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination in employment against qualified individuals on the basis of disability, which the ADA defines as a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity, such as hearing, seeing, speaking, walking, breathing, performing manual tasks, caring for oneself, learning or working; and Whereas, an employer is required to provide a reasonable accommodation to an employee with a disability unless the accommodation would be an undue hardship that would require significant difficultly or expense; and Whereas, many unemployed individuals with disabilities are ready, able and willing to work. Therefore Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Arizona, the Senate concurring: That the Members of the Legislature support the employment of persons with disabilities and encourage Arizona businesses to hire persons with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Executive order No. 2020-04 Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council - 01/15/2020

“WHEREAS, it is important for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to have a forum to discuss issues important to them, to identify concerns, gaps and duplications in available services and programs, and to build capacity for system change when needed; and

WHEREAS, individuals with developmental disabilities and their families, state agencies, protection and advocacy organizations, local and non-governmental agencies and private and non­profit groups serving individuals with developmental disabilities all play important roles in facilitating advocacy, capacity building and system change activities for individuals with developmental disabilities…

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of Arizona by the Arizona Constitution and Laws of Arizona, hereby reauthorize the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council…”

Systems
  • Other
Attachments

EXECUTIVE ORDER 2020-03: Emphasizing the Role of the Department of Corrections in Rehabilitation and Reentry - 01/13/2020

“WHEREAS, studies have shown that education programs, job training programs, and substance abuse treatment provided in correctional settings reduce recidivism rates; and

WHEREAS, many individual who are released from custody face significant barriers to obtaining employment and housing, including lack of in-demand job skills, lack of a high school degree, substance abuse disorder and mental illness…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging
Attachments

Arizona Employment First Joins Effort to Observe National Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/05/2018

~“Arizona Employment First announced its participation in National Disability Employment Awareness Month, an annual awareness campaign that takes place each October. Governor Doug Ducey has issued a proclamation recognizing October as Disability Employment Awareness Month, encouraging all Arizonans to recognize the strengths that people with disabilities bring to the workforce, community and our state as a whole.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 2017-08 The Establishment of Arizona as an Employment First State - 11/15/2017

~~WHEREAS, Arizonans who have disabilities are valued members of society; and

WHEREAS, opportunity for all includes ensuring opportunity for individuals who have disabilities; and

WHEREAS, there is a dignity in work that provides individuals not only a source of income, but also a source of pride, sense of accomplishment, and opportunities for social interaction; and

WHEREAS, every Arizonan should have the opportunity to participate in the workforce, including those who have disabilities; and

WHEREAS, an estimated 418,000 individuals in Arizona have some form of disability; and

WHEREAS, the employment gap between individuals with and without disabilities in Arizona has been between forty and fifty percentage points over the last several years; and

WHEREAS, opportunities for meaningful and competitive employment will improve the individuals' quality of life, increase community participation, and empower them to make their own choices in life; and

WHEREAS, individuals who have disabilities can be dedicated and productive members of the workforce; and

WHEREAS, in 2014, only 14% of Arizona's developmental disability funding spent on day and employment services went to integrated employment; and

WHEREAS, an inclusive and diverse workforce will help erase the stigma attached to those who have disabilities; and

WHEREAS, Arizona seeks to improve and coordinate efforts to increase community employment opportunities for Arizonans who have disabilities.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and Laws of the State of Arizona hereby declare the following:1. All state agencies that provide services and support to persons who have disabilities shall implement Employment First in Arizona and shall coordinate efforts to improve employment opportunities for working-age adults who have disabilities. Such efforts shall include:     a. In collaboration with stakeholders, review and alignment of policies and services for individuals who have disabilities to increase opportunities for community employment;     b. In collaboration with stakeholders, identify best practices, effective partnerships, sources of available federal funds, opportunities for shared services among existing providers, and the means to expand model programs to increase community employment opportunities;     c. Establish interagency agreements to improve coordination of services and allow for data sharing as appropriate;....

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order No. 93-13: Governor's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities

"I, Fife Symington, Governor of the State of Arizona, do hereby create a new Executive Order for the permanent establishment of the Governor’s committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities and delineate herein its purpose, structure and function….The Governor’s Committee On the Employment of People with Disabilities is established to promote the employment of people with disabilities; to promote the implementation of the Americans With Disabilities Act; and to promote a better quality of life for people with disabilities."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 21

Developmental Disabilities Policies - 05/22/2019

~~“Welcome to the DDD policy page.

DDD develops policies that conform to state, federal, and contractual requirements. DDD has five policy manuals, which include the Operations, Medical, Eligibility, Behavior Supports, and Provider manuals. Changes in policy are communicated to contracted DDD providers via electronic policy notifications, which are also sent to all DDD employees, Providers, Administrative Services Subcontractors, and individuals who have opted to receive notifications.”

This page has links to each of the policy manuals.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Employment Services - 04/06/2019

~~“Pima County One-Stop opened the Kino Veterans’ Workforce Center, 2801 E. Ajo Way, to help military veterans find jobs and get training, benefits and support services; and to help employers hire veterans.

One-Stop’s partners in the Center include the U.S. Departments of Labor, Defense and Veterans Affairs; the Arizona Departments of Veterans Services and Economic Security; Pima Community College; Community Partnership of Southern Arizona and Rally Point; CODAC/Comin’ Home; Tucson Veterans Serving Veterans; Salvation Army; Old Pueblo Community Services; Primavera Foundation; the Arizona Veterans Commission; SER Jobs for Progress; and local employers. Peer support, drop-in and welcome”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference Call for Papers/Call for Brochure Artwork Information - 01/30/2019

~“Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, is being held August 19-21, 2019 at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge in Phoenix. The Transition Planning Committee is looking for Secondary Transition Stakeholders providing innovative programs, promising practices, inspiring collaborations, and motivational students or personnel to present at the conference. The form is at this link. The deadline for proposals is March 1, 2019.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employment Opportunities for Arizonans with Disabilities - 01/29/2019

~“Employers who hire people with disabilities not only benefit from a more inclusive workplace, but also a team of eager workers who often bring innovative perspectives and an expanded customer-base of clients who prefer to patronize inclusive businesses. Since employees with disabilities tend to stay employed with the same company longer, employers also save on training and recruitment costs.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council - 11/20/2018

~“The Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council (DDAC) is an advisory council to the Assistant Director of the Division of Developmental Disabilities on a wide variety of matters relating to the Division. Council members are appointed by the Arizona Governor to three year terms. Membership is comprised of seventeen individuals from a cross-section of the community including parents of a person with a developmental disabilitiy, service providers, members serviced by the Division of Developmental Disabilities, and other community stakeholders.

The mission of the DDAC is to provide, in partnership with the Division of Developmental Disabilities, advisory oversight on behalf of consumers, families, and providers.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Ultimate Dream Job: National Apprenticeship Week 2018 - 11/16/2018

~“The Arizona Apprenticeship Office under the Arizona Department of Economic Security (DES) is continuously expanding the number of registered apprenticeship opportunities available to its residents. Apprenticeships, which were once only available in trades such as manufacturing and construction, are now emerging in fields including cyber and information technology (IT), healthcare, sales, professional services, and more. This year kicks-off the apprenticeship journey for Arizona barber, Lana Cantrell, and her first apprentice.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Helping the "Perfectly Imperfect Child" - 07/25/2018

~~“Pre-ETS is a program that is offered in collaboration with the Division of Employment and Rehabilitation Services (DERS). The Pre-ETS program helps students with disabilities prepare for future employment through a series of workshops that provide job exploration counseling, work-based learning and other work readiness training.  The program is available to youth with any kind of disability who are between the ages of 14 and 22. Group workshops make up the majority of the program. However, customized one-on-one workshops will be made available for those who qualify, such as Kendrick, who uses an augmentative communications device.

 “The new Pre-ETS program is a requirement under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. It is also in alignment with Governor Ducey’s Employment First(link is external) policy.” The Employment First initiative was established by executive order to expand career opportunities for all Arizonans.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Mental Health Block Grant - 06/19/2018

~~“Through the 10% set-aside, MHBG funds for FEP can be used for the following: • Treatment of members determined to have experienced a first episode of psychosis; • Expansion of Evidence-Based Practices in Supported Employment or wrap around services for individuals living in Permanent Supported Housing; • Programmatic / treatment related services for members enrolled in FEP programs; • Salaries of employees that work in administrative, supervisory and directly in a treatment capacity with FEP members; • Promotion of the current and effective treatment model; and • General startup costs such as planning administration and training related to establishing and providing services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

DES Helps Adults with Autism Thrive through Fulfilling Employment - 04/13/2018

~~“For many adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), networking with potential employers and finding gainful employment can be a challenge. Roughly 60-80% of the adults with ASD in Arizona are currently unemployed. To address this growing concern, the Department of Economic Security (DES) collaborates with key community partners to host customized Autism Job Fairs to educate and connect adult job seekers with ASD to viable and fulfilling employment in their communities.

Before networking at the Autism Job Fairs begins, Dr. James B. Adams of the ASU Autism/Asperger’s Research Program, offers two enlightening workshops: one tailored to teach job seekers with ASD soft skills required to land and keep a job, and the other directed to the employers to help them understand what to expect when interviewing and employing an adult with autism.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

AZ ABLE - Achieving a Better Life Experience - 03/18/2018

~~“Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) account programs are investment programs that offer persons with disabilities, their family and friends, the option to contribute to a tax-exempt savings account for disability-related expenses. As of March 5, 2018, AZ ABLE accounts are open for enrollment.

Learn more about the AZ ABLE account program, such as eligibility, investment options, and other information at the AZ ABLE website(link is external).

Benefits of Opening an AZ ABLE Account•Money saved does not affect SNAP•Money saved does not affect Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) Medicaid•Money saved only suspends SSI if account balance reaches over $100,000•Provides financial freedom for people with disabilities•Account is owned by the individual with the disability•Dramatically increases ability to save•Before ABLE, individuals with disabilities could only save around $2,000 of their own money before risking loss of health care and other benefits•Provides a new investment opportunity•Includes tax free earnings”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Arizona Resources - 04/29/2019

~~“Here you will find a list of Arizona organizations that provide assistive technology (AT) and related services. If you can’t find the information you are looking for, please contct us for assistance:  602-728-9534, askAzTAP@nau.edu.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Project To Create 500 Jobs For Arizonans With Disabilities - 02/05/2019

~“Governor Doug Ducey today joined The Precisionist Inc. (TPI) to announce the creation of over 500 jobs for individuals with a broad range of disabilities. Through an innovative partnership with Arizona businesses, known as the “Phoenix Precision Project,” participants in the program will receive training and employment opportunities in a broad range of fields such as software development, database analytics, accounting, data entry and more.

The program is a collaboration between the Governor’s Office, TPI, Salt River Project, the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) and First Place® AZ, a Phoenix community offering housing, education and training to adults with autism. It is expected to create more than 500 Arizona jobs for adults with autism and other special abilities within the next three to five years—and about 1,000 total by 2025.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Skilled Trades Workforce Development in Arizona - 11/18/2018

~“AZAGC’s intention is to have the information in this resource guide expand to include as many relavent organizations as possible so our members and others in the industry have a comprehensive resource to assist them in connecting with future employees and in developing and sustatinig their company’s workforce strategy”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Ability360 Employment Services - 07/07/2018

~~Did you know you can work even if you have a disability and receive Social Security benefits?  Most people with disabilities can do some work and many can work again full time.  Don’t let fear stand in your way.  If you are tired of worrying about money and are tired of being bored, please continue reading.  If you currently receive SSDI or SSI benefits you are eligible for programs and work incentives that can help you to get a job and manage your benefits.  As a recipient of Social Security benefits you qualify for a number of work incentives and a program called Ticket to Work.

ABIL Employment Services has been providing assistance and support to persons with disabilities seeking employment through the Ticket to Work program since 2002.  We are recognized as one of the largest and most successful organizations providing services through the Ticket program in the entire country

Systems
  • Other

Untapped Arizona - 08/04/2017

~~“Employers in Arizona—including businesses, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies— recognize that a diverse and inclusive workplace benefits everyone, and they are actively recruiting and hiring people with disabilities. Untapped Arizona assists businesses in meeting their workforce needs by providing tools and information to support their efforts to recruit, hire, and develop workers with disabilities. We also partner with workforce-related networks, initiatives, and coalitions to support increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Partnering with employment service providers….”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

“DES Spotlight: Mental Health Disorders and Job Placement Through Vocational Rehabilitation” - 02/02/2017

~~“According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness(link is external), approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experiences mental illness in a given year and approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S. experiences a serious mental illness in a given year that substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.

There are those who suffer from psychiatric issues every day, yet still function in society and even manage to hold down jobs. Studies have suggested that of 25 chronic physical and mental issues, depression has the most financial impact on employers, even outweighing medical and pharmacy costs for employees.

As one of the State's largest agencies, the Department of Economic Security (DES) serves approximately 2.2 million people a year, with job services being a major component. One of the ways DES can assist those with mental health disorders, particularly those applying for jobs, is by simply trying to understand life from their perspective”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health

Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) - 01/05/2017

~~“The Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) is a committee dedicated to improving collaboration among secondary transition planning partners.On this page you will find information on each community partner as well as a link to our monthly communique. If you are interested in more information on the AZCoPT or to set up your own local community of practice please email AZCoPT.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arizona Department of Economic Security & Arizona Department of Health Services Agreement - 03/16/2012

This contract between the Arizona Department of Economic Security (ADES) and the Arizona Department of Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services (ADHS/ DBHS) serves to promotes the increased employment of people with disabilities in integrated, community settings

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (ADDPC) - 07/01/2009

~~“A staff of six assists the all-volunteer Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council, which is made up of individuals with disabilities, family members, professional stakeholders and state agency representatives appointed by the Governor of Arizona. The 23-member Council meets at least four times a year to discuss issues and vote on which projects to support by allocating our federal funds.We were created on July 1, 2009 as a successor organization to the former Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities.

OUR MISSION:  We want to develop and support capacity building and systemic change to increase inclusion and involvement of persons with developmental disabilities in their communities through the promotion of self-determination, independence and dignity in all aspects of life.OUR VISION:  The vision of the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council is one community working together to achieve full inclusion and participation of persons with developmental disabilities."

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ADDPC - 2014 Employment Options for People with IDD

“Several initiatives are also underway to support adults, youth and their families to make informed decisions about work or to consider a progressive move into a more integrated working environment and/or increase earnings:   Employment Summit for Transition-Age Youth: Representatives … are part of a collaborative work group to plan for a Summit geared toward promoting employment among transition age youth with developmental disabilities.   Disability Benefits 101 Online Tool: Many people with disabilities are afraid to consider employment or a progressive move because they are uninformed about the work and healthcare incentives that can assist them to make the transition. In 2012, the Arizona Disability Benefits 101 online tool will be available to support individuals with disabilities to plan for employment, learn how work and benefits go together and make informed decisions about going to work or accepting a job offer.   Untapped Arizona: A new employer engagement collaborative, Untapped Arizona, was created to support the business community in meeting their workforce needs by including individuals with disabilities in their hiring practices. Untapped Arizona has developed a system to connect employers with qualified job seekers with disabilities. Additionally, Untapped Arizona has a network of partners who can provide technical assistance and support to employers pertaining to hiring, legal issues, reasonable accommodations and employee retention.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Arizona Uniform Application FY 2018-2019 State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan - 08/16/2017

~~Transition Planning.“3. Vocational/EmploymentAn important component of transitioning to adulthood includes vocational goals that lead to employment or other types of meaningful activity. While a job can provide financial support, personal fulfillment, and social opportunities, other activities such as an internship or volunteering in an area of special interest to the young adult can also provide personal satisfaction and an opportunity to engage socially with others.  The CFT along with involved system partners work together to prepare the young adult for employment or other vocational endeavors…”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council “2017 Self-advocacy grant” - 03/02/2017

~~“One of the main purposes of the Arizona Developmental Disabilities Planning Council is to issue competitive grants based on the goals of our Five-Year State Plan: Self-advocacy, Integrated Employment and Inclusion. In addition, the ADDPC follows a process for soliciting, reviewing and awarding grant applications consistent with state laws, administrative rules and regulations for grants, and procurement administration.  If you have any specific questions related to a grant, please reach out to us and we can help answer your inquiries.

Please note that ADDPC grants cannot be used to provide individual direct support; visit the Grant FAQs tab in this section for more information.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“DES Spotlight: Mental Health Disorders and Job Placement Through Vocational Rehabilitation” - 02/02/2017

~~“According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness(link is external), approximately 1 in 5 adults in the U.S. experiences mental illness in a given year and approximately 1 in 25 adults in the U.S. experiences a serious mental illness in a given year that substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.

There are those who suffer from psychiatric issues every day, yet still function in society and even manage to hold down jobs. Studies have suggested that of 25 chronic physical and mental issues, depression has the most financial impact on employers, even outweighing medical and pharmacy costs for employees.

As one of the State's largest agencies, the Department of Economic Security (DES) serves approximately 2.2 million people a year, with job services being a major component. One of the ways DES can assist those with mental health disorders, particularly those applying for jobs, is by simply trying to understand life from their perspective”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health

Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) - 01/01/2017

~"The Arizona Community of Practice on Transition (AZCoPT) is a committee dedicated to improving collaboration among secondary transition planning partners.

On this page you will find information on each community partner as well as a link to our monthly communique. If you are interested in more information on the AZCoPT or to set up your own local community of practice please email AZCoPT."

.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Arizona Association of Community Health Centers (AACHC), d.b.a. Arizona Alliance for Community Health Centers was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving the “left behind” population, specifically, service-industry workers, variable-income and seasonal workers, and self-employed individuals.  Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are El Rio Community Health Center, Asian Pacific Community in Action, Helping Families in Need, and Keogh Health Connection. They will partner with   Cover Arizona (statewide coalition of 600+ organizations), Cover Kids Coalition,  AZ Dept. of Insurance, Chambers of Commerce, Faith-based organizations,  Small business owners,  Hospitality employers,  Southern AZ hospitals,  AZ Dept. of Health, AZ Public Health Association, and Food Bank Association .  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.:Tara PleasePhone: (602) 288-7547Email: Tarap@aachc.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transition Conference & Directors' Institute - Phoenix, AZ - 08/19/2019

~~“The Arizona Department of Education, Exceptional Student Services is pleased to present the opening of registration for Arizona’s Annual Transition Conference, Building Success: One Transition at a Time, and the Arizona Directors’ Institute, Building Success: One Collaboration at a Time! New for 2019, these conferences are being held back-to-back from August 19 – 23 at the JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

EVIDENCE FOR SUCCESS 2019 Combined Disability Conference - 04/24/2018

~~Evidence for Success Disability Conference June 7-9, 2020

We-Ko-Pa Resort and Conference Center

Scottsdale / Fountain Hills, AZ

 AT  •   EBP  •   AIVRTTAC One Conference – Three Different Focus Areas!

If you work with or support people with disabilities, the 2020 Evidence for Success Disability Conference is designed to foster the knowledge and skills necessary to facilitate access, change attitudes and promote inclusion in education, employment and community living so that people with disabilities will fully participate in all life experiences.

The conference format integrates three of the Institute for Human Development’s (IHD) project areas into one super educational event:

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY (AT)  – celebrating 20 years as Arizona’s largest, most comprehensive Assistive Technology Conference; featuring Therese Willkomm at the AT Makers Preconference Workshop and Monday Featured Speaker.

EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICES IN DISABILITY DISCIPLINES (EBP) – bridging the research-to-practice gap to help professionals implement evidence based practices.

AMERICAN INDIAN VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION TRAINING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CENTER (AIVRTTAC) – supporting positive outcomes for Tribal members receiving vocational rehabilitation services."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Navigating the System: A Guide for Individuals and Families - 02/01/2018

~~“The mission of Arizona’s Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (ADDPC) is to develop and support capacity building and systemic change to increase inclusion and involvement of persons with developmental disabilities in their communities through the promotion of self-determination, independence and dignity in all aspects of life.What do they do?The ADDPC serves residents with developmental disabilities along with their families. They provide support to projects for three current goals that are in their state plan:•  Increasing employment opportunities•  Encouraging individuals to advocate for themselves•  Empowering those individuals with informationThe ADDPC has a calendar for future conferences and events. They have  meetings that are open to the public.  They have articles on subjects such as employment, education and other related topics. In addition,ADDPC has updates on proposed laws that may affect people with developmental disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Social Security's Ticket to Work Program: The Basics - 12/31/2016

~~“The Ticket to Work Program is a federal program that helps Social Security beneficiaries with a disability reach their employment goals. Designed for beneficiaries aged 18 – 64 who get Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), Ticket to Work offers a variety of services to help you get a job. These services can include:• Vocational rehabilitation• Training• Referrals• Job coaching• Job counseling• Placement servicesThe services offered through the Ticket to Work Program help you to find and apply for jobs that already exist in the marketplace—it is not linked to special jobs for Social Security beneficiaries.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Arizona Eighteenth Annual Transition Conference - 08/29/2016

~~The Arizona Department of Education, Exceptional Student Services is pleased to present:Arizona’s Annual Transition ConferenceBuilding Success: One Transition at a TimeAugust 19-21, 2019

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

AZ Disability Benefits 101 - Finding the Right Job for You: The Details - 06/21/2016

This webpage serves as a guide for people with disabilities in Arizona to understand their various employment options. It includes traditional work options, self-employment, temporary employment, customized employment and telecommuting or telework.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment

Arizona’s Transition Conference - 08/01/2015

Arizona’s Fifteenth Annual Transition Conference, Connecting for Success: Shared Expectations, Responsibilities, and Outcomes, is a collaborative, cross-stakeholder professional development event aimed at providing meaningful and pertinent information needed in the transition planning process for youth and young adults with disabilities. This annual conference provides a dynamic array of national speakers, state level experts, and includes participation of youth, young adults, and family members. Session content is structured around three topical strands: (1) connecting with youth, (2) connecting with families, and (3) connecting with agency and community partners.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Arizona Employment First Webinar - 06/27/2014

Arizona is planning its course to become number twenty-seven. Please join us for the national perspective on employment first, including the forces pushing behind employment first and Arizona's current and future efforts to enhance employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. WHO should participate? People with disabilities and their families, educators, transition specialists, service providers, employers and other interested individuals are invited to join the discussion about integrated employment for people with disabilities. HOW can you help? Participate in this Employment First Webinar and provide your input. Become part of the planning process and help us advance integrated employment as the first option for people with disabilities in Arizona.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training for Vendors Qualified to Provide Services through

~~DDD’s Training Unit provides the following training, free of charge, in order to support statewide providers and caregivers that best serve DDD members.

Contact Us•Email: dddstatewidetraining@azdes.gov•Phone: (602) 771-8125

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Arizona Demonstration Fact Sheet - 01/01/2018

~~“Date Extension Application Submitted: September 30, 2015Date Extension Application Approved: September 30, 2016Date Implemented:  October 1, 2016Date Expires: September 30, 2021

In addition, outside this demonstration, the state aims to encourage employment through referrals to a new state-only work search and job training program called AHCCCS Works.  This program, which will help connect beneficiaries to employment supports, is available for AHCCCS CARE beneficiaries who choose to participate.  Health coverage provided by the Medicaid program and this demonstration will not be affected by this state initiative.”  

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona’s Eligibility Policy Manual for Medical, Nutrition and Cash Assistance “Medicaid Buy-in” - 07/14/2016

Medicare beneficiaries are eligible for State buy-in or buy-out depending on their income. 1) Buy-in It normally takes three months after approval of AHCCCS Medicare Savings Program (MSP) benefits or certain Medicaid programs for the Social Security Administration (SSA) to stop taking the Part B premium amount out of the beneficiary's SSA check. Services covered: “AHCCCS covers habilitation services for Arizona Long Term Care System (ALTCS) members through its Managed Care Contractors or the FFS program. The service known as “Day Treatment and Training”, also known as developmentally disabled daycare, is included under the habilitation services. Services are designed to assist individuals in acquiring, retaining and improving the self -help, socialization and adaptive skills necessary to reside successfully in Home and Community Based (HCB) settings. The services the provision of training in independent living skills or special developmental skills, orientation and mobility training, sensory-motor development, supported employment and intensive behavioral intervention for individuals with a diagnosis of autism when specific criteria are satisfied.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona’s 1115 Waiver - 07/01/2016

~~“With over 1.6 million Arizonans enrolled in AHCCCS, Medicaid has a far greater responsibility for impacting population health. Despite past innovation, we have an opportunity and obligation to do more. The goals of Modernizing Arizona Medicaid are to: (1) Engage Arizonans to take charge of their health; (2) Make Medicaid a temporary option; and (3) Promote a quality product at the most affordable price.AHCCCS will seek waiver authority to implement new programs and processes to carry this momentum forward to meet future challenges and respond to current economic realities through the AHCCCS CARE plan.”. The Waiver allows Arizona to run its unique and successful managed care model and exempts Arizona from certain provisions of the Social Security Act. It also includes expenditure authority for costs not otherwise matched by the federal government. Waiver programs are required to be budget neutral for the federal government − not cost more federal dollars than without a waiver. Specifically, the Waiver allows Arizona to:•Mandate managed care;•Provide Long Term Care Services in home and community-based settings rather than more costly institutions; and•Implement administrative simplifications.” 

 

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona HCBS Transition Plan Review - 11/25/2015

Arizona submitted its STP to CMS on October 20, 2015. CMS has completed the initial review of the STP and has some questions and requests regarding the transition timeframe, the public notice processes, public comments described in the STP, and the person-centered planning process described in the STP. C MS is continuing with a more in -depth review of the STP and will be providing additional detailed feedback.  This document includes a summary of current ssues.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Arizona Medicaid State Plan - 01/15/1990

The Arizona Medicaid state plan details the a state and Federal government Medicaid implementation agreement.  It describes how that state administers its Medicaid and CHIP programs. It also describes how the state will abide by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative activities that are underway in the state.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

In the Grand Canyon State of Arizona, people appreciate the value of independence, so the need to promote career success is the top priority for individuals with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Arizona's VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
2.17%
Change from
2017 to 2018
7,171,646
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.63%
Change from
2017 to 2018
449,009
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.35%
Change from
2017 to 2018
173,613
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
9.15%
Change from
2017 to 2018
38.67%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.49%
Change from
2017 to 2018
75.68%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 7,171,646
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 449,009
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 173,613
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,822,052
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 38.67%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.68%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 13.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 471,575
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 465,829
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 761,990
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 40,732
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 218,760
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 47,536
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 18,420
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 621
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 29,136
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 38,969

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,753
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 151,124

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 29,931
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 62,009
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 113,259
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 26.40%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 23.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.20%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 11,694