Georgia

States - Big Screen

Things are looking peachy for workers with disabilities in the great state of Georgia, where high expectations are on the horizon.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Georgia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2016 to 2017
10,429,379
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.56%
Change from
2016 to 2017
661,498
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
227,895
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.45%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.42%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.01%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 13,214,860 10,310,371 10,429,379
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 657,996 698,283 661,498
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 200,764 236,577 227,895
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,145,481 4,227,892 4,329,722
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.51% 33.88% 34.45%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.07% 75.69% 76.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.00% 5.40% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.90% 21.70% 21.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.40% 15.20% 14.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 580,094 621,469 587,687
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 644,176 680,504 663,272
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 777,690 819,284 784,314
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 380,409 406,273 398,279
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 55,138 64,891 53,476
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,929 5,392 4,548
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 20,568 21,272 22,395
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,155 N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 23,906 29,659 27,788
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 16,233 18,938 13,132

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,488 6,859 7,350
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.80% 2.90% 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 285,889 284,601 282,646

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 15,276 15,978 13,859
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 46,821 53,267 45,947
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 112,177 116,662 98,241
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.60% 13.70% 14.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 2.80% 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 3.60% 5.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 2.80% 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 2,706.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,653 2,639 4,671
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,670 3,441 2,857
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 2,680 2,665 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 5,082 4,313 4,929
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6 29 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1 20 47
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 17.00% 69.00% 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.01 0.20 0.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,420
6,239
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 230 292 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 405 547 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 689 1,008 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,996 2,545 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 942 1,572 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 158 275 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.20% 37.50% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,314 9,312 11,826
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 437,897 441,114 442,689
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 101 124 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 423 548 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $8,646,000 $8,882,000 $8,253,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $17,324,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $117,985,000 $126,851,000 $112,518,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $16,972,000 $16,745,000 $17,188,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 12.00% 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,580 4,197 3,960
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 2,939
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 12,429 12,473 10,524
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 23.60 23.00 24.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.87% 64.89% 64.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.56% 15.04% 15.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.13% 2.07% 1.97%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.16% 98.40% 99.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.39% 26.00% 25.80%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 53.73% 56.07% 58.75%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.04% 78.46% 82.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.34% 30.07% 32.95%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,688,563
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,114
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 239,895
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,043,403
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,283,298
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 214
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,158
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,372
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,823,472
AbilityOne wages (services). $11,757,487

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 28 35 30
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 28 35 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,040 1,604 1,464
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,040 1,604 1,464

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~The Georgia Pathways to Work program is designed for youth, ages 14 to 24, who have a disability and are either in school or out-of-school youth. This demonstration program contains the following elements:
• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 256) Title II

Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD): Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) has a formal MOU with DBHDD that utilizes the SE IPS model. This MOU covers both the behavioral health and developmental disabilities divisions of DBHDD to serve those individuals using Supported and Customized Employment. This agreement allows VR services to collaborate statewide with a network of providers including CSBs for the provision of SES. These agencies prepare VR clients for permanent jobs through supported employment and complementary services. The CSBs provide a wide scope of outpatient, day, residential housing, and community-based services that include SE. The Memorandum of Understanding with DBHDD allows for improved coordination of efforts to serve those with the most significant disabilities. (Page 262) Title II

Annual On-going Staff Development Training Sessions: GVRA provides annual training opportunities to staff in an effort to grow the team’s knowledge base in providing services to individuals and to ensure that staff is prepared when changes occur to policies and practice standards. The following training sessions have been developed based on the feedback from personnel on what is pertinent to achieving high standards in service delivery:
(1) Disability-Specific Topics (including Positive Behavioral Supports training for counselors who have clients with Most Significant Disabilities, Deaf Culture Literacy, and Individualized Placement and Support Training for Counselors Handling Clients with Severe & Persistent Mental Illness. (2) Customized Employment Training. (3) Case Management. (4) Eligibility for Services. (5) IPE Development. (6) Varying Types of Caseloads (including Supported Employment and Transition). (7) Values-based Training for Persons Working with Individuals with Disabilities. (8) Collaborative Training with School Personnel on Creative Individual Assessments. (9) Transition Resource Planning. (10) Road Map for Services Available to Georgians. (11) Job Development. (12) Employment Engagement Training (developing a work plan and work goal). (13) Compliance Training (including Sexual Harassment and Anti-Discrimination). (Page 280) Title II

Access to Supported Employment: There are concerns that there is both a paucity of Supported Employment Providers, and that from the supported employment providers’ perspective, SES are cost-prohibitive. Concerns regarding access to Supported Employment have highlighted the following needs for services expansion: (1) Increase in SES, especially for those individuals with significant disabilities. Many of these individuals have limited or no access to SES. (2) Increase in both services and actual Customized Employment opportunities. (3) Increase in the availability in specific skills training that is actually aligned with real jobs within the state and less on generic training. (Page 282) Title II

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Most of these services made available to employers are in response to an immediate separation event. Additional opportunities may be discussed with employers when there is adequate time and opportunity for layoff aversion efforts. The foundation of Georgia’s layoff aversion strategy are activities which gather information and build partnerships. The State focuses on exploring and sharing labor market information which may predict opportunities for intervention in the workforce system. It then utilizes this information to engage in outreach through multiple partners, such as GDOL’s BSU and GDEcD, to engage businesses in workforce discussions. These conversations reveal opportunities for the State and LWDAs to intervene in offering strategies such as IWT to help businesses upskill workers to become more productive or to learn on new technologies. Georgia has also had success leveraging upcoming separation events as a talent base to fill job openings with other businesses seeking skilled talent by hosting job fairs and recruitment events in coordination with the employer of separation. (Page 168) Title II

The primary strategy GVRA has used in realizing key achievements has been to establish and formalize partnerships. GVRA recognizes that in a time of decreasing resources and increasing need, leveraging the capacity of strategic partners is the only way to meet the needs and individual goals of persons served. Additionally, rich data through program evaluation, State Rehabilitation Council input, and constituent feedback has been used to inform and guide significant changes to GVRA over the past year. Finally, through the addition of personnel and providers who are experts in serving individuals with disabilities, GVRA has been able to identify and incorporate new evidence-based practices into its VR services as part of these on-going changes. (Page 301-302) Title VI

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

School to Work Transition

~~Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness for Project Search.   Project Search is only offered in a subset of communities across Georgia as it is not available in every county. It is a collaboration between businesses, schools, and GVRA. The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, one-year, school-to-work program for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities that takes place entirely at the workplace. This innovative, business-led model of school-to-work transition features total workplace immersion, which facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction; career exploration; and hands-on, worksite-based training and support. The goal for each student is competitive employment. Project SEARCH was developed at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and has been implemented at several sites in Georgia involving the collaborative effort of the Transition Unit of GVRA, area school systems, and several of Georgia’s leading employers. GVRA is working to add Project Search partners across the state to create more opportunities for youth with significant disabilities in obtaining real-life work experience that improves successful transitions from school to adult life.  (Page 252) Title IV

GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows:
449.1.01 Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) staff shall recognize that every student or youth, regardless of the severity of his or her disability, is considered able to benefit in terms of a competitive integrated employment outcome.
449.1.03 VR shall provide students 14 to 22 years old Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) that allows them to explore the world of work and engage in work based learning opportunities for the purpose of becoming employed in a meaningful career. If individualized services are needed in addition to Pre-ETS, VR shall provide these services following VR policy of application, determination of eligibility, comprehensive needs assessment and IPE development. (Page 257) Title IV

Another component of the Interagency Cooperative Agreement is transition planning for educational agencies that facilitate the development and implementation of IEPs. The agreement stipulates the following:
i. VR provides GaDOE the eligibility criteria for VR services; works collaboratively with local school districts to identify and locate students with disabilities who may be in need of services; and, develops, in conjunction with the eligible student, an IPE prior to the student’s graduation. This plan includes VR services that are determined to be appropriate for the student.
ii. Each school district receives intensive, rehabilitation services for earlier identification of and interventions provided to students with disabilities that facilitates successful employment outcomes.
iii. VR works with each eligible student to develop a work plan and determine the VR services appropriate to the students’ goal. (Page 258) Title IV

GVRA has developed hiring and retention competencies necessary to improve individual performance and agency outcomes. Georgia State law does not require certification or licensure for rehabilitation professionals or paraprofessionals; therefore, GVRA established the CSPD standard for the VR Counselor position. This is the CRC credential awarded by the CRCC and it follows national standards.
The CRC is the VR staff person with the authority to determine eligibility and priority category, develop Work Plans (IPE) including all amendments and all reviews, authorize funds, and close cases. One hundred percent (100%) of Georgia’s CRCs meet the CSPD standard and are eligible to independently perform core functions. The remaining counselors have obtained either a bachelors or master’s degree, work under the supervision of a CRC, and are encouraged to complete the education and certification process to become a CRC. (Page 278-279) Title IV

Based on the trend analysis and the steady growth that is projected, in 2020 VR services will be serving 25% more clients than this year. In addition, as shown in the estimates above, GVRA intends to increase the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs) from 50% to 66% of the individuals who apply for VR services in the given year. For example, in FY2020, GVRA estimates that the organization will develop IPEs for 11,069 of the 16,462 individuals who apply for VR services. (Page 287) Title IV

When an individual is determined eligible for VR services and assigned to a priority category that is closed for services, they shall be placed on a waiting list to be served in the chronological order in which they were determined eligible. Individuals who are currently participating in an active IPE prior to the closing of the priority category for which they are assigned, shall continue to receive services. As closed priority categories are re-opened, individuals will be moved off of the waiting list in a chronological order with those with the most significant disability (Priority Category 1 and 2) being served first.
GVRA shall administer and conduct its vocational rehabilitation program activities without regard to age, gender, race, color, creed or national origin. No qualified individual with disabilities shall be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under the VRP because the program’s or a provider’s facilities are inaccessible or unusable. (Page 292) Title IV

GVRA is only its third year of operation. In the 2014-2016 State Plan, GVRA set the following goals to guide the work of the agency.
i. Goal I - Maximize available federal funds to assist more individuals with disabilities to achieve their employment goals.
ii. Goal II - Expand transition services to assist more students with disabilities to go from high school to work or post-secondary education/training.
iii. Goal III - Enhance services to unserved and underserved populations to increase their employment outcomes.
iv. Goal IV - Help employers meet their human resources needs though hiring qualified individuals with disabilities.
Working closely with SRC, GVRA was able to make great strides in tackling and managing a greatly reduced budget for vocational rehabilitation services. In the 2014 program year, GVRA achieved the following towards its goals and objectives outlined in their 2014-2016 State Plan:
• Over 25,905 clients were served by GVRA for the most recently completed program year.
• VR collaborated with CRPs to call clients on the waiting list and quickly reengage them in the VR process. This partnership enabled VR to efficiently reduce the waiting list from 8,300 to zero.
• GVRA created a CSU to serve as a bridge to effectively meet the needs of clients and ensure that they receive excellent service in a timely manner and in accordance with all applicable regulations and policies.
• The High School/High Tech Program expanded to 72 schools providing over 3,800 transition activities to 746 students with disabilities, the highest number to date. Of those, 109 students won the competition for computers to assist them in furthering their education.
• GVRA renovated, refurbished, or moved VR field offices to more appropriate spaces and closed offices that were far from clients. VR also provided technology to counselors to more effectively serve clients in convenient locations.
• GVRA and VR implemented a plan to increase the salaries of CRCs.
• GVRA and VR collaborated with DBHDD to increase and enhance services for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, and for those with developmental disabilities. (Page 301) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~The proposed Georgia Pathways to Work program aims to significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with the core program partners, GaDOE, as wells as local employers. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as HDCI to ensure responsiveness to the known workforce demands in Georgia, as well as supporting their efforts to better engage those with disabilities. The overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive integrated employment through improving the 18 existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for out-of-school youth. This will be achieved by tailoring the career pathways to a variety of work opportunities available in the communities. The program will also engage employers in the model design and employ social media strategies to connect youth across the nation. Additionally, a result of the program will be to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways. (Page 108-109) Title II

The assessment of each competitive grant application will involve an intense evaluation of the ability of the eligible provider to meet the literacy needs of the area, and to comply with the expectations and statutes described within WIOA. At minimum, the review process and scoring rubric will consider the following:
• The ability of the eligible provider to meet the literacy needs and English language needs identified for the population in the area. Particular emphasis will be given to the provider’s ability to provide targeted service to individuals with barriers to employment—including low literacy skills and an English language barrier;
• The eligible provider’s ability to provide service to individuals with a (physical or learning) disability;
• The eligible provider’s demonstrated effectiveness in providing literacy instruction, including its ability to meet State-adjusted levels of performance and improve the literacy levels of eligible individuals;
• The eligible provider’s alignment with WIOA Local Plan;
• The depth, intensity, and rigor of the programs and activities offered by the eligible provider. The proposed program must incorporate the basic tenets of reading instruction. Attention will be given to the extent to which the eligible provider incorporates stringent research in the grant proposal submission and the development of the literacy program itself;
• The extent to which the eligible provider’s program is based on intense research and best practices;
• The extent to which the eligible provider demonstrates the effective use of technology for instruction, to include distance education, toward students’ improved performance;
• The eligible provider’s demonstrated integration of contextualized instruction, to blend literacy skills, and preparation for transition to post-secondary education or entry into the workplace. Particular attention will be given to implementation of a career pathways system, activities that promote and lead to economic self-sufficiency, and the ability to exercise the full rights of citizenship. (Page 231) Title II

GVRA has interagency cooperation with the following federal, state, and local agencies and programs:
i. Memorandum of Agreements have been developed with the following Local Education Agencies (LEA’s) to fulfill the goals of the Georgia Career Pathways Grant: Explore, Engage, Employ (E3): Atlanta Area School for the Deaf, Georgia School for the Deaf, Georgia Academy for the Blind, Troup County, Paulding County, Decatur County, and Hall County. A Memorandum of Understanding with GVRA and GaDOE has been implemented to support a capacity building pilot providing two GVRA employees housed at GaDOE in the Division for Special Education Services and Supports, and Career, Technical, Agricultural Education Division to provide instruction and direction to VR transition staff in Pre-Employment Transition Services. Since its inception, VR has maintained a cooperative relationship with Muskogee Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) program. MVR works to empower American Indians with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society. Through this partnership with the Lower Muskogee Creek Indian Tribe, VR services provides disability assessment, evaluation, and referral services that assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment. (Page 253) Title IV

In order to effectively increase and improve the competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for youth and students with disabilities, GVRA has identified the following priorities (under Goal 2):
i. Redirect VR resources (staff, equipment, services, etc.) to focus primarily on youth and students with disabilities based on the principle that serving this population will have a greater impact on the entire population of individuals with disabilities in the long-term, and thus should be a major focus of GVRA.
ii. Develop, implement and offer a robust and comprehensive array of transition services to all school districts within the state that is a combination of traditional VR services, provider services, and unique and specialty services that can be customized to a certain degree based on individual school district needs. This will also include a new array of services available to youth as young as 14 years of age.
iii. Develop and implement a career pathway model of services for both in-school students and out-of-school youth that will include Vocational Rehabilitation services that are aligned with the current GaDOE’s Occupational Clusters and curriculum-based career pathways; as well as alternative integrated community-based career pathways for those youth who are not in school.
iv. Partner with GaDOE, TCSG and USG to develop collaborative arrangements that improve the transition from high school to post-secondary education for students with disabilities.
v. Recruit and train specialty staff, with expertise in transition and career pathways, to better facilitate service enhancements for youth and students with disabilities.
vi. Partner with Certified Transition Programs also known as Inclusive Post-Secondary Education programs (IPSE) to increase client’s participation in obtaining measurable skill gains and industry recognized certifications. Use the agency’s Employment Services Unit to develop formal agreements with local employers and provide a variety of youth and student-directed employer supports and services, such as, career exploration, pre-apprenticeships, on-the-job training, job analysis, career pathway training curriculum development, and employment opportunities. (Page 289) Title IV

Strategies:
• Transform how GVRA and the VR services focus on youth and students with disabilities by integrating services agency-wide to make this population the highest focus.
• Partner with GaDOE to increase and deliver a comprehensive array of transitional services to every school district within the state, including a special focus on career pathways and customized career pathways.
• Develop a concentrated outreach effort to identify youth with disabilities that are not enrolled in school, and make the same robust services available to them.
• Partner with the existing VR provider network to create community-based career pathways for youth not enrolled in school.
• Partner with both TCSG and USG to improve post-secondary transition.
Goal 3: Increase and improve competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for unserved and underserved populations, to include veterans and individuals with sensory disabilities, mental illness, developmental disabilities, or autism. (Page 296) Title IV

GVRA’s goal to improve and expand VR services for Program Years 2018 and PY 2019 for students with disabilities by the following:
• Develop and offer a comprehensive array of services to all school districts statewide. Specifically, GVRA will develop all 5 required Pre-ETS activities, as well as the 9 authorized activities as may be needed, and offer those to every school district in the state of Georgia. These will include services that are VR Program-provided, as well as services provided through the VR provider network. Where there is a paucity of such Pre-ETS services in particular geographic areas of the state, GVRA announced a Request for Proposal for Pre-ETS and Transition Services.
• Develop new and innovative services for both in-school and out-of-school career pathways. As a part of this, GVRA is in Year 3 of the 5 year Georgia Career Pathways federal demonstration grant and is delivering Explore, Engage, Employ E3 services to 7 pilot districts. This is done in collaboration with GaDOE, the individual local school district, and the local employers and businesses. E3 will be the delivery model for all students and youth with disabilities in the future. A unique component of the E3 grant team is the Social Media Technologist who has established the E3 brand on all social media outlets. The SMT has overseen the development of 2 apps for students with disabilities to engage and develop skills. An RFP for a website has been announced and in the procurement process. The website will be non-governmental and is part of the strategy for engaging and tracking students and youth to assist them in reaching their career goals and meaningful employment. (Page 298) Title IV

Apprenticeship
GVRA has developed the following strategies for Federal Fiscal Years 2019 and 2020 to leverage other public and private funds to increase the resources for extended services and expanded Supported Employment Opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities: • Continue to expand the current blended funding relationship with DBHDD to increase SE service delivery to transitioning youth with developmental disabilities, or behavioral health diagnoses. • Utilize new grant and private foundation funding to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Georgia Pathways to Work program in engaging youth with significant disabilities in early Supported Employment experiences such as supported internships, and apprenticeships. • Explore funding options for extended supports through the Ticket to Work Program. • Continue to expand and facilitate the SE provider network’s use of natural supports. • Increase the use of Social Security Reimbursements for additional program expenditures. GVRA will also continue to explore new grant and funding opportunities to expand resources for extended services and SE opportunities. (Page 295) Title I Georgia WorkSmart, an initiative created by Governor Nathan Deal in 2015, promotes workbased learning training models, such as apprenticeships, pre-apprenticeships, and internships. The ultimate objective of Georgia WorkSmart is to utilize these work-based learning programs to address the primary workforce challenges identified by more than 80 Georgia private sector partners. These challenges stem from the following trends: a rapidly aging workforce, a lack of workplace soft skills among new employees, difficulty in recruiting new talent, and a greater demand for basic educational skills in math, reading, and writing. Georgia WorkSmart encourages the development of apprenticeship and internship programs to address these needs. Additionally, Georgia WorkSmart acts as a liaison between private and public entities utilizing apprenticeship programs and the Georgia workforce system. In addition to maintaining the State’s WIOA Registered Apprenticeship Eligible Training Provider List, Georgia WorkSmart assists each local workforce office in supporting Registered Apprenticeships with WIOA funding. Within Georgia, WIOA funding is encouraged to be used in order to add greater value 30 and sustainably to Registered Apprenticeships in good standing with U.S. DOL Office of Apprenticeship. (Page 38-39) Title I Local WIOA formula funds are encouraged to be used in support of apprentices and employers participating in Registered Apprenticeship programs. Registered Apprenticeship can help the workforce system achieve quality performance outcomes. Given the unique structure of Registered Apprenticeship programs, there are several ways in which WIOA training services may be used in conjunction with the programs. Primarily, the use of ITAs, OJT contracts, and Supportive Services are the most common method in which a LWDA can serve programs in their area. However, the use of Incumbent Worker Training, Work Experience, and Customized Training are also encouraged as valid apprenticeship training support. For these WIOA services, each local workforce area has been encouraged to develop policy and procedures dedicated to the appropriate use of WIOA funds toward Registered Apprenticeship. The purpose of dedicated local apprenticeship policy is to ensure LWDA’s WIOA service delivery is adequately prepared to be applied to these long-term training programs. In addition to local policy development, the State has also created a Registered Apprenticeship-specific Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) procedure. Per WIOA, all Registered Apprenticeship sponsors in good standing with OA are automatically eligible to be included onto the State ETPL. WFD has been obtaining periodic listings of all Registered Apprenticeship Sponsors in Georgia from the OA State Director and have provided each sponsor with a notifying letter informing them of their voluntary inclusion onto the ETPL. Once the sponsor has confirmed their desire to be included on the ETPL, their program’s training program is made available state-wide. This allows eligible participants to receive WIOA ITA funding toward apprenticeship training costs. This procedure has allowed apprenticeship sponsors to obtain new pathways to find individuals wishing to join an apprenticeship. (Page 102-103) Title II Registered Apprenticeship is fully aligned with the employer-focused, work-based training that WIOA envisions. Georgia WorkSmart coordinates with Georgia’s nineteen LWDAs to support Registered Apprenticeship programs through WIOA service delivery. Specifically, Georgia WorkSmart encourages the use of ITAs to fund the Related Classroom Instruction component of an apprentice’s training program. For an individual apprentice to receive an ITA, their respective apprenticeship program must be listed on the Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL). As required by WIOA, Georgia WorkSmart has developed a mechanism to notify all approved Registered Apprenticeship Sponsors of their automatic eligibility to be included on the state-wide ETPL. Seeing that all approved Registered Apprenticeship sponsors have been vetted by OA, Georgia has developed a form to collect basic training program details of any approved sponsor who chooses to be included on the ETPL. This process has helped to better align Registered Apprenticeship sponsors with their local workforce representatives as well as helped to increase WIOA support toward individual apprentices training costs. (Page 172-173) Title II
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~II. Priority Category 2, Individual with a Significant Disability: An eligible client shall be classified in this category if he/she has been determined by GVRA to be an individual who: • A recipient of SSI or SSDI or, an eligible individual who has: • Limitations in 1 or more Functional Capacities, and • Requires multiple VR services over an extended period of time
III. Priority Category 3, Individual with a Disability: An eligible client shall be classified in this category if he/she has been determined by GVRA to be an individual who: An eligible individual who is determined to not have a Significant or Most Significant Disability
The following table captures the capacities, number of services and extended periods of time for GVRA’s Order of Selection. (Page 292) Title I

GVRA has developed the following strategies for Federal Fiscal Years 2019 and 2020 to leverage other public and private funds to increase the resources for extended services and expanded Supported Employment Opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities:
• Continue to expand the current blended funding relationship with DBHDD to increase SE service delivery to transitioning youth with developmental disabilities, or behavioral health diagnoses.
• Utilize new grant and private foundation funding to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Georgia Pathways to Work program in engaging youth with significant disabilities in early Supported Employment experiences such as supported internships, and apprenticeships.
• Explore funding options for extended supports through the Ticket to Work Program.
• Continue to expand and facilitate the SE provider network’s use of natural supports.
• Increase the use of Social Security Reimbursements for additional program expenditures. (Page 295) Title IV
 

Employer/ Business

~~To that end, GVRA has an Employment Services Division within the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, and its primary function is to create a single focused approach and strategy to engage employers in the most meaningful way. Under the GVRA employer services division, all organizations efforts of engaging, contacting and relating to local businesses and corporate entities will be coordinated into a unified approach. The overall goals of the GVRA Employment Services Division will be:
1) To interface with employers to identify specific employer job and workforce needs and to provide the employers with qualified candidates to meet their needs;
2) To interface with any employer who is a federal contractor and/or federal subcontractor to identify specific job and workforce needs pertaining to the employer’s federal mandate and seven percent workforce quota and to provide employers with qualified candidates to meet their needs and fulfill their federal workforce compliance;
3) To interface with any employer to create employer-based training and education opportunities for individuals with disabilities, such as specific employer job education, pre-apprenticeships, on-the-job training, and career pathway customization to increase the qualifications of individuals with disabilities as potential job candidates for that employer; and
4) To interface with any employer to provide education and training to that employer regarding contemporary information about hiring individuals with disabilities, such as job accommodations, disability awareness, and federal contractor requirements to increase the employer’s interest and willingness to hire individuals with disabilities. (Page 263) Title IV

With the passage of WIOA, a greater emphasis has been placed on the State’s workforce development system. GVRA has changed its organizational structure for its field staff, especially as it relates to employer engagement. The intent of this restructuring is to create a standardized approach for VR field staff to engage employers, as well as working with the VR program’s provider network to create a unified approach to job development and job placement.
Partnerships: Throughout this document, partnership has been the foundation to expanding and improving service delivery statewide. GVRA will continue to collaborate with the SRC, other State agencies, community stakeholders, businesses and other unique partners to share a common message that GVRA is “good for business” and supports employers in meeting their workforce needs and business goals with individuals with disabilities who are qualified to perform the job. (Page 264) Title IV

Business Services Division: As mentioned above, the Business Division of GVRA was recently established to focus on aligning the workforce with private and public sector career opportunities. Since its inception, the Business Division has been evolving into the centralized point of contact for all external employer relations. This division is responsible for the following:
i. Developing new career opportunities, business partnerships and/or contracts. This includes expanding and developing relationships with corporations that turn into local hiring of persons with disabilities.
ii. Expanding relationships with current employers who look to VR first to fill their workforce needs and assessing what the drivers are for them to hire individuals with disabilities. This division promotes current employer’s use of the Talent Acquisition Portal for job postings. Additionally, this division will be looking to these employers to engage with potential businesses to answer their questions and speak to their experiences when working with VR services.  (Page 264) Title IV

iii. Understanding the diversity within GVRA’s total Talent Pool including placement profiles and marketing this pool to established partnerships statewide.
iv. Working with the new marketing and outreach position to produce collateral tools that focus on awareness and inclusion.
v. Providing consultation, technical assistance and support to employers on workplace accommodation and assistive technology.
vi. Creating a tracking database of new and existing business opportunities. The Employer Database is being developed to integrate with GVRA’s current case management system in order to facilitate better record keeping of current and new relationships with businesses. VR will continue to work with the Georgia Industries for the Blind’s Call Center who contacts all Georgia employers quarterly to find out if they have open positions and will make this available in the database to be used by the Business Relations Specialists. (Page 265) Title IV

iii. Develop an Employment Services division within VR to focus on formal employer engagement that will support all VR services and create more employment and career opportunities within the local employer community; having a particular focus on two major State initiatives: 1) Go Build Georgia and 2) High Demand Career Initiative.
iv. Develop collaborative relationships with other State agencies and organizations that share a similar mission and/or serve a common population; the intent of these relationships will be to create a seamless array of services that are complimentary and aligned in purpose.
v. Implement an internal training plan and schedule to address transformational leadership for all supervisors within the agency; and also extensive professional staff development that focuses on creative ways to improve and increase services for individuals with disabilities.
In order to effectively increase and improve the competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for youth and students with disabilities, GVRA has identified the following priorities (under Goal 2):
i. Redirect VR resources (staff, equipment, services, etc.) to focus primarily on youth and students with disabilities based on the principle that serving this population will have a greater impact on the entire population of individuals with disabilities in the long-term, and thus should be a major focus of GVRA. (Page 289) Title IV

GVRA goals and priorities identified above are based on the information provided through on-going comprehensive statewide assessments, including information from the public-at-large, consumers and their families, the SRC, disability advocacy groups, other State agencies, other disability organizations, local school districts, community providers and employers. A description of the Statewide Assessment and the needs and concerns that were identified can be found under Section (j). (Page 290) Title IV

Partner with current, as well as new providers to offer new and/or improved services to this population specifically. It is GVRA’s plan to do an overall assessment of all current provider-offered services based on each service’s ability to produce positive outcomes. Based on this review, GVRA will collaborate with all of its providers to: 1) either improve or eliminate unproductive services; 2) implement new services as may be needed; and 3) specifically offer those PETS services that cannot be provided by the VR Program directly. In all cases, the providers will be held to the same standards that the VR Program itself will be held to, and GVRA will continually monitor provider performance to ensure the best value for dollars spent and the best employment outcomes. (Page 299) Title IV

Data Collection
Currently the primary data collection and report system used by GVRA through the VR Program is Libera System 7 electronic case management system, and the data collected is specific to individuals served through the VR Program. At the current time, neither the Libera System 7 case management system, nor its data, is integrated with all the programs and activities present in the one-stop centers. GVRA and the VR Program are in the process of moving to a new client information system. GVRA is working with Alliance Corporation for the implementation of the new AWARE client information system set to “go live” April 30, 2018. (Page 121) Title I Utilizing the working groups, the State will formulate a process for a longitudinal evaluation of core programs. With WIOA setting common performance measures across the core partner programs, there is a greater opportunity for a seamless evaluation of program outcome data. This evaluation will enable partners to identify achievements and shortcomings across the workforce system and enable the state to be responsive to the needs of the labor market and participants. (Page 139) Title I
511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
Georgia’s One-Stop delivery system is focused on ensuring universal access across its workforce system. The State and its local partners, maintain compliance with the provisions of WIOA Section 188 which require programmatic and physical accessibility. Through monitoring performed at both the state and local level, Georgia ensures that all One-Stops are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize Georgia’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual, to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. In addition, the State maintains a Methods of Administration which details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be maintained. The Methods of Administration is a “living” document which ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level as quickly as possible. (Page 154) Title II Per federal law, each LWDA must appoint a local Equal Opportunity Officer who is responsible for ensuring local WIOA Section 188 compliance. Local Equal Opportunity Officers are responsible for informing senior staff of applicable federal regulations and ensuring all programs and activities are implemented in compliance. Additionally, local Equal Opportunity Officers collect and resolve local grievances and complaints as needed. Local Equal Opportunity Officers actively liaises with the State’s Title I-B Equal Opportunity Officer and USDOL’s Civil Rights Center to remain current on regulatory updates and guidance. They are then responsible for circulating new information locally and ensuring it is properly implemented. Separately, as a component of one-stop certification, the State collects a business plan from each LWDA which details how a new one-stop will satisfy accessibility requirements and the provisions of WIOA Section 188. In order to be certified, each comprehensive one-stop must satisfy the requisite federal criteria. This process ensures universal access to programmatic services and facilities are maintained across the state. (Page 155) Title II
Vets
* Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 50) Title I Georgia has a large military presence with eight military installations and more than 752,800 veterans. In PY12 Operation: Workforce was launched to help Georgia’s returning veterans re-enter the civilian workforce by connecting veterans and employers. Through Operation: Workforce, WFD is an active participant on Georgia’s Returning Veterans Taskforce, comprised of GDOL, Georgia Department of Veterans Services (GDVS), Georgia National Guard and Reserve, Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve, GVRA, TCSG, and USG. Since PY12, Operation: Workforce’s web presence (operationworkforce.com) has served as a platform for veterans and employers to connect. The site allows veterans to create a profile, upload a résumé, and search and apply for job openings within the state of Georgia. It also allows Georgia employers to create profiles, post job listings, review job applicants, and search the site for qualified candidates. Employers are able to sign a pledge of commitment to give enhanced hiring opportunities to Georgia’s veterans, and veterans are able to find veteran-friendly employers across the state. Operation: Workforce also serves veterans by translating their military occupational classifications into civilian occupations that best align with their skill set and training. In PY13, Operation: Workforce launched its Employers’ Summit. In order to educate employers on improving current recruitment and hiring processes to better find and hire veterans. In PY14, the Employers’ Summits were utilized to connect returning service members with employers. (Page 151-152) Title II GDOL staff informs veterans of priority of service at initial contact and provides informational pamphlets detailing priority of service and the range of workforce services available to them. If the customer is eligible, veterans and spouses are entitled to take advantage of the priority throughout the full array of employment, training, placement, and other services provided. Once POS is provided, staff review the GDOL- 3404 form with the veteran to determine if they have a Significant Barrier to Employment (SBE) per VPL 3-14 and subsequent amendments. Wagner Peyser (WP) staff will refer veteran customers who do not identify a SBE to GDOL WP Service Specialists, or GDOL DVOP staff will provide case management services if the veteran meets one of the following SBE criteria: • A special disabled or disabled veteran, as those terms are defined in 38U.S.C § 4211(1) and (3); Special disabled and disabled veterans are those: who are entitled to compensation (or who but for the receipt of military retired pay would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans’ Affairs; or, were discharged or released from active; • Homeless, as defined in Section 103(a) of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11302(a)); • A recently-separated service member, as defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(6), who at any point in the previous 12 months has been unemployed for 27 or more consecutive weeks; • An offender, as defined by WIA Section 101(27), who has been released from incarceration within the last 12 months; • Lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; or • Low-income (as defined by WIA at Section 101(25)(B)). • DVOP services to veterans aged 18-24 as approved by the Secretary of Labor. (Page 153) Title II
Mental Health

~~In 1998, the Georgia General Assembly (O.C.G.A. § 50-4-7) formally established 12 State Service Delivery Regions for delivering state services to local units of government and citizens and for the purpose of establishing common state agency regional boundaries (excluding health and mental health districts). The current 12 State Service Delivery Regions are divided in a manner that takes into account population centers, occupation & industrial composition, employment location quotients, geographical boundaries, commuting patterns, economic trends, and industrial needs across counties. The 12 State Service Delivery Region model is leveraged by several state agencies, including GDEcD, GDOL, and Regional Commissions, each of which are key partners under WIOA. Other state agencies have developed different regional designation models to fit their respective service delivery activities. (Page 161) Title I

Additionally, Telamon serves as a delegate agency for the East Coast Migrant Head Start Program. This program has a long tradition of delivering comprehensive and high-quality services to foster healthy development in low-income children aged six weeks to five years. The Migrant Head Start program provides a range of individualized services in the areas of education and early childhood development, including medical, dental and mental health; nutrition; and parent involvement. In addition, the entire range of Migrant Head Start services is responsive to the developmental, ethnic, cultural and linguistic heritage and experience of each child and family. GDOL outreach workers partner with Telamon to identify parents with youth that could benefit from these services. (Page 220) Title II

The Georgia State Use Council and DOAS administers the State Use law through the non-profit GEPS. Some of Georgia’s CRPs and nonprofit partners are in GEPS. Some VR clients do receive services from those CRPS when deemed appropriate based on their individualized plans for employment.
To avoid duplication of effort and to enhance the number of individuals served, GVRA and SRC have developed working relationships to coordinate activities with other Georgia councils. Linkages to productive relationships exist with the Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities, Mayors Committees on Employment of People with Disabilities, Georgia Mental Health Planning Council, Georgia Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, Inc., Georgia Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Trust Commission, the Council on American Indian Concerns, and other Georgia rehabilitation service agencies.
VR regional leaders continue to establish collaborative relationships with community organizations and businesses to assist people with disabilities in going to work. These organizations include, but are not limited to: chambers of commerce, city and county governments, the criminal justice system, urban leagues, churches, healthcare and social assistance services, housing authorities, and educational institutions. (Page 255) Title II

VR does not have cooperative agreements with non-educational agencies serving out-of-school youth. GVRA has partnered with DJJ to pilot a program with the YDC in Augusta. Through this pilot, GVRA worked with the mental health unit to develop an effective and efficient process for transitioning youth out of the facility and into employment or training opportunities upon their release. Additionally, the agency is finalizing a referral process by which the YDC will refer all youth whom they believe has a disability and may be appropriate for VR services. (Page 255) Title II

GVRA executed a formal Memorandum of Understanding with DBHDD in 2015, the State agency responsible for providing services to individuals with a mental illness. The current MOU expands the capacity of the VR program to serve those individuals who have a severe and persistent mental illness in supported employment, specifically following the IPS model of SE. A description of this partnership is in Section (f) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of SES. (Page 268) Title IV

The following goals and strategies will be required in order to achieve the goals and priorities for Program Years 2018 and PY 2019 that were outlined in Section (1) State Goals and Priorities.
Goal 1: Increase and improve competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for all individuals with disabilities.
Strategies:
• Partner with the existing VR provider network to design and implement new types of services to better serve individuals with disabilities.
• Partner with new potential providers to design and implement new types of services in areas of the State where there is a paucity of services.
• Partner with existing mental health and developmental disability providers to assist them in transforming traditional services to become better at competitive employment.
• Identify a model for continuous quality improvement to evaluate existing and new services. The model should include: (1) Assessment of the stability of processes or outcomes to determine whether there is an undesirable degree of variation or a failure to perform at an expected level. (2) Identify problems and opportunities to improve the performance of processes. (3) Assess the outcome of the services provided. (4) Assess whether a new or improved process meets performance expectations. (Page 296) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
The ability to file a UI claim is available at every comprehensive one-stop center. Access and meaningful assistance is critical, whether the customer is in rural Georgia, relies on public transportation, or needs access to the Internet. Assistance is assured through: • UI orientation provided to every new claimant explaining the full range of workforce services available to help them return to work; • Online access via GDOL’s website where customers can file electronically from career centers, home, libraries or any other Internet portal; • Dedicated, experienced staff at every one-stop; • Fully staffed resource centers at all career centers, including Internet access, copies, phones, fax and resource libraries; • A dedicated toll-free number for customers filing for UI at one-stops; • Access points at over 40 one-stops and career centers across the state; • An opportunity for each claimant to access in-person reemployment services as they come to career centers and one-stops to complete the UI filing process; • The use of state-of-the-art EG résumé and job matching service as a requirement for ES registration for claimants; • The availability of staff, technology, language translation services, and written materials in a variety of languages to meet the needs of all customers; • Fully accessible services, online and in person, to serve any customer with a disability; (Page 205) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 11 - 20 of 68

Goals of the 2017 – 2019 State Plan - 02/04/2019

~~“Goal 3: Develop opportunities for consumer employment

Description: Collaborate with GVRA, Department of Labor and other entities to develop meaningful policy to encourage employment opportunities for persons with disabilities.

Objective to Goal 3:

    Promote ongoing participation of initiatives such as Employment First and the ABLE Act.    Introduce new legislation: Enable Work (Phil Payne Sliding Fee Scale PSA Program & PeachWork). Legislation that encourages employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Education & Training Division - 01/01/2019

~~“The State Approving Agency has the function of ensuring that institutions and establishments meet and maintain acceptable approval standards so that eligible persons who attend may receive educational assistance from VA. This includes all public and private schools and all establishments offering apprenticeship and other on-the-job training. The satisfactory performance of these duties requires that State Approving Agency personnel have extensive knowledge in education administration and a full understanding of the laws and regulations that govern and control the Veterans Educational Assistance Program.”

Systems
  • Other

Technical Assistance for Transition - 12/25/2018

~~This page is a list of materials about “Technical Assistance for Transition includes topics such as Transition Compliance, Transition Planning, IEP Development, and topics related to transition andimprovement activities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DBHDD/GVRA Supported Employment Collaboration for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities - 12/19/2018

~~“The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD), and Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s (GVRA) Supported Employment Collaboration went live statewide March 1, 2018. The goal of the collaboration is to support individuals with significant Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities in finding and maintaining competitive integrated employment.

GVRA is the funding source for the initial phases of Supported Employment services. DBHDD will be the funding source for long-term Supported Employment services following GVRA Services.

Individuals will be referred to GVRA from DBHDD for the initial phases of Supported Employment. Individuals will be referred from GVRA to DBHDD for long term supports. Long -term supports may be waiver funded, State-funded, or Employment Express funded.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Special Education Services and Supports - 12/07/2018

~~“The Georgia Department of Education (Division for Special Education Services and Supports) provides necessary infrastructure and supports for leaders, teachers, and families to meet the whole child needs of each student improving student outcomes and school climate resulting in an increased quality of life and workforce ready future. We must commit to effective collaboration across agencies and school-home partnerships to support local school districts in their efforts to provide special education and related services for students with disabilities. 

The Ga DOE must provide state General Supervision for local school districts to improve educational results and functional outcomes for all children with disabilities and ensure that the requirements of IDEA are met. We believe that all students must have an equitable opportunity for school completion and successful postsecondary outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Compensated Work Therapy - 12/03/2018

~~“CWT programs strive to maintain highly responsive long- term quality relationships with business and industry promoting employment opportunities for veterans with physical and mental disabilities. Many of our individual programs are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) and are members of the U.S. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association (USPRA). Typically, CWT programs are located within VA Medical Centers in most large metropolitan areas and many smaller communities.”

Systems
  • Other

Employment First Council membership completed with two new appointments - 12/01/2018

~~“The Office of Gov. Nathan Deal has announced two appointments to the Employment First Council, completing the 14- member body established by Georgia’s Employment First Act. Signed into law in May, House Bill 831 promotes inclusive, competitive work opportunities for people with disabilities and establishes employment as the first and preferred option for individuals receiving public services who want a career.

The Council, which will hold its inaugural meeting this month, is chaired by Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s Executive Director. Its membership is comprised of members of the disability community, a family advocate, an employer, and representatives from state agencies serving people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Real Careers Resources - 11/13/2018

~~“GCDD's priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as "customized employment." The web-link provides access to several resources related to helping Georgians with developmental disabilities acquire career opportunities. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Real Careers - 11/13/2018

~~The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) builds on the work of the Jobs for All United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy grant. In addition, The Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights and Assistance Act defines employment as: People get and keep employment consistent with their interest, abilities and needs.

GCDD VisionThe GCDD’s priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as “customized employment.” Click here  https://gcdd.org/news-a-media/videos/75-ihg-employees.html   to view a video.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

2018 WorkSource Georgia Mountains Modification Revisions and Additions - 10/01/2018

~~“WorkSource Georgia Mountains (WSGM) has published Program Year 2018 Revisions to the Program Year (PY) 2016-2020 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Local Plan for the Georgia Mountains Local Workforce Development Region.WSGM receives WIOA funding to coordinate the delivery of employment and training activities in the Georgia Mountains region of Georgia. The Georgia Mountains region includes the following counties: Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Lumpkin, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, and White, along with 38 municipalities within these counties.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

SB 106 "Patients First Act" - 03/27/2019

~~“A BILL to be entitled an Act to amend Article 7 of Chapter 4 of Title 49 and Title 33 of the O.C.G.A., relating to medical assistance and insurance, respectively, so as to authorize the Department of Community Health to submit a Section 1115 waiver request to the United States Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; to authorize the Governor to submit a Section 1332 innovation waiver proposal to the United States Secretaries of Health and Human Services and the Treasury; to provide for implementation of approved Section 1332 waivers; to provide for expiration of authority; to provide for legislative findings; to provide for related matters; to provide for a short title; to provide for an effective date; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.”

Systems
  • Other

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Governor and the General Assembly; to provide for a short title; to provide for definitions; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes”

Systems
  • Other

HB 768 Handicapped persons; ABLE program establishment to use tax exempt accounts to pay for qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; provisions - 05/03/2016

“A BILL to be entitled an Act to amend Title 30 of the O.C.G.A., relating to disabled persons, so as to provide for the establishment of a qualified ABLE program in this state to enable the contribution of funds to tax-exempt accounts to pay for the qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; to amend Code Section 48-7-27 of the O.C.G.A., relating to computation of taxable net income; to amend Code Section 50-13-2 of the O.C.G.A., relating to the definitions for purposes of the Georgia Administrative Procedure Act, so as to exclude the Georgia ABLE Program Corporation from the meaning of "agency"; to provide for related matters; to provide for an effective date; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Georgia House Resolution 642 - 08/17/2015

 “WHEREAS, an ‘Employment First’ policy provides that employment should be the first and preferred option for all people, regardless of their disability, and that employment in the general workforce at or above the minimum wage is the first and preferred option for all working age citizens with disabilities.”   “WHEREAS, an Employment First policy established by the State of Georgia would require the collaboration of all involved state agencies, including the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities, Department of Education, Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency, and the Department of Community Health, in aligning their programs and resources to such end.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 26

Real Careers Resources - 11/13/2018

~~“GCDD's priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as "customized employment." The web-link provides access to several resources related to helping Georgians with developmental disabilities acquire career opportunities. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Real Careers - 11/13/2018

~~The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) builds on the work of the Jobs for All United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy grant. In addition, The Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights and Assistance Act defines employment as: People get and keep employment consistent with their interest, abilities and needs.

GCDD VisionThe GCDD’s priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as “customized employment.” Click here  https://gcdd.org/news-a-media/videos/75-ihg-employees.html   to view a video.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

2018 WorkSource Georgia Mountains Modification Revisions and Additions - 10/01/2018

~~“WorkSource Georgia Mountains (WSGM) has published Program Year 2018 Revisions to the Program Year (PY) 2016-2020 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Local Plan for the Georgia Mountains Local Workforce Development Region.WSGM receives WIOA funding to coordinate the delivery of employment and training activities in the Georgia Mountains region of Georgia. The Georgia Mountains region includes the following counties: Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Lumpkin, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, and White, along with 38 municipalities within these counties.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018” - 07/01/2018

“Community integration and inclusion into the larger natural community is supported and evident. Terms “Integration and Inclusion” mean: a. Use of community resources that are available to other citizens; b. Providing the opportunity to actively participate in community activities and types of employment as citizens without disabilities; c. The organization has community partnerships for capacity building and advocacy of activities to achieve this goal of integration;”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018 ” - 07/01/2018

“Quality Assurance and Standard Compliance Requirements 1.The DD Crisis Providers of the Crisis System shall develop and maintain performance indicators and outcome data as part of their quality management system that will assist DBHDD and Georgia Crisis Access Line (GCAL) to monitor and generate monthly reports of the Georgia Crisis Response System (GCRS-DD) to make quality improvement decisions based on data collected.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

IEP Team Meeting Facilitation - 03/01/2018

~~“IEP Team Meeting Facilitation is a collaborative dispute prevention and resolution process used when members of an IEP Team agree that the presence of a third party would help facilitate communication and problem solving.  IEP Team Meeting Facilitation can be especially useful when there is a history of communication challenges or a meeting is expected to be particularly complex or controversial.

In a facilitated IEP Team meeting, an impartial facilitator helps to keep members of the IEP Team focused on the development of the IEP while addressing conflicts and disagreements that may arise during the meeting.  At the meeting, the facilitator will use communication skills that create an environment in which the IEP Team members can listen to each member’s point of view and work together to complete the development of a high quality IEP."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Developmental Disabilities “Announcements” - 08/24/2017

~~“There were significant changes to the COMP Waiver that occurred following approval by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in March 2017.  As a result, the four fiscal support services agencies sent an information sheet with the following facts about the transition:

The changes that have occurred are as follows: •CLD has been removed•CLS has two new service codes, CL Basic and CL Extended•CL Basic is used for employees that work a shift of 2.75 hours or less•CL Extended is used for employees that work a shift of 3 or more hours•CLS received a 7.2% increase to the total funds allocated to CLS”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency FY 2017-2019 Strategic Plan (FY 2018 Update) - 08/03/2017

~~“While the Agency’s mission of employment and independence for Georgian with Disabilities remains the same, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), which was signed into law in July 2014, brought changes to the way GVRA serves clients with disabilities. WIOA’s implementing regulations went into effect on October 18, 2016. GVRA has been updating policies and procedures to adhere to the changes and improvements in services to individuals with disabilities.  One major tenant in the Act relates to services to students with disabilities (age 14 to 22) where GVRA will provide pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) to groups of students in secondary education and identified as being served on an IEP or 504 and who are therefore potentially eligible to receive pre-ETS.  Another major focus of the Act is to serve eligible youth with disabilities age 14 to 24 who are not in school or training and provide them with services that will lead to competitive employment. “      

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Deal announces launch of Georgia STABLE - 06/14/2017

~~“June 14, 2017Gov. Nathan Deal today announced the launch of Georgia STABLE, a tax-free savings program for eligible individuals with disabilities. The program is administered by the Georgia Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program Corporation, established through legislation signed in 2016. The Georgia ABLE Act is modeled after the federal ABLE Act of 2014.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

“Public Policy for the People: 13 February 2017” - 02/13/2017

~~“Besides GCDD's Public Policy Team trolling the halls of the Gold Dome to speak with legislators about the need for more DD Waivers and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education, we have also hosted 2 advocacy days so far. On February 1st we spoke about the need for more DD Waiver funding and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education. …

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DBHDD/GVRA Supported Employment Collaboration for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities - 12/19/2018

~~“The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD), and Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s (GVRA) Supported Employment Collaboration went live statewide March 1, 2018. The goal of the collaboration is to support individuals with significant Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities in finding and maintaining competitive integrated employment.

GVRA is the funding source for the initial phases of Supported Employment services. DBHDD will be the funding source for long-term Supported Employment services following GVRA Services.

Individuals will be referred to GVRA from DBHDD for the initial phases of Supported Employment. Individuals will be referred from GVRA to DBHDD for long term supports. Long -term supports may be waiver funded, State-funded, or Employment Express funded.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transitioning Youth to Adult Care - 05/19/2018

~~Projects and Activities•Provide leadership training opportunities for youth with special needs to be mentors to other youth in transition across Georgia….•Develop and make available guidance materials for families, public health workers, physicians and healthcare professionals on transitioning youth with special needs to adult health care.•Provide trainings for youth, families, educators, and health care providers on topics such as preparing for higher education or vocational training, independent living, supported employment, recreation and leisure, and how to integrate health goals onto Individualized Education Programs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Gather to SOAR at Self-Employment Seminar” - 09/07/2017

~~“SOAR: A Pathway to Self-Employment seminar in August 2017 at the All About Developmental Disabilities (AADD) Family Support Center in Decatur, Georgia.

The seminar was co-hosted by Synergies Work, Inc., a nonprofit that provides people with disabilities the supports to become financially independent as entrepreneurs and the Georgia Microboards Association (GMA), a nonprofit organization that provides technical assistance to people with disabilities and their families.

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), behavioral health and community service professionals, individuals with disabilities and their families attended the one-day seminar to learn how to successfully be self-employed.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities' Mission

“The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities is the state's leader in advancing public policy on behalf of persons with developmental disabilities. Our mission is to promote public policy that creates an integrated community life for persons with developmental disabilities, their families, friends, neighbors and all who support them. We achieve this mission by sharing information, coordinating public outreach and implementing strategic legislative advocacy.    “The GCDD works with legislators and advocacy groups to influence and support public policy that fosters a positive change in the way education, housing, workplace/careers and community living opportunities are made available to persons with developmental disabilities.”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Georgia’s Explore, Engage, Employ (E3) - 11/01/2017

~~“Georgia VR is implementing E3 (Explore, Engage, Employ) in 7 school districts to serve 3,000 students and youth.  E3 goals are to engage employers to customize existing career pathways and develop alternative pathways for students and out of school youth; involve families to increase youth participation, and utilize social media strategies to develop services and connect youth to career interests.  Partners include the Poses Family Foundation, GA Department of Education, Technical College System of Georgia, Center for Leadership in Disability, Parent to Parent of Georgia, Burton Blatt Institute and Jobs for the Future.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

GVRA provides Career Specialist Pilot for ECCHS - 10/30/2017

~~“Elbert County Comprehensive High School (ECCHS) was selected as one of five Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) Capacity Building Pilots to receive a Career Specialist for Transition funded by GVRA. In collaboration with the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE), Division for Special Education Services and Supports, five pilots were invited to participate including Fulton County, Elbert County, Gainesville City, Henry County and Houston County School Systems….Through the assignment of GVRA funded Career Specialists to five pilot Local Education Agencies (LEA’s), the GaDOE, GVRA and LEA will work collaboratively to provide leadership, planning, technical assistance, and consultation, and to coordinate services and evaluate the effectiveness of a district-based Career Specialist for Transition to meet the requirements of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) as defined by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). One of the new provisions in WIOA requires Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), in collaboration with the LEA, to provide, or arrange for the provision of, pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities in Georgia secondary schools who are eligible or potentially eligible for services.

Services and support will be provided to students with disabilities in 9th -12th grades, ages 14 years through age 21 years statewide. With an expanded scope of work for students with disabilities, collaboration is essential.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Georgia Department of Community Affairs “Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program – Housing for Persons with Disabilities” - 08/01/2016

~~The Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program is designed for individuals with a disability who are at or below 30% of the Area Median Income and between the ages of 18 and 61. Recently, HUD awarded the State of Georgia with $14.4 million to provide long-term rental assistance to individuals who meet these qualifications. In order to be considered for the program, the participant must be referred by either the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities or the State of Georgia Money Follows the Person program.

To find out more on eligibility and how to get connected with the program, visit the DCA Section 811 website to find rental unit locations and program applications.

 

.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Disability Employment Initiative - 11/05/2015

“The Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD) was awarded $2.4 million by the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) to improve employment opportunities for adults and youth with disabilities. Georgia’s Disability Employment Initiative is a partnership between GDEcD and the Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA). The initiative is designed to improve job placement rates for youth and adults with disabilities that live within two of the state’s 19 Local Workforce Development Areas (LWDA).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…"   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services."  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Money Follows the Person

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…“…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~"Georgia Association for Primary Health Care, Inc. (GAPHC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations (hourly wage and variable income workers); rural residents; Hispanic residents; other minorities; women; veterans; and re-entry population. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. GAPHC represents all Georgia FQHCs and has established relationships with consumers and organizations such as: Social services departments, Head Start programs, Non-profits, Church groups, School systems, Local governments, and Employers/small businesses. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Duane A. KavkaPhone: (404) 659-2898Email:  dkavka@gaphc.org

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia Veterans Education Career Transition Resource Center - 05/28/2019

~~“Connecting veterans to careers through education and training.

We can help translate your military and civilian transcripts into potential credits toward certificates, diplomas and degrees depending on recency and your program of study. We also offer accelerated training programs in high demand careers at little to no cost if you are a Georgia resident or are stationed in Georgia.”

Systems
  • Other

Technical Assistance for Transition - 12/25/2018

~~This page is a list of materials about “Technical Assistance for Transition includes topics such as Transition Compliance, Transition Planning, IEP Development, and topics related to transition andimprovement activities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

GA Department of Behavioral Health & DD - Guide to Supported Employment - 04/25/2015

This Guide to Supported Employment was prepared by the Georgia Division of Developmental Disabilities Statewide Quality Improvement Council. It is intended to: Explain why employment is important; Illustrate through real examples the difference work makes in people’s lives; Answer common questions about pay and health benefits when you work and have an intellectual and/or developmental disability; and Provide information and resources on Supported Employment programs in Georgia.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)

~~“Currently, there is no planned face-to-face district leader training, via the RESAs, for support in completing the initial 2017-2018 CNA report. The GaDOE will deliver on-line training on the CNA process, as already outlined through its webinar series, and face-to-face regional trainings in May 10, 2017….

The GaDOE is currently developing a dedicated webpage on the GaDOE website that will house all resources and information related to the CNA process. The Office of School & District Effectiveness will hold trainings for select groups following a schedule available through their office.”

Systems
  • Department of Education

University of GA, Institute of Human Development & Disability - Consulting/Technical Assistance

The IHDD is available for consultations and technical assistance with professionals, para-professionals, families and family members to create meaningful community activities that highlight people with disabilities and their families. IHDD has been highly sought to provide national consulting to train and develop new skills sets in Customized Employment and its associated Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Toolkit, as well as the Evidence-Based Individual Placement and Supports model of employment. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement

University of GA, Institute on Human Development & Disability - WorkWorks Training

Through service, teaching, and research, the Institute on Human Development and Disability hopes to, “contribute to creating an environment where individuals with disabilities are independent and enjoy careers of choice.” Through WorkWorks, the institute offers a variety of training programs related to integrated employment opportunities for employment specialists and job coaches.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Justice Department Sues Georgia for Unnecessarily Segregating Students with Disabilities - 08/23/2016

The Lawsuit is the First Challenge to a State-Run School System for Segregating Students with Disabilities The Justice Department announced today that it has filed a lawsuit against the state of Georgia alleging that its treatment and segregation of students with disabilities in the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support (GNETS) Program violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Systems
  • Department of Education

Justice Department Reaches Extension Agreement to Improve Georgia’s Development Disability and Mental Health System - 05/18/2016

The extension agreement builds upon a 2010 settlement agreement resolving a lawsuit brought by the department under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Supreme Court’s Olmstead decision. The case involves Georgia’s provision of community services for individuals with mental illness and developmental disabilities. Under the agreement, Georgia will help people with developmental disabilities move from its state hospitals to integrated settings, consistent with their needs and preferences; will identify and address each individual’s needs in the community prior to discharge; and will monitor services and track outcomes for people after their discharge. For individuals who have moved from the state hospitals to the community, Georgia will monitor their health and wellbeing to ensure that emerging needs are met in a timely fashion. The extension agreement also calls for creation of at least 675 new Medicaid home- and community-based waiver slots as alternatives to placement in a facility.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

United States of America v. The State of Georgia, et al. Civil Action NO 1:10-CV-249-CAP - 10/19/2010

“To comply with this Settlement Agreement, the State shall provide the following services to individuals in the target population: … d. Supported Employment i. “Supported Employment will be operated according to an evidence-based supported employment model, and it will be assessed by an established fidelity scale such as the scale included in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) supported tool kit” ii. Enrollment in congregate programs shall not constitute Supported Employment. iii. Pursuant to the following schedule, the State shall provide Supported Employment services to 550 individuals with SPMI by July 1, 2015 .

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

GA Community Based Alternatives for Youth (01.R02.00) - 10/01/2012

"Provides behavioral assistance, care management, clinical services, respite, supported employment, community transition, customized goods and services, expressive clinical services, family peer support, financial support, waiver transportation, youth peer support for individuals w/mental illness ages 18-21 and w/SED ages 4-17."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia New Options Waiver (0175.R06.00) - 10/01/2012

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, FMS, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech/language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for MR/IID "

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program - 03/03/2012

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.        
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver Program (0323.R04.00 - 01/01/2011

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational services, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, financial support services, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech and language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, community residential alternative, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/ID, DD, ages 0 - no max age."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Medicaid Activities “Waivers”

Waiver programs help people who are elderly or have disabilities and need help to live in their home or community instead of an institution such as a nursing home or ICF-MR. Each program offers several "core" services: -service coordination (help with managing care needs and services) -personal support (assistance with daily living activities, i.e. bathing, dressing, meals and housekeeping) -home health services (nursing, home health aide, and occupational, physical and speech therapy) -emergency response systems -respite care (caregiver relief)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver (COMP) - Provider Reference Guide

All providers (agencies) must apply to become a co-employer of services. Enrolled Co-Employer providers can serve in this capacity for the following COMP services, only: • Community Access • Community Guide • Community Living Support • Supported Employment • Transportation

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how Georgia administers its Medicaid program. As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act, the plan was developed by Georgia and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The state plan includes provisions that describes groups of individuals to be covered by Medicaid, Medicaid covered services, reimbursement methodologies for providers and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.  The approved State Plan also provides assurance that Georgia abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Things are looking peachy for workers with disabilities in the great state of Georgia, where high expectations are on the horizon.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Georgia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2016 to 2017
10,429,379
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.56%
Change from
2016 to 2017
661,498
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
227,895
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.45%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.42%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.01%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 13,214,860 10,310,371 10,429,379
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 657,996 698,283 661,498
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 200,764 236,577 227,895
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,145,481 4,227,892 4,329,722
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.51% 33.88% 34.45%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.07% 75.69% 76.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.00% 5.40% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.90% 21.70% 21.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.40% 15.20% 14.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 580,094 621,469 587,687
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 644,176 680,504 663,272
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 777,690 819,284 784,314
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 380,409 406,273 398,279
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 55,138 64,891 53,476
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,929 5,392 4,548
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 20,568 21,272 22,395
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,155 N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 23,906 29,659 27,788
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 16,233 18,938 13,132

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,488 6,859 7,350
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.80% 2.90% 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 285,889 284,601 282,646

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 15,276 15,978 13,859
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 46,821 53,267 45,947
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 112,177 116,662 98,241
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.60% 13.70% 14.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 2.80% 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 3.60% 5.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 2.80% 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 2,706.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,653 2,639 4,671
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,670 3,441 2,857
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 2,680 2,665 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 5,082 4,313 4,929
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6 29 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1 20 47
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 17.00% 69.00% 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.01 0.20 0.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,420
6,239
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 230 292 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 405 547 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 689 1,008 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,996 2,545 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 942 1,572 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 158 275 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.20% 37.50% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,314 9,312 11,826
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 437,897 441,114 442,689
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 101 124 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 423 548 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $8,646,000 $8,882,000 $8,253,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $17,324,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $117,985,000 $126,851,000 $112,518,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $16,972,000 $16,745,000 $17,188,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 12.00% 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,580 4,197 3,960
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 2,939
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 12,429 12,473 10,524
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 23.60 23.00 24.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.87% 64.89% 64.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.56% 15.04% 15.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.13% 2.07% 1.97%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.16% 98.40% 99.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.39% 26.00% 25.80%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 53.73% 56.07% 58.75%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.04% 78.46% 82.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.34% 30.07% 32.95%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,688,563
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,114
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 239,895
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,043,403
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,283,298
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 214
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,158
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,372
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,823,472
AbilityOne wages (services). $11,757,487

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 28 35 30
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 28 35 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,040 1,604 1,464
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,040 1,604 1,464

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~The Georgia Pathways to Work program is designed for youth, ages 14 to 24, who have a disability and are either in school or out-of-school youth. This demonstration program contains the following elements:
• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 256) Title II

Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD): Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) has a formal MOU with DBHDD that utilizes the SE IPS model. This MOU covers both the behavioral health and developmental disabilities divisions of DBHDD to serve those individuals using Supported and Customized Employment. This agreement allows VR services to collaborate statewide with a network of providers including CSBs for the provision of SES. These agencies prepare VR clients for permanent jobs through supported employment and complementary services. The CSBs provide a wide scope of outpatient, day, residential housing, and community-based services that include SE. The Memorandum of Understanding with DBHDD allows for improved coordination of efforts to serve those with the most significant disabilities. (Page 262) Title II

Annual On-going Staff Development Training Sessions: GVRA provides annual training opportunities to staff in an effort to grow the team’s knowledge base in providing services to individuals and to ensure that staff is prepared when changes occur to policies and practice standards. The following training sessions have been developed based on the feedback from personnel on what is pertinent to achieving high standards in service delivery:
(1) Disability-Specific Topics (including Positive Behavioral Supports training for counselors who have clients with Most Significant Disabilities, Deaf Culture Literacy, and Individualized Placement and Support Training for Counselors Handling Clients with Severe & Persistent Mental Illness. (2) Customized Employment Training. (3) Case Management. (4) Eligibility for Services. (5) IPE Development. (6) Varying Types of Caseloads (including Supported Employment and Transition). (7) Values-based Training for Persons Working with Individuals with Disabilities. (8) Collaborative Training with School Personnel on Creative Individual Assessments. (9) Transition Resource Planning. (10) Road Map for Services Available to Georgians. (11) Job Development. (12) Employment Engagement Training (developing a work plan and work goal). (13) Compliance Training (including Sexual Harassment and Anti-Discrimination). (Page 280) Title II

Access to Supported Employment: There are concerns that there is both a paucity of Supported Employment Providers, and that from the supported employment providers’ perspective, SES are cost-prohibitive. Concerns regarding access to Supported Employment have highlighted the following needs for services expansion: (1) Increase in SES, especially for those individuals with significant disabilities. Many of these individuals have limited or no access to SES. (2) Increase in both services and actual Customized Employment opportunities. (3) Increase in the availability in specific skills training that is actually aligned with real jobs within the state and less on generic training. (Page 282) Title II

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Most of these services made available to employers are in response to an immediate separation event. Additional opportunities may be discussed with employers when there is adequate time and opportunity for layoff aversion efforts. The foundation of Georgia’s layoff aversion strategy are activities which gather information and build partnerships. The State focuses on exploring and sharing labor market information which may predict opportunities for intervention in the workforce system. It then utilizes this information to engage in outreach through multiple partners, such as GDOL’s BSU and GDEcD, to engage businesses in workforce discussions. These conversations reveal opportunities for the State and LWDAs to intervene in offering strategies such as IWT to help businesses upskill workers to become more productive or to learn on new technologies. Georgia has also had success leveraging upcoming separation events as a talent base to fill job openings with other businesses seeking skilled talent by hosting job fairs and recruitment events in coordination with the employer of separation. (Page 168) Title II

The primary strategy GVRA has used in realizing key achievements has been to establish and formalize partnerships. GVRA recognizes that in a time of decreasing resources and increasing need, leveraging the capacity of strategic partners is the only way to meet the needs and individual goals of persons served. Additionally, rich data through program evaluation, State Rehabilitation Council input, and constituent feedback has been used to inform and guide significant changes to GVRA over the past year. Finally, through the addition of personnel and providers who are experts in serving individuals with disabilities, GVRA has been able to identify and incorporate new evidence-based practices into its VR services as part of these on-going changes. (Page 301-302) Title VI

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

School to Work Transition

~~Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness for Project Search.   Project Search is only offered in a subset of communities across Georgia as it is not available in every county. It is a collaboration between businesses, schools, and GVRA. The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, one-year, school-to-work program for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities that takes place entirely at the workplace. This innovative, business-led model of school-to-work transition features total workplace immersion, which facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction; career exploration; and hands-on, worksite-based training and support. The goal for each student is competitive employment. Project SEARCH was developed at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and has been implemented at several sites in Georgia involving the collaborative effort of the Transition Unit of GVRA, area school systems, and several of Georgia’s leading employers. GVRA is working to add Project Search partners across the state to create more opportunities for youth with significant disabilities in obtaining real-life work experience that improves successful transitions from school to adult life.  (Page 252) Title IV

GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows:
449.1.01 Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) staff shall recognize that every student or youth, regardless of the severity of his or her disability, is considered able to benefit in terms of a competitive integrated employment outcome.
449.1.03 VR shall provide students 14 to 22 years old Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) that allows them to explore the world of work and engage in work based learning opportunities for the purpose of becoming employed in a meaningful career. If individualized services are needed in addition to Pre-ETS, VR shall provide these services following VR policy of application, determination of eligibility, comprehensive needs assessment and IPE development. (Page 257) Title IV

Another component of the Interagency Cooperative Agreement is transition planning for educational agencies that facilitate the development and implementation of IEPs. The agreement stipulates the following:
i. VR provides GaDOE the eligibility criteria for VR services; works collaboratively with local school districts to identify and locate students with disabilities who may be in need of services; and, develops, in conjunction with the eligible student, an IPE prior to the student’s graduation. This plan includes VR services that are determined to be appropriate for the student.
ii. Each school district receives intensive, rehabilitation services for earlier identification of and interventions provided to students with disabilities that facilitates successful employment outcomes.
iii. VR works with each eligible student to develop a work plan and determine the VR services appropriate to the students’ goal. (Page 258) Title IV

GVRA has developed hiring and retention competencies necessary to improve individual performance and agency outcomes. Georgia State law does not require certification or licensure for rehabilitation professionals or paraprofessionals; therefore, GVRA established the CSPD standard for the VR Counselor position. This is the CRC credential awarded by the CRCC and it follows national standards.
The CRC is the VR staff person with the authority to determine eligibility and priority category, develop Work Plans (IPE) including all amendments and all reviews, authorize funds, and close cases. One hundred percent (100%) of Georgia’s CRCs meet the CSPD standard and are eligible to independently perform core functions. The remaining counselors have obtained either a bachelors or master’s degree, work under the supervision of a CRC, and are encouraged to complete the education and certification process to become a CRC. (Page 278-279) Title IV

Based on the trend analysis and the steady growth that is projected, in 2020 VR services will be serving 25% more clients than this year. In addition, as shown in the estimates above, GVRA intends to increase the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs) from 50% to 66% of the individuals who apply for VR services in the given year. For example, in FY2020, GVRA estimates that the organization will develop IPEs for 11,069 of the 16,462 individuals who apply for VR services. (Page 287) Title IV

When an individual is determined eligible for VR services and assigned to a priority category that is closed for services, they shall be placed on a waiting list to be served in the chronological order in which they were determined eligible. Individuals who are currently participating in an active IPE prior to the closing of the priority category for which they are assigned, shall continue to receive services. As closed priority categories are re-opened, individuals will be moved off of the waiting list in a chronological order with those with the most significant disability (Priority Category 1 and 2) being served first.
GVRA shall administer and conduct its vocational rehabilitation program activities without regard to age, gender, race, color, creed or national origin. No qualified individual with disabilities shall be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under the VRP because the program’s or a provider’s facilities are inaccessible or unusable. (Page 292) Title IV

GVRA is only its third year of operation. In the 2014-2016 State Plan, GVRA set the following goals to guide the work of the agency.
i. Goal I - Maximize available federal funds to assist more individuals with disabilities to achieve their employment goals.
ii. Goal II - Expand transition services to assist more students with disabilities to go from high school to work or post-secondary education/training.
iii. Goal III - Enhance services to unserved and underserved populations to increase their employment outcomes.
iv. Goal IV - Help employers meet their human resources needs though hiring qualified individuals with disabilities.
Working closely with SRC, GVRA was able to make great strides in tackling and managing a greatly reduced budget for vocational rehabilitation services. In the 2014 program year, GVRA achieved the following towards its goals and objectives outlined in their 2014-2016 State Plan:
• Over 25,905 clients were served by GVRA for the most recently completed program year.
• VR collaborated with CRPs to call clients on the waiting list and quickly reengage them in the VR process. This partnership enabled VR to efficiently reduce the waiting list from 8,300 to zero.
• GVRA created a CSU to serve as a bridge to effectively meet the needs of clients and ensure that they receive excellent service in a timely manner and in accordance with all applicable regulations and policies.
• The High School/High Tech Program expanded to 72 schools providing over 3,800 transition activities to 746 students with disabilities, the highest number to date. Of those, 109 students won the competition for computers to assist them in furthering their education.
• GVRA renovated, refurbished, or moved VR field offices to more appropriate spaces and closed offices that were far from clients. VR also provided technology to counselors to more effectively serve clients in convenient locations.
• GVRA and VR implemented a plan to increase the salaries of CRCs.
• GVRA and VR collaborated with DBHDD to increase and enhance services for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, and for those with developmental disabilities. (Page 301) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~The proposed Georgia Pathways to Work program aims to significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with the core program partners, GaDOE, as wells as local employers. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as HDCI to ensure responsiveness to the known workforce demands in Georgia, as well as supporting their efforts to better engage those with disabilities. The overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive integrated employment through improving the 18 existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for out-of-school youth. This will be achieved by tailoring the career pathways to a variety of work opportunities available in the communities. The program will also engage employers in the model design and employ social media strategies to connect youth across the nation. Additionally, a result of the program will be to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways. (Page 108-109) Title II

The assessment of each competitive grant application will involve an intense evaluation of the ability of the eligible provider to meet the literacy needs of the area, and to comply with the expectations and statutes described within WIOA. At minimum, the review process and scoring rubric will consider the following:
• The ability of the eligible provider to meet the literacy needs and English language needs identified for the population in the area. Particular emphasis will be given to the provider’s ability to provide targeted service to individuals with barriers to employment—including low literacy skills and an English language barrier;
• The eligible provider’s ability to provide service to individuals with a (physical or learning) disability;
• The eligible provider’s demonstrated effectiveness in providing literacy instruction, including its ability to meet State-adjusted levels of performance and improve the literacy levels of eligible individuals;
• The eligible provider’s alignment with WIOA Local Plan;
• The depth, intensity, and rigor of the programs and activities offered by the eligible provider. The proposed program must incorporate the basic tenets of reading instruction. Attention will be given to the extent to which the eligible provider incorporates stringent research in the grant proposal submission and the development of the literacy program itself;
• The extent to which the eligible provider’s program is based on intense research and best practices;
• The extent to which the eligible provider demonstrates the effective use of technology for instruction, to include distance education, toward students’ improved performance;
• The eligible provider’s demonstrated integration of contextualized instruction, to blend literacy skills, and preparation for transition to post-secondary education or entry into the workplace. Particular attention will be given to implementation of a career pathways system, activities that promote and lead to economic self-sufficiency, and the ability to exercise the full rights of citizenship. (Page 231) Title II

GVRA has interagency cooperation with the following federal, state, and local agencies and programs:
i. Memorandum of Agreements have been developed with the following Local Education Agencies (LEA’s) to fulfill the goals of the Georgia Career Pathways Grant: Explore, Engage, Employ (E3): Atlanta Area School for the Deaf, Georgia School for the Deaf, Georgia Academy for the Blind, Troup County, Paulding County, Decatur County, and Hall County. A Memorandum of Understanding with GVRA and GaDOE has been implemented to support a capacity building pilot providing two GVRA employees housed at GaDOE in the Division for Special Education Services and Supports, and Career, Technical, Agricultural Education Division to provide instruction and direction to VR transition staff in Pre-Employment Transition Services. Since its inception, VR has maintained a cooperative relationship with Muskogee Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) program. MVR works to empower American Indians with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society. Through this partnership with the Lower Muskogee Creek Indian Tribe, VR services provides disability assessment, evaluation, and referral services that assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment. (Page 253) Title IV

In order to effectively increase and improve the competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for youth and students with disabilities, GVRA has identified the following priorities (under Goal 2):
i. Redirect VR resources (staff, equipment, services, etc.) to focus primarily on youth and students with disabilities based on the principle that serving this population will have a greater impact on the entire population of individuals with disabilities in the long-term, and thus should be a major focus of GVRA.
ii. Develop, implement and offer a robust and comprehensive array of transition services to all school districts within the state that is a combination of traditional VR services, provider services, and unique and specialty services that can be customized to a certain degree based on individual school district needs. This will also include a new array of services available to youth as young as 14 years of age.
iii. Develop and implement a career pathway model of services for both in-school students and out-of-school youth that will include Vocational Rehabilitation services that are aligned with the current GaDOE’s Occupational Clusters and curriculum-based career pathways; as well as alternative integrated community-based career pathways for those youth who are not in school.
iv. Partner with GaDOE, TCSG and USG to develop collaborative arrangements that improve the transition from high school to post-secondary education for students with disabilities.
v. Recruit and train specialty staff, with expertise in transition and career pathways, to better facilitate service enhancements for youth and students with disabilities.
vi. Partner with Certified Transition Programs also known as Inclusive Post-Secondary Education programs (IPSE) to increase client’s participation in obtaining measurable skill gains and industry recognized certifications. Use the agency’s Employment Services Unit to develop formal agreements with local employers and provide a variety of youth and student-directed employer supports and services, such as, career exploration, pre-apprenticeships, on-the-job training, job analysis, career pathway training curriculum development, and employment opportunities. (Page 289) Title IV

Strategies:
• Transform how GVRA and the VR services focus on youth and students with disabilities by integrating services agency-wide to make this population the highest focus.
• Partner with GaDOE to increase and deliver a comprehensive array of transitional services to every school district within the state, including a special focus on career pathways and customized career pathways.
• Develop a concentrated outreach effort to identify youth with disabilities that are not enrolled in school, and make the same robust services available to them.
• Partner with the existing VR provider network to create community-based career pathways for youth not enrolled in school.
• Partner with both TCSG and USG to improve post-secondary transition.
Goal 3: Increase and improve competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for unserved and underserved populations, to include veterans and individuals with sensory disabilities, mental illness, developmental disabilities, or autism. (Page 296) Title IV

GVRA’s goal to improve and expand VR services for Program Years 2018 and PY 2019 for students with disabilities by the following:
• Develop and offer a comprehensive array of services to all school districts statewide. Specifically, GVRA will develop all 5 required Pre-ETS activities, as well as the 9 authorized activities as may be needed, and offer those to every school district in the state of Georgia. These will include services that are VR Program-provided, as well as services provided through the VR provider network. Where there is a paucity of such Pre-ETS services in particular geographic areas of the state, GVRA announced a Request for Proposal for Pre-ETS and Transition Services.
• Develop new and innovative services for both in-school and out-of-school career pathways. As a part of this, GVRA is in Year 3 of the 5 year Georgia Career Pathways federal demonstration grant and is delivering Explore, Engage, Employ E3 services to 7 pilot districts. This is done in collaboration with GaDOE, the individual local school district, and the local employers and businesses. E3 will be the delivery model for all students and youth with disabilities in the future. A unique component of the E3 grant team is the Social Media Technologist who has established the E3 brand on all social media outlets. The SMT has overseen the development of 2 apps for students with disabilities to engage and develop skills. An RFP for a website has been announced and in the procurement process. The website will be non-governmental and is part of the strategy for engaging and tracking students and youth to assist them in reaching their career goals and meaningful employment. (Page 298) Title IV

Apprenticeship
GVRA has developed the following strategies for Federal Fiscal Years 2019 and 2020 to leverage other public and private funds to increase the resources for extended services and expanded Supported Employment Opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities: • Continue to expand the current blended funding relationship with DBHDD to increase SE service delivery to transitioning youth with developmental disabilities, or behavioral health diagnoses. • Utilize new grant and private foundation funding to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Georgia Pathways to Work program in engaging youth with significant disabilities in early Supported Employment experiences such as supported internships, and apprenticeships. • Explore funding options for extended supports through the Ticket to Work Program. • Continue to expand and facilitate the SE provider network’s use of natural supports. • Increase the use of Social Security Reimbursements for additional program expenditures. GVRA will also continue to explore new grant and funding opportunities to expand resources for extended services and SE opportunities. (Page 295) Title I Georgia WorkSmart, an initiative created by Governor Nathan Deal in 2015, promotes workbased learning training models, such as apprenticeships, pre-apprenticeships, and internships. The ultimate objective of Georgia WorkSmart is to utilize these work-based learning programs to address the primary workforce challenges identified by more than 80 Georgia private sector partners. These challenges stem from the following trends: a rapidly aging workforce, a lack of workplace soft skills among new employees, difficulty in recruiting new talent, and a greater demand for basic educational skills in math, reading, and writing. Georgia WorkSmart encourages the development of apprenticeship and internship programs to address these needs. Additionally, Georgia WorkSmart acts as a liaison between private and public entities utilizing apprenticeship programs and the Georgia workforce system. In addition to maintaining the State’s WIOA Registered Apprenticeship Eligible Training Provider List, Georgia WorkSmart assists each local workforce office in supporting Registered Apprenticeships with WIOA funding. Within Georgia, WIOA funding is encouraged to be used in order to add greater value 30 and sustainably to Registered Apprenticeships in good standing with U.S. DOL Office of Apprenticeship. (Page 38-39) Title I Local WIOA formula funds are encouraged to be used in support of apprentices and employers participating in Registered Apprenticeship programs. Registered Apprenticeship can help the workforce system achieve quality performance outcomes. Given the unique structure of Registered Apprenticeship programs, there are several ways in which WIOA training services may be used in conjunction with the programs. Primarily, the use of ITAs, OJT contracts, and Supportive Services are the most common method in which a LWDA can serve programs in their area. However, the use of Incumbent Worker Training, Work Experience, and Customized Training are also encouraged as valid apprenticeship training support. For these WIOA services, each local workforce area has been encouraged to develop policy and procedures dedicated to the appropriate use of WIOA funds toward Registered Apprenticeship. The purpose of dedicated local apprenticeship policy is to ensure LWDA’s WIOA service delivery is adequately prepared to be applied to these long-term training programs. In addition to local policy development, the State has also created a Registered Apprenticeship-specific Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) procedure. Per WIOA, all Registered Apprenticeship sponsors in good standing with OA are automatically eligible to be included onto the State ETPL. WFD has been obtaining periodic listings of all Registered Apprenticeship Sponsors in Georgia from the OA State Director and have provided each sponsor with a notifying letter informing them of their voluntary inclusion onto the ETPL. Once the sponsor has confirmed their desire to be included on the ETPL, their program’s training program is made available state-wide. This allows eligible participants to receive WIOA ITA funding toward apprenticeship training costs. This procedure has allowed apprenticeship sponsors to obtain new pathways to find individuals wishing to join an apprenticeship. (Page 102-103) Title II Registered Apprenticeship is fully aligned with the employer-focused, work-based training that WIOA envisions. Georgia WorkSmart coordinates with Georgia’s nineteen LWDAs to support Registered Apprenticeship programs through WIOA service delivery. Specifically, Georgia WorkSmart encourages the use of ITAs to fund the Related Classroom Instruction component of an apprentice’s training program. For an individual apprentice to receive an ITA, their respective apprenticeship program must be listed on the Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL). As required by WIOA, Georgia WorkSmart has developed a mechanism to notify all approved Registered Apprenticeship Sponsors of their automatic eligibility to be included on the state-wide ETPL. Seeing that all approved Registered Apprenticeship sponsors have been vetted by OA, Georgia has developed a form to collect basic training program details of any approved sponsor who chooses to be included on the ETPL. This process has helped to better align Registered Apprenticeship sponsors with their local workforce representatives as well as helped to increase WIOA support toward individual apprentices training costs. (Page 172-173) Title II
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~II. Priority Category 2, Individual with a Significant Disability: An eligible client shall be classified in this category if he/she has been determined by GVRA to be an individual who: • A recipient of SSI or SSDI or, an eligible individual who has: • Limitations in 1 or more Functional Capacities, and • Requires multiple VR services over an extended period of time
III. Priority Category 3, Individual with a Disability: An eligible client shall be classified in this category if he/she has been determined by GVRA to be an individual who: An eligible individual who is determined to not have a Significant or Most Significant Disability
The following table captures the capacities, number of services and extended periods of time for GVRA’s Order of Selection. (Page 292) Title I

GVRA has developed the following strategies for Federal Fiscal Years 2019 and 2020 to leverage other public and private funds to increase the resources for extended services and expanded Supported Employment Opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities:
• Continue to expand the current blended funding relationship with DBHDD to increase SE service delivery to transitioning youth with developmental disabilities, or behavioral health diagnoses.
• Utilize new grant and private foundation funding to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Georgia Pathways to Work program in engaging youth with significant disabilities in early Supported Employment experiences such as supported internships, and apprenticeships.
• Explore funding options for extended supports through the Ticket to Work Program.
• Continue to expand and facilitate the SE provider network’s use of natural supports.
• Increase the use of Social Security Reimbursements for additional program expenditures. (Page 295) Title IV
 

Employer/ Business

~~To that end, GVRA has an Employment Services Division within the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, and its primary function is to create a single focused approach and strategy to engage employers in the most meaningful way. Under the GVRA employer services division, all organizations efforts of engaging, contacting and relating to local businesses and corporate entities will be coordinated into a unified approach. The overall goals of the GVRA Employment Services Division will be:
1) To interface with employers to identify specific employer job and workforce needs and to provide the employers with qualified candidates to meet their needs;
2) To interface with any employer who is a federal contractor and/or federal subcontractor to identify specific job and workforce needs pertaining to the employer’s federal mandate and seven percent workforce quota and to provide employers with qualified candidates to meet their needs and fulfill their federal workforce compliance;
3) To interface with any employer to create employer-based training and education opportunities for individuals with disabilities, such as specific employer job education, pre-apprenticeships, on-the-job training, and career pathway customization to increase the qualifications of individuals with disabilities as potential job candidates for that employer; and
4) To interface with any employer to provide education and training to that employer regarding contemporary information about hiring individuals with disabilities, such as job accommodations, disability awareness, and federal contractor requirements to increase the employer’s interest and willingness to hire individuals with disabilities. (Page 263) Title IV

With the passage of WIOA, a greater emphasis has been placed on the State’s workforce development system. GVRA has changed its organizational structure for its field staff, especially as it relates to employer engagement. The intent of this restructuring is to create a standardized approach for VR field staff to engage employers, as well as working with the VR program’s provider network to create a unified approach to job development and job placement.
Partnerships: Throughout this document, partnership has been the foundation to expanding and improving service delivery statewide. GVRA will continue to collaborate with the SRC, other State agencies, community stakeholders, businesses and other unique partners to share a common message that GVRA is “good for business” and supports employers in meeting their workforce needs and business goals with individuals with disabilities who are qualified to perform the job. (Page 264) Title IV

Business Services Division: As mentioned above, the Business Division of GVRA was recently established to focus on aligning the workforce with private and public sector career opportunities. Since its inception, the Business Division has been evolving into the centralized point of contact for all external employer relations. This division is responsible for the following:
i. Developing new career opportunities, business partnerships and/or contracts. This includes expanding and developing relationships with corporations that turn into local hiring of persons with disabilities.
ii. Expanding relationships with current employers who look to VR first to fill their workforce needs and assessing what the drivers are for them to hire individuals with disabilities. This division promotes current employer’s use of the Talent Acquisition Portal for job postings. Additionally, this division will be looking to these employers to engage with potential businesses to answer their questions and speak to their experiences when working with VR services.  (Page 264) Title IV

iii. Understanding the diversity within GVRA’s total Talent Pool including placement profiles and marketing this pool to established partnerships statewide.
iv. Working with the new marketing and outreach position to produce collateral tools that focus on awareness and inclusion.
v. Providing consultation, technical assistance and support to employers on workplace accommodation and assistive technology.
vi. Creating a tracking database of new and existing business opportunities. The Employer Database is being developed to integrate with GVRA’s current case management system in order to facilitate better record keeping of current and new relationships with businesses. VR will continue to work with the Georgia Industries for the Blind’s Call Center who contacts all Georgia employers quarterly to find out if they have open positions and will make this available in the database to be used by the Business Relations Specialists. (Page 265) Title IV

iii. Develop an Employment Services division within VR to focus on formal employer engagement that will support all VR services and create more employment and career opportunities within the local employer community; having a particular focus on two major State initiatives: 1) Go Build Georgia and 2) High Demand Career Initiative.
iv. Develop collaborative relationships with other State agencies and organizations that share a similar mission and/or serve a common population; the intent of these relationships will be to create a seamless array of services that are complimentary and aligned in purpose.
v. Implement an internal training plan and schedule to address transformational leadership for all supervisors within the agency; and also extensive professional staff development that focuses on creative ways to improve and increase services for individuals with disabilities.
In order to effectively increase and improve the competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for youth and students with disabilities, GVRA has identified the following priorities (under Goal 2):
i. Redirect VR resources (staff, equipment, services, etc.) to focus primarily on youth and students with disabilities based on the principle that serving this population will have a greater impact on the entire population of individuals with disabilities in the long-term, and thus should be a major focus of GVRA. (Page 289) Title IV

GVRA goals and priorities identified above are based on the information provided through on-going comprehensive statewide assessments, including information from the public-at-large, consumers and their families, the SRC, disability advocacy groups, other State agencies, other disability organizations, local school districts, community providers and employers. A description of the Statewide Assessment and the needs and concerns that were identified can be found under Section (j). (Page 290) Title IV

Partner with current, as well as new providers to offer new and/or improved services to this population specifically. It is GVRA’s plan to do an overall assessment of all current provider-offered services based on each service’s ability to produce positive outcomes. Based on this review, GVRA will collaborate with all of its providers to: 1) either improve or eliminate unproductive services; 2) implement new services as may be needed; and 3) specifically offer those PETS services that cannot be provided by the VR Program directly. In all cases, the providers will be held to the same standards that the VR Program itself will be held to, and GVRA will continually monitor provider performance to ensure the best value for dollars spent and the best employment outcomes. (Page 299) Title IV

Data Collection
Currently the primary data collection and report system used by GVRA through the VR Program is Libera System 7 electronic case management system, and the data collected is specific to individuals served through the VR Program. At the current time, neither the Libera System 7 case management system, nor its data, is integrated with all the programs and activities present in the one-stop centers. GVRA and the VR Program are in the process of moving to a new client information system. GVRA is working with Alliance Corporation for the implementation of the new AWARE client information system set to “go live” April 30, 2018. (Page 121) Title I Utilizing the working groups, the State will formulate a process for a longitudinal evaluation of core programs. With WIOA setting common performance measures across the core partner programs, there is a greater opportunity for a seamless evaluation of program outcome data. This evaluation will enable partners to identify achievements and shortcomings across the workforce system and enable the state to be responsive to the needs of the labor market and participants. (Page 139) Title I
511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
Georgia’s One-Stop delivery system is focused on ensuring universal access across its workforce system. The State and its local partners, maintain compliance with the provisions of WIOA Section 188 which require programmatic and physical accessibility. Through monitoring performed at both the state and local level, Georgia ensures that all One-Stops are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize Georgia’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual, to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. In addition, the State maintains a Methods of Administration which details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be maintained. The Methods of Administration is a “living” document which ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level as quickly as possible. (Page 154) Title II Per federal law, each LWDA must appoint a local Equal Opportunity Officer who is responsible for ensuring local WIOA Section 188 compliance. Local Equal Opportunity Officers are responsible for informing senior staff of applicable federal regulations and ensuring all programs and activities are implemented in compliance. Additionally, local Equal Opportunity Officers collect and resolve local grievances and complaints as needed. Local Equal Opportunity Officers actively liaises with the State’s Title I-B Equal Opportunity Officer and USDOL’s Civil Rights Center to remain current on regulatory updates and guidance. They are then responsible for circulating new information locally and ensuring it is properly implemented. Separately, as a component of one-stop certification, the State collects a business plan from each LWDA which details how a new one-stop will satisfy accessibility requirements and the provisions of WIOA Section 188. In order to be certified, each comprehensive one-stop must satisfy the requisite federal criteria. This process ensures universal access to programmatic services and facilities are maintained across the state. (Page 155) Title II
Vets
* Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 50) Title I Georgia has a large military presence with eight military installations and more than 752,800 veterans. In PY12 Operation: Workforce was launched to help Georgia’s returning veterans re-enter the civilian workforce by connecting veterans and employers. Through Operation: Workforce, WFD is an active participant on Georgia’s Returning Veterans Taskforce, comprised of GDOL, Georgia Department of Veterans Services (GDVS), Georgia National Guard and Reserve, Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve, GVRA, TCSG, and USG. Since PY12, Operation: Workforce’s web presence (operationworkforce.com) has served as a platform for veterans and employers to connect. The site allows veterans to create a profile, upload a résumé, and search and apply for job openings within the state of Georgia. It also allows Georgia employers to create profiles, post job listings, review job applicants, and search the site for qualified candidates. Employers are able to sign a pledge of commitment to give enhanced hiring opportunities to Georgia’s veterans, and veterans are able to find veteran-friendly employers across the state. Operation: Workforce also serves veterans by translating their military occupational classifications into civilian occupations that best align with their skill set and training. In PY13, Operation: Workforce launched its Employers’ Summit. In order to educate employers on improving current recruitment and hiring processes to better find and hire veterans. In PY14, the Employers’ Summits were utilized to connect returning service members with employers. (Page 151-152) Title II GDOL staff informs veterans of priority of service at initial contact and provides informational pamphlets detailing priority of service and the range of workforce services available to them. If the customer is eligible, veterans and spouses are entitled to take advantage of the priority throughout the full array of employment, training, placement, and other services provided. Once POS is provided, staff review the GDOL- 3404 form with the veteran to determine if they have a Significant Barrier to Employment (SBE) per VPL 3-14 and subsequent amendments. Wagner Peyser (WP) staff will refer veteran customers who do not identify a SBE to GDOL WP Service Specialists, or GDOL DVOP staff will provide case management services if the veteran meets one of the following SBE criteria: • A special disabled or disabled veteran, as those terms are defined in 38U.S.C § 4211(1) and (3); Special disabled and disabled veterans are those: who are entitled to compensation (or who but for the receipt of military retired pay would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans’ Affairs; or, were discharged or released from active; • Homeless, as defined in Section 103(a) of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11302(a)); • A recently-separated service member, as defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(6), who at any point in the previous 12 months has been unemployed for 27 or more consecutive weeks; • An offender, as defined by WIA Section 101(27), who has been released from incarceration within the last 12 months; • Lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; or • Low-income (as defined by WIA at Section 101(25)(B)). • DVOP services to veterans aged 18-24 as approved by the Secretary of Labor. (Page 153) Title II
Mental Health

~~In 1998, the Georgia General Assembly (O.C.G.A. § 50-4-7) formally established 12 State Service Delivery Regions for delivering state services to local units of government and citizens and for the purpose of establishing common state agency regional boundaries (excluding health and mental health districts). The current 12 State Service Delivery Regions are divided in a manner that takes into account population centers, occupation & industrial composition, employment location quotients, geographical boundaries, commuting patterns, economic trends, and industrial needs across counties. The 12 State Service Delivery Region model is leveraged by several state agencies, including GDEcD, GDOL, and Regional Commissions, each of which are key partners under WIOA. Other state agencies have developed different regional designation models to fit their respective service delivery activities. (Page 161) Title I

Additionally, Telamon serves as a delegate agency for the East Coast Migrant Head Start Program. This program has a long tradition of delivering comprehensive and high-quality services to foster healthy development in low-income children aged six weeks to five years. The Migrant Head Start program provides a range of individualized services in the areas of education and early childhood development, including medical, dental and mental health; nutrition; and parent involvement. In addition, the entire range of Migrant Head Start services is responsive to the developmental, ethnic, cultural and linguistic heritage and experience of each child and family. GDOL outreach workers partner with Telamon to identify parents with youth that could benefit from these services. (Page 220) Title II

The Georgia State Use Council and DOAS administers the State Use law through the non-profit GEPS. Some of Georgia’s CRPs and nonprofit partners are in GEPS. Some VR clients do receive services from those CRPS when deemed appropriate based on their individualized plans for employment.
To avoid duplication of effort and to enhance the number of individuals served, GVRA and SRC have developed working relationships to coordinate activities with other Georgia councils. Linkages to productive relationships exist with the Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities, Mayors Committees on Employment of People with Disabilities, Georgia Mental Health Planning Council, Georgia Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, Inc., Georgia Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Trust Commission, the Council on American Indian Concerns, and other Georgia rehabilitation service agencies.
VR regional leaders continue to establish collaborative relationships with community organizations and businesses to assist people with disabilities in going to work. These organizations include, but are not limited to: chambers of commerce, city and county governments, the criminal justice system, urban leagues, churches, healthcare and social assistance services, housing authorities, and educational institutions. (Page 255) Title II

VR does not have cooperative agreements with non-educational agencies serving out-of-school youth. GVRA has partnered with DJJ to pilot a program with the YDC in Augusta. Through this pilot, GVRA worked with the mental health unit to develop an effective and efficient process for transitioning youth out of the facility and into employment or training opportunities upon their release. Additionally, the agency is finalizing a referral process by which the YDC will refer all youth whom they believe has a disability and may be appropriate for VR services. (Page 255) Title II

GVRA executed a formal Memorandum of Understanding with DBHDD in 2015, the State agency responsible for providing services to individuals with a mental illness. The current MOU expands the capacity of the VR program to serve those individuals who have a severe and persistent mental illness in supported employment, specifically following the IPS model of SE. A description of this partnership is in Section (f) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of SES. (Page 268) Title IV

The following goals and strategies will be required in order to achieve the goals and priorities for Program Years 2018 and PY 2019 that were outlined in Section (1) State Goals and Priorities.
Goal 1: Increase and improve competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for all individuals with disabilities.
Strategies:
• Partner with the existing VR provider network to design and implement new types of services to better serve individuals with disabilities.
• Partner with new potential providers to design and implement new types of services in areas of the State where there is a paucity of services.
• Partner with existing mental health and developmental disability providers to assist them in transforming traditional services to become better at competitive employment.
• Identify a model for continuous quality improvement to evaluate existing and new services. The model should include: (1) Assessment of the stability of processes or outcomes to determine whether there is an undesirable degree of variation or a failure to perform at an expected level. (2) Identify problems and opportunities to improve the performance of processes. (3) Assess the outcome of the services provided. (4) Assess whether a new or improved process meets performance expectations. (Page 296) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
The ability to file a UI claim is available at every comprehensive one-stop center. Access and meaningful assistance is critical, whether the customer is in rural Georgia, relies on public transportation, or needs access to the Internet. Assistance is assured through: • UI orientation provided to every new claimant explaining the full range of workforce services available to help them return to work; • Online access via GDOL’s website where customers can file electronically from career centers, home, libraries or any other Internet portal; • Dedicated, experienced staff at every one-stop; • Fully staffed resource centers at all career centers, including Internet access, copies, phones, fax and resource libraries; • A dedicated toll-free number for customers filing for UI at one-stops; • Access points at over 40 one-stops and career centers across the state; • An opportunity for each claimant to access in-person reemployment services as they come to career centers and one-stops to complete the UI filing process; • The use of state-of-the-art EG résumé and job matching service as a requirement for ES registration for claimants; • The availability of staff, technology, language translation services, and written materials in a variety of languages to meet the needs of all customers; • Fully accessible services, online and in person, to serve any customer with a disability; (Page 205) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 11 - 20 of 68

Goals of the 2017 – 2019 State Plan - 02/04/2019

~~“Goal 3: Develop opportunities for consumer employment

Description: Collaborate with GVRA, Department of Labor and other entities to develop meaningful policy to encourage employment opportunities for persons with disabilities.

Objective to Goal 3:

    Promote ongoing participation of initiatives such as Employment First and the ABLE Act.    Introduce new legislation: Enable Work (Phil Payne Sliding Fee Scale PSA Program & PeachWork). Legislation that encourages employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Education & Training Division - 01/01/2019

~~“The State Approving Agency has the function of ensuring that institutions and establishments meet and maintain acceptable approval standards so that eligible persons who attend may receive educational assistance from VA. This includes all public and private schools and all establishments offering apprenticeship and other on-the-job training. The satisfactory performance of these duties requires that State Approving Agency personnel have extensive knowledge in education administration and a full understanding of the laws and regulations that govern and control the Veterans Educational Assistance Program.”

Systems
  • Other

Technical Assistance for Transition - 12/25/2018

~~This page is a list of materials about “Technical Assistance for Transition includes topics such as Transition Compliance, Transition Planning, IEP Development, and topics related to transition andimprovement activities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DBHDD/GVRA Supported Employment Collaboration for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities - 12/19/2018

~~“The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD), and Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s (GVRA) Supported Employment Collaboration went live statewide March 1, 2018. The goal of the collaboration is to support individuals with significant Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities in finding and maintaining competitive integrated employment.

GVRA is the funding source for the initial phases of Supported Employment services. DBHDD will be the funding source for long-term Supported Employment services following GVRA Services.

Individuals will be referred to GVRA from DBHDD for the initial phases of Supported Employment. Individuals will be referred from GVRA to DBHDD for long term supports. Long -term supports may be waiver funded, State-funded, or Employment Express funded.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Special Education Services and Supports - 12/07/2018

~~“The Georgia Department of Education (Division for Special Education Services and Supports) provides necessary infrastructure and supports for leaders, teachers, and families to meet the whole child needs of each student improving student outcomes and school climate resulting in an increased quality of life and workforce ready future. We must commit to effective collaboration across agencies and school-home partnerships to support local school districts in their efforts to provide special education and related services for students with disabilities. 

The Ga DOE must provide state General Supervision for local school districts to improve educational results and functional outcomes for all children with disabilities and ensure that the requirements of IDEA are met. We believe that all students must have an equitable opportunity for school completion and successful postsecondary outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Compensated Work Therapy - 12/03/2018

~~“CWT programs strive to maintain highly responsive long- term quality relationships with business and industry promoting employment opportunities for veterans with physical and mental disabilities. Many of our individual programs are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) and are members of the U.S. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association (USPRA). Typically, CWT programs are located within VA Medical Centers in most large metropolitan areas and many smaller communities.”

Systems
  • Other

Employment First Council membership completed with two new appointments - 12/01/2018

~~“The Office of Gov. Nathan Deal has announced two appointments to the Employment First Council, completing the 14- member body established by Georgia’s Employment First Act. Signed into law in May, House Bill 831 promotes inclusive, competitive work opportunities for people with disabilities and establishes employment as the first and preferred option for individuals receiving public services who want a career.

The Council, which will hold its inaugural meeting this month, is chaired by Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s Executive Director. Its membership is comprised of members of the disability community, a family advocate, an employer, and representatives from state agencies serving people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Real Careers Resources - 11/13/2018

~~“GCDD's priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as "customized employment." The web-link provides access to several resources related to helping Georgians with developmental disabilities acquire career opportunities. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Real Careers - 11/13/2018

~~The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) builds on the work of the Jobs for All United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy grant. In addition, The Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights and Assistance Act defines employment as: People get and keep employment consistent with their interest, abilities and needs.

GCDD VisionThe GCDD’s priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as “customized employment.” Click here  https://gcdd.org/news-a-media/videos/75-ihg-employees.html   to view a video.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

2018 WorkSource Georgia Mountains Modification Revisions and Additions - 10/01/2018

~~“WorkSource Georgia Mountains (WSGM) has published Program Year 2018 Revisions to the Program Year (PY) 2016-2020 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Local Plan for the Georgia Mountains Local Workforce Development Region.WSGM receives WIOA funding to coordinate the delivery of employment and training activities in the Georgia Mountains region of Georgia. The Georgia Mountains region includes the following counties: Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Lumpkin, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, and White, along with 38 municipalities within these counties.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

SB 106 "Patients First Act" - 03/27/2019

~~“A BILL to be entitled an Act to amend Article 7 of Chapter 4 of Title 49 and Title 33 of the O.C.G.A., relating to medical assistance and insurance, respectively, so as to authorize the Department of Community Health to submit a Section 1115 waiver request to the United States Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; to authorize the Governor to submit a Section 1332 innovation waiver proposal to the United States Secretaries of Health and Human Services and the Treasury; to provide for implementation of approved Section 1332 waivers; to provide for expiration of authority; to provide for legislative findings; to provide for related matters; to provide for a short title; to provide for an effective date; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.”

Systems
  • Other

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Governor and the General Assembly; to provide for a short title; to provide for definitions; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes”

Systems
  • Other

HB 768 Handicapped persons; ABLE program establishment to use tax exempt accounts to pay for qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; provisions - 05/03/2016

“A BILL to be entitled an Act to amend Title 30 of the O.C.G.A., relating to disabled persons, so as to provide for the establishment of a qualified ABLE program in this state to enable the contribution of funds to tax-exempt accounts to pay for the qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; to amend Code Section 48-7-27 of the O.C.G.A., relating to computation of taxable net income; to amend Code Section 50-13-2 of the O.C.G.A., relating to the definitions for purposes of the Georgia Administrative Procedure Act, so as to exclude the Georgia ABLE Program Corporation from the meaning of "agency"; to provide for related matters; to provide for an effective date; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Georgia House Resolution 642 - 08/17/2015

 “WHEREAS, an ‘Employment First’ policy provides that employment should be the first and preferred option for all people, regardless of their disability, and that employment in the general workforce at or above the minimum wage is the first and preferred option for all working age citizens with disabilities.”   “WHEREAS, an Employment First policy established by the State of Georgia would require the collaboration of all involved state agencies, including the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities, Department of Education, Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency, and the Department of Community Health, in aligning their programs and resources to such end.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 26

Real Careers Resources - 11/13/2018

~~“GCDD's priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as "customized employment." The web-link provides access to several resources related to helping Georgians with developmental disabilities acquire career opportunities. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Real Careers - 11/13/2018

~~The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) builds on the work of the Jobs for All United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy grant. In addition, The Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights and Assistance Act defines employment as: People get and keep employment consistent with their interest, abilities and needs.

GCDD VisionThe GCDD’s priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as “customized employment.” Click here  https://gcdd.org/news-a-media/videos/75-ihg-employees.html   to view a video.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

2018 WorkSource Georgia Mountains Modification Revisions and Additions - 10/01/2018

~~“WorkSource Georgia Mountains (WSGM) has published Program Year 2018 Revisions to the Program Year (PY) 2016-2020 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Local Plan for the Georgia Mountains Local Workforce Development Region.WSGM receives WIOA funding to coordinate the delivery of employment and training activities in the Georgia Mountains region of Georgia. The Georgia Mountains region includes the following counties: Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Lumpkin, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, and White, along with 38 municipalities within these counties.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018” - 07/01/2018

“Community integration and inclusion into the larger natural community is supported and evident. Terms “Integration and Inclusion” mean: a. Use of community resources that are available to other citizens; b. Providing the opportunity to actively participate in community activities and types of employment as citizens without disabilities; c. The organization has community partnerships for capacity building and advocacy of activities to achieve this goal of integration;”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018 ” - 07/01/2018

“Quality Assurance and Standard Compliance Requirements 1.The DD Crisis Providers of the Crisis System shall develop and maintain performance indicators and outcome data as part of their quality management system that will assist DBHDD and Georgia Crisis Access Line (GCAL) to monitor and generate monthly reports of the Georgia Crisis Response System (GCRS-DD) to make quality improvement decisions based on data collected.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

IEP Team Meeting Facilitation - 03/01/2018

~~“IEP Team Meeting Facilitation is a collaborative dispute prevention and resolution process used when members of an IEP Team agree that the presence of a third party would help facilitate communication and problem solving.  IEP Team Meeting Facilitation can be especially useful when there is a history of communication challenges or a meeting is expected to be particularly complex or controversial.

In a facilitated IEP Team meeting, an impartial facilitator helps to keep members of the IEP Team focused on the development of the IEP while addressing conflicts and disagreements that may arise during the meeting.  At the meeting, the facilitator will use communication skills that create an environment in which the IEP Team members can listen to each member’s point of view and work together to complete the development of a high quality IEP."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Developmental Disabilities “Announcements” - 08/24/2017

~~“There were significant changes to the COMP Waiver that occurred following approval by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in March 2017.  As a result, the four fiscal support services agencies sent an information sheet with the following facts about the transition:

The changes that have occurred are as follows: •CLD has been removed•CLS has two new service codes, CL Basic and CL Extended•CL Basic is used for employees that work a shift of 2.75 hours or less•CL Extended is used for employees that work a shift of 3 or more hours•CLS received a 7.2% increase to the total funds allocated to CLS”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency FY 2017-2019 Strategic Plan (FY 2018 Update) - 08/03/2017

~~“While the Agency’s mission of employment and independence for Georgian with Disabilities remains the same, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), which was signed into law in July 2014, brought changes to the way GVRA serves clients with disabilities. WIOA’s implementing regulations went into effect on October 18, 2016. GVRA has been updating policies and procedures to adhere to the changes and improvements in services to individuals with disabilities.  One major tenant in the Act relates to services to students with disabilities (age 14 to 22) where GVRA will provide pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) to groups of students in secondary education and identified as being served on an IEP or 504 and who are therefore potentially eligible to receive pre-ETS.  Another major focus of the Act is to serve eligible youth with disabilities age 14 to 24 who are not in school or training and provide them with services that will lead to competitive employment. “      

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Deal announces launch of Georgia STABLE - 06/14/2017

~~“June 14, 2017Gov. Nathan Deal today announced the launch of Georgia STABLE, a tax-free savings program for eligible individuals with disabilities. The program is administered by the Georgia Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program Corporation, established through legislation signed in 2016. The Georgia ABLE Act is modeled after the federal ABLE Act of 2014.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

“Public Policy for the People: 13 February 2017” - 02/13/2017

~~“Besides GCDD's Public Policy Team trolling the halls of the Gold Dome to speak with legislators about the need for more DD Waivers and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education, we have also hosted 2 advocacy days so far. On February 1st we spoke about the need for more DD Waiver funding and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education. …

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DBHDD/GVRA Supported Employment Collaboration for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities - 12/19/2018

~~“The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD), and Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s (GVRA) Supported Employment Collaboration went live statewide March 1, 2018. The goal of the collaboration is to support individuals with significant Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities in finding and maintaining competitive integrated employment.

GVRA is the funding source for the initial phases of Supported Employment services. DBHDD will be the funding source for long-term Supported Employment services following GVRA Services.

Individuals will be referred to GVRA from DBHDD for the initial phases of Supported Employment. Individuals will be referred from GVRA to DBHDD for long term supports. Long -term supports may be waiver funded, State-funded, or Employment Express funded.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transitioning Youth to Adult Care - 05/19/2018

~~Projects and Activities•Provide leadership training opportunities for youth with special needs to be mentors to other youth in transition across Georgia….•Develop and make available guidance materials for families, public health workers, physicians and healthcare professionals on transitioning youth with special needs to adult health care.•Provide trainings for youth, families, educators, and health care providers on topics such as preparing for higher education or vocational training, independent living, supported employment, recreation and leisure, and how to integrate health goals onto Individualized Education Programs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Gather to SOAR at Self-Employment Seminar” - 09/07/2017

~~“SOAR: A Pathway to Self-Employment seminar in August 2017 at the All About Developmental Disabilities (AADD) Family Support Center in Decatur, Georgia.

The seminar was co-hosted by Synergies Work, Inc., a nonprofit that provides people with disabilities the supports to become financially independent as entrepreneurs and the Georgia Microboards Association (GMA), a nonprofit organization that provides technical assistance to people with disabilities and their families.

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), behavioral health and community service professionals, individuals with disabilities and their families attended the one-day seminar to learn how to successfully be self-employed.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities' Mission

“The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities is the state's leader in advancing public policy on behalf of persons with developmental disabilities. Our mission is to promote public policy that creates an integrated community life for persons with developmental disabilities, their families, friends, neighbors and all who support them. We achieve this mission by sharing information, coordinating public outreach and implementing strategic legislative advocacy.    “The GCDD works with legislators and advocacy groups to influence and support public policy that fosters a positive change in the way education, housing, workplace/careers and community living opportunities are made available to persons with developmental disabilities.”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Georgia’s Explore, Engage, Employ (E3) - 11/01/2017

~~“Georgia VR is implementing E3 (Explore, Engage, Employ) in 7 school districts to serve 3,000 students and youth.  E3 goals are to engage employers to customize existing career pathways and develop alternative pathways for students and out of school youth; involve families to increase youth participation, and utilize social media strategies to develop services and connect youth to career interests.  Partners include the Poses Family Foundation, GA Department of Education, Technical College System of Georgia, Center for Leadership in Disability, Parent to Parent of Georgia, Burton Blatt Institute and Jobs for the Future.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

GVRA provides Career Specialist Pilot for ECCHS - 10/30/2017

~~“Elbert County Comprehensive High School (ECCHS) was selected as one of five Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) Capacity Building Pilots to receive a Career Specialist for Transition funded by GVRA. In collaboration with the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE), Division for Special Education Services and Supports, five pilots were invited to participate including Fulton County, Elbert County, Gainesville City, Henry County and Houston County School Systems….Through the assignment of GVRA funded Career Specialists to five pilot Local Education Agencies (LEA’s), the GaDOE, GVRA and LEA will work collaboratively to provide leadership, planning, technical assistance, and consultation, and to coordinate services and evaluate the effectiveness of a district-based Career Specialist for Transition to meet the requirements of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) as defined by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). One of the new provisions in WIOA requires Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), in collaboration with the LEA, to provide, or arrange for the provision of, pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities in Georgia secondary schools who are eligible or potentially eligible for services.

Services and support will be provided to students with disabilities in 9th -12th grades, ages 14 years through age 21 years statewide. With an expanded scope of work for students with disabilities, collaboration is essential.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Georgia Department of Community Affairs “Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program – Housing for Persons with Disabilities” - 08/01/2016

~~The Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program is designed for individuals with a disability who are at or below 30% of the Area Median Income and between the ages of 18 and 61. Recently, HUD awarded the State of Georgia with $14.4 million to provide long-term rental assistance to individuals who meet these qualifications. In order to be considered for the program, the participant must be referred by either the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities or the State of Georgia Money Follows the Person program.

To find out more on eligibility and how to get connected with the program, visit the DCA Section 811 website to find rental unit locations and program applications.

 

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Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Disability Employment Initiative - 11/05/2015

“The Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD) was awarded $2.4 million by the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) to improve employment opportunities for adults and youth with disabilities. Georgia’s Disability Employment Initiative is a partnership between GDEcD and the Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA). The initiative is designed to improve job placement rates for youth and adults with disabilities that live within two of the state’s 19 Local Workforce Development Areas (LWDA).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…"   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services."  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Money Follows the Person

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…“…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~"Georgia Association for Primary Health Care, Inc. (GAPHC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations (hourly wage and variable income workers); rural residents; Hispanic residents; other minorities; women; veterans; and re-entry population. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. GAPHC represents all Georgia FQHCs and has established relationships with consumers and organizations such as: Social services departments, Head Start programs, Non-profits, Church groups, School systems, Local governments, and Employers/small businesses. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Duane A. KavkaPhone: (404) 659-2898Email:  dkavka@gaphc.org

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia Veterans Education Career Transition Resource Center - 05/28/2019

~~“Connecting veterans to careers through education and training.

We can help translate your military and civilian transcripts into potential credits toward certificates, diplomas and degrees depending on recency and your program of study. We also offer accelerated training programs in high demand careers at little to no cost if you are a Georgia resident or are stationed in Georgia.”

Systems
  • Other

Technical Assistance for Transition - 12/25/2018

~~This page is a list of materials about “Technical Assistance for Transition includes topics such as Transition Compliance, Transition Planning, IEP Development, and topics related to transition andimprovement activities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

GA Department of Behavioral Health & DD - Guide to Supported Employment - 04/25/2015

This Guide to Supported Employment was prepared by the Georgia Division of Developmental Disabilities Statewide Quality Improvement Council. It is intended to: Explain why employment is important; Illustrate through real examples the difference work makes in people’s lives; Answer common questions about pay and health benefits when you work and have an intellectual and/or developmental disability; and Provide information and resources on Supported Employment programs in Georgia.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)

~~“Currently, there is no planned face-to-face district leader training, via the RESAs, for support in completing the initial 2017-2018 CNA report. The GaDOE will deliver on-line training on the CNA process, as already outlined through its webinar series, and face-to-face regional trainings in May 10, 2017….

The GaDOE is currently developing a dedicated webpage on the GaDOE website that will house all resources and information related to the CNA process. The Office of School & District Effectiveness will hold trainings for select groups following a schedule available through their office.”

Systems
  • Department of Education

University of GA, Institute of Human Development & Disability - Consulting/Technical Assistance

The IHDD is available for consultations and technical assistance with professionals, para-professionals, families and family members to create meaningful community activities that highlight people with disabilities and their families. IHDD has been highly sought to provide national consulting to train and develop new skills sets in Customized Employment and its associated Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Toolkit, as well as the Evidence-Based Individual Placement and Supports model of employment. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement

University of GA, Institute on Human Development & Disability - WorkWorks Training

Through service, teaching, and research, the Institute on Human Development and Disability hopes to, “contribute to creating an environment where individuals with disabilities are independent and enjoy careers of choice.” Through WorkWorks, the institute offers a variety of training programs related to integrated employment opportunities for employment specialists and job coaches.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Justice Department Sues Georgia for Unnecessarily Segregating Students with Disabilities - 08/23/2016

The Lawsuit is the First Challenge to a State-Run School System for Segregating Students with Disabilities The Justice Department announced today that it has filed a lawsuit against the state of Georgia alleging that its treatment and segregation of students with disabilities in the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support (GNETS) Program violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Systems
  • Department of Education

Justice Department Reaches Extension Agreement to Improve Georgia’s Development Disability and Mental Health System - 05/18/2016

The extension agreement builds upon a 2010 settlement agreement resolving a lawsuit brought by the department under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Supreme Court’s Olmstead decision. The case involves Georgia’s provision of community services for individuals with mental illness and developmental disabilities. Under the agreement, Georgia will help people with developmental disabilities move from its state hospitals to integrated settings, consistent with their needs and preferences; will identify and address each individual’s needs in the community prior to discharge; and will monitor services and track outcomes for people after their discharge. For individuals who have moved from the state hospitals to the community, Georgia will monitor their health and wellbeing to ensure that emerging needs are met in a timely fashion. The extension agreement also calls for creation of at least 675 new Medicaid home- and community-based waiver slots as alternatives to placement in a facility.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

United States of America v. The State of Georgia, et al. Civil Action NO 1:10-CV-249-CAP - 10/19/2010

“To comply with this Settlement Agreement, the State shall provide the following services to individuals in the target population: … d. Supported Employment i. “Supported Employment will be operated according to an evidence-based supported employment model, and it will be assessed by an established fidelity scale such as the scale included in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) supported tool kit” ii. Enrollment in congregate programs shall not constitute Supported Employment. iii. Pursuant to the following schedule, the State shall provide Supported Employment services to 550 individuals with SPMI by July 1, 2015 .

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

GA Community Based Alternatives for Youth (01.R02.00) - 10/01/2012

"Provides behavioral assistance, care management, clinical services, respite, supported employment, community transition, customized goods and services, expressive clinical services, family peer support, financial support, waiver transportation, youth peer support for individuals w/mental illness ages 18-21 and w/SED ages 4-17."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia New Options Waiver (0175.R06.00) - 10/01/2012

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, FMS, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech/language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for MR/IID "

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program - 03/03/2012

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.        
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver Program (0323.R04.00 - 01/01/2011

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational services, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, financial support services, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech and language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, community residential alternative, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/ID, DD, ages 0 - no max age."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Medicaid Activities “Waivers”

Waiver programs help people who are elderly or have disabilities and need help to live in their home or community instead of an institution such as a nursing home or ICF-MR. Each program offers several "core" services: -service coordination (help with managing care needs and services) -personal support (assistance with daily living activities, i.e. bathing, dressing, meals and housekeeping) -home health services (nursing, home health aide, and occupational, physical and speech therapy) -emergency response systems -respite care (caregiver relief)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver (COMP) - Provider Reference Guide

All providers (agencies) must apply to become a co-employer of services. Enrolled Co-Employer providers can serve in this capacity for the following COMP services, only: • Community Access • Community Guide • Community Living Support • Supported Employment • Transportation

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how Georgia administers its Medicaid program. As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act, the plan was developed by Georgia and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The state plan includes provisions that describes groups of individuals to be covered by Medicaid, Medicaid covered services, reimbursement methodologies for providers and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.  The approved State Plan also provides assurance that Georgia abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Things are looking peachy for workers with disabilities in the great state of Georgia, where high expectations are on the horizon.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Georgia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2016 to 2017
10,429,379
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.56%
Change from
2016 to 2017
661,498
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
227,895
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.45%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.42%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.01%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 13,214,860 10,310,371 10,429,379
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 657,996 698,283 661,498
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 200,764 236,577 227,895
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,145,481 4,227,892 4,329,722
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.51% 33.88% 34.45%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.07% 75.69% 76.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.00% 5.40% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.90% 21.70% 21.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.40% 15.20% 14.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 580,094 621,469 587,687
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 644,176 680,504 663,272
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 777,690 819,284 784,314
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 380,409 406,273 398,279
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 55,138 64,891 53,476
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,929 5,392 4,548
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 20,568 21,272 22,395
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,155 N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 23,906 29,659 27,788
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 16,233 18,938 13,132

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,488 6,859 7,350
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.80% 2.90% 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 285,889 284,601 282,646

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 15,276 15,978 13,859
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 46,821 53,267 45,947
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 112,177 116,662 98,241
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.60% 13.70% 14.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 2.80% 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 3.60% 5.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 2.80% 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 2,706.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,653 2,639 4,671
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,670 3,441 2,857
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 2,680 2,665 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 5,082 4,313 4,929
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6 29 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1 20 47
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 17.00% 69.00% 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.01 0.20 0.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,420
6,239
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 230 292 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 405 547 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 689 1,008 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,996 2,545 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 942 1,572 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 158 275 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.20% 37.50% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,314 9,312 11,826
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 437,897 441,114 442,689
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 101 124 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 423 548 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $8,646,000 $8,882,000 $8,253,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $17,324,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $117,985,000 $126,851,000 $112,518,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $16,972,000 $16,745,000 $17,188,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 12.00% 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,580 4,197 3,960
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 2,939
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 12,429 12,473 10,524
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 23.60 23.00 24.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.87% 64.89% 64.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.56% 15.04% 15.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.13% 2.07% 1.97%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.16% 98.40% 99.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.39% 26.00% 25.80%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 53.73% 56.07% 58.75%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.04% 78.46% 82.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.34% 30.07% 32.95%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,688,563
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,114
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 239,895
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,043,403
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,283,298
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 214
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,158
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,372
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,823,472
AbilityOne wages (services). $11,757,487

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 28 35 30
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 28 35 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,040 1,604 1,464
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,040 1,604 1,464

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~The Georgia Pathways to Work program is designed for youth, ages 14 to 24, who have a disability and are either in school or out-of-school youth. This demonstration program contains the following elements:
• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 256) Title II

Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD): Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) has a formal MOU with DBHDD that utilizes the SE IPS model. This MOU covers both the behavioral health and developmental disabilities divisions of DBHDD to serve those individuals using Supported and Customized Employment. This agreement allows VR services to collaborate statewide with a network of providers including CSBs for the provision of SES. These agencies prepare VR clients for permanent jobs through supported employment and complementary services. The CSBs provide a wide scope of outpatient, day, residential housing, and community-based services that include SE. The Memorandum of Understanding with DBHDD allows for improved coordination of efforts to serve those with the most significant disabilities. (Page 262) Title II

Annual On-going Staff Development Training Sessions: GVRA provides annual training opportunities to staff in an effort to grow the team’s knowledge base in providing services to individuals and to ensure that staff is prepared when changes occur to policies and practice standards. The following training sessions have been developed based on the feedback from personnel on what is pertinent to achieving high standards in service delivery:
(1) Disability-Specific Topics (including Positive Behavioral Supports training for counselors who have clients with Most Significant Disabilities, Deaf Culture Literacy, and Individualized Placement and Support Training for Counselors Handling Clients with Severe & Persistent Mental Illness. (2) Customized Employment Training. (3) Case Management. (4) Eligibility for Services. (5) IPE Development. (6) Varying Types of Caseloads (including Supported Employment and Transition). (7) Values-based Training for Persons Working with Individuals with Disabilities. (8) Collaborative Training with School Personnel on Creative Individual Assessments. (9) Transition Resource Planning. (10) Road Map for Services Available to Georgians. (11) Job Development. (12) Employment Engagement Training (developing a work plan and work goal). (13) Compliance Training (including Sexual Harassment and Anti-Discrimination). (Page 280) Title II

Access to Supported Employment: There are concerns that there is both a paucity of Supported Employment Providers, and that from the supported employment providers’ perspective, SES are cost-prohibitive. Concerns regarding access to Supported Employment have highlighted the following needs for services expansion: (1) Increase in SES, especially for those individuals with significant disabilities. Many of these individuals have limited or no access to SES. (2) Increase in both services and actual Customized Employment opportunities. (3) Increase in the availability in specific skills training that is actually aligned with real jobs within the state and less on generic training. (Page 282) Title II

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Most of these services made available to employers are in response to an immediate separation event. Additional opportunities may be discussed with employers when there is adequate time and opportunity for layoff aversion efforts. The foundation of Georgia’s layoff aversion strategy are activities which gather information and build partnerships. The State focuses on exploring and sharing labor market information which may predict opportunities for intervention in the workforce system. It then utilizes this information to engage in outreach through multiple partners, such as GDOL’s BSU and GDEcD, to engage businesses in workforce discussions. These conversations reveal opportunities for the State and LWDAs to intervene in offering strategies such as IWT to help businesses upskill workers to become more productive or to learn on new technologies. Georgia has also had success leveraging upcoming separation events as a talent base to fill job openings with other businesses seeking skilled talent by hosting job fairs and recruitment events in coordination with the employer of separation. (Page 168) Title II

The primary strategy GVRA has used in realizing key achievements has been to establish and formalize partnerships. GVRA recognizes that in a time of decreasing resources and increasing need, leveraging the capacity of strategic partners is the only way to meet the needs and individual goals of persons served. Additionally, rich data through program evaluation, State Rehabilitation Council input, and constituent feedback has been used to inform and guide significant changes to GVRA over the past year. Finally, through the addition of personnel and providers who are experts in serving individuals with disabilities, GVRA has been able to identify and incorporate new evidence-based practices into its VR services as part of these on-going changes. (Page 301-302) Title VI

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

School to Work Transition

~~Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness for Project Search.   Project Search is only offered in a subset of communities across Georgia as it is not available in every county. It is a collaboration between businesses, schools, and GVRA. The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, one-year, school-to-work program for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities that takes place entirely at the workplace. This innovative, business-led model of school-to-work transition features total workplace immersion, which facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction; career exploration; and hands-on, worksite-based training and support. The goal for each student is competitive employment. Project SEARCH was developed at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and has been implemented at several sites in Georgia involving the collaborative effort of the Transition Unit of GVRA, area school systems, and several of Georgia’s leading employers. GVRA is working to add Project Search partners across the state to create more opportunities for youth with significant disabilities in obtaining real-life work experience that improves successful transitions from school to adult life.  (Page 252) Title IV

GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows:
449.1.01 Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) staff shall recognize that every student or youth, regardless of the severity of his or her disability, is considered able to benefit in terms of a competitive integrated employment outcome.
449.1.03 VR shall provide students 14 to 22 years old Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) that allows them to explore the world of work and engage in work based learning opportunities for the purpose of becoming employed in a meaningful career. If individualized services are needed in addition to Pre-ETS, VR shall provide these services following VR policy of application, determination of eligibility, comprehensive needs assessment and IPE development. (Page 257) Title IV

Another component of the Interagency Cooperative Agreement is transition planning for educational agencies that facilitate the development and implementation of IEPs. The agreement stipulates the following:
i. VR provides GaDOE the eligibility criteria for VR services; works collaboratively with local school districts to identify and locate students with disabilities who may be in need of services; and, develops, in conjunction with the eligible student, an IPE prior to the student’s graduation. This plan includes VR services that are determined to be appropriate for the student.
ii. Each school district receives intensive, rehabilitation services for earlier identification of and interventions provided to students with disabilities that facilitates successful employment outcomes.
iii. VR works with each eligible student to develop a work plan and determine the VR services appropriate to the students’ goal. (Page 258) Title IV

GVRA has developed hiring and retention competencies necessary to improve individual performance and agency outcomes. Georgia State law does not require certification or licensure for rehabilitation professionals or paraprofessionals; therefore, GVRA established the CSPD standard for the VR Counselor position. This is the CRC credential awarded by the CRCC and it follows national standards.
The CRC is the VR staff person with the authority to determine eligibility and priority category, develop Work Plans (IPE) including all amendments and all reviews, authorize funds, and close cases. One hundred percent (100%) of Georgia’s CRCs meet the CSPD standard and are eligible to independently perform core functions. The remaining counselors have obtained either a bachelors or master’s degree, work under the supervision of a CRC, and are encouraged to complete the education and certification process to become a CRC. (Page 278-279) Title IV

Based on the trend analysis and the steady growth that is projected, in 2020 VR services will be serving 25% more clients than this year. In addition, as shown in the estimates above, GVRA intends to increase the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs) from 50% to 66% of the individuals who apply for VR services in the given year. For example, in FY2020, GVRA estimates that the organization will develop IPEs for 11,069 of the 16,462 individuals who apply for VR services. (Page 287) Title IV

When an individual is determined eligible for VR services and assigned to a priority category that is closed for services, they shall be placed on a waiting list to be served in the chronological order in which they were determined eligible. Individuals who are currently participating in an active IPE prior to the closing of the priority category for which they are assigned, shall continue to receive services. As closed priority categories are re-opened, individuals will be moved off of the waiting list in a chronological order with those with the most significant disability (Priority Category 1 and 2) being served first.
GVRA shall administer and conduct its vocational rehabilitation program activities without regard to age, gender, race, color, creed or national origin. No qualified individual with disabilities shall be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under the VRP because the program’s or a provider’s facilities are inaccessible or unusable. (Page 292) Title IV

GVRA is only its third year of operation. In the 2014-2016 State Plan, GVRA set the following goals to guide the work of the agency.
i. Goal I - Maximize available federal funds to assist more individuals with disabilities to achieve their employment goals.
ii. Goal II - Expand transition services to assist more students with disabilities to go from high school to work or post-secondary education/training.
iii. Goal III - Enhance services to unserved and underserved populations to increase their employment outcomes.
iv. Goal IV - Help employers meet their human resources needs though hiring qualified individuals with disabilities.
Working closely with SRC, GVRA was able to make great strides in tackling and managing a greatly reduced budget for vocational rehabilitation services. In the 2014 program year, GVRA achieved the following towards its goals and objectives outlined in their 2014-2016 State Plan:
• Over 25,905 clients were served by GVRA for the most recently completed program year.
• VR collaborated with CRPs to call clients on the waiting list and quickly reengage them in the VR process. This partnership enabled VR to efficiently reduce the waiting list from 8,300 to zero.
• GVRA created a CSU to serve as a bridge to effectively meet the needs of clients and ensure that they receive excellent service in a timely manner and in accordance with all applicable regulations and policies.
• The High School/High Tech Program expanded to 72 schools providing over 3,800 transition activities to 746 students with disabilities, the highest number to date. Of those, 109 students won the competition for computers to assist them in furthering their education.
• GVRA renovated, refurbished, or moved VR field offices to more appropriate spaces and closed offices that were far from clients. VR also provided technology to counselors to more effectively serve clients in convenient locations.
• GVRA and VR implemented a plan to increase the salaries of CRCs.
• GVRA and VR collaborated with DBHDD to increase and enhance services for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, and for those with developmental disabilities. (Page 301) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~The proposed Georgia Pathways to Work program aims to significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with the core program partners, GaDOE, as wells as local employers. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as HDCI to ensure responsiveness to the known workforce demands in Georgia, as well as supporting their efforts to better engage those with disabilities. The overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive integrated employment through improving the 18 existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for out-of-school youth. This will be achieved by tailoring the career pathways to a variety of work opportunities available in the communities. The program will also engage employers in the model design and employ social media strategies to connect youth across the nation. Additionally, a result of the program will be to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways. (Page 108-109) Title II

The assessment of each competitive grant application will involve an intense evaluation of the ability of the eligible provider to meet the literacy needs of the area, and to comply with the expectations and statutes described within WIOA. At minimum, the review process and scoring rubric will consider the following:
• The ability of the eligible provider to meet the literacy needs and English language needs identified for the population in the area. Particular emphasis will be given to the provider’s ability to provide targeted service to individuals with barriers to employment—including low literacy skills and an English language barrier;
• The eligible provider’s ability to provide service to individuals with a (physical or learning) disability;
• The eligible provider’s demonstrated effectiveness in providing literacy instruction, including its ability to meet State-adjusted levels of performance and improve the literacy levels of eligible individuals;
• The eligible provider’s alignment with WIOA Local Plan;
• The depth, intensity, and rigor of the programs and activities offered by the eligible provider. The proposed program must incorporate the basic tenets of reading instruction. Attention will be given to the extent to which the eligible provider incorporates stringent research in the grant proposal submission and the development of the literacy program itself;
• The extent to which the eligible provider’s program is based on intense research and best practices;
• The extent to which the eligible provider demonstrates the effective use of technology for instruction, to include distance education, toward students’ improved performance;
• The eligible provider’s demonstrated integration of contextualized instruction, to blend literacy skills, and preparation for transition to post-secondary education or entry into the workplace. Particular attention will be given to implementation of a career pathways system, activities that promote and lead to economic self-sufficiency, and the ability to exercise the full rights of citizenship. (Page 231) Title II

GVRA has interagency cooperation with the following federal, state, and local agencies and programs:
i. Memorandum of Agreements have been developed with the following Local Education Agencies (LEA’s) to fulfill the goals of the Georgia Career Pathways Grant: Explore, Engage, Employ (E3): Atlanta Area School for the Deaf, Georgia School for the Deaf, Georgia Academy for the Blind, Troup County, Paulding County, Decatur County, and Hall County. A Memorandum of Understanding with GVRA and GaDOE has been implemented to support a capacity building pilot providing two GVRA employees housed at GaDOE in the Division for Special Education Services and Supports, and Career, Technical, Agricultural Education Division to provide instruction and direction to VR transition staff in Pre-Employment Transition Services. Since its inception, VR has maintained a cooperative relationship with Muskogee Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) program. MVR works to empower American Indians with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society. Through this partnership with the Lower Muskogee Creek Indian Tribe, VR services provides disability assessment, evaluation, and referral services that assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment. (Page 253) Title IV

In order to effectively increase and improve the competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for youth and students with disabilities, GVRA has identified the following priorities (under Goal 2):
i. Redirect VR resources (staff, equipment, services, etc.) to focus primarily on youth and students with disabilities based on the principle that serving this population will have a greater impact on the entire population of individuals with disabilities in the long-term, and thus should be a major focus of GVRA.
ii. Develop, implement and offer a robust and comprehensive array of transition services to all school districts within the state that is a combination of traditional VR services, provider services, and unique and specialty services that can be customized to a certain degree based on individual school district needs. This will also include a new array of services available to youth as young as 14 years of age.
iii. Develop and implement a career pathway model of services for both in-school students and out-of-school youth that will include Vocational Rehabilitation services that are aligned with the current GaDOE’s Occupational Clusters and curriculum-based career pathways; as well as alternative integrated community-based career pathways for those youth who are not in school.
iv. Partner with GaDOE, TCSG and USG to develop collaborative arrangements that improve the transition from high school to post-secondary education for students with disabilities.
v. Recruit and train specialty staff, with expertise in transition and career pathways, to better facilitate service enhancements for youth and students with disabilities.
vi. Partner with Certified Transition Programs also known as Inclusive Post-Secondary Education programs (IPSE) to increase client’s participation in obtaining measurable skill gains and industry recognized certifications. Use the agency’s Employment Services Unit to develop formal agreements with local employers and provide a variety of youth and student-directed employer supports and services, such as, career exploration, pre-apprenticeships, on-the-job training, job analysis, career pathway training curriculum development, and employment opportunities. (Page 289) Title IV

Strategies:
• Transform how GVRA and the VR services focus on youth and students with disabilities by integrating services agency-wide to make this population the highest focus.
• Partner with GaDOE to increase and deliver a comprehensive array of transitional services to every school district within the state, including a special focus on career pathways and customized career pathways.
• Develop a concentrated outreach effort to identify youth with disabilities that are not enrolled in school, and make the same robust services available to them.
• Partner with the existing VR provider network to create community-based career pathways for youth not enrolled in school.
• Partner with both TCSG and USG to improve post-secondary transition.
Goal 3: Increase and improve competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for unserved and underserved populations, to include veterans and individuals with sensory disabilities, mental illness, developmental disabilities, or autism. (Page 296) Title IV

GVRA’s goal to improve and expand VR services for Program Years 2018 and PY 2019 for students with disabilities by the following:
• Develop and offer a comprehensive array of services to all school districts statewide. Specifically, GVRA will develop all 5 required Pre-ETS activities, as well as the 9 authorized activities as may be needed, and offer those to every school district in the state of Georgia. These will include services that are VR Program-provided, as well as services provided through the VR provider network. Where there is a paucity of such Pre-ETS services in particular geographic areas of the state, GVRA announced a Request for Proposal for Pre-ETS and Transition Services.
• Develop new and innovative services for both in-school and out-of-school career pathways. As a part of this, GVRA is in Year 3 of the 5 year Georgia Career Pathways federal demonstration grant and is delivering Explore, Engage, Employ E3 services to 7 pilot districts. This is done in collaboration with GaDOE, the individual local school district, and the local employers and businesses. E3 will be the delivery model for all students and youth with disabilities in the future. A unique component of the E3 grant team is the Social Media Technologist who has established the E3 brand on all social media outlets. The SMT has overseen the development of 2 apps for students with disabilities to engage and develop skills. An RFP for a website has been announced and in the procurement process. The website will be non-governmental and is part of the strategy for engaging and tracking students and youth to assist them in reaching their career goals and meaningful employment. (Page 298) Title IV

Apprenticeship
GVRA has developed the following strategies for Federal Fiscal Years 2019 and 2020 to leverage other public and private funds to increase the resources for extended services and expanded Supported Employment Opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities: • Continue to expand the current blended funding relationship with DBHDD to increase SE service delivery to transitioning youth with developmental disabilities, or behavioral health diagnoses. • Utilize new grant and private foundation funding to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Georgia Pathways to Work program in engaging youth with significant disabilities in early Supported Employment experiences such as supported internships, and apprenticeships. • Explore funding options for extended supports through the Ticket to Work Program. • Continue to expand and facilitate the SE provider network’s use of natural supports. • Increase the use of Social Security Reimbursements for additional program expenditures. GVRA will also continue to explore new grant and funding opportunities to expand resources for extended services and SE opportunities. (Page 295) Title I Georgia WorkSmart, an initiative created by Governor Nathan Deal in 2015, promotes workbased learning training models, such as apprenticeships, pre-apprenticeships, and internships. The ultimate objective of Georgia WorkSmart is to utilize these work-based learning programs to address the primary workforce challenges identified by more than 80 Georgia private sector partners. These challenges stem from the following trends: a rapidly aging workforce, a lack of workplace soft skills among new employees, difficulty in recruiting new talent, and a greater demand for basic educational skills in math, reading, and writing. Georgia WorkSmart encourages the development of apprenticeship and internship programs to address these needs. Additionally, Georgia WorkSmart acts as a liaison between private and public entities utilizing apprenticeship programs and the Georgia workforce system. In addition to maintaining the State’s WIOA Registered Apprenticeship Eligible Training Provider List, Georgia WorkSmart assists each local workforce office in supporting Registered Apprenticeships with WIOA funding. Within Georgia, WIOA funding is encouraged to be used in order to add greater value 30 and sustainably to Registered Apprenticeships in good standing with U.S. DOL Office of Apprenticeship. (Page 38-39) Title I Local WIOA formula funds are encouraged to be used in support of apprentices and employers participating in Registered Apprenticeship programs. Registered Apprenticeship can help the workforce system achieve quality performance outcomes. Given the unique structure of Registered Apprenticeship programs, there are several ways in which WIOA training services may be used in conjunction with the programs. Primarily, the use of ITAs, OJT contracts, and Supportive Services are the most common method in which a LWDA can serve programs in their area. However, the use of Incumbent Worker Training, Work Experience, and Customized Training are also encouraged as valid apprenticeship training support. For these WIOA services, each local workforce area has been encouraged to develop policy and procedures dedicated to the appropriate use of WIOA funds toward Registered Apprenticeship. The purpose of dedicated local apprenticeship policy is to ensure LWDA’s WIOA service delivery is adequately prepared to be applied to these long-term training programs. In addition to local policy development, the State has also created a Registered Apprenticeship-specific Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) procedure. Per WIOA, all Registered Apprenticeship sponsors in good standing with OA are automatically eligible to be included onto the State ETPL. WFD has been obtaining periodic listings of all Registered Apprenticeship Sponsors in Georgia from the OA State Director and have provided each sponsor with a notifying letter informing them of their voluntary inclusion onto the ETPL. Once the sponsor has confirmed their desire to be included on the ETPL, their program’s training program is made available state-wide. This allows eligible participants to receive WIOA ITA funding toward apprenticeship training costs. This procedure has allowed apprenticeship sponsors to obtain new pathways to find individuals wishing to join an apprenticeship. (Page 102-103) Title II Registered Apprenticeship is fully aligned with the employer-focused, work-based training that WIOA envisions. Georgia WorkSmart coordinates with Georgia’s nineteen LWDAs to support Registered Apprenticeship programs through WIOA service delivery. Specifically, Georgia WorkSmart encourages the use of ITAs to fund the Related Classroom Instruction component of an apprentice’s training program. For an individual apprentice to receive an ITA, their respective apprenticeship program must be listed on the Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL). As required by WIOA, Georgia WorkSmart has developed a mechanism to notify all approved Registered Apprenticeship Sponsors of their automatic eligibility to be included on the state-wide ETPL. Seeing that all approved Registered Apprenticeship sponsors have been vetted by OA, Georgia has developed a form to collect basic training program details of any approved sponsor who chooses to be included on the ETPL. This process has helped to better align Registered Apprenticeship sponsors with their local workforce representatives as well as helped to increase WIOA support toward individual apprentices training costs. (Page 172-173) Title II
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~II. Priority Category 2, Individual with a Significant Disability: An eligible client shall be classified in this category if he/she has been determined by GVRA to be an individual who: • A recipient of SSI or SSDI or, an eligible individual who has: • Limitations in 1 or more Functional Capacities, and • Requires multiple VR services over an extended period of time
III. Priority Category 3, Individual with a Disability: An eligible client shall be classified in this category if he/she has been determined by GVRA to be an individual who: An eligible individual who is determined to not have a Significant or Most Significant Disability
The following table captures the capacities, number of services and extended periods of time for GVRA’s Order of Selection. (Page 292) Title I

GVRA has developed the following strategies for Federal Fiscal Years 2019 and 2020 to leverage other public and private funds to increase the resources for extended services and expanded Supported Employment Opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities:
• Continue to expand the current blended funding relationship with DBHDD to increase SE service delivery to transitioning youth with developmental disabilities, or behavioral health diagnoses.
• Utilize new grant and private foundation funding to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Georgia Pathways to Work program in engaging youth with significant disabilities in early Supported Employment experiences such as supported internships, and apprenticeships.
• Explore funding options for extended supports through the Ticket to Work Program.
• Continue to expand and facilitate the SE provider network’s use of natural supports.
• Increase the use of Social Security Reimbursements for additional program expenditures. (Page 295) Title IV
 

Employer/ Business

~~To that end, GVRA has an Employment Services Division within the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, and its primary function is to create a single focused approach and strategy to engage employers in the most meaningful way. Under the GVRA employer services division, all organizations efforts of engaging, contacting and relating to local businesses and corporate entities will be coordinated into a unified approach. The overall goals of the GVRA Employment Services Division will be:
1) To interface with employers to identify specific employer job and workforce needs and to provide the employers with qualified candidates to meet their needs;
2) To interface with any employer who is a federal contractor and/or federal subcontractor to identify specific job and workforce needs pertaining to the employer’s federal mandate and seven percent workforce quota and to provide employers with qualified candidates to meet their needs and fulfill their federal workforce compliance;
3) To interface with any employer to create employer-based training and education opportunities for individuals with disabilities, such as specific employer job education, pre-apprenticeships, on-the-job training, and career pathway customization to increase the qualifications of individuals with disabilities as potential job candidates for that employer; and
4) To interface with any employer to provide education and training to that employer regarding contemporary information about hiring individuals with disabilities, such as job accommodations, disability awareness, and federal contractor requirements to increase the employer’s interest and willingness to hire individuals with disabilities. (Page 263) Title IV

With the passage of WIOA, a greater emphasis has been placed on the State’s workforce development system. GVRA has changed its organizational structure for its field staff, especially as it relates to employer engagement. The intent of this restructuring is to create a standardized approach for VR field staff to engage employers, as well as working with the VR program’s provider network to create a unified approach to job development and job placement.
Partnerships: Throughout this document, partnership has been the foundation to expanding and improving service delivery statewide. GVRA will continue to collaborate with the SRC, other State agencies, community stakeholders, businesses and other unique partners to share a common message that GVRA is “good for business” and supports employers in meeting their workforce needs and business goals with individuals with disabilities who are qualified to perform the job. (Page 264) Title IV

Business Services Division: As mentioned above, the Business Division of GVRA was recently established to focus on aligning the workforce with private and public sector career opportunities. Since its inception, the Business Division has been evolving into the centralized point of contact for all external employer relations. This division is responsible for the following:
i. Developing new career opportunities, business partnerships and/or contracts. This includes expanding and developing relationships with corporations that turn into local hiring of persons with disabilities.
ii. Expanding relationships with current employers who look to VR first to fill their workforce needs and assessing what the drivers are for them to hire individuals with disabilities. This division promotes current employer’s use of the Talent Acquisition Portal for job postings. Additionally, this division will be looking to these employers to engage with potential businesses to answer their questions and speak to their experiences when working with VR services.  (Page 264) Title IV

iii. Understanding the diversity within GVRA’s total Talent Pool including placement profiles and marketing this pool to established partnerships statewide.
iv. Working with the new marketing and outreach position to produce collateral tools that focus on awareness and inclusion.
v. Providing consultation, technical assistance and support to employers on workplace accommodation and assistive technology.
vi. Creating a tracking database of new and existing business opportunities. The Employer Database is being developed to integrate with GVRA’s current case management system in order to facilitate better record keeping of current and new relationships with businesses. VR will continue to work with the Georgia Industries for the Blind’s Call Center who contacts all Georgia employers quarterly to find out if they have open positions and will make this available in the database to be used by the Business Relations Specialists. (Page 265) Title IV

iii. Develop an Employment Services division within VR to focus on formal employer engagement that will support all VR services and create more employment and career opportunities within the local employer community; having a particular focus on two major State initiatives: 1) Go Build Georgia and 2) High Demand Career Initiative.
iv. Develop collaborative relationships with other State agencies and organizations that share a similar mission and/or serve a common population; the intent of these relationships will be to create a seamless array of services that are complimentary and aligned in purpose.
v. Implement an internal training plan and schedule to address transformational leadership for all supervisors within the agency; and also extensive professional staff development that focuses on creative ways to improve and increase services for individuals with disabilities.
In order to effectively increase and improve the competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for youth and students with disabilities, GVRA has identified the following priorities (under Goal 2):
i. Redirect VR resources (staff, equipment, services, etc.) to focus primarily on youth and students with disabilities based on the principle that serving this population will have a greater impact on the entire population of individuals with disabilities in the long-term, and thus should be a major focus of GVRA. (Page 289) Title IV

GVRA goals and priorities identified above are based on the information provided through on-going comprehensive statewide assessments, including information from the public-at-large, consumers and their families, the SRC, disability advocacy groups, other State agencies, other disability organizations, local school districts, community providers and employers. A description of the Statewide Assessment and the needs and concerns that were identified can be found under Section (j). (Page 290) Title IV

Partner with current, as well as new providers to offer new and/or improved services to this population specifically. It is GVRA’s plan to do an overall assessment of all current provider-offered services based on each service’s ability to produce positive outcomes. Based on this review, GVRA will collaborate with all of its providers to: 1) either improve or eliminate unproductive services; 2) implement new services as may be needed; and 3) specifically offer those PETS services that cannot be provided by the VR Program directly. In all cases, the providers will be held to the same standards that the VR Program itself will be held to, and GVRA will continually monitor provider performance to ensure the best value for dollars spent and the best employment outcomes. (Page 299) Title IV

Data Collection
Currently the primary data collection and report system used by GVRA through the VR Program is Libera System 7 electronic case management system, and the data collected is specific to individuals served through the VR Program. At the current time, neither the Libera System 7 case management system, nor its data, is integrated with all the programs and activities present in the one-stop centers. GVRA and the VR Program are in the process of moving to a new client information system. GVRA is working with Alliance Corporation for the implementation of the new AWARE client information system set to “go live” April 30, 2018. (Page 121) Title I Utilizing the working groups, the State will formulate a process for a longitudinal evaluation of core programs. With WIOA setting common performance measures across the core partner programs, there is a greater opportunity for a seamless evaluation of program outcome data. This evaluation will enable partners to identify achievements and shortcomings across the workforce system and enable the state to be responsive to the needs of the labor market and participants. (Page 139) Title I
511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
Georgia’s One-Stop delivery system is focused on ensuring universal access across its workforce system. The State and its local partners, maintain compliance with the provisions of WIOA Section 188 which require programmatic and physical accessibility. Through monitoring performed at both the state and local level, Georgia ensures that all One-Stops are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize Georgia’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual, to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. In addition, the State maintains a Methods of Administration which details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be maintained. The Methods of Administration is a “living” document which ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level as quickly as possible. (Page 154) Title II Per federal law, each LWDA must appoint a local Equal Opportunity Officer who is responsible for ensuring local WIOA Section 188 compliance. Local Equal Opportunity Officers are responsible for informing senior staff of applicable federal regulations and ensuring all programs and activities are implemented in compliance. Additionally, local Equal Opportunity Officers collect and resolve local grievances and complaints as needed. Local Equal Opportunity Officers actively liaises with the State’s Title I-B Equal Opportunity Officer and USDOL’s Civil Rights Center to remain current on regulatory updates and guidance. They are then responsible for circulating new information locally and ensuring it is properly implemented. Separately, as a component of one-stop certification, the State collects a business plan from each LWDA which details how a new one-stop will satisfy accessibility requirements and the provisions of WIOA Section 188. In order to be certified, each comprehensive one-stop must satisfy the requisite federal criteria. This process ensures universal access to programmatic services and facilities are maintained across the state. (Page 155) Title II
Vets
* Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 50) Title I Georgia has a large military presence with eight military installations and more than 752,800 veterans. In PY12 Operation: Workforce was launched to help Georgia’s returning veterans re-enter the civilian workforce by connecting veterans and employers. Through Operation: Workforce, WFD is an active participant on Georgia’s Returning Veterans Taskforce, comprised of GDOL, Georgia Department of Veterans Services (GDVS), Georgia National Guard and Reserve, Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve, GVRA, TCSG, and USG. Since PY12, Operation: Workforce’s web presence (operationworkforce.com) has served as a platform for veterans and employers to connect. The site allows veterans to create a profile, upload a résumé, and search and apply for job openings within the state of Georgia. It also allows Georgia employers to create profiles, post job listings, review job applicants, and search the site for qualified candidates. Employers are able to sign a pledge of commitment to give enhanced hiring opportunities to Georgia’s veterans, and veterans are able to find veteran-friendly employers across the state. Operation: Workforce also serves veterans by translating their military occupational classifications into civilian occupations that best align with their skill set and training. In PY13, Operation: Workforce launched its Employers’ Summit. In order to educate employers on improving current recruitment and hiring processes to better find and hire veterans. In PY14, the Employers’ Summits were utilized to connect returning service members with employers. (Page 151-152) Title II GDOL staff informs veterans of priority of service at initial contact and provides informational pamphlets detailing priority of service and the range of workforce services available to them. If the customer is eligible, veterans and spouses are entitled to take advantage of the priority throughout the full array of employment, training, placement, and other services provided. Once POS is provided, staff review the GDOL- 3404 form with the veteran to determine if they have a Significant Barrier to Employment (SBE) per VPL 3-14 and subsequent amendments. Wagner Peyser (WP) staff will refer veteran customers who do not identify a SBE to GDOL WP Service Specialists, or GDOL DVOP staff will provide case management services if the veteran meets one of the following SBE criteria: • A special disabled or disabled veteran, as those terms are defined in 38U.S.C § 4211(1) and (3); Special disabled and disabled veterans are those: who are entitled to compensation (or who but for the receipt of military retired pay would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans’ Affairs; or, were discharged or released from active; • Homeless, as defined in Section 103(a) of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11302(a)); • A recently-separated service member, as defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(6), who at any point in the previous 12 months has been unemployed for 27 or more consecutive weeks; • An offender, as defined by WIA Section 101(27), who has been released from incarceration within the last 12 months; • Lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; or • Low-income (as defined by WIA at Section 101(25)(B)). • DVOP services to veterans aged 18-24 as approved by the Secretary of Labor. (Page 153) Title II
Mental Health

~~In 1998, the Georgia General Assembly (O.C.G.A. § 50-4-7) formally established 12 State Service Delivery Regions for delivering state services to local units of government and citizens and for the purpose of establishing common state agency regional boundaries (excluding health and mental health districts). The current 12 State Service Delivery Regions are divided in a manner that takes into account population centers, occupation & industrial composition, employment location quotients, geographical boundaries, commuting patterns, economic trends, and industrial needs across counties. The 12 State Service Delivery Region model is leveraged by several state agencies, including GDEcD, GDOL, and Regional Commissions, each of which are key partners under WIOA. Other state agencies have developed different regional designation models to fit their respective service delivery activities. (Page 161) Title I

Additionally, Telamon serves as a delegate agency for the East Coast Migrant Head Start Program. This program has a long tradition of delivering comprehensive and high-quality services to foster healthy development in low-income children aged six weeks to five years. The Migrant Head Start program provides a range of individualized services in the areas of education and early childhood development, including medical, dental and mental health; nutrition; and parent involvement. In addition, the entire range of Migrant Head Start services is responsive to the developmental, ethnic, cultural and linguistic heritage and experience of each child and family. GDOL outreach workers partner with Telamon to identify parents with youth that could benefit from these services. (Page 220) Title II

The Georgia State Use Council and DOAS administers the State Use law through the non-profit GEPS. Some of Georgia’s CRPs and nonprofit partners are in GEPS. Some VR clients do receive services from those CRPS when deemed appropriate based on their individualized plans for employment.
To avoid duplication of effort and to enhance the number of individuals served, GVRA and SRC have developed working relationships to coordinate activities with other Georgia councils. Linkages to productive relationships exist with the Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities, Mayors Committees on Employment of People with Disabilities, Georgia Mental Health Planning Council, Georgia Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, Inc., Georgia Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Trust Commission, the Council on American Indian Concerns, and other Georgia rehabilitation service agencies.
VR regional leaders continue to establish collaborative relationships with community organizations and businesses to assist people with disabilities in going to work. These organizations include, but are not limited to: chambers of commerce, city and county governments, the criminal justice system, urban leagues, churches, healthcare and social assistance services, housing authorities, and educational institutions. (Page 255) Title II

VR does not have cooperative agreements with non-educational agencies serving out-of-school youth. GVRA has partnered with DJJ to pilot a program with the YDC in Augusta. Through this pilot, GVRA worked with the mental health unit to develop an effective and efficient process for transitioning youth out of the facility and into employment or training opportunities upon their release. Additionally, the agency is finalizing a referral process by which the YDC will refer all youth whom they believe has a disability and may be appropriate for VR services. (Page 255) Title II

GVRA executed a formal Memorandum of Understanding with DBHDD in 2015, the State agency responsible for providing services to individuals with a mental illness. The current MOU expands the capacity of the VR program to serve those individuals who have a severe and persistent mental illness in supported employment, specifically following the IPS model of SE. A description of this partnership is in Section (f) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of SES. (Page 268) Title IV

The following goals and strategies will be required in order to achieve the goals and priorities for Program Years 2018 and PY 2019 that were outlined in Section (1) State Goals and Priorities.
Goal 1: Increase and improve competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for all individuals with disabilities.
Strategies:
• Partner with the existing VR provider network to design and implement new types of services to better serve individuals with disabilities.
• Partner with new potential providers to design and implement new types of services in areas of the State where there is a paucity of services.
• Partner with existing mental health and developmental disability providers to assist them in transforming traditional services to become better at competitive employment.
• Identify a model for continuous quality improvement to evaluate existing and new services. The model should include: (1) Assessment of the stability of processes or outcomes to determine whether there is an undesirable degree of variation or a failure to perform at an expected level. (2) Identify problems and opportunities to improve the performance of processes. (3) Assess the outcome of the services provided. (4) Assess whether a new or improved process meets performance expectations. (Page 296) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
The ability to file a UI claim is available at every comprehensive one-stop center. Access and meaningful assistance is critical, whether the customer is in rural Georgia, relies on public transportation, or needs access to the Internet. Assistance is assured through: • UI orientation provided to every new claimant explaining the full range of workforce services available to help them return to work; • Online access via GDOL’s website where customers can file electronically from career centers, home, libraries or any other Internet portal; • Dedicated, experienced staff at every one-stop; • Fully staffed resource centers at all career centers, including Internet access, copies, phones, fax and resource libraries; • A dedicated toll-free number for customers filing for UI at one-stops; • Access points at over 40 one-stops and career centers across the state; • An opportunity for each claimant to access in-person reemployment services as they come to career centers and one-stops to complete the UI filing process; • The use of state-of-the-art EG résumé and job matching service as a requirement for ES registration for claimants; • The availability of staff, technology, language translation services, and written materials in a variety of languages to meet the needs of all customers; • Fully accessible services, online and in person, to serve any customer with a disability; (Page 205) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 11 - 20 of 68

Goals of the 2017 – 2019 State Plan - 02/04/2019

~~“Goal 3: Develop opportunities for consumer employment

Description: Collaborate with GVRA, Department of Labor and other entities to develop meaningful policy to encourage employment opportunities for persons with disabilities.

Objective to Goal 3:

    Promote ongoing participation of initiatives such as Employment First and the ABLE Act.    Introduce new legislation: Enable Work (Phil Payne Sliding Fee Scale PSA Program & PeachWork). Legislation that encourages employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Education & Training Division - 01/01/2019

~~“The State Approving Agency has the function of ensuring that institutions and establishments meet and maintain acceptable approval standards so that eligible persons who attend may receive educational assistance from VA. This includes all public and private schools and all establishments offering apprenticeship and other on-the-job training. The satisfactory performance of these duties requires that State Approving Agency personnel have extensive knowledge in education administration and a full understanding of the laws and regulations that govern and control the Veterans Educational Assistance Program.”

Systems
  • Other

Technical Assistance for Transition - 12/25/2018

~~This page is a list of materials about “Technical Assistance for Transition includes topics such as Transition Compliance, Transition Planning, IEP Development, and topics related to transition andimprovement activities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DBHDD/GVRA Supported Employment Collaboration for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities - 12/19/2018

~~“The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD), and Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s (GVRA) Supported Employment Collaboration went live statewide March 1, 2018. The goal of the collaboration is to support individuals with significant Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities in finding and maintaining competitive integrated employment.

GVRA is the funding source for the initial phases of Supported Employment services. DBHDD will be the funding source for long-term Supported Employment services following GVRA Services.

Individuals will be referred to GVRA from DBHDD for the initial phases of Supported Employment. Individuals will be referred from GVRA to DBHDD for long term supports. Long -term supports may be waiver funded, State-funded, or Employment Express funded.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Special Education Services and Supports - 12/07/2018

~~“The Georgia Department of Education (Division for Special Education Services and Supports) provides necessary infrastructure and supports for leaders, teachers, and families to meet the whole child needs of each student improving student outcomes and school climate resulting in an increased quality of life and workforce ready future. We must commit to effective collaboration across agencies and school-home partnerships to support local school districts in their efforts to provide special education and related services for students with disabilities. 

The Ga DOE must provide state General Supervision for local school districts to improve educational results and functional outcomes for all children with disabilities and ensure that the requirements of IDEA are met. We believe that all students must have an equitable opportunity for school completion and successful postsecondary outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Compensated Work Therapy - 12/03/2018

~~“CWT programs strive to maintain highly responsive long- term quality relationships with business and industry promoting employment opportunities for veterans with physical and mental disabilities. Many of our individual programs are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) and are members of the U.S. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association (USPRA). Typically, CWT programs are located within VA Medical Centers in most large metropolitan areas and many smaller communities.”

Systems
  • Other

Employment First Council membership completed with two new appointments - 12/01/2018

~~“The Office of Gov. Nathan Deal has announced two appointments to the Employment First Council, completing the 14- member body established by Georgia’s Employment First Act. Signed into law in May, House Bill 831 promotes inclusive, competitive work opportunities for people with disabilities and establishes employment as the first and preferred option for individuals receiving public services who want a career.

The Council, which will hold its inaugural meeting this month, is chaired by Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s Executive Director. Its membership is comprised of members of the disability community, a family advocate, an employer, and representatives from state agencies serving people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Real Careers Resources - 11/13/2018

~~“GCDD's priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as "customized employment." The web-link provides access to several resources related to helping Georgians with developmental disabilities acquire career opportunities. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Real Careers - 11/13/2018

~~The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) builds on the work of the Jobs for All United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy grant. In addition, The Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights and Assistance Act defines employment as: People get and keep employment consistent with their interest, abilities and needs.

GCDD VisionThe GCDD’s priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as “customized employment.” Click here  https://gcdd.org/news-a-media/videos/75-ihg-employees.html   to view a video.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

2018 WorkSource Georgia Mountains Modification Revisions and Additions - 10/01/2018

~~“WorkSource Georgia Mountains (WSGM) has published Program Year 2018 Revisions to the Program Year (PY) 2016-2020 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Local Plan for the Georgia Mountains Local Workforce Development Region.WSGM receives WIOA funding to coordinate the delivery of employment and training activities in the Georgia Mountains region of Georgia. The Georgia Mountains region includes the following counties: Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Lumpkin, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, and White, along with 38 municipalities within these counties.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

SB 106 "Patients First Act" - 03/27/2019

~~“A BILL to be entitled an Act to amend Article 7 of Chapter 4 of Title 49 and Title 33 of the O.C.G.A., relating to medical assistance and insurance, respectively, so as to authorize the Department of Community Health to submit a Section 1115 waiver request to the United States Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; to authorize the Governor to submit a Section 1332 innovation waiver proposal to the United States Secretaries of Health and Human Services and the Treasury; to provide for implementation of approved Section 1332 waivers; to provide for expiration of authority; to provide for legislative findings; to provide for related matters; to provide for a short title; to provide for an effective date; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.”

Systems
  • Other

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Governor and the General Assembly; to provide for a short title; to provide for definitions; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes”

Systems
  • Other

HB 768 Handicapped persons; ABLE program establishment to use tax exempt accounts to pay for qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; provisions - 05/03/2016

“A BILL to be entitled an Act to amend Title 30 of the O.C.G.A., relating to disabled persons, so as to provide for the establishment of a qualified ABLE program in this state to enable the contribution of funds to tax-exempt accounts to pay for the qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; to amend Code Section 48-7-27 of the O.C.G.A., relating to computation of taxable net income; to amend Code Section 50-13-2 of the O.C.G.A., relating to the definitions for purposes of the Georgia Administrative Procedure Act, so as to exclude the Georgia ABLE Program Corporation from the meaning of "agency"; to provide for related matters; to provide for an effective date; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Georgia House Resolution 642 - 08/17/2015

 “WHEREAS, an ‘Employment First’ policy provides that employment should be the first and preferred option for all people, regardless of their disability, and that employment in the general workforce at or above the minimum wage is the first and preferred option for all working age citizens with disabilities.”   “WHEREAS, an Employment First policy established by the State of Georgia would require the collaboration of all involved state agencies, including the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities, Department of Education, Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency, and the Department of Community Health, in aligning their programs and resources to such end.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 26

Real Careers Resources - 11/13/2018

~~“GCDD's priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as "customized employment." The web-link provides access to several resources related to helping Georgians with developmental disabilities acquire career opportunities. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Real Careers - 11/13/2018

~~The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) builds on the work of the Jobs for All United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy grant. In addition, The Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights and Assistance Act defines employment as: People get and keep employment consistent with their interest, abilities and needs.

GCDD VisionThe GCDD’s priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as “customized employment.” Click here  https://gcdd.org/news-a-media/videos/75-ihg-employees.html   to view a video.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

2018 WorkSource Georgia Mountains Modification Revisions and Additions - 10/01/2018

~~“WorkSource Georgia Mountains (WSGM) has published Program Year 2018 Revisions to the Program Year (PY) 2016-2020 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Local Plan for the Georgia Mountains Local Workforce Development Region.WSGM receives WIOA funding to coordinate the delivery of employment and training activities in the Georgia Mountains region of Georgia. The Georgia Mountains region includes the following counties: Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Lumpkin, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, and White, along with 38 municipalities within these counties.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018” - 07/01/2018

“Community integration and inclusion into the larger natural community is supported and evident. Terms “Integration and Inclusion” mean: a. Use of community resources that are available to other citizens; b. Providing the opportunity to actively participate in community activities and types of employment as citizens without disabilities; c. The organization has community partnerships for capacity building and advocacy of activities to achieve this goal of integration;”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018 ” - 07/01/2018

“Quality Assurance and Standard Compliance Requirements 1.The DD Crisis Providers of the Crisis System shall develop and maintain performance indicators and outcome data as part of their quality management system that will assist DBHDD and Georgia Crisis Access Line (GCAL) to monitor and generate monthly reports of the Georgia Crisis Response System (GCRS-DD) to make quality improvement decisions based on data collected.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

IEP Team Meeting Facilitation - 03/01/2018

~~“IEP Team Meeting Facilitation is a collaborative dispute prevention and resolution process used when members of an IEP Team agree that the presence of a third party would help facilitate communication and problem solving.  IEP Team Meeting Facilitation can be especially useful when there is a history of communication challenges or a meeting is expected to be particularly complex or controversial.

In a facilitated IEP Team meeting, an impartial facilitator helps to keep members of the IEP Team focused on the development of the IEP while addressing conflicts and disagreements that may arise during the meeting.  At the meeting, the facilitator will use communication skills that create an environment in which the IEP Team members can listen to each member’s point of view and work together to complete the development of a high quality IEP."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Developmental Disabilities “Announcements” - 08/24/2017

~~“There were significant changes to the COMP Waiver that occurred following approval by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in March 2017.  As a result, the four fiscal support services agencies sent an information sheet with the following facts about the transition:

The changes that have occurred are as follows: •CLD has been removed•CLS has two new service codes, CL Basic and CL Extended•CL Basic is used for employees that work a shift of 2.75 hours or less•CL Extended is used for employees that work a shift of 3 or more hours•CLS received a 7.2% increase to the total funds allocated to CLS”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency FY 2017-2019 Strategic Plan (FY 2018 Update) - 08/03/2017

~~“While the Agency’s mission of employment and independence for Georgian with Disabilities remains the same, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), which was signed into law in July 2014, brought changes to the way GVRA serves clients with disabilities. WIOA’s implementing regulations went into effect on October 18, 2016. GVRA has been updating policies and procedures to adhere to the changes and improvements in services to individuals with disabilities.  One major tenant in the Act relates to services to students with disabilities (age 14 to 22) where GVRA will provide pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) to groups of students in secondary education and identified as being served on an IEP or 504 and who are therefore potentially eligible to receive pre-ETS.  Another major focus of the Act is to serve eligible youth with disabilities age 14 to 24 who are not in school or training and provide them with services that will lead to competitive employment. “      

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Deal announces launch of Georgia STABLE - 06/14/2017

~~“June 14, 2017Gov. Nathan Deal today announced the launch of Georgia STABLE, a tax-free savings program for eligible individuals with disabilities. The program is administered by the Georgia Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program Corporation, established through legislation signed in 2016. The Georgia ABLE Act is modeled after the federal ABLE Act of 2014.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

“Public Policy for the People: 13 February 2017” - 02/13/2017

~~“Besides GCDD's Public Policy Team trolling the halls of the Gold Dome to speak with legislators about the need for more DD Waivers and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education, we have also hosted 2 advocacy days so far. On February 1st we spoke about the need for more DD Waiver funding and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education. …

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DBHDD/GVRA Supported Employment Collaboration for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities - 12/19/2018

~~“The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD), and Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s (GVRA) Supported Employment Collaboration went live statewide March 1, 2018. The goal of the collaboration is to support individuals with significant Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities in finding and maintaining competitive integrated employment.

GVRA is the funding source for the initial phases of Supported Employment services. DBHDD will be the funding source for long-term Supported Employment services following GVRA Services.

Individuals will be referred to GVRA from DBHDD for the initial phases of Supported Employment. Individuals will be referred from GVRA to DBHDD for long term supports. Long -term supports may be waiver funded, State-funded, or Employment Express funded.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transitioning Youth to Adult Care - 05/19/2018

~~Projects and Activities•Provide leadership training opportunities for youth with special needs to be mentors to other youth in transition across Georgia….•Develop and make available guidance materials for families, public health workers, physicians and healthcare professionals on transitioning youth with special needs to adult health care.•Provide trainings for youth, families, educators, and health care providers on topics such as preparing for higher education or vocational training, independent living, supported employment, recreation and leisure, and how to integrate health goals onto Individualized Education Programs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Gather to SOAR at Self-Employment Seminar” - 09/07/2017

~~“SOAR: A Pathway to Self-Employment seminar in August 2017 at the All About Developmental Disabilities (AADD) Family Support Center in Decatur, Georgia.

The seminar was co-hosted by Synergies Work, Inc., a nonprofit that provides people with disabilities the supports to become financially independent as entrepreneurs and the Georgia Microboards Association (GMA), a nonprofit organization that provides technical assistance to people with disabilities and their families.

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), behavioral health and community service professionals, individuals with disabilities and their families attended the one-day seminar to learn how to successfully be self-employed.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities' Mission

“The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities is the state's leader in advancing public policy on behalf of persons with developmental disabilities. Our mission is to promote public policy that creates an integrated community life for persons with developmental disabilities, their families, friends, neighbors and all who support them. We achieve this mission by sharing information, coordinating public outreach and implementing strategic legislative advocacy.    “The GCDD works with legislators and advocacy groups to influence and support public policy that fosters a positive change in the way education, housing, workplace/careers and community living opportunities are made available to persons with developmental disabilities.”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Georgia’s Explore, Engage, Employ (E3) - 11/01/2017

~~“Georgia VR is implementing E3 (Explore, Engage, Employ) in 7 school districts to serve 3,000 students and youth.  E3 goals are to engage employers to customize existing career pathways and develop alternative pathways for students and out of school youth; involve families to increase youth participation, and utilize social media strategies to develop services and connect youth to career interests.  Partners include the Poses Family Foundation, GA Department of Education, Technical College System of Georgia, Center for Leadership in Disability, Parent to Parent of Georgia, Burton Blatt Institute and Jobs for the Future.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

GVRA provides Career Specialist Pilot for ECCHS - 10/30/2017

~~“Elbert County Comprehensive High School (ECCHS) was selected as one of five Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) Capacity Building Pilots to receive a Career Specialist for Transition funded by GVRA. In collaboration with the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE), Division for Special Education Services and Supports, five pilots were invited to participate including Fulton County, Elbert County, Gainesville City, Henry County and Houston County School Systems….Through the assignment of GVRA funded Career Specialists to five pilot Local Education Agencies (LEA’s), the GaDOE, GVRA and LEA will work collaboratively to provide leadership, planning, technical assistance, and consultation, and to coordinate services and evaluate the effectiveness of a district-based Career Specialist for Transition to meet the requirements of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) as defined by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). One of the new provisions in WIOA requires Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), in collaboration with the LEA, to provide, or arrange for the provision of, pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities in Georgia secondary schools who are eligible or potentially eligible for services.

Services and support will be provided to students with disabilities in 9th -12th grades, ages 14 years through age 21 years statewide. With an expanded scope of work for students with disabilities, collaboration is essential.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Georgia Department of Community Affairs “Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program – Housing for Persons with Disabilities” - 08/01/2016

~~The Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program is designed for individuals with a disability who are at or below 30% of the Area Median Income and between the ages of 18 and 61. Recently, HUD awarded the State of Georgia with $14.4 million to provide long-term rental assistance to individuals who meet these qualifications. In order to be considered for the program, the participant must be referred by either the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities or the State of Georgia Money Follows the Person program.

To find out more on eligibility and how to get connected with the program, visit the DCA Section 811 website to find rental unit locations and program applications.

 

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Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Disability Employment Initiative - 11/05/2015

“The Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD) was awarded $2.4 million by the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) to improve employment opportunities for adults and youth with disabilities. Georgia’s Disability Employment Initiative is a partnership between GDEcD and the Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA). The initiative is designed to improve job placement rates for youth and adults with disabilities that live within two of the state’s 19 Local Workforce Development Areas (LWDA).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…"   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services."  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Money Follows the Person

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…“…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~"Georgia Association for Primary Health Care, Inc. (GAPHC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations (hourly wage and variable income workers); rural residents; Hispanic residents; other minorities; women; veterans; and re-entry population. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. GAPHC represents all Georgia FQHCs and has established relationships with consumers and organizations such as: Social services departments, Head Start programs, Non-profits, Church groups, School systems, Local governments, and Employers/small businesses. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Duane A. KavkaPhone: (404) 659-2898Email:  dkavka@gaphc.org

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia Veterans Education Career Transition Resource Center - 05/28/2019

~~“Connecting veterans to careers through education and training.

We can help translate your military and civilian transcripts into potential credits toward certificates, diplomas and degrees depending on recency and your program of study. We also offer accelerated training programs in high demand careers at little to no cost if you are a Georgia resident or are stationed in Georgia.”

Systems
  • Other

Technical Assistance for Transition - 12/25/2018

~~This page is a list of materials about “Technical Assistance for Transition includes topics such as Transition Compliance, Transition Planning, IEP Development, and topics related to transition andimprovement activities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

GA Department of Behavioral Health & DD - Guide to Supported Employment - 04/25/2015

This Guide to Supported Employment was prepared by the Georgia Division of Developmental Disabilities Statewide Quality Improvement Council. It is intended to: Explain why employment is important; Illustrate through real examples the difference work makes in people’s lives; Answer common questions about pay and health benefits when you work and have an intellectual and/or developmental disability; and Provide information and resources on Supported Employment programs in Georgia.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)

~~“Currently, there is no planned face-to-face district leader training, via the RESAs, for support in completing the initial 2017-2018 CNA report. The GaDOE will deliver on-line training on the CNA process, as already outlined through its webinar series, and face-to-face regional trainings in May 10, 2017….

The GaDOE is currently developing a dedicated webpage on the GaDOE website that will house all resources and information related to the CNA process. The Office of School & District Effectiveness will hold trainings for select groups following a schedule available through their office.”

Systems
  • Department of Education

University of GA, Institute of Human Development & Disability - Consulting/Technical Assistance

The IHDD is available for consultations and technical assistance with professionals, para-professionals, families and family members to create meaningful community activities that highlight people with disabilities and their families. IHDD has been highly sought to provide national consulting to train and develop new skills sets in Customized Employment and its associated Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Toolkit, as well as the Evidence-Based Individual Placement and Supports model of employment. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement

University of GA, Institute on Human Development & Disability - WorkWorks Training

Through service, teaching, and research, the Institute on Human Development and Disability hopes to, “contribute to creating an environment where individuals with disabilities are independent and enjoy careers of choice.” Through WorkWorks, the institute offers a variety of training programs related to integrated employment opportunities for employment specialists and job coaches.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Justice Department Sues Georgia for Unnecessarily Segregating Students with Disabilities - 08/23/2016

The Lawsuit is the First Challenge to a State-Run School System for Segregating Students with Disabilities The Justice Department announced today that it has filed a lawsuit against the state of Georgia alleging that its treatment and segregation of students with disabilities in the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support (GNETS) Program violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Systems
  • Department of Education

Justice Department Reaches Extension Agreement to Improve Georgia’s Development Disability and Mental Health System - 05/18/2016

The extension agreement builds upon a 2010 settlement agreement resolving a lawsuit brought by the department under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Supreme Court’s Olmstead decision. The case involves Georgia’s provision of community services for individuals with mental illness and developmental disabilities. Under the agreement, Georgia will help people with developmental disabilities move from its state hospitals to integrated settings, consistent with their needs and preferences; will identify and address each individual’s needs in the community prior to discharge; and will monitor services and track outcomes for people after their discharge. For individuals who have moved from the state hospitals to the community, Georgia will monitor their health and wellbeing to ensure that emerging needs are met in a timely fashion. The extension agreement also calls for creation of at least 675 new Medicaid home- and community-based waiver slots as alternatives to placement in a facility.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

United States of America v. The State of Georgia, et al. Civil Action NO 1:10-CV-249-CAP - 10/19/2010

“To comply with this Settlement Agreement, the State shall provide the following services to individuals in the target population: … d. Supported Employment i. “Supported Employment will be operated according to an evidence-based supported employment model, and it will be assessed by an established fidelity scale such as the scale included in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) supported tool kit” ii. Enrollment in congregate programs shall not constitute Supported Employment. iii. Pursuant to the following schedule, the State shall provide Supported Employment services to 550 individuals with SPMI by July 1, 2015 .

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

GA Community Based Alternatives for Youth (01.R02.00) - 10/01/2012

"Provides behavioral assistance, care management, clinical services, respite, supported employment, community transition, customized goods and services, expressive clinical services, family peer support, financial support, waiver transportation, youth peer support for individuals w/mental illness ages 18-21 and w/SED ages 4-17."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia New Options Waiver (0175.R06.00) - 10/01/2012

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, FMS, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech/language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for MR/IID "

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program - 03/03/2012

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.        
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver Program (0323.R04.00 - 01/01/2011

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational services, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, financial support services, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech and language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, community residential alternative, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/ID, DD, ages 0 - no max age."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Medicaid Activities “Waivers”

Waiver programs help people who are elderly or have disabilities and need help to live in their home or community instead of an institution such as a nursing home or ICF-MR. Each program offers several "core" services: -service coordination (help with managing care needs and services) -personal support (assistance with daily living activities, i.e. bathing, dressing, meals and housekeeping) -home health services (nursing, home health aide, and occupational, physical and speech therapy) -emergency response systems -respite care (caregiver relief)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver (COMP) - Provider Reference Guide

All providers (agencies) must apply to become a co-employer of services. Enrolled Co-Employer providers can serve in this capacity for the following COMP services, only: • Community Access • Community Guide • Community Living Support • Supported Employment • Transportation

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how Georgia administers its Medicaid program. As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act, the plan was developed by Georgia and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The state plan includes provisions that describes groups of individuals to be covered by Medicaid, Medicaid covered services, reimbursement methodologies for providers and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.  The approved State Plan also provides assurance that Georgia abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phablet

Snapshot

Things are looking peachy for workers with disabilities in the great state of Georgia, where high expectations are on the horizon.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Georgia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2016 to 2017
10,429,379
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.56%
Change from
2016 to 2017
661,498
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
227,895
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.45%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.42%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.01%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 10,429,379
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 661,498
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 227,895
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,329,722
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.45%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 587,687
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 663,272
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 784,314
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 398,279
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 53,476
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,548
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 22,395
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,788
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 13,132

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,350
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 282,646

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 13,859
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 45,947
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 98,241
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 14.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 2,706.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 4,671
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,857
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,929
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 47
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 11,826
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 442,689
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $8,253,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $17,324,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $112,518,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $17,188,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,960
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,939
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 10,524
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 24.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.97%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 25.80%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.75%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.95%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,688,563
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,114
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 239,895
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,043,403
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,283,298
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 214
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,158
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,372
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,823,472
AbilityOne wages (services). $11,757,487

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 30
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,464
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,464

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~The Georgia Pathways to Work program is designed for youth, ages 14 to 24, who have a disability and are either in school or out-of-school youth. This demonstration program contains the following elements:
• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 256) Title II

Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD): Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) has a formal MOU with DBHDD that utilizes the SE IPS model. This MOU covers both the behavioral health and developmental disabilities divisions of DBHDD to serve those individuals using Supported and Customized Employment. This agreement allows VR services to collaborate statewide with a network of providers including CSBs for the provision of SES. These agencies prepare VR clients for permanent jobs through supported employment and complementary services. The CSBs provide a wide scope of outpatient, day, residential housing, and community-based services that include SE. The Memorandum of Understanding with DBHDD allows for improved coordination of efforts to serve those with the most significant disabilities. (Page 262) Title II

Annual On-going Staff Development Training Sessions: GVRA provides annual training opportunities to staff in an effort to grow the team’s knowledge base in providing services to individuals and to ensure that staff is prepared when changes occur to policies and practice standards. The following training sessions have been developed based on the feedback from personnel on what is pertinent to achieving high standards in service delivery:
(1) Disability-Specific Topics (including Positive Behavioral Supports training for counselors who have clients with Most Significant Disabilities, Deaf Culture Literacy, and Individualized Placement and Support Training for Counselors Handling Clients with Severe & Persistent Mental Illness. (2) Customized Employment Training. (3) Case Management. (4) Eligibility for Services. (5) IPE Development. (6) Varying Types of Caseloads (including Supported Employment and Transition). (7) Values-based Training for Persons Working with Individuals with Disabilities. (8) Collaborative Training with School Personnel on Creative Individual Assessments. (9) Transition Resource Planning. (10) Road Map for Services Available to Georgians. (11) Job Development. (12) Employment Engagement Training (developing a work plan and work goal). (13) Compliance Training (including Sexual Harassment and Anti-Discrimination). (Page 280) Title II

Access to Supported Employment: There are concerns that there is both a paucity of Supported Employment Providers, and that from the supported employment providers’ perspective, SES are cost-prohibitive. Concerns regarding access to Supported Employment have highlighted the following needs for services expansion: (1) Increase in SES, especially for those individuals with significant disabilities. Many of these individuals have limited or no access to SES. (2) Increase in both services and actual Customized Employment opportunities. (3) Increase in the availability in specific skills training that is actually aligned with real jobs within the state and less on generic training. (Page 282) Title II

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Most of these services made available to employers are in response to an immediate separation event. Additional opportunities may be discussed with employers when there is adequate time and opportunity for layoff aversion efforts. The foundation of Georgia’s layoff aversion strategy are activities which gather information and build partnerships. The State focuses on exploring and sharing labor market information which may predict opportunities for intervention in the workforce system. It then utilizes this information to engage in outreach through multiple partners, such as GDOL’s BSU and GDEcD, to engage businesses in workforce discussions. These conversations reveal opportunities for the State and LWDAs to intervene in offering strategies such as IWT to help businesses upskill workers to become more productive or to learn on new technologies. Georgia has also had success leveraging upcoming separation events as a talent base to fill job openings with other businesses seeking skilled talent by hosting job fairs and recruitment events in coordination with the employer of separation. (Page 168) Title II

The primary strategy GVRA has used in realizing key achievements has been to establish and formalize partnerships. GVRA recognizes that in a time of decreasing resources and increasing need, leveraging the capacity of strategic partners is the only way to meet the needs and individual goals of persons served. Additionally, rich data through program evaluation, State Rehabilitation Council input, and constituent feedback has been used to inform and guide significant changes to GVRA over the past year. Finally, through the addition of personnel and providers who are experts in serving individuals with disabilities, GVRA has been able to identify and incorporate new evidence-based practices into its VR services as part of these on-going changes. (Page 301-302) Title VI

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

School to Work Transition

~~Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness for Project Search.   Project Search is only offered in a subset of communities across Georgia as it is not available in every county. It is a collaboration between businesses, schools, and GVRA. The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, one-year, school-to-work program for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities that takes place entirely at the workplace. This innovative, business-led model of school-to-work transition features total workplace immersion, which facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction; career exploration; and hands-on, worksite-based training and support. The goal for each student is competitive employment. Project SEARCH was developed at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and has been implemented at several sites in Georgia involving the collaborative effort of the Transition Unit of GVRA, area school systems, and several of Georgia’s leading employers. GVRA is working to add Project Search partners across the state to create more opportunities for youth with significant disabilities in obtaining real-life work experience that improves successful transitions from school to adult life.  (Page 252) Title IV

GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows:
449.1.01 Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) staff shall recognize that every student or youth, regardless of the severity of his or her disability, is considered able to benefit in terms of a competitive integrated employment outcome.
449.1.03 VR shall provide students 14 to 22 years old Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) that allows them to explore the world of work and engage in work based learning opportunities for the purpose of becoming employed in a meaningful career. If individualized services are needed in addition to Pre-ETS, VR shall provide these services following VR policy of application, determination of eligibility, comprehensive needs assessment and IPE development. (Page 257) Title IV

Another component of the Interagency Cooperative Agreement is transition planning for educational agencies that facilitate the development and implementation of IEPs. The agreement stipulates the following:
i. VR provides GaDOE the eligibility criteria for VR services; works collaboratively with local school districts to identify and locate students with disabilities who may be in need of services; and, develops, in conjunction with the eligible student, an IPE prior to the student’s graduation. This plan includes VR services that are determined to be appropriate for the student.
ii. Each school district receives intensive, rehabilitation services for earlier identification of and interventions provided to students with disabilities that facilitates successful employment outcomes.
iii. VR works with each eligible student to develop a work plan and determine the VR services appropriate to the students’ goal. (Page 258) Title IV

GVRA has developed hiring and retention competencies necessary to improve individual performance and agency outcomes. Georgia State law does not require certification or licensure for rehabilitation professionals or paraprofessionals; therefore, GVRA established the CSPD standard for the VR Counselor position. This is the CRC credential awarded by the CRCC and it follows national standards.
The CRC is the VR staff person with the authority to determine eligibility and priority category, develop Work Plans (IPE) including all amendments and all reviews, authorize funds, and close cases. One hundred percent (100%) of Georgia’s CRCs meet the CSPD standard and are eligible to independently perform core functions. The remaining counselors have obtained either a bachelors or master’s degree, work under the supervision of a CRC, and are encouraged to complete the education and certification process to become a CRC. (Page 278-279) Title IV

Based on the trend analysis and the steady growth that is projected, in 2020 VR services will be serving 25% more clients than this year. In addition, as shown in the estimates above, GVRA intends to increase the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs) from 50% to 66% of the individuals who apply for VR services in the given year. For example, in FY2020, GVRA estimates that the organization will develop IPEs for 11,069 of the 16,462 individuals who apply for VR services. (Page 287) Title IV

When an individual is determined eligible for VR services and assigned to a priority category that is closed for services, they shall be placed on a waiting list to be served in the chronological order in which they were determined eligible. Individuals who are currently participating in an active IPE prior to the closing of the priority category for which they are assigned, shall continue to receive services. As closed priority categories are re-opened, individuals will be moved off of the waiting list in a chronological order with those with the most significant disability (Priority Category 1 and 2) being served first.
GVRA shall administer and conduct its vocational rehabilitation program activities without regard to age, gender, race, color, creed or national origin. No qualified individual with disabilities shall be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under the VRP because the program’s or a provider’s facilities are inaccessible or unusable. (Page 292) Title IV

GVRA is only its third year of operation. In the 2014-2016 State Plan, GVRA set the following goals to guide the work of the agency.
i. Goal I - Maximize available federal funds to assist more individuals with disabilities to achieve their employment goals.
ii. Goal II - Expand transition services to assist more students with disabilities to go from high school to work or post-secondary education/training.
iii. Goal III - Enhance services to unserved and underserved populations to increase their employment outcomes.
iv. Goal IV - Help employers meet their human resources needs though hiring qualified individuals with disabilities.
Working closely with SRC, GVRA was able to make great strides in tackling and managing a greatly reduced budget for vocational rehabilitation services. In the 2014 program year, GVRA achieved the following towards its goals and objectives outlined in their 2014-2016 State Plan:
• Over 25,905 clients were served by GVRA for the most recently completed program year.
• VR collaborated with CRPs to call clients on the waiting list and quickly reengage them in the VR process. This partnership enabled VR to efficiently reduce the waiting list from 8,300 to zero.
• GVRA created a CSU to serve as a bridge to effectively meet the needs of clients and ensure that they receive excellent service in a timely manner and in accordance with all applicable regulations and policies.
• The High School/High Tech Program expanded to 72 schools providing over 3,800 transition activities to 746 students with disabilities, the highest number to date. Of those, 109 students won the competition for computers to assist them in furthering their education.
• GVRA renovated, refurbished, or moved VR field offices to more appropriate spaces and closed offices that were far from clients. VR also provided technology to counselors to more effectively serve clients in convenient locations.
• GVRA and VR implemented a plan to increase the salaries of CRCs.
• GVRA and VR collaborated with DBHDD to increase and enhance services for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, and for those with developmental disabilities. (Page 301) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~The proposed Georgia Pathways to Work program aims to significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with the core program partners, GaDOE, as wells as local employers. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as HDCI to ensure responsiveness to the known workforce demands in Georgia, as well as supporting their efforts to better engage those with disabilities. The overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive integrated employment through improving the 18 existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for out-of-school youth. This will be achieved by tailoring the career pathways to a variety of work opportunities available in the communities. The program will also engage employers in the model design and employ social media strategies to connect youth across the nation. Additionally, a result of the program will be to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways. (Page 108-109) Title II

The assessment of each competitive grant application will involve an intense evaluation of the ability of the eligible provider to meet the literacy needs of the area, and to comply with the expectations and statutes described within WIOA. At minimum, the review process and scoring rubric will consider the following:
• The ability of the eligible provider to meet the literacy needs and English language needs identified for the population in the area. Particular emphasis will be given to the provider’s ability to provide targeted service to individuals with barriers to employment—including low literacy skills and an English language barrier;
• The eligible provider’s ability to provide service to individuals with a (physical or learning) disability;
• The eligible provider’s demonstrated effectiveness in providing literacy instruction, including its ability to meet State-adjusted levels of performance and improve the literacy levels of eligible individuals;
• The eligible provider’s alignment with WIOA Local Plan;
• The depth, intensity, and rigor of the programs and activities offered by the eligible provider. The proposed program must incorporate the basic tenets of reading instruction. Attention will be given to the extent to which the eligible provider incorporates stringent research in the grant proposal submission and the development of the literacy program itself;
• The extent to which the eligible provider’s program is based on intense research and best practices;
• The extent to which the eligible provider demonstrates the effective use of technology for instruction, to include distance education, toward students’ improved performance;
• The eligible provider’s demonstrated integration of contextualized instruction, to blend literacy skills, and preparation for transition to post-secondary education or entry into the workplace. Particular attention will be given to implementation of a career pathways system, activities that promote and lead to economic self-sufficiency, and the ability to exercise the full rights of citizenship. (Page 231) Title II

GVRA has interagency cooperation with the following federal, state, and local agencies and programs:
i. Memorandum of Agreements have been developed with the following Local Education Agencies (LEA’s) to fulfill the goals of the Georgia Career Pathways Grant: Explore, Engage, Employ (E3): Atlanta Area School for the Deaf, Georgia School for the Deaf, Georgia Academy for the Blind, Troup County, Paulding County, Decatur County, and Hall County. A Memorandum of Understanding with GVRA and GaDOE has been implemented to support a capacity building pilot providing two GVRA employees housed at GaDOE in the Division for Special Education Services and Supports, and Career, Technical, Agricultural Education Division to provide instruction and direction to VR transition staff in Pre-Employment Transition Services. Since its inception, VR has maintained a cooperative relationship with Muskogee Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) program. MVR works to empower American Indians with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society. Through this partnership with the Lower Muskogee Creek Indian Tribe, VR services provides disability assessment, evaluation, and referral services that assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment. (Page 253) Title IV

In order to effectively increase and improve the competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for youth and students with disabilities, GVRA has identified the following priorities (under Goal 2):
i. Redirect VR resources (staff, equipment, services, etc.) to focus primarily on youth and students with disabilities based on the principle that serving this population will have a greater impact on the entire population of individuals with disabilities in the long-term, and thus should be a major focus of GVRA.
ii. Develop, implement and offer a robust and comprehensive array of transition services to all school districts within the state that is a combination of traditional VR services, provider services, and unique and specialty services that can be customized to a certain degree based on individual school district needs. This will also include a new array of services available to youth as young as 14 years of age.
iii. Develop and implement a career pathway model of services for both in-school students and out-of-school youth that will include Vocational Rehabilitation services that are aligned with the current GaDOE’s Occupational Clusters and curriculum-based career pathways; as well as alternative integrated community-based career pathways for those youth who are not in school.
iv. Partner with GaDOE, TCSG and USG to develop collaborative arrangements that improve the transition from high school to post-secondary education for students with disabilities.
v. Recruit and train specialty staff, with expertise in transition and career pathways, to better facilitate service enhancements for youth and students with disabilities.
vi. Partner with Certified Transition Programs also known as Inclusive Post-Secondary Education programs (IPSE) to increase client’s participation in obtaining measurable skill gains and industry recognized certifications. Use the agency’s Employment Services Unit to develop formal agreements with local employers and provide a variety of youth and student-directed employer supports and services, such as, career exploration, pre-apprenticeships, on-the-job training, job analysis, career pathway training curriculum development, and employment opportunities. (Page 289) Title IV

Strategies:
• Transform how GVRA and the VR services focus on youth and students with disabilities by integrating services agency-wide to make this population the highest focus.
• Partner with GaDOE to increase and deliver a comprehensive array of transitional services to every school district within the state, including a special focus on career pathways and customized career pathways.
• Develop a concentrated outreach effort to identify youth with disabilities that are not enrolled in school, and make the same robust services available to them.
• Partner with the existing VR provider network to create community-based career pathways for youth not enrolled in school.
• Partner with both TCSG and USG to improve post-secondary transition.
Goal 3: Increase and improve competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for unserved and underserved populations, to include veterans and individuals with sensory disabilities, mental illness, developmental disabilities, or autism. (Page 296) Title IV

GVRA’s goal to improve and expand VR services for Program Years 2018 and PY 2019 for students with disabilities by the following:
• Develop and offer a comprehensive array of services to all school districts statewide. Specifically, GVRA will develop all 5 required Pre-ETS activities, as well as the 9 authorized activities as may be needed, and offer those to every school district in the state of Georgia. These will include services that are VR Program-provided, as well as services provided through the VR provider network. Where there is a paucity of such Pre-ETS services in particular geographic areas of the state, GVRA announced a Request for Proposal for Pre-ETS and Transition Services.
• Develop new and innovative services for both in-school and out-of-school career pathways. As a part of this, GVRA is in Year 3 of the 5 year Georgia Career Pathways federal demonstration grant and is delivering Explore, Engage, Employ E3 services to 7 pilot districts. This is done in collaboration with GaDOE, the individual local school district, and the local employers and businesses. E3 will be the delivery model for all students and youth with disabilities in the future. A unique component of the E3 grant team is the Social Media Technologist who has established the E3 brand on all social media outlets. The SMT has overseen the development of 2 apps for students with disabilities to engage and develop skills. An RFP for a website has been announced and in the procurement process. The website will be non-governmental and is part of the strategy for engaging and tracking students and youth to assist them in reaching their career goals and meaningful employment. (Page 298) Title IV

Apprenticeship
GVRA has developed the following strategies for Federal Fiscal Years 2019 and 2020 to leverage other public and private funds to increase the resources for extended services and expanded Supported Employment Opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities: • Continue to expand the current blended funding relationship with DBHDD to increase SE service delivery to transitioning youth with developmental disabilities, or behavioral health diagnoses. • Utilize new grant and private foundation funding to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Georgia Pathways to Work program in engaging youth with significant disabilities in early Supported Employment experiences such as supported internships, and apprenticeships. • Explore funding options for extended supports through the Ticket to Work Program. • Continue to expand and facilitate the SE provider network’s use of natural supports. • Increase the use of Social Security Reimbursements for additional program expenditures. GVRA will also continue to explore new grant and funding opportunities to expand resources for extended services and SE opportunities. (Page 295) Title I Georgia WorkSmart, an initiative created by Governor Nathan Deal in 2015, promotes workbased learning training models, such as apprenticeships, pre-apprenticeships, and internships. The ultimate objective of Georgia WorkSmart is to utilize these work-based learning programs to address the primary workforce challenges identified by more than 80 Georgia private sector partners. These challenges stem from the following trends: a rapidly aging workforce, a lack of workplace soft skills among new employees, difficulty in recruiting new talent, and a greater demand for basic educational skills in math, reading, and writing. Georgia WorkSmart encourages the development of apprenticeship and internship programs to address these needs. Additionally, Georgia WorkSmart acts as a liaison between private and public entities utilizing apprenticeship programs and the Georgia workforce system. In addition to maintaining the State’s WIOA Registered Apprenticeship Eligible Training Provider List, Georgia WorkSmart assists each local workforce office in supporting Registered Apprenticeships with WIOA funding. Within Georgia, WIOA funding is encouraged to be used in order to add greater value 30 and sustainably to Registered Apprenticeships in good standing with U.S. DOL Office of Apprenticeship. (Page 38-39) Title I Local WIOA formula funds are encouraged to be used in support of apprentices and employers participating in Registered Apprenticeship programs. Registered Apprenticeship can help the workforce system achieve quality performance outcomes. Given the unique structure of Registered Apprenticeship programs, there are several ways in which WIOA training services may be used in conjunction with the programs. Primarily, the use of ITAs, OJT contracts, and Supportive Services are the most common method in which a LWDA can serve programs in their area. However, the use of Incumbent Worker Training, Work Experience, and Customized Training are also encouraged as valid apprenticeship training support. For these WIOA services, each local workforce area has been encouraged to develop policy and procedures dedicated to the appropriate use of WIOA funds toward Registered Apprenticeship. The purpose of dedicated local apprenticeship policy is to ensure LWDA’s WIOA service delivery is adequately prepared to be applied to these long-term training programs. In addition to local policy development, the State has also created a Registered Apprenticeship-specific Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL) procedure. Per WIOA, all Registered Apprenticeship sponsors in good standing with OA are automatically eligible to be included onto the State ETPL. WFD has been obtaining periodic listings of all Registered Apprenticeship Sponsors in Georgia from the OA State Director and have provided each sponsor with a notifying letter informing them of their voluntary inclusion onto the ETPL. Once the sponsor has confirmed their desire to be included on the ETPL, their program’s training program is made available state-wide. This allows eligible participants to receive WIOA ITA funding toward apprenticeship training costs. This procedure has allowed apprenticeship sponsors to obtain new pathways to find individuals wishing to join an apprenticeship. (Page 102-103) Title II Registered Apprenticeship is fully aligned with the employer-focused, work-based training that WIOA envisions. Georgia WorkSmart coordinates with Georgia’s nineteen LWDAs to support Registered Apprenticeship programs through WIOA service delivery. Specifically, Georgia WorkSmart encourages the use of ITAs to fund the Related Classroom Instruction component of an apprentice’s training program. For an individual apprentice to receive an ITA, their respective apprenticeship program must be listed on the Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL). As required by WIOA, Georgia WorkSmart has developed a mechanism to notify all approved Registered Apprenticeship Sponsors of their automatic eligibility to be included on the state-wide ETPL. Seeing that all approved Registered Apprenticeship sponsors have been vetted by OA, Georgia has developed a form to collect basic training program details of any approved sponsor who chooses to be included on the ETPL. This process has helped to better align Registered Apprenticeship sponsors with their local workforce representatives as well as helped to increase WIOA support toward individual apprentices training costs. (Page 172-173) Title II
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~II. Priority Category 2, Individual with a Significant Disability: An eligible client shall be classified in this category if he/she has been determined by GVRA to be an individual who: • A recipient of SSI or SSDI or, an eligible individual who has: • Limitations in 1 or more Functional Capacities, and • Requires multiple VR services over an extended period of time
III. Priority Category 3, Individual with a Disability: An eligible client shall be classified in this category if he/she has been determined by GVRA to be an individual who: An eligible individual who is determined to not have a Significant or Most Significant Disability
The following table captures the capacities, number of services and extended periods of time for GVRA’s Order of Selection. (Page 292) Title I

GVRA has developed the following strategies for Federal Fiscal Years 2019 and 2020 to leverage other public and private funds to increase the resources for extended services and expanded Supported Employment Opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities:
• Continue to expand the current blended funding relationship with DBHDD to increase SE service delivery to transitioning youth with developmental disabilities, or behavioral health diagnoses.
• Utilize new grant and private foundation funding to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Georgia Pathways to Work program in engaging youth with significant disabilities in early Supported Employment experiences such as supported internships, and apprenticeships.
• Explore funding options for extended supports through the Ticket to Work Program.
• Continue to expand and facilitate the SE provider network’s use of natural supports.
• Increase the use of Social Security Reimbursements for additional program expenditures. (Page 295) Title IV
 

Employer/ Business

~~To that end, GVRA has an Employment Services Division within the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, and its primary function is to create a single focused approach and strategy to engage employers in the most meaningful way. Under the GVRA employer services division, all organizations efforts of engaging, contacting and relating to local businesses and corporate entities will be coordinated into a unified approach. The overall goals of the GVRA Employment Services Division will be:
1) To interface with employers to identify specific employer job and workforce needs and to provide the employers with qualified candidates to meet their needs;
2) To interface with any employer who is a federal contractor and/or federal subcontractor to identify specific job and workforce needs pertaining to the employer’s federal mandate and seven percent workforce quota and to provide employers with qualified candidates to meet their needs and fulfill their federal workforce compliance;
3) To interface with any employer to create employer-based training and education opportunities for individuals with disabilities, such as specific employer job education, pre-apprenticeships, on-the-job training, and career pathway customization to increase the qualifications of individuals with disabilities as potential job candidates for that employer; and
4) To interface with any employer to provide education and training to that employer regarding contemporary information about hiring individuals with disabilities, such as job accommodations, disability awareness, and federal contractor requirements to increase the employer’s interest and willingness to hire individuals with disabilities. (Page 263) Title IV

With the passage of WIOA, a greater emphasis has been placed on the State’s workforce development system. GVRA has changed its organizational structure for its field staff, especially as it relates to employer engagement. The intent of this restructuring is to create a standardized approach for VR field staff to engage employers, as well as working with the VR program’s provider network to create a unified approach to job development and job placement.
Partnerships: Throughout this document, partnership has been the foundation to expanding and improving service delivery statewide. GVRA will continue to collaborate with the SRC, other State agencies, community stakeholders, businesses and other unique partners to share a common message that GVRA is “good for business” and supports employers in meeting their workforce needs and business goals with individuals with disabilities who are qualified to perform the job. (Page 264) Title IV

Business Services Division: As mentioned above, the Business Division of GVRA was recently established to focus on aligning the workforce with private and public sector career opportunities. Since its inception, the Business Division has been evolving into the centralized point of contact for all external employer relations. This division is responsible for the following:
i. Developing new career opportunities, business partnerships and/or contracts. This includes expanding and developing relationships with corporations that turn into local hiring of persons with disabilities.
ii. Expanding relationships with current employers who look to VR first to fill their workforce needs and assessing what the drivers are for them to hire individuals with disabilities. This division promotes current employer’s use of the Talent Acquisition Portal for job postings. Additionally, this division will be looking to these employers to engage with potential businesses to answer their questions and speak to their experiences when working with VR services.  (Page 264) Title IV

iii. Understanding the diversity within GVRA’s total Talent Pool including placement profiles and marketing this pool to established partnerships statewide.
iv. Working with the new marketing and outreach position to produce collateral tools that focus on awareness and inclusion.
v. Providing consultation, technical assistance and support to employers on workplace accommodation and assistive technology.
vi. Creating a tracking database of new and existing business opportunities. The Employer Database is being developed to integrate with GVRA’s current case management system in order to facilitate better record keeping of current and new relationships with businesses. VR will continue to work with the Georgia Industries for the Blind’s Call Center who contacts all Georgia employers quarterly to find out if they have open positions and will make this available in the database to be used by the Business Relations Specialists. (Page 265) Title IV

iii. Develop an Employment Services division within VR to focus on formal employer engagement that will support all VR services and create more employment and career opportunities within the local employer community; having a particular focus on two major State initiatives: 1) Go Build Georgia and 2) High Demand Career Initiative.
iv. Develop collaborative relationships with other State agencies and organizations that share a similar mission and/or serve a common population; the intent of these relationships will be to create a seamless array of services that are complimentary and aligned in purpose.
v. Implement an internal training plan and schedule to address transformational leadership for all supervisors within the agency; and also extensive professional staff development that focuses on creative ways to improve and increase services for individuals with disabilities.
In order to effectively increase and improve the competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for youth and students with disabilities, GVRA has identified the following priorities (under Goal 2):
i. Redirect VR resources (staff, equipment, services, etc.) to focus primarily on youth and students with disabilities based on the principle that serving this population will have a greater impact on the entire population of individuals with disabilities in the long-term, and thus should be a major focus of GVRA. (Page 289) Title IV

GVRA goals and priorities identified above are based on the information provided through on-going comprehensive statewide assessments, including information from the public-at-large, consumers and their families, the SRC, disability advocacy groups, other State agencies, other disability organizations, local school districts, community providers and employers. A description of the Statewide Assessment and the needs and concerns that were identified can be found under Section (j). (Page 290) Title IV

Partner with current, as well as new providers to offer new and/or improved services to this population specifically. It is GVRA’s plan to do an overall assessment of all current provider-offered services based on each service’s ability to produce positive outcomes. Based on this review, GVRA will collaborate with all of its providers to: 1) either improve or eliminate unproductive services; 2) implement new services as may be needed; and 3) specifically offer those PETS services that cannot be provided by the VR Program directly. In all cases, the providers will be held to the same standards that the VR Program itself will be held to, and GVRA will continually monitor provider performance to ensure the best value for dollars spent and the best employment outcomes. (Page 299) Title IV

Data Collection
Currently the primary data collection and report system used by GVRA through the VR Program is Libera System 7 electronic case management system, and the data collected is specific to individuals served through the VR Program. At the current time, neither the Libera System 7 case management system, nor its data, is integrated with all the programs and activities present in the one-stop centers. GVRA and the VR Program are in the process of moving to a new client information system. GVRA is working with Alliance Corporation for the implementation of the new AWARE client information system set to “go live” April 30, 2018. (Page 121) Title I Utilizing the working groups, the State will formulate a process for a longitudinal evaluation of core programs. With WIOA setting common performance measures across the core partner programs, there is a greater opportunity for a seamless evaluation of program outcome data. This evaluation will enable partners to identify achievements and shortcomings across the workforce system and enable the state to be responsive to the needs of the labor market and participants. (Page 139) Title I
511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
Georgia’s One-Stop delivery system is focused on ensuring universal access across its workforce system. The State and its local partners, maintain compliance with the provisions of WIOA Section 188 which require programmatic and physical accessibility. Through monitoring performed at both the state and local level, Georgia ensures that all One-Stops are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize Georgia’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual, to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. In addition, the State maintains a Methods of Administration which details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be maintained. The Methods of Administration is a “living” document which ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level as quickly as possible. (Page 154) Title II Per federal law, each LWDA must appoint a local Equal Opportunity Officer who is responsible for ensuring local WIOA Section 188 compliance. Local Equal Opportunity Officers are responsible for informing senior staff of applicable federal regulations and ensuring all programs and activities are implemented in compliance. Additionally, local Equal Opportunity Officers collect and resolve local grievances and complaints as needed. Local Equal Opportunity Officers actively liaises with the State’s Title I-B Equal Opportunity Officer and USDOL’s Civil Rights Center to remain current on regulatory updates and guidance. They are then responsible for circulating new information locally and ensuring it is properly implemented. Separately, as a component of one-stop certification, the State collects a business plan from each LWDA which details how a new one-stop will satisfy accessibility requirements and the provisions of WIOA Section 188. In order to be certified, each comprehensive one-stop must satisfy the requisite federal criteria. This process ensures universal access to programmatic services and facilities are maintained across the state. (Page 155) Title II
Vets
* Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 50) Title I Georgia has a large military presence with eight military installations and more than 752,800 veterans. In PY12 Operation: Workforce was launched to help Georgia’s returning veterans re-enter the civilian workforce by connecting veterans and employers. Through Operation: Workforce, WFD is an active participant on Georgia’s Returning Veterans Taskforce, comprised of GDOL, Georgia Department of Veterans Services (GDVS), Georgia National Guard and Reserve, Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve, GVRA, TCSG, and USG. Since PY12, Operation: Workforce’s web presence (operationworkforce.com) has served as a platform for veterans and employers to connect. The site allows veterans to create a profile, upload a résumé, and search and apply for job openings within the state of Georgia. It also allows Georgia employers to create profiles, post job listings, review job applicants, and search the site for qualified candidates. Employers are able to sign a pledge of commitment to give enhanced hiring opportunities to Georgia’s veterans, and veterans are able to find veteran-friendly employers across the state. Operation: Workforce also serves veterans by translating their military occupational classifications into civilian occupations that best align with their skill set and training. In PY13, Operation: Workforce launched its Employers’ Summit. In order to educate employers on improving current recruitment and hiring processes to better find and hire veterans. In PY14, the Employers’ Summits were utilized to connect returning service members with employers. (Page 151-152) Title II GDOL staff informs veterans of priority of service at initial contact and provides informational pamphlets detailing priority of service and the range of workforce services available to them. If the customer is eligible, veterans and spouses are entitled to take advantage of the priority throughout the full array of employment, training, placement, and other services provided. Once POS is provided, staff review the GDOL- 3404 form with the veteran to determine if they have a Significant Barrier to Employment (SBE) per VPL 3-14 and subsequent amendments. Wagner Peyser (WP) staff will refer veteran customers who do not identify a SBE to GDOL WP Service Specialists, or GDOL DVOP staff will provide case management services if the veteran meets one of the following SBE criteria: • A special disabled or disabled veteran, as those terms are defined in 38U.S.C § 4211(1) and (3); Special disabled and disabled veterans are those: who are entitled to compensation (or who but for the receipt of military retired pay would be entitled to compensation) under laws administered by the Secretary of Veterans’ Affairs; or, were discharged or released from active; • Homeless, as defined in Section 103(a) of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11302(a)); • A recently-separated service member, as defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(6), who at any point in the previous 12 months has been unemployed for 27 or more consecutive weeks; • An offender, as defined by WIA Section 101(27), who has been released from incarceration within the last 12 months; • Lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; or • Low-income (as defined by WIA at Section 101(25)(B)). • DVOP services to veterans aged 18-24 as approved by the Secretary of Labor. (Page 153) Title II
Mental Health

~~In 1998, the Georgia General Assembly (O.C.G.A. § 50-4-7) formally established 12 State Service Delivery Regions for delivering state services to local units of government and citizens and for the purpose of establishing common state agency regional boundaries (excluding health and mental health districts). The current 12 State Service Delivery Regions are divided in a manner that takes into account population centers, occupation & industrial composition, employment location quotients, geographical boundaries, commuting patterns, economic trends, and industrial needs across counties. The 12 State Service Delivery Region model is leveraged by several state agencies, including GDEcD, GDOL, and Regional Commissions, each of which are key partners under WIOA. Other state agencies have developed different regional designation models to fit their respective service delivery activities. (Page 161) Title I

Additionally, Telamon serves as a delegate agency for the East Coast Migrant Head Start Program. This program has a long tradition of delivering comprehensive and high-quality services to foster healthy development in low-income children aged six weeks to five years. The Migrant Head Start program provides a range of individualized services in the areas of education and early childhood development, including medical, dental and mental health; nutrition; and parent involvement. In addition, the entire range of Migrant Head Start services is responsive to the developmental, ethnic, cultural and linguistic heritage and experience of each child and family. GDOL outreach workers partner with Telamon to identify parents with youth that could benefit from these services. (Page 220) Title II

The Georgia State Use Council and DOAS administers the State Use law through the non-profit GEPS. Some of Georgia’s CRPs and nonprofit partners are in GEPS. Some VR clients do receive services from those CRPS when deemed appropriate based on their individualized plans for employment.
To avoid duplication of effort and to enhance the number of individuals served, GVRA and SRC have developed working relationships to coordinate activities with other Georgia councils. Linkages to productive relationships exist with the Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities, Mayors Committees on Employment of People with Disabilities, Georgia Mental Health Planning Council, Georgia Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, Inc., Georgia Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Trust Commission, the Council on American Indian Concerns, and other Georgia rehabilitation service agencies.
VR regional leaders continue to establish collaborative relationships with community organizations and businesses to assist people with disabilities in going to work. These organizations include, but are not limited to: chambers of commerce, city and county governments, the criminal justice system, urban leagues, churches, healthcare and social assistance services, housing authorities, and educational institutions. (Page 255) Title II

VR does not have cooperative agreements with non-educational agencies serving out-of-school youth. GVRA has partnered with DJJ to pilot a program with the YDC in Augusta. Through this pilot, GVRA worked with the mental health unit to develop an effective and efficient process for transitioning youth out of the facility and into employment or training opportunities upon their release. Additionally, the agency is finalizing a referral process by which the YDC will refer all youth whom they believe has a disability and may be appropriate for VR services. (Page 255) Title II

GVRA executed a formal Memorandum of Understanding with DBHDD in 2015, the State agency responsible for providing services to individuals with a mental illness. The current MOU expands the capacity of the VR program to serve those individuals who have a severe and persistent mental illness in supported employment, specifically following the IPS model of SE. A description of this partnership is in Section (f) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of SES. (Page 268) Title IV

The following goals and strategies will be required in order to achieve the goals and priorities for Program Years 2018 and PY 2019 that were outlined in Section (1) State Goals and Priorities.
Goal 1: Increase and improve competitive employment outcomes and career opportunities for all individuals with disabilities.
Strategies:
• Partner with the existing VR provider network to design and implement new types of services to better serve individuals with disabilities.
• Partner with new potential providers to design and implement new types of services in areas of the State where there is a paucity of services.
• Partner with existing mental health and developmental disability providers to assist them in transforming traditional services to become better at competitive employment.
• Identify a model for continuous quality improvement to evaluate existing and new services. The model should include: (1) Assessment of the stability of processes or outcomes to determine whether there is an undesirable degree of variation or a failure to perform at an expected level. (2) Identify problems and opportunities to improve the performance of processes. (3) Assess the outcome of the services provided. (4) Assess whether a new or improved process meets performance expectations. (Page 296) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
The ability to file a UI claim is available at every comprehensive one-stop center. Access and meaningful assistance is critical, whether the customer is in rural Georgia, relies on public transportation, or needs access to the Internet. Assistance is assured through: • UI orientation provided to every new claimant explaining the full range of workforce services available to help them return to work; • Online access via GDOL’s website where customers can file electronically from career centers, home, libraries or any other Internet portal; • Dedicated, experienced staff at every one-stop; • Fully staffed resource centers at all career centers, including Internet access, copies, phones, fax and resource libraries; • A dedicated toll-free number for customers filing for UI at one-stops; • Access points at over 40 one-stops and career centers across the state; • An opportunity for each claimant to access in-person reemployment services as they come to career centers and one-stops to complete the UI filing process; • The use of state-of-the-art EG résumé and job matching service as a requirement for ES registration for claimants; • The availability of staff, technology, language translation services, and written materials in a variety of languages to meet the needs of all customers; • Fully accessible services, online and in person, to serve any customer with a disability; (Page 205) Title IV
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 11 - 20 of 68

Goals of the 2017 – 2019 State Plan - 02/04/2019

~~“Goal 3: Develop opportunities for consumer employment

Description: Collaborate with GVRA, Department of Labor and other entities to develop meaningful policy to encourage employment opportunities for persons with disabilities.

Objective to Goal 3:

    Promote ongoing participation of initiatives such as Employment First and the ABLE Act.    Introduce new legislation: Enable Work (Phil Payne Sliding Fee Scale PSA Program & PeachWork). Legislation that encourages employment.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veterans Education & Training Division - 01/01/2019

~~“The State Approving Agency has the function of ensuring that institutions and establishments meet and maintain acceptable approval standards so that eligible persons who attend may receive educational assistance from VA. This includes all public and private schools and all establishments offering apprenticeship and other on-the-job training. The satisfactory performance of these duties requires that State Approving Agency personnel have extensive knowledge in education administration and a full understanding of the laws and regulations that govern and control the Veterans Educational Assistance Program.”

Systems
  • Other

Technical Assistance for Transition - 12/25/2018

~~This page is a list of materials about “Technical Assistance for Transition includes topics such as Transition Compliance, Transition Planning, IEP Development, and topics related to transition andimprovement activities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DBHDD/GVRA Supported Employment Collaboration for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities - 12/19/2018

~~“The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD), and Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s (GVRA) Supported Employment Collaboration went live statewide March 1, 2018. The goal of the collaboration is to support individuals with significant Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities in finding and maintaining competitive integrated employment.

GVRA is the funding source for the initial phases of Supported Employment services. DBHDD will be the funding source for long-term Supported Employment services following GVRA Services.

Individuals will be referred to GVRA from DBHDD for the initial phases of Supported Employment. Individuals will be referred from GVRA to DBHDD for long term supports. Long -term supports may be waiver funded, State-funded, or Employment Express funded.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Special Education Services and Supports - 12/07/2018

~~“The Georgia Department of Education (Division for Special Education Services and Supports) provides necessary infrastructure and supports for leaders, teachers, and families to meet the whole child needs of each student improving student outcomes and school climate resulting in an increased quality of life and workforce ready future. We must commit to effective collaboration across agencies and school-home partnerships to support local school districts in their efforts to provide special education and related services for students with disabilities. 

The Ga DOE must provide state General Supervision for local school districts to improve educational results and functional outcomes for all children with disabilities and ensure that the requirements of IDEA are met. We believe that all students must have an equitable opportunity for school completion and successful postsecondary outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Compensated Work Therapy - 12/03/2018

~~“CWT programs strive to maintain highly responsive long- term quality relationships with business and industry promoting employment opportunities for veterans with physical and mental disabilities. Many of our individual programs are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) and are members of the U.S. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association (USPRA). Typically, CWT programs are located within VA Medical Centers in most large metropolitan areas and many smaller communities.”

Systems
  • Other

Employment First Council membership completed with two new appointments - 12/01/2018

~~“The Office of Gov. Nathan Deal has announced two appointments to the Employment First Council, completing the 14- member body established by Georgia’s Employment First Act. Signed into law in May, House Bill 831 promotes inclusive, competitive work opportunities for people with disabilities and establishes employment as the first and preferred option for individuals receiving public services who want a career.

The Council, which will hold its inaugural meeting this month, is chaired by Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s Executive Director. Its membership is comprised of members of the disability community, a family advocate, an employer, and representatives from state agencies serving people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Real Careers Resources - 11/13/2018

~~“GCDD's priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as "customized employment." The web-link provides access to several resources related to helping Georgians with developmental disabilities acquire career opportunities. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Real Careers - 11/13/2018

~~The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) builds on the work of the Jobs for All United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy grant. In addition, The Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights and Assistance Act defines employment as: People get and keep employment consistent with their interest, abilities and needs.

GCDD VisionThe GCDD’s priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as “customized employment.” Click here  https://gcdd.org/news-a-media/videos/75-ihg-employees.html   to view a video.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

2018 WorkSource Georgia Mountains Modification Revisions and Additions - 10/01/2018

~~“WorkSource Georgia Mountains (WSGM) has published Program Year 2018 Revisions to the Program Year (PY) 2016-2020 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Local Plan for the Georgia Mountains Local Workforce Development Region.WSGM receives WIOA funding to coordinate the delivery of employment and training activities in the Georgia Mountains region of Georgia. The Georgia Mountains region includes the following counties: Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Lumpkin, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, and White, along with 38 municipalities within these counties.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

SB 106 "Patients First Act" - 03/27/2019

~~“A BILL to be entitled an Act to amend Article 7 of Chapter 4 of Title 49 and Title 33 of the O.C.G.A., relating to medical assistance and insurance, respectively, so as to authorize the Department of Community Health to submit a Section 1115 waiver request to the United States Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; to authorize the Governor to submit a Section 1332 innovation waiver proposal to the United States Secretaries of Health and Human Services and the Treasury; to provide for implementation of approved Section 1332 waivers; to provide for expiration of authority; to provide for legislative findings; to provide for related matters; to provide for a short title; to provide for an effective date; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.”

Systems
  • Other

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Governor and the General Assembly; to provide for a short title; to provide for definitions; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes”

Systems
  • Other

HB 768 Handicapped persons; ABLE program establishment to use tax exempt accounts to pay for qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; provisions - 05/03/2016

“A BILL to be entitled an Act to amend Title 30 of the O.C.G.A., relating to disabled persons, so as to provide for the establishment of a qualified ABLE program in this state to enable the contribution of funds to tax-exempt accounts to pay for the qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; to amend Code Section 48-7-27 of the O.C.G.A., relating to computation of taxable net income; to amend Code Section 50-13-2 of the O.C.G.A., relating to the definitions for purposes of the Georgia Administrative Procedure Act, so as to exclude the Georgia ABLE Program Corporation from the meaning of "agency"; to provide for related matters; to provide for an effective date; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Georgia House Resolution 642 - 08/17/2015

 “WHEREAS, an ‘Employment First’ policy provides that employment should be the first and preferred option for all people, regardless of their disability, and that employment in the general workforce at or above the minimum wage is the first and preferred option for all working age citizens with disabilities.”   “WHEREAS, an Employment First policy established by the State of Georgia would require the collaboration of all involved state agencies, including the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities, Department of Education, Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency, and the Department of Community Health, in aligning their programs and resources to such end.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 26

Real Careers Resources - 11/13/2018

~~“GCDD's priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as "customized employment." The web-link provides access to several resources related to helping Georgians with developmental disabilities acquire career opportunities. “

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Real Careers - 11/13/2018

~~The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) builds on the work of the Jobs for All United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy grant. In addition, The Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights and Assistance Act defines employment as: People get and keep employment consistent with their interest, abilities and needs.

GCDD VisionThe GCDD’s priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as “customized employment.” Click here  https://gcdd.org/news-a-media/videos/75-ihg-employees.html   to view a video.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

2018 WorkSource Georgia Mountains Modification Revisions and Additions - 10/01/2018

~~“WorkSource Georgia Mountains (WSGM) has published Program Year 2018 Revisions to the Program Year (PY) 2016-2020 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Local Plan for the Georgia Mountains Local Workforce Development Region.WSGM receives WIOA funding to coordinate the delivery of employment and training activities in the Georgia Mountains region of Georgia. The Georgia Mountains region includes the following counties: Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Lumpkin, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, and White, along with 38 municipalities within these counties.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018” - 07/01/2018

“Community integration and inclusion into the larger natural community is supported and evident. Terms “Integration and Inclusion” mean: a. Use of community resources that are available to other citizens; b. Providing the opportunity to actively participate in community activities and types of employment as citizens without disabilities; c. The organization has community partnerships for capacity building and advocacy of activities to achieve this goal of integration;”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018 ” - 07/01/2018

“Quality Assurance and Standard Compliance Requirements 1.The DD Crisis Providers of the Crisis System shall develop and maintain performance indicators and outcome data as part of their quality management system that will assist DBHDD and Georgia Crisis Access Line (GCAL) to monitor and generate monthly reports of the Georgia Crisis Response System (GCRS-DD) to make quality improvement decisions based on data collected.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

IEP Team Meeting Facilitation - 03/01/2018

~~“IEP Team Meeting Facilitation is a collaborative dispute prevention and resolution process used when members of an IEP Team agree that the presence of a third party would help facilitate communication and problem solving.  IEP Team Meeting Facilitation can be especially useful when there is a history of communication challenges or a meeting is expected to be particularly complex or controversial.

In a facilitated IEP Team meeting, an impartial facilitator helps to keep members of the IEP Team focused on the development of the IEP while addressing conflicts and disagreements that may arise during the meeting.  At the meeting, the facilitator will use communication skills that create an environment in which the IEP Team members can listen to each member’s point of view and work together to complete the development of a high quality IEP."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Developmental Disabilities “Announcements” - 08/24/2017

~~“There were significant changes to the COMP Waiver that occurred following approval by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in March 2017.  As a result, the four fiscal support services agencies sent an information sheet with the following facts about the transition:

The changes that have occurred are as follows: •CLD has been removed•CLS has two new service codes, CL Basic and CL Extended•CL Basic is used for employees that work a shift of 2.75 hours or less•CL Extended is used for employees that work a shift of 3 or more hours•CLS received a 7.2% increase to the total funds allocated to CLS”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency FY 2017-2019 Strategic Plan (FY 2018 Update) - 08/03/2017

~~“While the Agency’s mission of employment and independence for Georgian with Disabilities remains the same, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), which was signed into law in July 2014, brought changes to the way GVRA serves clients with disabilities. WIOA’s implementing regulations went into effect on October 18, 2016. GVRA has been updating policies and procedures to adhere to the changes and improvements in services to individuals with disabilities.  One major tenant in the Act relates to services to students with disabilities (age 14 to 22) where GVRA will provide pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) to groups of students in secondary education and identified as being served on an IEP or 504 and who are therefore potentially eligible to receive pre-ETS.  Another major focus of the Act is to serve eligible youth with disabilities age 14 to 24 who are not in school or training and provide them with services that will lead to competitive employment. “      

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Deal announces launch of Georgia STABLE - 06/14/2017

~~“June 14, 2017Gov. Nathan Deal today announced the launch of Georgia STABLE, a tax-free savings program for eligible individuals with disabilities. The program is administered by the Georgia Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program Corporation, established through legislation signed in 2016. The Georgia ABLE Act is modeled after the federal ABLE Act of 2014.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

“Public Policy for the People: 13 February 2017” - 02/13/2017

~~“Besides GCDD's Public Policy Team trolling the halls of the Gold Dome to speak with legislators about the need for more DD Waivers and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education, we have also hosted 2 advocacy days so far. On February 1st we spoke about the need for more DD Waiver funding and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education. …

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DBHDD/GVRA Supported Employment Collaboration for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities - 12/19/2018

~~“The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD), and Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s (GVRA) Supported Employment Collaboration went live statewide March 1, 2018. The goal of the collaboration is to support individuals with significant Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities in finding and maintaining competitive integrated employment.

GVRA is the funding source for the initial phases of Supported Employment services. DBHDD will be the funding source for long-term Supported Employment services following GVRA Services.

Individuals will be referred to GVRA from DBHDD for the initial phases of Supported Employment. Individuals will be referred from GVRA to DBHDD for long term supports. Long -term supports may be waiver funded, State-funded, or Employment Express funded.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transitioning Youth to Adult Care - 05/19/2018

~~Projects and Activities•Provide leadership training opportunities for youth with special needs to be mentors to other youth in transition across Georgia….•Develop and make available guidance materials for families, public health workers, physicians and healthcare professionals on transitioning youth with special needs to adult health care.•Provide trainings for youth, families, educators, and health care providers on topics such as preparing for higher education or vocational training, independent living, supported employment, recreation and leisure, and how to integrate health goals onto Individualized Education Programs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Gather to SOAR at Self-Employment Seminar” - 09/07/2017

~~“SOAR: A Pathway to Self-Employment seminar in August 2017 at the All About Developmental Disabilities (AADD) Family Support Center in Decatur, Georgia.

The seminar was co-hosted by Synergies Work, Inc., a nonprofit that provides people with disabilities the supports to become financially independent as entrepreneurs and the Georgia Microboards Association (GMA), a nonprofit organization that provides technical assistance to people with disabilities and their families.

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), behavioral health and community service professionals, individuals with disabilities and their families attended the one-day seminar to learn how to successfully be self-employed.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities' Mission

“The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities is the state's leader in advancing public policy on behalf of persons with developmental disabilities. Our mission is to promote public policy that creates an integrated community life for persons with developmental disabilities, their families, friends, neighbors and all who support them. We achieve this mission by sharing information, coordinating public outreach and implementing strategic legislative advocacy.    “The GCDD works with legislators and advocacy groups to influence and support public policy that fosters a positive change in the way education, housing, workplace/careers and community living opportunities are made available to persons with developmental disabilities.”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Georgia’s Explore, Engage, Employ (E3) - 11/01/2017

~~“Georgia VR is implementing E3 (Explore, Engage, Employ) in 7 school districts to serve 3,000 students and youth.  E3 goals are to engage employers to customize existing career pathways and develop alternative pathways for students and out of school youth; involve families to increase youth participation, and utilize social media strategies to develop services and connect youth to career interests.  Partners include the Poses Family Foundation, GA Department of Education, Technical College System of Georgia, Center for Leadership in Disability, Parent to Parent of Georgia, Burton Blatt Institute and Jobs for the Future.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

GVRA provides Career Specialist Pilot for ECCHS - 10/30/2017

~~“Elbert County Comprehensive High School (ECCHS) was selected as one of five Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) Capacity Building Pilots to receive a Career Specialist for Transition funded by GVRA. In collaboration with the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE), Division for Special Education Services and Supports, five pilots were invited to participate including Fulton County, Elbert County, Gainesville City, Henry County and Houston County School Systems….Through the assignment of GVRA funded Career Specialists to five pilot Local Education Agencies (LEA’s), the GaDOE, GVRA and LEA will work collaboratively to provide leadership, planning, technical assistance, and consultation, and to coordinate services and evaluate the effectiveness of a district-based Career Specialist for Transition to meet the requirements of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) as defined by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). One of the new provisions in WIOA requires Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), in collaboration with the LEA, to provide, or arrange for the provision of, pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities in Georgia secondary schools who are eligible or potentially eligible for services.

Services and support will be provided to students with disabilities in 9th -12th grades, ages 14 years through age 21 years statewide. With an expanded scope of work for students with disabilities, collaboration is essential.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Georgia Department of Community Affairs “Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program – Housing for Persons with Disabilities” - 08/01/2016

~~The Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program is designed for individuals with a disability who are at or below 30% of the Area Median Income and between the ages of 18 and 61. Recently, HUD awarded the State of Georgia with $14.4 million to provide long-term rental assistance to individuals who meet these qualifications. In order to be considered for the program, the participant must be referred by either the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities or the State of Georgia Money Follows the Person program.

To find out more on eligibility and how to get connected with the program, visit the DCA Section 811 website to find rental unit locations and program applications.

 

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Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Disability Employment Initiative - 11/05/2015

“The Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD) was awarded $2.4 million by the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) to improve employment opportunities for adults and youth with disabilities. Georgia’s Disability Employment Initiative is a partnership between GDEcD and the Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA). The initiative is designed to improve job placement rates for youth and adults with disabilities that live within two of the state’s 19 Local Workforce Development Areas (LWDA).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…"   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services."  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Money Follows the Person

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…“…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~"Georgia Association for Primary Health Care, Inc. (GAPHC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations (hourly wage and variable income workers); rural residents; Hispanic residents; other minorities; women; veterans; and re-entry population. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. GAPHC represents all Georgia FQHCs and has established relationships with consumers and organizations such as: Social services departments, Head Start programs, Non-profits, Church groups, School systems, Local governments, and Employers/small businesses. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Duane A. KavkaPhone: (404) 659-2898Email:  dkavka@gaphc.org

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia Veterans Education Career Transition Resource Center - 05/28/2019

~~“Connecting veterans to careers through education and training.

We can help translate your military and civilian transcripts into potential credits toward certificates, diplomas and degrees depending on recency and your program of study. We also offer accelerated training programs in high demand careers at little to no cost if you are a Georgia resident or are stationed in Georgia.”

Systems
  • Other

Technical Assistance for Transition - 12/25/2018

~~This page is a list of materials about “Technical Assistance for Transition includes topics such as Transition Compliance, Transition Planning, IEP Development, and topics related to transition andimprovement activities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

GA Department of Behavioral Health & DD - Guide to Supported Employment - 04/25/2015

This Guide to Supported Employment was prepared by the Georgia Division of Developmental Disabilities Statewide Quality Improvement Council. It is intended to: Explain why employment is important; Illustrate through real examples the difference work makes in people’s lives; Answer common questions about pay and health benefits when you work and have an intellectual and/or developmental disability; and Provide information and resources on Supported Employment programs in Georgia.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)

~~“Currently, there is no planned face-to-face district leader training, via the RESAs, for support in completing the initial 2017-2018 CNA report. The GaDOE will deliver on-line training on the CNA process, as already outlined through its webinar series, and face-to-face regional trainings in May 10, 2017….

The GaDOE is currently developing a dedicated webpage on the GaDOE website that will house all resources and information related to the CNA process. The Office of School & District Effectiveness will hold trainings for select groups following a schedule available through their office.”

Systems
  • Department of Education

University of GA, Institute of Human Development & Disability - Consulting/Technical Assistance

The IHDD is available for consultations and technical assistance with professionals, para-professionals, families and family members to create meaningful community activities that highlight people with disabilities and their families. IHDD has been highly sought to provide national consulting to train and develop new skills sets in Customized Employment and its associated Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Toolkit, as well as the Evidence-Based Individual Placement and Supports model of employment. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement

University of GA, Institute on Human Development & Disability - WorkWorks Training

Through service, teaching, and research, the Institute on Human Development and Disability hopes to, “contribute to creating an environment where individuals with disabilities are independent and enjoy careers of choice.” Through WorkWorks, the institute offers a variety of training programs related to integrated employment opportunities for employment specialists and job coaches.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Justice Department Sues Georgia for Unnecessarily Segregating Students with Disabilities - 08/23/2016

The Lawsuit is the First Challenge to a State-Run School System for Segregating Students with Disabilities The Justice Department announced today that it has filed a lawsuit against the state of Georgia alleging that its treatment and segregation of students with disabilities in the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support (GNETS) Program violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Systems
  • Department of Education

Justice Department Reaches Extension Agreement to Improve Georgia’s Development Disability and Mental Health System - 05/18/2016

The extension agreement builds upon a 2010 settlement agreement resolving a lawsuit brought by the department under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Supreme Court’s Olmstead decision. The case involves Georgia’s provision of community services for individuals with mental illness and developmental disabilities. Under the agreement, Georgia will help people with developmental disabilities move from its state hospitals to integrated settings, consistent with their needs and preferences; will identify and address each individual’s needs in the community prior to discharge; and will monitor services and track outcomes for people after their discharge. For individuals who have moved from the state hospitals to the community, Georgia will monitor their health and wellbeing to ensure that emerging needs are met in a timely fashion. The extension agreement also calls for creation of at least 675 new Medicaid home- and community-based waiver slots as alternatives to placement in a facility.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

United States of America v. The State of Georgia, et al. Civil Action NO 1:10-CV-249-CAP - 10/19/2010

“To comply with this Settlement Agreement, the State shall provide the following services to individuals in the target population: … d. Supported Employment i. “Supported Employment will be operated according to an evidence-based supported employment model, and it will be assessed by an established fidelity scale such as the scale included in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) supported tool kit” ii. Enrollment in congregate programs shall not constitute Supported Employment. iii. Pursuant to the following schedule, the State shall provide Supported Employment services to 550 individuals with SPMI by July 1, 2015 .

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Displaying 11 - 17 of 17

GA Community Based Alternatives for Youth (01.R02.00) - 10/01/2012

"Provides behavioral assistance, care management, clinical services, respite, supported employment, community transition, customized goods and services, expressive clinical services, family peer support, financial support, waiver transportation, youth peer support for individuals w/mental illness ages 18-21 and w/SED ages 4-17."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia New Options Waiver (0175.R06.00) - 10/01/2012

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, FMS, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech/language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for MR/IID "

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program - 03/03/2012

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.        
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver Program (0323.R04.00 - 01/01/2011

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational services, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, financial support services, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech and language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, community residential alternative, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/ID, DD, ages 0 - no max age."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Medicaid Activities “Waivers”

Waiver programs help people who are elderly or have disabilities and need help to live in their home or community instead of an institution such as a nursing home or ICF-MR. Each program offers several "core" services: -service coordination (help with managing care needs and services) -personal support (assistance with daily living activities, i.e. bathing, dressing, meals and housekeeping) -home health services (nursing, home health aide, and occupational, physical and speech therapy) -emergency response systems -respite care (caregiver relief)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver (COMP) - Provider Reference Guide

All providers (agencies) must apply to become a co-employer of services. Enrolled Co-Employer providers can serve in this capacity for the following COMP services, only: • Community Access • Community Guide • Community Living Support • Supported Employment • Transportation

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how Georgia administers its Medicaid program. As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act, the plan was developed by Georgia and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The state plan includes provisions that describes groups of individuals to be covered by Medicaid, Medicaid covered services, reimbursement methodologies for providers and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.  The approved State Plan also provides assurance that Georgia abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phone

Snapshot

Things are looking peachy for workers with disabilities in the great state of Georgia, where high expectations are on the horizon.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Georgia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2016 to 2017
10,429,379
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.56%
Change from
2016 to 2017
661,498
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
227,895
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.45%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.42%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.01%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 10,429,379
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 661,498
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 227,895
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,329,722
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.45%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 587,687
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 663,272
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 784,314
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 398,279
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 53,476
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,548
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 22,395
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,788
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 13,132

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,350
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 282,646

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 13,859
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 45,947
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 98,241
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 14.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 2,706.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 4,671
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,857
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,929
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 47
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 11,826
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 442,689
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $8,253,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $17,324,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $112,518,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $17,188,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,960
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,939
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 10,524
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 24.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.97%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 25.80%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.75%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.95%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,688,563
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,114
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 239,895
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,043,403
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,283,298
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 214
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,158
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,372
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,823,472
AbilityOne wages (services). $11,757,487

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 30
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,464
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,464

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.