Georgia

States - Big Screen

Things are looking peachy for workers with disabilities in the great state of Georgia, where high expectations are on the horizon.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Georgia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2016 to 2017
10,429,379
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.56%
Change from
2016 to 2017
661,498
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
227,895
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.45%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.42%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.01%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 13,214,860 10,310,371 10,429,379
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 657,996 698,283 661,498
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 200,764 236,577 227,895
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,145,481 4,227,892 4,329,722
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.51% 33.88% 34.45%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.07% 75.69% 76.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.00% 5.40% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.90% 21.70% 21.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.40% 15.20% 14.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 580,094 621,469 587,687
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 644,176 680,504 663,272
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 777,690 819,284 784,314
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 380,409 406,273 398,279
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 55,138 64,891 53,476
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,929 5,392 4,548
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 20,568 21,272 22,395
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,155 N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 23,906 29,659 27,788
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 16,233 18,938 13,132

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,488 6,859 7,350
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.80% 2.90% 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 285,889 284,601 282,646

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 15,276 15,978 13,859
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 46,821 53,267 45,947
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 112,177 116,662 98,241
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.60% 13.70% 14.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 2.80% 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 3.60% 5.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 2.80% 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 2,706.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,653 2,639 4,671
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,670 3,441 2,857
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 2,680 2,665 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 5,082 4,313 4,929
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6 29 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1 20 47
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 17.00% 69.00% 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.01 0.20 0.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,420
6,239
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 230 292 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 405 547 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 689 1,008 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,996 2,545 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 942 1,572 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 158 275 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.20% 37.50% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,314 9,312 11,826
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 437,897 441,114 442,689
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 101 124 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 423 548 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $8,646,000 $8,882,000 $8,253,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $17,324,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $117,985,000 $126,851,000 $112,518,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $16,972,000 $16,745,000 $17,188,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 12.00% 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,580 4,197 3,960
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 2,939
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 12,429 12,473 10,524
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 23.60 23.00 24.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.87% 64.89% 64.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.56% 15.04% 15.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.13% 2.07% 1.97%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.16% 98.40% 99.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.39% 26.00% 25.80%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 53.73% 56.07% 58.75%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.04% 78.46% 82.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.34% 30.07% 32.95%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,688,563
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,114
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 239,895
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,043,403
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,283,298
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 214
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,158
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,372
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,823,472
AbilityOne wages (services). $11,757,487

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 28 35 30
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 28 35 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,040 1,604 1,464
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,040 1,604 1,464

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No specific disability related information found.  

Customized Employment

~~• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 247)
DBHDD: GVRA has a formal MOU with DBHDD that utilizes the SE IPS model. This MOU covers both the behavioral health and developmental disabilities divisions of DBHDD to serve those individuals using Supported and Customized Employment.
This agreement allows VR services to collaborate statewide with a network of providers including CSBs for the provision of SES. These agencies prepare VR clients for permanent jobs through supported employment and complementary services. The CSBs provide a wide scope of outpatient, day, residential housing, and community-based services that include SE. The Memorandum of Understanding with DBHDD allows for improved coordination of efforts to serve those with the most significant disabilities. (Page 253)
1. Disability-Specific Topics (including Positive Behavioral Supports training for counselors who have clients with Most Significant Disabilities, Deaf Culture Literacy, and Individualized Placement and Support Training for Counselors Handling Clients with Severe & Persistent Mental Illness.
2. Customized Employment Training.
3. Case Management.
4. Eligibility for Services.
5. IPE Development.
6. Varying Types of Caseloads (including Supported Employment and Transition).
7. Values-based Training for Persons Working with Individuals with Disabilities.
8. Collaborative Training with School Personnel on Creative Individual Assessments.
9. Transition Resource Planning.
10. Road Map for Services Available to Georgians.
11. Job Development.
12. Employment Engagement Training (developing a work plan and work goal).
13. Compliance Training (including Sexual Harassment and Anti-Discrimination).
VR continues to identify current information from research, rehabilitation trends and professional resources. This information is provided to agency staff through a variety of methods, including training at the State, quadrant and local level. Most recently this training has been focused on Customized Employment. (Page 269)
Access to Supported Employment: There are concerns that there is both a paucity of Supported Employment Providers, and that from the supported employment providers’ perspective, SES are cost–prohibitive. Concerns regarding access to Supported Employment have highlighted the following needs for services expansion:
1. Increase in SES, especially for those individuals with significant disabilities. Many of these individuals have limited or no access to SES.
2. Increase in both services and actual Customized Employment opportunities.
3. Increase in the availability in specific skills training that is actually aligned with real jobs within the state and less on generic training. (Page 271)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Describe how the designated State unit will collaborate with the State agency responsible for administering each of the following programs to develop opportunities for competitive integrated employment, to the greatest extent practicable:
1. THE STATE MEDICAID PLAN UNDER TITLE XIX OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT;
GVRA has established collaborative relationships with multiple State agencies in order to more efficiently and effectively assist individuals with disabilities in achieving employment in an integrated setting. In some cases, these collaborative relationships have been developed to enhance the working relationship between the VR program and other State agencies. Several of these relationships have been formalized through Interagency Cooperative Agreements that were described earlier in Sections (e) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations and (f) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of SES. GVRA has identified other State agencies in which formal agreements need to be developed to support collaboration and seamless service delivery statewide. (Page 258)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Through the workforce system, the State will provide youth participants the opportunity to become involved in 14 required youth elements which are listed in the Youth program elements section:
1. Tutoring, Study Skills Training, Instruction and Evidence Based Dropout Prevention and Recovery Strategies can allow a participant to attain their secondary school diploma or a recognized equivalent.
2. Alternative Secondary School Services or Dropout Recovery Services show students alternative learning environments that focus on their skills, abilities, and learning style to prevent them from dropping out of school.
3. Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences are structured learning programs that take place for a specific period.
4. Occupational Skills Training allows participants to become proficient in performing actual tasks and technical functions required by certain occupational fields at all different levels.
5. Education Offered Concurrently with and in the same context as Workforce Preparation integrates training and education.
6. Leadership Development includes the development of positive social and civic behaviors.
7. Supportive Services are in place to allow youth participants to partake in WIOA activities.
8. Adult Mentoring is a 12-month program that matches a youth participant with an adult that will guide the mentee.
9. Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling gives youth participants the opportunity to meet with counselors for career and academic counseling.
10. Financial Literacy Education informs participants of smart financial decisions and habits.
11. Entrepreneurial Skills Training educates youth participants on the skills needed to start and maintain a small business.
12. Labor Market and Employment Information Services provide information about in-demand industry sectors.
13. Activities that Prepare for Transition to Postsecondary Education and Training allows for career exploration and research.
14. Follow-up Services are available to youth participants once they have exited the program. (Page 184)
Services are provided to eligible youth participants through a network of youth service providers, which are competitively procured by Georgia’s 19 LWDAs. Georgia is committed to providing, through LWDAs, the following required youth elements:
1. Tutoring, Study Skills Training, Instruction and Evidence based Drop-out Prevention and Recovery Strategies;
2. Alternative Secondary School Services or Drop-out Recovery Services;
3. Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences;
4. Occupational Skills Training;
5. Education Offered Concurrently with and in the same context as Workforce Preparation;
6. Leadership Development;
7. Supportive Services;
8. Adult Mentoring;
9. Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling;
10. Financial Literacy Education;
11. Entrepreneurial Skills Training;
12. Labor Market and Employment Information Services;
13. Activities that Prepare for Transition to Post-secondary Education and Training; and
14. Follow-up Services. (Page 195)
 

School to Work Transition

~~TAA coordinates and facilitates worker orientations to inform the workers about the benefits and services they may receive as well as the eligibility requirements associated with each benefit. The worker orientations often include LWDA representatives to provide guidance on demand occupations and available training in the LWDA. DOL staff assist workers with TAA registration and filing UI claims. (Page 162)
x. The Georgia SRC strongly supports amending current 361.45(c)(2) by adding a new paragraph (v) that would require a DSU to provide eligible individuals who are entitled to Social Security benefits under titles II or XVI of the Social Security Act, information on available assistance and supports available to them when entering the workforce (i.e., benefits planning and financial supports). (Page 239)
Non–Disability Specific Barriers: There is on–going feedback for assistance to address some of the non–disability specific barriers to employment such as transportation, disincentives through entitlement benefits, and lack of family support for employment. (Page 271)
 

Career Pathways

~~Project SEARCH is only offered in a subset of communities across Georgia. The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, one-year, school-to-work program for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities that takes place entirely at the workplace. This innovative, business-led model of school-to-work transition features total workplace immersion, which facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction; career exploration; and hands-on, worksite-based training and support. The goal for each student is competitive employment. Project SEARCH was developed at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and has been implemented at several sites in Georgia through a statewide initiative involving the collaborative effort of DoDD, a division of GVRA, area school systems, and several of Georgia’s leading employers. GVRA is working to add Project Search partners across the state to create more opportunities for youth with significant disabilities in obtaining real-life work experience that improves successful transitions from school to adult life. (Page 242)
ii. Goal II - Expand transition services to assist more students with disabilities to go from high school to work or post-secondary education/training. (Page 291)
 

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~GVRA has a strong statewide presence with offices located in urban and rural areas to provide vocational rehabilitation services to assist in the workforce development of individuals with disabilities. GVRA intends to focus on both youth with disabilities and students with disabilities to better prepare them to become an integral part of Georgia’s workforce. GVRA plans to offer an array of transition services to every public school district in the state with these services focused on assisting students with disabilities to either continue on to a post-secondary education or into a career pathway that is based on the specific skill requirements of Georgia’s employers. GVRA plans to conduct outreach activities to identify and attract those youth with disabilities who are not in school to participate in community-based alternative career pathways that are also based on the specific skill requirements of Georgia’s employers; or if appropriate, assist these youth in returning to school, either secondary or post-secondary. (Page 61)
Finally, GVRA has partnered with the Department of Education (DOE) in the current federal career pathways demonstration grant to expand transition services to students with disabilities and out-of-school youth that lead to real jobs in their communities. As a part of this partnership, GVRA intends to offer an array of transition services to the 50 intensive school districts identified by DOE as part of DOE’s state systemic improvement plan (SSIP).(Page 78)
Youth with Disabilities
Georgia’s one-stop system engages youth in customized career pathways and SES through collaborative partnerships between VR and other core partner programs in the one-stop system. Georgia recently developed a strategic initiative to expand and improve VR services for youth with disabilities who are either in-school or out-of-school. The purpose of this initiative is to braid existing and new resources to offer a robust, comprehensive array of VR services to all schools. Current VR program policies and procedures are being reviewed and amended to reflect this new way of doing business. The plan includes the provision of pre-employment transition services and timely development and approval of an individualized plan for employment for each youth served. One subset of the proposed plan to expand and improve VR services is a newly awarded, five-year demonstration project entitled “Georgia Pathways to Work” funded through the US Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Services Administration.
The proposed Georgia Pathways to Work program aims to significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with the core program partners, GaDOE, as wells as local employers. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as HDCI to ensure responsiveness to the known workforce demands in Georgia, as well as supporting their efforts to better engage those with disabilities. The overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive integrated employment through improving the 18 existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for out-of-school youth. (Page 104)
1. Provide the vision and mission of the program or organization. Please include a description of the population that the program will serve, including how the program will meet the needs of persons with barriers to employment (e.g. Displaced Homemaker, Low-income Individual, Individuals with Disabilities, Single Parents, and other individuals as described in the law).
2. Provide a description (and supporting documents, when available) of the program’s implementation of career pathways system as well as any cooperative agreements/contracts that the program has with other agencies and service providers for the delivery of adult education and literacy activities. Also, describe ways in which the program coordinates with other service providers to provide wrap-around services to participants (e.g. child care, transportation). (Page 221)
• The depth, intensity, and rigor of the programs and activities offered by the eligible provider. The proposed program must incorporate the basic tenets of reading instruction. Attention will be given to the extent to which the eligible provider incorporates stringent research in the grant proposal submission and the development of the literacy program itself;
• The extent to which the eligible provider’s program is based on intense research and best practices;
• The extent to which the eligible provider demonstrates the effective use of technology for instruction, to include distance education, toward students’ improved performance;
• The eligible provider’s demonstrated integration of contextualized instruction, to blend literacy skills, and preparation for transition to post-secondary education or entry into the workplace. Particular attention will be given to implementation of a career pathways system, activities that promote and lead to economic self-sufficiency, and the ability to exercise the full rights of citizenship; (Page 222)
The GVRA Executive Director provided an update to SRC members for their meeting in October on actions the agency has taken to implement WIOA recommendations for expanding and enhancing services for youth with disabilities. This work includes the receipt of two new federal grant awards:
1. U.S. Department of Labor, ETA’s Disability Employment Initiative Cooperative Agreements: awarded directly to WFD in partnership with GVRA that focuses on the Georgia Disability Employment Initiative, Customized Career Pathways.
2. U.S. Department of Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration’s Demonstration and Training: Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities, Georgia Pathways to Work: awarded directly to GVRA that focuses on career pathways for youth with disabilities who are in school or out-of-school. In addition, GVRA has appointed a Director of Transition Services. This new position emphasizes the importance and significance of services to youth with disabilities before they leave high school. All of these activities are very innovative in preparing high school students with disabilities for competitive employment. The Council would like to see these programs expanded throughout the state as part of VR transition services. (Page 240)
Georgia Pathways to Work will change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as Go Build Georgia and HDCI to be responsive to the known market demands for careers in Georgia, as well as supporting employer efforts to more effectively engage Georgians with disabilities. Furthermore, the overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive, integrated employment through existing and customized pathways. Additionally, this demonstration project will be implemented to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways.
GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows: (Page 248)
In collaboration with GaDOE, Burton Blatt Institute, and Poses Family Foundation, GVRA is customizing the landscape of career pathways for young Georgians with disabilities. The Georgia Pathways to Work program- E3: Explore, Engage, Employ- connects real people to real jobs that fill a real need for employers in their individual communities. The purpose of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to improve the 18 existing career pathways by tailoring them to a variety of work opportunities available in the communities. The program will engage employers in the model design and employ social media strategies to connect youth across the nation. The project impact is to change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. (Page 247)
• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 247)
Georgia Pathways to Work will change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as Go Build Georgia and HDCI to be responsive to the known market demands for careers in Georgia, as well as supporting employer efforts to more effectively engage Georgians with disabilities. Furthermore, the overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive, integrated employment through existing and customized pathways. Additionally, this demonstration project will be implemented to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways.
GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows:
I.   THE VR CSPM STATES THAT TRANSITION SERVICES ARE TO BE PROVIDED TO ELIGIBLE STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES THAT FACILITATE THE TRANSITION FROM THE RECEIPT OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICES IN SECONDARY SCHOOL TO THE RECEIPT OF VR SERVICES ORIENTED TOWARD AN EMPLOYMENT OUTCOME (CSPM 450.1.02). (Page 248)
WFD: GVRA has partnered with WFD to engage youth in customized career pathways and supported employment. This work is funded through the USDOL ETA Disability Employment Initiative Cooperative Agreements. (Page 253)
i.   Implementing the Georgia Pathways to Work grant. As described in Section (d) Coordination with Education Officials, GVRA was awarded a grant through the Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Services Administration. The Georgia Pathways to Work will significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with GaDOE, WFD, and local businesses and employers. The focus of this proposed model will be to increase access for students with disabilities to the existing high school career pathways, as well as customizing those existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for those youth who are not in school. (Page 258)
Based on the feedback that GVRA has received, there were some common statewide needs identified for youth and students with disabilities. These include:
1. Increase and enhance transition services overall, especially to younger students, ages 14-16.
2. Improve the quality of GVRA’s transitional staff who are provided to the local school districts to ensure greater consistency of services.
3. Expand the array of transition services made available to schools.
4. Develop outreach efforts that engage youth with disabilities who have dropped out of school.
5. Improve alignment of GVRA’s transition services with the needs of the local school districts.
6. Improve alignment of the VR program’s training programs with the GaDOE’s occupational clusters and career pathways. (Page 273)
iii.  Develop and implement a career pathway model of services for both in-school students and out-of-school youth that will include Vocational Rehabilitation services that are aligned with the current GaDOE’s Occupational Clusters and curriculum-based career pathways; as well as alternative integrated community-based career pathways for those youth who are not in school.
iv.  Partner with GaDOE, TCSG and USG to develop collaborative arrangements that improve the transition from high school to post-secondary education for students with disabilities. (Page 278)
• Transform how GVRA and the VR services focus on youth and students with disabilities by integrating services agency-wide to make this population the highest focus.
• Partner with GaDOE to increase and deliver a comprehensive array of transitional services to every school district within the state, including a special focus on career pathways and customized career pathways.
• Develop a concentrated outreach effort to identify youth with disabilities that are not enrolled in school, and make the same robust services available to them.
• Partner with the existing VR provider network to create community-based career pathways for youth not enrolled in school.
• Partner with both TCSG and USG to improve post-secondary transition.
Strategies:
• Develop formal third-party agreements with local employers to contribute to all career pathways available to youth with disabilities, both in school and out of school. (Page 286)
GVRA’s goal to improve and expand VR services for students with disabilities by the following:
• Develop and offer a comprehensive array of services to all school districts statewide. Specifically, GVRA will develop all 5 required PETS activities, as well as the 9 authorized activities as may be needed, and offer those to every school district in the state of Georgia. These will include services that are VR Program-provided, as well as services provided through the VR provider network. GVRA’s goal is to establish a minimum number of PETS services offered and provided to each school district within the state. Then as these PETS services are provided, the services will be continually evaluated and changed for improvements that produce the best outcomes, either competitive employment or postsecondary education and training. Where there is a paucity of such PETS services in particular geographic areas of the state, GVRA will solicit both new service providers and/or new services to ensure the minimum of necessary PETS services. It should be noted that all PETS services statewide will also offer both during school and after school hours of availability; and GVRA will work collaboratively with each local school district to best fit the services to the community.
• Develop new and innovative services for both in-school and out-of-school career pathways. As a part of this, GVRA will utilize its current Georgia Career Pathways federal demonstration grant as the method to pilot new services that can be added to the array of PETS services. This will be done in collaboration with GaDOE, the individual local school district, and the local employers and businesses. For example, based on local employer involvement and feedback, GVRA may ask the local school district to tailor its current career pathway curriculum to fit the specific needs of the local employers, or may ask the school to include more opportunities for work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, etc., especially for the PETS students. As new services are piloted, they will be evaluated and improved as needed, with a long range to roll out successful new services statewide. (Page 288)
 

Employer/ Business

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 303)

511

~~The primary data collection and reporting system used by GVRA through the VR program is the Libera System 7 electronic case management system, and the data collected is specific to individuals served through the VR program. At the current time, neither the Libera System 7 case management system, nor its data, is integrated with all the programs and activities present in the one-stop centers. (Page 117)

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.
Georgia’s One-Stop delivery system is focused on ensuring universal access across its workforce system. The State and its local partners, maintain compliance with the provisions of WIOA Section 188 which require programmatic and physical accessibility. Through monitoring performed at both the state and local level, Georgia ensures that all One-Stops are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize Georgia’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual, to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. In addition, the State maintains a Methods of Administration which details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be maintained. The Methods of Administration is a “living” document which ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level as quickly as possible.
Separately, as a component of one-stop certification, the State collects a business plan from each LWDA which details how a new one-stop will satisfy accessibility requirements and the provisions of WIOA Section 188. In order to be certified, each comprehensive one-stop must satisfy the requisite federal criteria. This process ensures universal access to programmatic services and facilities are maintained across the state.
Moreover, the One-Stop Integration Working Group is identifying additional criteria which will be assessed during the one-stop certification process. This may lead to additional accessibility requirements being incorporated into the one-stop certification process. Through the One-Stop Integration Working Group, the State continues to prioritize programmatic and physical accessibility in the one-stop certification process. The One-Stop Integration Working Group will provide guidance and technical assistance to LWDBs prior to the completion of LWDB certification, prior to July 1, 2017. (Page 144-145)
 

Displaying 11 - 20 of 66

Real Careers - 11/13/2018

~~The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) builds on the work of the Jobs for All United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy grant. In addition, The Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights and Assistance Act defines employment as: People get and keep employment consistent with their interest, abilities and needs.

GCDD VisionThe GCDD’s priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as “customized employment.” Click here  https://gcdd.org/news-a-media/videos/75-ihg-employees.html   to view a video.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

2018 WorkSource Georgia Mountains Modification Revisions and Additions - 10/01/2018

~~“WorkSource Georgia Mountains (WSGM) has published Program Year 2018 Revisions to the Program Year (PY) 2016-2020 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Local Plan for the Georgia Mountains Local Workforce Development Region.WSGM receives WIOA funding to coordinate the delivery of employment and training activities in the Georgia Mountains region of Georgia. The Georgia Mountains region includes the following counties: Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Lumpkin, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, and White, along with 38 municipalities within these counties.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disability Providers of State –Funded Developmental Disability Services Fiscal Year 2018 - 07/01/2018

~~“Vision: It is the vision of DBHDD that every person who participates in our services leads a satisfying, independent life with dignity and respect. Mission: The mission of DBHDD is to provide and promote local accessibility and choice of services and programs for individuals, families and communities through partnerships, in order to create a sustainable, self-sufficient and resilient life in the community. Values: The core values of DBHDD are respect, inclusiveness, and transparency. DBHDD believes it is critical that services, supports, treatment and care respect the vision of the individual. Each provider must incorporate this belief and practice into its service delivery to support individuals with developmental disabilities in living a meaningful life in the community. Specifically, the provider must ensure: ➢ Person-centered service planning and delivery that address what is important to and for individuals.➢ Capacity and capabilities, including qualified and competent providers and staff. ➢ Individual safeguards.➢ Satisfactory individual outcomes.➢ Systems of care that have the infrastructure necessary to provide coordinated services, supports, treatment and care.➢ Individuals rights and responsibilities.➢ Individual access.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018” - 07/01/2018

“Community integration and inclusion into the larger natural community is supported and evident. Terms “Integration and Inclusion” mean: a. Use of community resources that are available to other citizens; b. Providing the opportunity to actively participate in community activities and types of employment as citizens without disabilities; c. The organization has community partnerships for capacity building and advocacy of activities to achieve this goal of integration;”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018 ” - 07/01/2018

“Quality Assurance and Standard Compliance Requirements 1.The DD Crisis Providers of the Crisis System shall develop and maintain performance indicators and outcome data as part of their quality management system that will assist DBHDD and Georgia Crisis Access Line (GCAL) to monitor and generate monthly reports of the Georgia Crisis Response System (GCRS-DD) to make quality improvement decisions based on data collected.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Transitioning Youth to Adult Care - 05/19/2018

~~Projects and Activities•Provide leadership training opportunities for youth with special needs to be mentors to other youth in transition across Georgia….•Develop and make available guidance materials for families, public health workers, physicians and healthcare professionals on transitioning youth with special needs to adult health care.•Provide trainings for youth, families, educators, and health care providers on topics such as preparing for higher education or vocational training, independent living, supported employment, recreation and leisure, and how to integrate health goals onto Individualized Education Programs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Governor and the General Assembly; to provide for a short title; to provide for definitions; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes”

Systems
  • Other

Money Follows the Person - 04/22/2018

~~“If you have lived in an inpatient facility (i.e., a hospital, nursing facility or an intermediate care facility for people with developmental disabilities) for at least 90 consecutive days and would rather live in your own home, apartment or group setting, you may be eligible for home-and community-based services (HCBS) through Georgia’s Medicaid programs.Money Follows the Person (MFP) can assist with home- and community-based services.  It is a grant offered through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Georgia Department of Community Health (DCH).” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Facilitated IEP Team Meeting Procedures - 03/01/2018

~~“IEP Team Meeting Facilitation Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team meeting facilitation is all about the student and helping the IEP Team overcome the pressure and anxiety often associated with a contentious meeting. The IEP facilitator makes sure that the focus of the Team remains on the best interests of the student. The facilitator is a skilled individual who has received specialized training in the area of conflict prevention and resolution through the IEP Team Meeting Facilitation process. IEP Team meeting facilitation is voluntary. Both parties must agree to invite an external facilitator into the IEP Team meeting. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. This is achieved by encouraging and directing communication specific to the IEP and assuring that the members of the IEP Team are empowered in their participation and invested in the IEP. The facilitator is not a member of the IEP Team and cannot provide legal advice to any Team member. Rather, the facilitator will help the IEP Team create an agenda, ground rules, and desired outcomes, and address issues during the IEP Team meeting that produce tension within the Team so that the Team is able to find their own solutions. The facilitator will also guide the discussions during the IEP Team meeting by asking student-focused questions.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Options Waiver Program (NOW) Renewal Announcement - 12/19/2017

~~“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has approved renewal of the New Options (NOW) Waiver through September 30, 2022.  The renewal reflects collaborative work by the Georgia Departments of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD) and Community Health (DCH) to align service rates with the Comprehensive Supports (COMP) Waiver Program and enhance supports to families and individuals through changes to respite services, community living support, therapy services and expand options to encourage the use of supported employment.  The frequently asked questions and answers below are designed to assist providers and family members, in understanding specific elements of the NOW Waiver renewal and invite them to participate in implementation plan meetings.  Provider/family forums will be scheduled to begin in January 2018 to answer questions and provide additional information about the implementation schedule….  Provides greater flexibility and assistance to individuals who wish to pursue   supported employment in community settings. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Governor and the General Assembly; to provide for a short title; to provide for definitions; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes”

Systems
  • Other

HB 768 Handicapped persons; ABLE program establishment to use tax exempt accounts to pay for qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; provisions - 05/03/2016

“A BILL to be entitled an Act to amend Title 30 of the O.C.G.A., relating to disabled persons, so as to provide for the establishment of a qualified ABLE program in this state to enable the contribution of funds to tax-exempt accounts to pay for the qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; to amend Code Section 48-7-27 of the O.C.G.A., relating to computation of taxable net income; to amend Code Section 50-13-2 of the O.C.G.A., relating to the definitions for purposes of the Georgia Administrative Procedure Act, so as to exclude the Georgia ABLE Program Corporation from the meaning of "agency"; to provide for related matters; to provide for an effective date; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Georgia House Resolution 642 - 08/17/2015

 “WHEREAS, an ‘Employment First’ policy provides that employment should be the first and preferred option for all people, regardless of their disability, and that employment in the general workforce at or above the minimum wage is the first and preferred option for all working age citizens with disabilities.”   “WHEREAS, an Employment First policy established by the State of Georgia would require the collaboration of all involved state agencies, including the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities, Department of Education, Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency, and the Department of Community Health, in aligning their programs and resources to such end.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 22

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018 ” - 07/01/2018

“Quality Assurance and Standard Compliance Requirements 1.The DD Crisis Providers of the Crisis System shall develop and maintain performance indicators and outcome data as part of their quality management system that will assist DBHDD and Georgia Crisis Access Line (GCAL) to monitor and generate monthly reports of the Georgia Crisis Response System (GCRS-DD) to make quality improvement decisions based on data collected.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Facilitated IEP Team Meeting Procedures - 03/01/2018

~~“IEP Team Meeting Facilitation Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team meeting facilitation is all about the student and helping the IEP Team overcome the pressure and anxiety often associated with a contentious meeting. The IEP facilitator makes sure that the focus of the Team remains on the best interests of the student. The facilitator is a skilled individual who has received specialized training in the area of conflict prevention and resolution through the IEP Team Meeting Facilitation process. IEP Team meeting facilitation is voluntary. Both parties must agree to invite an external facilitator into the IEP Team meeting. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. This is achieved by encouraging and directing communication specific to the IEP and assuring that the members of the IEP Team are empowered in their participation and invested in the IEP. The facilitator is not a member of the IEP Team and cannot provide legal advice to any Team member. Rather, the facilitator will help the IEP Team create an agenda, ground rules, and desired outcomes, and address issues during the IEP Team meeting that produce tension within the Team so that the Team is able to find their own solutions. The facilitator will also guide the discussions during the IEP Team meeting by asking student-focused questions.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Developmental Disabilities “Announcements” - 08/24/2017

~~“There were significant changes to the COMP Waiver that occurred following approval by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in March 2017.  As a result, the four fiscal support services agencies sent an information sheet with the following facts about the transition:

The changes that have occurred are as follows: •CLD has been removed•CLS has two new service codes, CL Basic and CL Extended•CL Basic is used for employees that work a shift of 2.75 hours or less•CL Extended is used for employees that work a shift of 3 or more hours•CLS received a 7.2% increase to the total funds allocated to CLS”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency FY 2017-2019 Strategic Plan (FY 2018 Update) - 08/03/2017

~~“While the Agency’s mission of employment and independence for Georgian with Disabilities remains the same, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), which was signed into law in July 2014, brought changes to the way GVRA serves clients with disabilities. WIOA’s implementing regulations went into effect on October 18, 2016. GVRA has been updating policies and procedures to adhere to the changes and improvements in services to individuals with disabilities.  One major tenant in the Act relates to services to students with disabilities (age 14 to 22) where GVRA will provide pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) to groups of students in secondary education and identified as being served on an IEP or 504 and who are therefore potentially eligible to receive pre-ETS.  Another major focus of the Act is to serve eligible youth with disabilities age 14 to 24 who are not in school or training and provide them with services that will lead to competitive employment. “      

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Deal announces launch of Georgia STABLE - 06/14/2017

~~“June 14, 2017Gov. Nathan Deal today announced the launch of Georgia STABLE, a tax-free savings program for eligible individuals with disabilities. The program is administered by the Georgia Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program Corporation, established through legislation signed in 2016. The Georgia ABLE Act is modeled after the federal ABLE Act of 2014.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

“Public Policy for the People: 13 February 2017” - 02/13/2017

~~“Besides GCDD's Public Policy Team trolling the halls of the Gold Dome to speak with legislators about the need for more DD Waivers and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education, we have also hosted 2 advocacy days so far. On February 1st we spoke about the need for more DD Waiver funding and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education. …

Systems
  • Other

Limitations on Subminimum Wage - 02/08/2017

~~“Any individual hired into subminimum wage employment after July 22, 2016, must receive CC&IR services once every six months the first year of employment and annually thereafter. All individuals employed at subminimum wage prior to July 22, 2016, require CC&IR services once by July 22, 2017, and annually thereafter. Employers should review any documents provided by the employee indicating that such counseling has been provided. The employer is required to verify the employee's completion of these services, and review and obtain any relevant documentation from the employee.

Under the WIOA amendments, employers are prohibited from compensating any individual with a disability who is 24 years of age or younger at subminimum wage, unless the individual has received documentation from GVRA upon completion of the following activities:

Pre-employment transition services or transition services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.Applied for vocational rehabilitation services, and the individual was determined:

Ineligible for vocational rehabilitation services.Eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, has an approved Individualized Plan for Employment, and the individual was unable to achieve an employment outcome in competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • 14(c)/Income Security

“Brush up on GCDD’s 2017 Legislative Priorities” - 01/01/2017

~~“Employment FirstEmployment First means that employment should be the first and preferred option for all people, regardless of their disability. Under Employment First legislation, employment in the general workforce at or above minimum wage is the first and preferred option for all working age citizens with disabilities. Under Employment First policy, state agencies will need to re-align their policies and funding to prioritize employment for all working-age Georgians with disabilities.•Support legislation that addresses employment barriers for people with disabilities, makes Georgia an Employment First state, and prioritizes competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities.

Inclusive Post-Secondary Education (IPSE) – Budget AskIPSE provides opportunities for students with intellectual disabilities to access higher education. This education prepares them to live increasingly independent lives and pursue careers of their choice. Graduates from IPSE programs are more likely to find employment and earn 73% more than their peers who do not receive post-secondary education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) “A New Focus on Transition: New Federal Regulations and New Initiatives Focus on Younger Clients” - 08/01/2016

“Georgia’s Career Pathways to Work: Explore, Engage and Employ (E3) initiative. Funded through a $4.7 million grant —stretched over five years — E3 is broken down into three components, and they follow the path of the student or young person as they prepare for a career. The first “Explore” phase encourages students and youth to begin exploring the world of work and possible career goals, learning about soft skills and how benefits work. The next phase, “Engage,” takes it a step further, allowing students to begin to participate in the world of work. In this phase, they’ll learn self-advocacy and the kind of skills that are required for different jobs. And the last phase, “Employ,” is broken down into two different phases in its own right. The first will focus on pre-employment services, preparing students to submit resumes and applications. The second looks at on-the-job accommodations, continuing education and the possibility of career advancement.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Georgia Career Pathways to Work, E3 Transition Services” - 05/06/2016

E3: Explore, Engage, Employ refers to Transition Services. There are two E3 initiatives in GVRA: -Georgia Career Pathways to Work – E3: Explore, Engage, Employ is a grant through which GVRA will initially work with 5 school districts to connect students and youth with disabilities to pathways that lead to careers. E3 services to these schools with begin 7/1/2016. -Statewide Services will be rolled out gradually to all school districts as information and data is gathered from the 5 districts served initially through the grant which is the pilot on which we will build statewide services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DBHDD/GVRA Supported Employment Collaboration for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities - 12/19/2018

~~“The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD), and Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s (GVRA) Supported Employment Collaboration went live statewide March 1, 2018. The goal of the collaboration is to support individuals with significant Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities in finding and maintaining competitive integrated employment.

GVRA is the funding source for the initial phases of Supported Employment services. DBHDD will be the funding source for long-term Supported Employment services following GVRA Services.

Individuals will be referred to GVRA from DBHDD for the initial phases of Supported Employment. Individuals will be referred from GVRA to DBHDD for long term supports. Long -term supports may be waiver funded, State-funded, or Employment Express funded.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transitioning Youth to Adult Care - 05/19/2018

~~Projects and Activities•Provide leadership training opportunities for youth with special needs to be mentors to other youth in transition across Georgia….•Develop and make available guidance materials for families, public health workers, physicians and healthcare professionals on transitioning youth with special needs to adult health care.•Provide trainings for youth, families, educators, and health care providers on topics such as preparing for higher education or vocational training, independent living, supported employment, recreation and leisure, and how to integrate health goals onto Individualized Education Programs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Gather to SOAR at Self-Employment Seminar” - 09/07/2017

~~“SOAR: A Pathway to Self-Employment seminar in August 2017 at the All About Developmental Disabilities (AADD) Family Support Center in Decatur, Georgia.

The seminar was co-hosted by Synergies Work, Inc., a nonprofit that provides people with disabilities the supports to become financially independent as entrepreneurs and the Georgia Microboards Association (GMA), a nonprofit organization that provides technical assistance to people with disabilities and their families.

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), behavioral health and community service professionals, individuals with disabilities and their families attended the one-day seminar to learn how to successfully be self-employed.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

GA Statewide Transition Steering Committee - Discovering Jobs Pilot Project - 09/04/2014

“The Statewide Transition Steering Committee…comprised of teachers and school vocational counselors, private employment representatives, other service providers, parents and advocacy groups, post-secondary and state agency representatives including VR…developed the Customized Supported Employment pilot project called Discovering Jobs: Linking Discovery to Employment that was launched in four counties. The on-going pilot utilizes a continuum of services and the Discovery process for students with significant cognitive disabilities as strategies to improve employment outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities' Mission

“The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities is the state's leader in advancing public policy on behalf of persons with developmental disabilities. Our mission is to promote public policy that creates an integrated community life for persons with developmental disabilities, their families, friends, neighbors and all who support them. We achieve this mission by sharing information, coordinating public outreach and implementing strategic legislative advocacy.    “The GCDD works with legislators and advocacy groups to influence and support public policy that fosters a positive change in the way education, housing, workplace/careers and community living opportunities are made available to persons with developmental disabilities.”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Georgia’s Explore, Engage, Employ (E3) - 11/01/2017

~~“Georgia VR is implementing E3 (Explore, Engage, Employ) in 7 school districts to serve 3,000 students and youth.  E3 goals are to engage employers to customize existing career pathways and develop alternative pathways for students and out of school youth; involve families to increase youth participation, and utilize social media strategies to develop services and connect youth to career interests.  Partners include the Poses Family Foundation, GA Department of Education, Technical College System of Georgia, Center for Leadership in Disability, Parent to Parent of Georgia, Burton Blatt Institute and Jobs for the Future.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

GVRA provides Career Specialist Pilot for ECCHS - 10/30/2017

~~“Elbert County Comprehensive High School (ECCHS) was selected as one of five Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) Capacity Building Pilots to receive a Career Specialist for Transition funded by GVRA. In collaboration with the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE), Division for Special Education Services and Supports, five pilots were invited to participate including Fulton County, Elbert County, Gainesville City, Henry County and Houston County School Systems….Through the assignment of GVRA funded Career Specialists to five pilot Local Education Agencies (LEA’s), the GaDOE, GVRA and LEA will work collaboratively to provide leadership, planning, technical assistance, and consultation, and to coordinate services and evaluate the effectiveness of a district-based Career Specialist for Transition to meet the requirements of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) as defined by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). One of the new provisions in WIOA requires Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), in collaboration with the LEA, to provide, or arrange for the provision of, pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities in Georgia secondary schools who are eligible or potentially eligible for services.

Services and support will be provided to students with disabilities in 9th -12th grades, ages 14 years through age 21 years statewide. With an expanded scope of work for students with disabilities, collaboration is essential.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Georgia Department of Community Affairs “Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program – Housing for Persons with Disabilities” - 08/01/2016

~~The Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program is designed for individuals with a disability who are at or below 30% of the Area Median Income and between the ages of 18 and 61. Recently, HUD awarded the State of Georgia with $14.4 million to provide long-term rental assistance to individuals who meet these qualifications. In order to be considered for the program, the participant must be referred by either the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities or the State of Georgia Money Follows the Person program.

To find out more on eligibility and how to get connected with the program, visit the DCA Section 811 website to find rental unit locations and program applications.

 

.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia’s Career Pathways to Work: Explore, Engage and Employ (E3) - 01/08/2016

"GVRA was recently awarded $4.7 million by the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) to improve employment opportunities for students and youth with disabilities. E3 is designed to connect real people to real jobs that fill a real need for employers.  E3 will work with GaDOE identified career pathways by tailoring them to a variety of work opportunities available in the communities.  The program will engage employers and employ social media strategies to connect youth across the nation.  The program impact is to change how organizations support independence, employment and career advancement of students and youth with disabilities. The initial rollout will be in five school districts in Georgia.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia Disability Employment Initiative - 11/05/2015

“The Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD) was awarded $2.4 million by the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) to improve employment opportunities for adults and youth with disabilities. Georgia’s Disability Employment Initiative is a partnership between GDEcD and the Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA). The initiative is designed to improve job placement rates for youth and adults with disabilities that live within two of the state’s 19 Local Workforce Development Areas (LWDA).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…"   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services."  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Money Follows the Person

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…“…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Technical Assistance for Transition - 12/25/2018

~~This page is a list of materials about “Technical Assistance for Transition includes topics such as Transition Compliance, Transition Planning, IEP Development, and topics related to transition andimprovement activities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DBHDD receives federal Mental Health Awareness Training grant - 12/17/2018

~~“The Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD) received a Notice of Award from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for the Mental Health Awareness Training Grant.  The project award is $125,000 annually for three years, running November 30, 2018 through November 29, 2021.“One person, whether young or old, taking his or her own life is too many,” said Commissioner Judy Fitzgerald.  This grant will fuel our collective efforts to raise awareness, educate, train, and intervene so that Georgia will be at the forefront of national strategies to prevent tragic consequences.”  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

GA Department of Behavioral Health & DD - Guide to Supported Employment - 04/25/2015

This Guide to Supported Employment was prepared by the Georgia Division of Developmental Disabilities Statewide Quality Improvement Council. It is intended to: Explain why employment is important; Illustrate through real examples the difference work makes in people’s lives; Answer common questions about pay and health benefits when you work and have an intellectual and/or developmental disability; and Provide information and resources on Supported Employment programs in Georgia.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)

~~“Currently, there is no planned face-to-face district leader training, via the RESAs, for support in completing the initial 2017-2018 CNA report. The GaDOE will deliver on-line training on the CNA process, as already outlined through its webinar series, and face-to-face regional trainings in May 10, 2017….

The GaDOE is currently developing a dedicated webpage on the GaDOE website that will house all resources and information related to the CNA process. The Office of School & District Effectiveness will hold trainings for select groups following a schedule available through their office.”

Systems
  • Department of Education

University of GA, Institute of Human Development & Disability - Consulting/Technical Assistance

The IHDD is available for consultations and technical assistance with professionals, para-professionals, families and family members to create meaningful community activities that highlight people with disabilities and their families. IHDD has been highly sought to provide national consulting to train and develop new skills sets in Customized Employment and its associated Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Toolkit, as well as the Evidence-Based Individual Placement and Supports model of employment. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement

University of GA, Institute of Human Development & Disability - Customized Employment

This web resource defines Customized Employment with examples and provides an overview of the University’s Customized Employment Initiative. It includes sections: What is Customized Employment, Types of Customized Employment, and links to resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

University of GA, Institute on Human Development & Disability - WorkWorks Training

Through service, teaching, and research, the Institute on Human Development and Disability hopes to, “contribute to creating an environment where individuals with disabilities are independent and enjoy careers of choice.” Through WorkWorks, the institute offers a variety of training programs related to integrated employment opportunities for employment specialists and job coaches.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Justice Department Sues Georgia for Unnecessarily Segregating Students with Disabilities - 08/23/2016

The Lawsuit is the First Challenge to a State-Run School System for Segregating Students with Disabilities The Justice Department announced today that it has filed a lawsuit against the state of Georgia alleging that its treatment and segregation of students with disabilities in the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support (GNETS) Program violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Systems
  • Department of Education

Justice Department Reaches Extension Agreement to Improve Georgia’s Development Disability and Mental Health System - 05/18/2016

The extension agreement builds upon a 2010 settlement agreement resolving a lawsuit brought by the department under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Supreme Court’s Olmstead decision. The case involves Georgia’s provision of community services for individuals with mental illness and developmental disabilities. Under the agreement, Georgia will help people with developmental disabilities move from its state hospitals to integrated settings, consistent with their needs and preferences; will identify and address each individual’s needs in the community prior to discharge; and will monitor services and track outcomes for people after their discharge. For individuals who have moved from the state hospitals to the community, Georgia will monitor their health and wellbeing to ensure that emerging needs are met in a timely fashion. The extension agreement also calls for creation of at least 675 new Medicaid home- and community-based waiver slots as alternatives to placement in a facility.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

United States of America v. The State of Georgia, et al. Civil Action NO 1:10-CV-249-CAP - 10/19/2010

“To comply with this Settlement Agreement, the State shall provide the following services to individuals in the target population: … d. Supported Employment i. “Supported Employment will be operated according to an evidence-based supported employment model, and it will be assessed by an established fidelity scale such as the scale included in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) supported tool kit” ii. Enrollment in congregate programs shall not constitute Supported Employment. iii. Pursuant to the following schedule, the State shall provide Supported Employment services to 550 individuals with SPMI by July 1, 2015 .

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Displaying 11 - 18 of 18

New Waiver Rules from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services: Georgia’s Transition Plan - 03/17/2013

Georgia has developed the following Transition Plan to follow in response to the new HCBS Settings Rule. This Statewide Transition Plan will present ways in which the State of Georgia will develop a tool(s) and implement evaluations of its home and community -based (HCBS) settings where 1915(c) waiver program services are currently available. It will also address methodologies used to maximize and enhance the public input process and ongoing compliance monitoring. If it is determined that there are settings that do not meet the final regulations’ HCBS settings requirements, such HCBS settings will be required to make changes that will bring them into compliance . “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Community Based Alternatives for Youth (01.R02.00) - 10/01/2012

"Provides behavioral assistance, care management, clinical services, respite, supported employment, community transition, customized goods and services, expressive clinical services, family peer support, financial support, waiver transportation, youth peer support for individuals w/mental illness ages 18-21 and w/SED ages 4-17."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia New Options Waiver (0175.R06.00) - 10/01/2012

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, FMS, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech/language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for MR/IID "

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program - 03/03/2012

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.        
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver Program (0323.R04.00 - 01/01/2011

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational services, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, financial support services, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech and language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, community residential alternative, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/ID, DD, ages 0 - no max age."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Medicaid Activities “Waivers”

Waiver programs help people who are elderly or have disabilities and need help to live in their home or community instead of an institution such as a nursing home or ICF-MR. Each program offers several "core" services: -service coordination (help with managing care needs and services) -personal support (assistance with daily living activities, i.e. bathing, dressing, meals and housekeeping) -home health services (nursing, home health aide, and occupational, physical and speech therapy) -emergency response systems -respite care (caregiver relief)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver (COMP) - Provider Reference Guide

All providers (agencies) must apply to become a co-employer of services. Enrolled Co-Employer providers can serve in this capacity for the following COMP services, only: • Community Access • Community Guide • Community Living Support • Supported Employment • Transportation

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how Georgia administers its Medicaid program. As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act, the plan was developed by Georgia and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The state plan includes provisions that describes groups of individuals to be covered by Medicaid, Medicaid covered services, reimbursement methodologies for providers and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.  The approved State Plan also provides assurance that Georgia abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Things are looking peachy for workers with disabilities in the great state of Georgia, where high expectations are on the horizon.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Georgia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2016 to 2017
10,429,379
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.56%
Change from
2016 to 2017
661,498
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
227,895
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.45%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.42%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.01%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 13,214,860 10,310,371 10,429,379
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 657,996 698,283 661,498
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 200,764 236,577 227,895
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,145,481 4,227,892 4,329,722
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.51% 33.88% 34.45%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.07% 75.69% 76.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.00% 5.40% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.90% 21.70% 21.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.40% 15.20% 14.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 580,094 621,469 587,687
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 644,176 680,504 663,272
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 777,690 819,284 784,314
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 380,409 406,273 398,279
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 55,138 64,891 53,476
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,929 5,392 4,548
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 20,568 21,272 22,395
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,155 N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 23,906 29,659 27,788
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 16,233 18,938 13,132

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,488 6,859 7,350
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.80% 2.90% 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 285,889 284,601 282,646

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 15,276 15,978 13,859
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 46,821 53,267 45,947
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 112,177 116,662 98,241
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.60% 13.70% 14.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 2.80% 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 3.60% 5.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 2.80% 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 2,706.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,653 2,639 4,671
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,670 3,441 2,857
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 2,680 2,665 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 5,082 4,313 4,929
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6 29 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1 20 47
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 17.00% 69.00% 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.01 0.20 0.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,420
6,239
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 230 292 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 405 547 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 689 1,008 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,996 2,545 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 942 1,572 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 158 275 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.20% 37.50% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,314 9,312 11,826
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 437,897 441,114 442,689
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 101 124 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 423 548 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $8,646,000 $8,882,000 $8,253,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $17,324,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $117,985,000 $126,851,000 $112,518,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $16,972,000 $16,745,000 $17,188,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 12.00% 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,580 4,197 3,960
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 2,939
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 12,429 12,473 10,524
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 23.60 23.00 24.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.87% 64.89% 64.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.56% 15.04% 15.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.13% 2.07% 1.97%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.16% 98.40% 99.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.39% 26.00% 25.80%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 53.73% 56.07% 58.75%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.04% 78.46% 82.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.34% 30.07% 32.95%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,688,563
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,114
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 239,895
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,043,403
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,283,298
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 214
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,158
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,372
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,823,472
AbilityOne wages (services). $11,757,487

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 28 35 30
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 28 35 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,040 1,604 1,464
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,040 1,604 1,464

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No specific disability related information found.  

Customized Employment

~~• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 247)
DBHDD: GVRA has a formal MOU with DBHDD that utilizes the SE IPS model. This MOU covers both the behavioral health and developmental disabilities divisions of DBHDD to serve those individuals using Supported and Customized Employment.
This agreement allows VR services to collaborate statewide with a network of providers including CSBs for the provision of SES. These agencies prepare VR clients for permanent jobs through supported employment and complementary services. The CSBs provide a wide scope of outpatient, day, residential housing, and community-based services that include SE. The Memorandum of Understanding with DBHDD allows for improved coordination of efforts to serve those with the most significant disabilities. (Page 253)
1. Disability-Specific Topics (including Positive Behavioral Supports training for counselors who have clients with Most Significant Disabilities, Deaf Culture Literacy, and Individualized Placement and Support Training for Counselors Handling Clients with Severe & Persistent Mental Illness.
2. Customized Employment Training.
3. Case Management.
4. Eligibility for Services.
5. IPE Development.
6. Varying Types of Caseloads (including Supported Employment and Transition).
7. Values-based Training for Persons Working with Individuals with Disabilities.
8. Collaborative Training with School Personnel on Creative Individual Assessments.
9. Transition Resource Planning.
10. Road Map for Services Available to Georgians.
11. Job Development.
12. Employment Engagement Training (developing a work plan and work goal).
13. Compliance Training (including Sexual Harassment and Anti-Discrimination).
VR continues to identify current information from research, rehabilitation trends and professional resources. This information is provided to agency staff through a variety of methods, including training at the State, quadrant and local level. Most recently this training has been focused on Customized Employment. (Page 269)
Access to Supported Employment: There are concerns that there is both a paucity of Supported Employment Providers, and that from the supported employment providers’ perspective, SES are cost–prohibitive. Concerns regarding access to Supported Employment have highlighted the following needs for services expansion:
1. Increase in SES, especially for those individuals with significant disabilities. Many of these individuals have limited or no access to SES.
2. Increase in both services and actual Customized Employment opportunities.
3. Increase in the availability in specific skills training that is actually aligned with real jobs within the state and less on generic training. (Page 271)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Describe how the designated State unit will collaborate with the State agency responsible for administering each of the following programs to develop opportunities for competitive integrated employment, to the greatest extent practicable:
1. THE STATE MEDICAID PLAN UNDER TITLE XIX OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT;
GVRA has established collaborative relationships with multiple State agencies in order to more efficiently and effectively assist individuals with disabilities in achieving employment in an integrated setting. In some cases, these collaborative relationships have been developed to enhance the working relationship between the VR program and other State agencies. Several of these relationships have been formalized through Interagency Cooperative Agreements that were described earlier in Sections (e) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations and (f) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of SES. GVRA has identified other State agencies in which formal agreements need to be developed to support collaboration and seamless service delivery statewide. (Page 258)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Through the workforce system, the State will provide youth participants the opportunity to become involved in 14 required youth elements which are listed in the Youth program elements section:
1. Tutoring, Study Skills Training, Instruction and Evidence Based Dropout Prevention and Recovery Strategies can allow a participant to attain their secondary school diploma or a recognized equivalent.
2. Alternative Secondary School Services or Dropout Recovery Services show students alternative learning environments that focus on their skills, abilities, and learning style to prevent them from dropping out of school.
3. Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences are structured learning programs that take place for a specific period.
4. Occupational Skills Training allows participants to become proficient in performing actual tasks and technical functions required by certain occupational fields at all different levels.
5. Education Offered Concurrently with and in the same context as Workforce Preparation integrates training and education.
6. Leadership Development includes the development of positive social and civic behaviors.
7. Supportive Services are in place to allow youth participants to partake in WIOA activities.
8. Adult Mentoring is a 12-month program that matches a youth participant with an adult that will guide the mentee.
9. Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling gives youth participants the opportunity to meet with counselors for career and academic counseling.
10. Financial Literacy Education informs participants of smart financial decisions and habits.
11. Entrepreneurial Skills Training educates youth participants on the skills needed to start and maintain a small business.
12. Labor Market and Employment Information Services provide information about in-demand industry sectors.
13. Activities that Prepare for Transition to Postsecondary Education and Training allows for career exploration and research.
14. Follow-up Services are available to youth participants once they have exited the program. (Page 184)
Services are provided to eligible youth participants through a network of youth service providers, which are competitively procured by Georgia’s 19 LWDAs. Georgia is committed to providing, through LWDAs, the following required youth elements:
1. Tutoring, Study Skills Training, Instruction and Evidence based Drop-out Prevention and Recovery Strategies;
2. Alternative Secondary School Services or Drop-out Recovery Services;
3. Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences;
4. Occupational Skills Training;
5. Education Offered Concurrently with and in the same context as Workforce Preparation;
6. Leadership Development;
7. Supportive Services;
8. Adult Mentoring;
9. Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling;
10. Financial Literacy Education;
11. Entrepreneurial Skills Training;
12. Labor Market and Employment Information Services;
13. Activities that Prepare for Transition to Post-secondary Education and Training; and
14. Follow-up Services. (Page 195)
 

School to Work Transition

~~TAA coordinates and facilitates worker orientations to inform the workers about the benefits and services they may receive as well as the eligibility requirements associated with each benefit. The worker orientations often include LWDA representatives to provide guidance on demand occupations and available training in the LWDA. DOL staff assist workers with TAA registration and filing UI claims. (Page 162)
x. The Georgia SRC strongly supports amending current 361.45(c)(2) by adding a new paragraph (v) that would require a DSU to provide eligible individuals who are entitled to Social Security benefits under titles II or XVI of the Social Security Act, information on available assistance and supports available to them when entering the workforce (i.e., benefits planning and financial supports). (Page 239)
Non–Disability Specific Barriers: There is on–going feedback for assistance to address some of the non–disability specific barriers to employment such as transportation, disincentives through entitlement benefits, and lack of family support for employment. (Page 271)
 

Career Pathways

~~Project SEARCH is only offered in a subset of communities across Georgia. The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, one-year, school-to-work program for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities that takes place entirely at the workplace. This innovative, business-led model of school-to-work transition features total workplace immersion, which facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction; career exploration; and hands-on, worksite-based training and support. The goal for each student is competitive employment. Project SEARCH was developed at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and has been implemented at several sites in Georgia through a statewide initiative involving the collaborative effort of DoDD, a division of GVRA, area school systems, and several of Georgia’s leading employers. GVRA is working to add Project Search partners across the state to create more opportunities for youth with significant disabilities in obtaining real-life work experience that improves successful transitions from school to adult life. (Page 242)
ii. Goal II - Expand transition services to assist more students with disabilities to go from high school to work or post-secondary education/training. (Page 291)
 

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~GVRA has a strong statewide presence with offices located in urban and rural areas to provide vocational rehabilitation services to assist in the workforce development of individuals with disabilities. GVRA intends to focus on both youth with disabilities and students with disabilities to better prepare them to become an integral part of Georgia’s workforce. GVRA plans to offer an array of transition services to every public school district in the state with these services focused on assisting students with disabilities to either continue on to a post-secondary education or into a career pathway that is based on the specific skill requirements of Georgia’s employers. GVRA plans to conduct outreach activities to identify and attract those youth with disabilities who are not in school to participate in community-based alternative career pathways that are also based on the specific skill requirements of Georgia’s employers; or if appropriate, assist these youth in returning to school, either secondary or post-secondary. (Page 61)
Finally, GVRA has partnered with the Department of Education (DOE) in the current federal career pathways demonstration grant to expand transition services to students with disabilities and out-of-school youth that lead to real jobs in their communities. As a part of this partnership, GVRA intends to offer an array of transition services to the 50 intensive school districts identified by DOE as part of DOE’s state systemic improvement plan (SSIP).(Page 78)
Youth with Disabilities
Georgia’s one-stop system engages youth in customized career pathways and SES through collaborative partnerships between VR and other core partner programs in the one-stop system. Georgia recently developed a strategic initiative to expand and improve VR services for youth with disabilities who are either in-school or out-of-school. The purpose of this initiative is to braid existing and new resources to offer a robust, comprehensive array of VR services to all schools. Current VR program policies and procedures are being reviewed and amended to reflect this new way of doing business. The plan includes the provision of pre-employment transition services and timely development and approval of an individualized plan for employment for each youth served. One subset of the proposed plan to expand and improve VR services is a newly awarded, five-year demonstration project entitled “Georgia Pathways to Work” funded through the US Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Services Administration.
The proposed Georgia Pathways to Work program aims to significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with the core program partners, GaDOE, as wells as local employers. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as HDCI to ensure responsiveness to the known workforce demands in Georgia, as well as supporting their efforts to better engage those with disabilities. The overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive integrated employment through improving the 18 existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for out-of-school youth. (Page 104)
1. Provide the vision and mission of the program or organization. Please include a description of the population that the program will serve, including how the program will meet the needs of persons with barriers to employment (e.g. Displaced Homemaker, Low-income Individual, Individuals with Disabilities, Single Parents, and other individuals as described in the law).
2. Provide a description (and supporting documents, when available) of the program’s implementation of career pathways system as well as any cooperative agreements/contracts that the program has with other agencies and service providers for the delivery of adult education and literacy activities. Also, describe ways in which the program coordinates with other service providers to provide wrap-around services to participants (e.g. child care, transportation). (Page 221)
• The depth, intensity, and rigor of the programs and activities offered by the eligible provider. The proposed program must incorporate the basic tenets of reading instruction. Attention will be given to the extent to which the eligible provider incorporates stringent research in the grant proposal submission and the development of the literacy program itself;
• The extent to which the eligible provider’s program is based on intense research and best practices;
• The extent to which the eligible provider demonstrates the effective use of technology for instruction, to include distance education, toward students’ improved performance;
• The eligible provider’s demonstrated integration of contextualized instruction, to blend literacy skills, and preparation for transition to post-secondary education or entry into the workplace. Particular attention will be given to implementation of a career pathways system, activities that promote and lead to economic self-sufficiency, and the ability to exercise the full rights of citizenship; (Page 222)
The GVRA Executive Director provided an update to SRC members for their meeting in October on actions the agency has taken to implement WIOA recommendations for expanding and enhancing services for youth with disabilities. This work includes the receipt of two new federal grant awards:
1. U.S. Department of Labor, ETA’s Disability Employment Initiative Cooperative Agreements: awarded directly to WFD in partnership with GVRA that focuses on the Georgia Disability Employment Initiative, Customized Career Pathways.
2. U.S. Department of Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration’s Demonstration and Training: Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities, Georgia Pathways to Work: awarded directly to GVRA that focuses on career pathways for youth with disabilities who are in school or out-of-school. In addition, GVRA has appointed a Director of Transition Services. This new position emphasizes the importance and significance of services to youth with disabilities before they leave high school. All of these activities are very innovative in preparing high school students with disabilities for competitive employment. The Council would like to see these programs expanded throughout the state as part of VR transition services. (Page 240)
Georgia Pathways to Work will change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as Go Build Georgia and HDCI to be responsive to the known market demands for careers in Georgia, as well as supporting employer efforts to more effectively engage Georgians with disabilities. Furthermore, the overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive, integrated employment through existing and customized pathways. Additionally, this demonstration project will be implemented to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways.
GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows: (Page 248)
In collaboration with GaDOE, Burton Blatt Institute, and Poses Family Foundation, GVRA is customizing the landscape of career pathways for young Georgians with disabilities. The Georgia Pathways to Work program- E3: Explore, Engage, Employ- connects real people to real jobs that fill a real need for employers in their individual communities. The purpose of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to improve the 18 existing career pathways by tailoring them to a variety of work opportunities available in the communities. The program will engage employers in the model design and employ social media strategies to connect youth across the nation. The project impact is to change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. (Page 247)
• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 247)
Georgia Pathways to Work will change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as Go Build Georgia and HDCI to be responsive to the known market demands for careers in Georgia, as well as supporting employer efforts to more effectively engage Georgians with disabilities. Furthermore, the overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive, integrated employment through existing and customized pathways. Additionally, this demonstration project will be implemented to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways.
GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows:
I.   THE VR CSPM STATES THAT TRANSITION SERVICES ARE TO BE PROVIDED TO ELIGIBLE STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES THAT FACILITATE THE TRANSITION FROM THE RECEIPT OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICES IN SECONDARY SCHOOL TO THE RECEIPT OF VR SERVICES ORIENTED TOWARD AN EMPLOYMENT OUTCOME (CSPM 450.1.02). (Page 248)
WFD: GVRA has partnered with WFD to engage youth in customized career pathways and supported employment. This work is funded through the USDOL ETA Disability Employment Initiative Cooperative Agreements. (Page 253)
i.   Implementing the Georgia Pathways to Work grant. As described in Section (d) Coordination with Education Officials, GVRA was awarded a grant through the Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Services Administration. The Georgia Pathways to Work will significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with GaDOE, WFD, and local businesses and employers. The focus of this proposed model will be to increase access for students with disabilities to the existing high school career pathways, as well as customizing those existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for those youth who are not in school. (Page 258)
Based on the feedback that GVRA has received, there were some common statewide needs identified for youth and students with disabilities. These include:
1. Increase and enhance transition services overall, especially to younger students, ages 14-16.
2. Improve the quality of GVRA’s transitional staff who are provided to the local school districts to ensure greater consistency of services.
3. Expand the array of transition services made available to schools.
4. Develop outreach efforts that engage youth with disabilities who have dropped out of school.
5. Improve alignment of GVRA’s transition services with the needs of the local school districts.
6. Improve alignment of the VR program’s training programs with the GaDOE’s occupational clusters and career pathways. (Page 273)
iii.  Develop and implement a career pathway model of services for both in-school students and out-of-school youth that will include Vocational Rehabilitation services that are aligned with the current GaDOE’s Occupational Clusters and curriculum-based career pathways; as well as alternative integrated community-based career pathways for those youth who are not in school.
iv.  Partner with GaDOE, TCSG and USG to develop collaborative arrangements that improve the transition from high school to post-secondary education for students with disabilities. (Page 278)
• Transform how GVRA and the VR services focus on youth and students with disabilities by integrating services agency-wide to make this population the highest focus.
• Partner with GaDOE to increase and deliver a comprehensive array of transitional services to every school district within the state, including a special focus on career pathways and customized career pathways.
• Develop a concentrated outreach effort to identify youth with disabilities that are not enrolled in school, and make the same robust services available to them.
• Partner with the existing VR provider network to create community-based career pathways for youth not enrolled in school.
• Partner with both TCSG and USG to improve post-secondary transition.
Strategies:
• Develop formal third-party agreements with local employers to contribute to all career pathways available to youth with disabilities, both in school and out of school. (Page 286)
GVRA’s goal to improve and expand VR services for students with disabilities by the following:
• Develop and offer a comprehensive array of services to all school districts statewide. Specifically, GVRA will develop all 5 required PETS activities, as well as the 9 authorized activities as may be needed, and offer those to every school district in the state of Georgia. These will include services that are VR Program-provided, as well as services provided through the VR provider network. GVRA’s goal is to establish a minimum number of PETS services offered and provided to each school district within the state. Then as these PETS services are provided, the services will be continually evaluated and changed for improvements that produce the best outcomes, either competitive employment or postsecondary education and training. Where there is a paucity of such PETS services in particular geographic areas of the state, GVRA will solicit both new service providers and/or new services to ensure the minimum of necessary PETS services. It should be noted that all PETS services statewide will also offer both during school and after school hours of availability; and GVRA will work collaboratively with each local school district to best fit the services to the community.
• Develop new and innovative services for both in-school and out-of-school career pathways. As a part of this, GVRA will utilize its current Georgia Career Pathways federal demonstration grant as the method to pilot new services that can be added to the array of PETS services. This will be done in collaboration with GaDOE, the individual local school district, and the local employers and businesses. For example, based on local employer involvement and feedback, GVRA may ask the local school district to tailor its current career pathway curriculum to fit the specific needs of the local employers, or may ask the school to include more opportunities for work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, etc., especially for the PETS students. As new services are piloted, they will be evaluated and improved as needed, with a long range to roll out successful new services statewide. (Page 288)
 

Employer/ Business

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 303)

511

~~The primary data collection and reporting system used by GVRA through the VR program is the Libera System 7 electronic case management system, and the data collected is specific to individuals served through the VR program. At the current time, neither the Libera System 7 case management system, nor its data, is integrated with all the programs and activities present in the one-stop centers. (Page 117)

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.
Georgia’s One-Stop delivery system is focused on ensuring universal access across its workforce system. The State and its local partners, maintain compliance with the provisions of WIOA Section 188 which require programmatic and physical accessibility. Through monitoring performed at both the state and local level, Georgia ensures that all One-Stops are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize Georgia’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual, to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. In addition, the State maintains a Methods of Administration which details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be maintained. The Methods of Administration is a “living” document which ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level as quickly as possible.
Separately, as a component of one-stop certification, the State collects a business plan from each LWDA which details how a new one-stop will satisfy accessibility requirements and the provisions of WIOA Section 188. In order to be certified, each comprehensive one-stop must satisfy the requisite federal criteria. This process ensures universal access to programmatic services and facilities are maintained across the state.
Moreover, the One-Stop Integration Working Group is identifying additional criteria which will be assessed during the one-stop certification process. This may lead to additional accessibility requirements being incorporated into the one-stop certification process. Through the One-Stop Integration Working Group, the State continues to prioritize programmatic and physical accessibility in the one-stop certification process. The One-Stop Integration Working Group will provide guidance and technical assistance to LWDBs prior to the completion of LWDB certification, prior to July 1, 2017. (Page 144-145)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 11 - 20 of 66

Real Careers - 11/13/2018

~~The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) builds on the work of the Jobs for All United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy grant. In addition, The Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights and Assistance Act defines employment as: People get and keep employment consistent with their interest, abilities and needs.

GCDD VisionThe GCDD’s priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as “customized employment.” Click here  https://gcdd.org/news-a-media/videos/75-ihg-employees.html   to view a video.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

2018 WorkSource Georgia Mountains Modification Revisions and Additions - 10/01/2018

~~“WorkSource Georgia Mountains (WSGM) has published Program Year 2018 Revisions to the Program Year (PY) 2016-2020 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Local Plan for the Georgia Mountains Local Workforce Development Region.WSGM receives WIOA funding to coordinate the delivery of employment and training activities in the Georgia Mountains region of Georgia. The Georgia Mountains region includes the following counties: Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Lumpkin, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, and White, along with 38 municipalities within these counties.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disability Providers of State –Funded Developmental Disability Services Fiscal Year 2018 - 07/01/2018

~~“Vision: It is the vision of DBHDD that every person who participates in our services leads a satisfying, independent life with dignity and respect. Mission: The mission of DBHDD is to provide and promote local accessibility and choice of services and programs for individuals, families and communities through partnerships, in order to create a sustainable, self-sufficient and resilient life in the community. Values: The core values of DBHDD are respect, inclusiveness, and transparency. DBHDD believes it is critical that services, supports, treatment and care respect the vision of the individual. Each provider must incorporate this belief and practice into its service delivery to support individuals with developmental disabilities in living a meaningful life in the community. Specifically, the provider must ensure: ➢ Person-centered service planning and delivery that address what is important to and for individuals.➢ Capacity and capabilities, including qualified and competent providers and staff. ➢ Individual safeguards.➢ Satisfactory individual outcomes.➢ Systems of care that have the infrastructure necessary to provide coordinated services, supports, treatment and care.➢ Individuals rights and responsibilities.➢ Individual access.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018” - 07/01/2018

“Community integration and inclusion into the larger natural community is supported and evident. Terms “Integration and Inclusion” mean: a. Use of community resources that are available to other citizens; b. Providing the opportunity to actively participate in community activities and types of employment as citizens without disabilities; c. The organization has community partnerships for capacity building and advocacy of activities to achieve this goal of integration;”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018 ” - 07/01/2018

“Quality Assurance and Standard Compliance Requirements 1.The DD Crisis Providers of the Crisis System shall develop and maintain performance indicators and outcome data as part of their quality management system that will assist DBHDD and Georgia Crisis Access Line (GCAL) to monitor and generate monthly reports of the Georgia Crisis Response System (GCRS-DD) to make quality improvement decisions based on data collected.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Transitioning Youth to Adult Care - 05/19/2018

~~Projects and Activities•Provide leadership training opportunities for youth with special needs to be mentors to other youth in transition across Georgia….•Develop and make available guidance materials for families, public health workers, physicians and healthcare professionals on transitioning youth with special needs to adult health care.•Provide trainings for youth, families, educators, and health care providers on topics such as preparing for higher education or vocational training, independent living, supported employment, recreation and leisure, and how to integrate health goals onto Individualized Education Programs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Governor and the General Assembly; to provide for a short title; to provide for definitions; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes”

Systems
  • Other

Money Follows the Person - 04/22/2018

~~“If you have lived in an inpatient facility (i.e., a hospital, nursing facility or an intermediate care facility for people with developmental disabilities) for at least 90 consecutive days and would rather live in your own home, apartment or group setting, you may be eligible for home-and community-based services (HCBS) through Georgia’s Medicaid programs.Money Follows the Person (MFP) can assist with home- and community-based services.  It is a grant offered through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Georgia Department of Community Health (DCH).” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Facilitated IEP Team Meeting Procedures - 03/01/2018

~~“IEP Team Meeting Facilitation Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team meeting facilitation is all about the student and helping the IEP Team overcome the pressure and anxiety often associated with a contentious meeting. The IEP facilitator makes sure that the focus of the Team remains on the best interests of the student. The facilitator is a skilled individual who has received specialized training in the area of conflict prevention and resolution through the IEP Team Meeting Facilitation process. IEP Team meeting facilitation is voluntary. Both parties must agree to invite an external facilitator into the IEP Team meeting. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. This is achieved by encouraging and directing communication specific to the IEP and assuring that the members of the IEP Team are empowered in their participation and invested in the IEP. The facilitator is not a member of the IEP Team and cannot provide legal advice to any Team member. Rather, the facilitator will help the IEP Team create an agenda, ground rules, and desired outcomes, and address issues during the IEP Team meeting that produce tension within the Team so that the Team is able to find their own solutions. The facilitator will also guide the discussions during the IEP Team meeting by asking student-focused questions.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Options Waiver Program (NOW) Renewal Announcement - 12/19/2017

~~“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has approved renewal of the New Options (NOW) Waiver through September 30, 2022.  The renewal reflects collaborative work by the Georgia Departments of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD) and Community Health (DCH) to align service rates with the Comprehensive Supports (COMP) Waiver Program and enhance supports to families and individuals through changes to respite services, community living support, therapy services and expand options to encourage the use of supported employment.  The frequently asked questions and answers below are designed to assist providers and family members, in understanding specific elements of the NOW Waiver renewal and invite them to participate in implementation plan meetings.  Provider/family forums will be scheduled to begin in January 2018 to answer questions and provide additional information about the implementation schedule….  Provides greater flexibility and assistance to individuals who wish to pursue   supported employment in community settings. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Governor and the General Assembly; to provide for a short title; to provide for definitions; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes”

Systems
  • Other

HB 768 Handicapped persons; ABLE program establishment to use tax exempt accounts to pay for qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; provisions - 05/03/2016

“A BILL to be entitled an Act to amend Title 30 of the O.C.G.A., relating to disabled persons, so as to provide for the establishment of a qualified ABLE program in this state to enable the contribution of funds to tax-exempt accounts to pay for the qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; to amend Code Section 48-7-27 of the O.C.G.A., relating to computation of taxable net income; to amend Code Section 50-13-2 of the O.C.G.A., relating to the definitions for purposes of the Georgia Administrative Procedure Act, so as to exclude the Georgia ABLE Program Corporation from the meaning of "agency"; to provide for related matters; to provide for an effective date; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Georgia House Resolution 642 - 08/17/2015

 “WHEREAS, an ‘Employment First’ policy provides that employment should be the first and preferred option for all people, regardless of their disability, and that employment in the general workforce at or above the minimum wage is the first and preferred option for all working age citizens with disabilities.”   “WHEREAS, an Employment First policy established by the State of Georgia would require the collaboration of all involved state agencies, including the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities, Department of Education, Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency, and the Department of Community Health, in aligning their programs and resources to such end.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 22

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018 ” - 07/01/2018

“Quality Assurance and Standard Compliance Requirements 1.The DD Crisis Providers of the Crisis System shall develop and maintain performance indicators and outcome data as part of their quality management system that will assist DBHDD and Georgia Crisis Access Line (GCAL) to monitor and generate monthly reports of the Georgia Crisis Response System (GCRS-DD) to make quality improvement decisions based on data collected.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Facilitated IEP Team Meeting Procedures - 03/01/2018

~~“IEP Team Meeting Facilitation Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team meeting facilitation is all about the student and helping the IEP Team overcome the pressure and anxiety often associated with a contentious meeting. The IEP facilitator makes sure that the focus of the Team remains on the best interests of the student. The facilitator is a skilled individual who has received specialized training in the area of conflict prevention and resolution through the IEP Team Meeting Facilitation process. IEP Team meeting facilitation is voluntary. Both parties must agree to invite an external facilitator into the IEP Team meeting. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. This is achieved by encouraging and directing communication specific to the IEP and assuring that the members of the IEP Team are empowered in their participation and invested in the IEP. The facilitator is not a member of the IEP Team and cannot provide legal advice to any Team member. Rather, the facilitator will help the IEP Team create an agenda, ground rules, and desired outcomes, and address issues during the IEP Team meeting that produce tension within the Team so that the Team is able to find their own solutions. The facilitator will also guide the discussions during the IEP Team meeting by asking student-focused questions.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Developmental Disabilities “Announcements” - 08/24/2017

~~“There were significant changes to the COMP Waiver that occurred following approval by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in March 2017.  As a result, the four fiscal support services agencies sent an information sheet with the following facts about the transition:

The changes that have occurred are as follows: •CLD has been removed•CLS has two new service codes, CL Basic and CL Extended•CL Basic is used for employees that work a shift of 2.75 hours or less•CL Extended is used for employees that work a shift of 3 or more hours•CLS received a 7.2% increase to the total funds allocated to CLS”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency FY 2017-2019 Strategic Plan (FY 2018 Update) - 08/03/2017

~~“While the Agency’s mission of employment and independence for Georgian with Disabilities remains the same, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), which was signed into law in July 2014, brought changes to the way GVRA serves clients with disabilities. WIOA’s implementing regulations went into effect on October 18, 2016. GVRA has been updating policies and procedures to adhere to the changes and improvements in services to individuals with disabilities.  One major tenant in the Act relates to services to students with disabilities (age 14 to 22) where GVRA will provide pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) to groups of students in secondary education and identified as being served on an IEP or 504 and who are therefore potentially eligible to receive pre-ETS.  Another major focus of the Act is to serve eligible youth with disabilities age 14 to 24 who are not in school or training and provide them with services that will lead to competitive employment. “      

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Deal announces launch of Georgia STABLE - 06/14/2017

~~“June 14, 2017Gov. Nathan Deal today announced the launch of Georgia STABLE, a tax-free savings program for eligible individuals with disabilities. The program is administered by the Georgia Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program Corporation, established through legislation signed in 2016. The Georgia ABLE Act is modeled after the federal ABLE Act of 2014.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

“Public Policy for the People: 13 February 2017” - 02/13/2017

~~“Besides GCDD's Public Policy Team trolling the halls of the Gold Dome to speak with legislators about the need for more DD Waivers and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education, we have also hosted 2 advocacy days so far. On February 1st we spoke about the need for more DD Waiver funding and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education. …

Systems
  • Other

Limitations on Subminimum Wage - 02/08/2017

~~“Any individual hired into subminimum wage employment after July 22, 2016, must receive CC&IR services once every six months the first year of employment and annually thereafter. All individuals employed at subminimum wage prior to July 22, 2016, require CC&IR services once by July 22, 2017, and annually thereafter. Employers should review any documents provided by the employee indicating that such counseling has been provided. The employer is required to verify the employee's completion of these services, and review and obtain any relevant documentation from the employee.

Under the WIOA amendments, employers are prohibited from compensating any individual with a disability who is 24 years of age or younger at subminimum wage, unless the individual has received documentation from GVRA upon completion of the following activities:

Pre-employment transition services or transition services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.Applied for vocational rehabilitation services, and the individual was determined:

Ineligible for vocational rehabilitation services.Eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, has an approved Individualized Plan for Employment, and the individual was unable to achieve an employment outcome in competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • 14(c)/Income Security

“Brush up on GCDD’s 2017 Legislative Priorities” - 01/01/2017

~~“Employment FirstEmployment First means that employment should be the first and preferred option for all people, regardless of their disability. Under Employment First legislation, employment in the general workforce at or above minimum wage is the first and preferred option for all working age citizens with disabilities. Under Employment First policy, state agencies will need to re-align their policies and funding to prioritize employment for all working-age Georgians with disabilities.•Support legislation that addresses employment barriers for people with disabilities, makes Georgia an Employment First state, and prioritizes competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities.

Inclusive Post-Secondary Education (IPSE) – Budget AskIPSE provides opportunities for students with intellectual disabilities to access higher education. This education prepares them to live increasingly independent lives and pursue careers of their choice. Graduates from IPSE programs are more likely to find employment and earn 73% more than their peers who do not receive post-secondary education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) “A New Focus on Transition: New Federal Regulations and New Initiatives Focus on Younger Clients” - 08/01/2016

“Georgia’s Career Pathways to Work: Explore, Engage and Employ (E3) initiative. Funded through a $4.7 million grant —stretched over five years — E3 is broken down into three components, and they follow the path of the student or young person as they prepare for a career. The first “Explore” phase encourages students and youth to begin exploring the world of work and possible career goals, learning about soft skills and how benefits work. The next phase, “Engage,” takes it a step further, allowing students to begin to participate in the world of work. In this phase, they’ll learn self-advocacy and the kind of skills that are required for different jobs. And the last phase, “Employ,” is broken down into two different phases in its own right. The first will focus on pre-employment services, preparing students to submit resumes and applications. The second looks at on-the-job accommodations, continuing education and the possibility of career advancement.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Georgia Career Pathways to Work, E3 Transition Services” - 05/06/2016

E3: Explore, Engage, Employ refers to Transition Services. There are two E3 initiatives in GVRA: -Georgia Career Pathways to Work – E3: Explore, Engage, Employ is a grant through which GVRA will initially work with 5 school districts to connect students and youth with disabilities to pathways that lead to careers. E3 services to these schools with begin 7/1/2016. -Statewide Services will be rolled out gradually to all school districts as information and data is gathered from the 5 districts served initially through the grant which is the pilot on which we will build statewide services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DBHDD/GVRA Supported Employment Collaboration for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities - 12/19/2018

~~“The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD), and Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s (GVRA) Supported Employment Collaboration went live statewide March 1, 2018. The goal of the collaboration is to support individuals with significant Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities in finding and maintaining competitive integrated employment.

GVRA is the funding source for the initial phases of Supported Employment services. DBHDD will be the funding source for long-term Supported Employment services following GVRA Services.

Individuals will be referred to GVRA from DBHDD for the initial phases of Supported Employment. Individuals will be referred from GVRA to DBHDD for long term supports. Long -term supports may be waiver funded, State-funded, or Employment Express funded.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transitioning Youth to Adult Care - 05/19/2018

~~Projects and Activities•Provide leadership training opportunities for youth with special needs to be mentors to other youth in transition across Georgia….•Develop and make available guidance materials for families, public health workers, physicians and healthcare professionals on transitioning youth with special needs to adult health care.•Provide trainings for youth, families, educators, and health care providers on topics such as preparing for higher education or vocational training, independent living, supported employment, recreation and leisure, and how to integrate health goals onto Individualized Education Programs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Gather to SOAR at Self-Employment Seminar” - 09/07/2017

~~“SOAR: A Pathway to Self-Employment seminar in August 2017 at the All About Developmental Disabilities (AADD) Family Support Center in Decatur, Georgia.

The seminar was co-hosted by Synergies Work, Inc., a nonprofit that provides people with disabilities the supports to become financially independent as entrepreneurs and the Georgia Microboards Association (GMA), a nonprofit organization that provides technical assistance to people with disabilities and their families.

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), behavioral health and community service professionals, individuals with disabilities and their families attended the one-day seminar to learn how to successfully be self-employed.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

GA Statewide Transition Steering Committee - Discovering Jobs Pilot Project - 09/04/2014

“The Statewide Transition Steering Committee…comprised of teachers and school vocational counselors, private employment representatives, other service providers, parents and advocacy groups, post-secondary and state agency representatives including VR…developed the Customized Supported Employment pilot project called Discovering Jobs: Linking Discovery to Employment that was launched in four counties. The on-going pilot utilizes a continuum of services and the Discovery process for students with significant cognitive disabilities as strategies to improve employment outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities' Mission

“The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities is the state's leader in advancing public policy on behalf of persons with developmental disabilities. Our mission is to promote public policy that creates an integrated community life for persons with developmental disabilities, their families, friends, neighbors and all who support them. We achieve this mission by sharing information, coordinating public outreach and implementing strategic legislative advocacy.    “The GCDD works with legislators and advocacy groups to influence and support public policy that fosters a positive change in the way education, housing, workplace/careers and community living opportunities are made available to persons with developmental disabilities.”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Georgia’s Explore, Engage, Employ (E3) - 11/01/2017

~~“Georgia VR is implementing E3 (Explore, Engage, Employ) in 7 school districts to serve 3,000 students and youth.  E3 goals are to engage employers to customize existing career pathways and develop alternative pathways for students and out of school youth; involve families to increase youth participation, and utilize social media strategies to develop services and connect youth to career interests.  Partners include the Poses Family Foundation, GA Department of Education, Technical College System of Georgia, Center for Leadership in Disability, Parent to Parent of Georgia, Burton Blatt Institute and Jobs for the Future.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

GVRA provides Career Specialist Pilot for ECCHS - 10/30/2017

~~“Elbert County Comprehensive High School (ECCHS) was selected as one of five Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) Capacity Building Pilots to receive a Career Specialist for Transition funded by GVRA. In collaboration with the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE), Division for Special Education Services and Supports, five pilots were invited to participate including Fulton County, Elbert County, Gainesville City, Henry County and Houston County School Systems….Through the assignment of GVRA funded Career Specialists to five pilot Local Education Agencies (LEA’s), the GaDOE, GVRA and LEA will work collaboratively to provide leadership, planning, technical assistance, and consultation, and to coordinate services and evaluate the effectiveness of a district-based Career Specialist for Transition to meet the requirements of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) as defined by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). One of the new provisions in WIOA requires Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), in collaboration with the LEA, to provide, or arrange for the provision of, pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities in Georgia secondary schools who are eligible or potentially eligible for services.

Services and support will be provided to students with disabilities in 9th -12th grades, ages 14 years through age 21 years statewide. With an expanded scope of work for students with disabilities, collaboration is essential.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Georgia Department of Community Affairs “Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program – Housing for Persons with Disabilities” - 08/01/2016

~~The Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program is designed for individuals with a disability who are at or below 30% of the Area Median Income and between the ages of 18 and 61. Recently, HUD awarded the State of Georgia with $14.4 million to provide long-term rental assistance to individuals who meet these qualifications. In order to be considered for the program, the participant must be referred by either the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities or the State of Georgia Money Follows the Person program.

To find out more on eligibility and how to get connected with the program, visit the DCA Section 811 website to find rental unit locations and program applications.

 

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Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia’s Career Pathways to Work: Explore, Engage and Employ (E3) - 01/08/2016

"GVRA was recently awarded $4.7 million by the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) to improve employment opportunities for students and youth with disabilities. E3 is designed to connect real people to real jobs that fill a real need for employers.  E3 will work with GaDOE identified career pathways by tailoring them to a variety of work opportunities available in the communities.  The program will engage employers and employ social media strategies to connect youth across the nation.  The program impact is to change how organizations support independence, employment and career advancement of students and youth with disabilities. The initial rollout will be in five school districts in Georgia.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia Disability Employment Initiative - 11/05/2015

“The Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD) was awarded $2.4 million by the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) to improve employment opportunities for adults and youth with disabilities. Georgia’s Disability Employment Initiative is a partnership between GDEcD and the Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA). The initiative is designed to improve job placement rates for youth and adults with disabilities that live within two of the state’s 19 Local Workforce Development Areas (LWDA).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…"   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services."  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Money Follows the Person

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…“…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Technical Assistance for Transition - 12/25/2018

~~This page is a list of materials about “Technical Assistance for Transition includes topics such as Transition Compliance, Transition Planning, IEP Development, and topics related to transition andimprovement activities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DBHDD receives federal Mental Health Awareness Training grant - 12/17/2018

~~“The Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD) received a Notice of Award from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for the Mental Health Awareness Training Grant.  The project award is $125,000 annually for three years, running November 30, 2018 through November 29, 2021.“One person, whether young or old, taking his or her own life is too many,” said Commissioner Judy Fitzgerald.  This grant will fuel our collective efforts to raise awareness, educate, train, and intervene so that Georgia will be at the forefront of national strategies to prevent tragic consequences.”  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

GA Department of Behavioral Health & DD - Guide to Supported Employment - 04/25/2015

This Guide to Supported Employment was prepared by the Georgia Division of Developmental Disabilities Statewide Quality Improvement Council. It is intended to: Explain why employment is important; Illustrate through real examples the difference work makes in people’s lives; Answer common questions about pay and health benefits when you work and have an intellectual and/or developmental disability; and Provide information and resources on Supported Employment programs in Georgia.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)

~~“Currently, there is no planned face-to-face district leader training, via the RESAs, for support in completing the initial 2017-2018 CNA report. The GaDOE will deliver on-line training on the CNA process, as already outlined through its webinar series, and face-to-face regional trainings in May 10, 2017….

The GaDOE is currently developing a dedicated webpage on the GaDOE website that will house all resources and information related to the CNA process. The Office of School & District Effectiveness will hold trainings for select groups following a schedule available through their office.”

Systems
  • Department of Education

University of GA, Institute of Human Development & Disability - Consulting/Technical Assistance

The IHDD is available for consultations and technical assistance with professionals, para-professionals, families and family members to create meaningful community activities that highlight people with disabilities and their families. IHDD has been highly sought to provide national consulting to train and develop new skills sets in Customized Employment and its associated Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Toolkit, as well as the Evidence-Based Individual Placement and Supports model of employment. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement

University of GA, Institute of Human Development & Disability - Customized Employment

This web resource defines Customized Employment with examples and provides an overview of the University’s Customized Employment Initiative. It includes sections: What is Customized Employment, Types of Customized Employment, and links to resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

University of GA, Institute on Human Development & Disability - WorkWorks Training

Through service, teaching, and research, the Institute on Human Development and Disability hopes to, “contribute to creating an environment where individuals with disabilities are independent and enjoy careers of choice.” Through WorkWorks, the institute offers a variety of training programs related to integrated employment opportunities for employment specialists and job coaches.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Justice Department Sues Georgia for Unnecessarily Segregating Students with Disabilities - 08/23/2016

The Lawsuit is the First Challenge to a State-Run School System for Segregating Students with Disabilities The Justice Department announced today that it has filed a lawsuit against the state of Georgia alleging that its treatment and segregation of students with disabilities in the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support (GNETS) Program violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Systems
  • Department of Education

Justice Department Reaches Extension Agreement to Improve Georgia’s Development Disability and Mental Health System - 05/18/2016

The extension agreement builds upon a 2010 settlement agreement resolving a lawsuit brought by the department under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Supreme Court’s Olmstead decision. The case involves Georgia’s provision of community services for individuals with mental illness and developmental disabilities. Under the agreement, Georgia will help people with developmental disabilities move from its state hospitals to integrated settings, consistent with their needs and preferences; will identify and address each individual’s needs in the community prior to discharge; and will monitor services and track outcomes for people after their discharge. For individuals who have moved from the state hospitals to the community, Georgia will monitor their health and wellbeing to ensure that emerging needs are met in a timely fashion. The extension agreement also calls for creation of at least 675 new Medicaid home- and community-based waiver slots as alternatives to placement in a facility.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

United States of America v. The State of Georgia, et al. Civil Action NO 1:10-CV-249-CAP - 10/19/2010

“To comply with this Settlement Agreement, the State shall provide the following services to individuals in the target population: … d. Supported Employment i. “Supported Employment will be operated according to an evidence-based supported employment model, and it will be assessed by an established fidelity scale such as the scale included in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) supported tool kit” ii. Enrollment in congregate programs shall not constitute Supported Employment. iii. Pursuant to the following schedule, the State shall provide Supported Employment services to 550 individuals with SPMI by July 1, 2015 .

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Displaying 11 - 18 of 18

New Waiver Rules from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services: Georgia’s Transition Plan - 03/17/2013

Georgia has developed the following Transition Plan to follow in response to the new HCBS Settings Rule. This Statewide Transition Plan will present ways in which the State of Georgia will develop a tool(s) and implement evaluations of its home and community -based (HCBS) settings where 1915(c) waiver program services are currently available. It will also address methodologies used to maximize and enhance the public input process and ongoing compliance monitoring. If it is determined that there are settings that do not meet the final regulations’ HCBS settings requirements, such HCBS settings will be required to make changes that will bring them into compliance . “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Community Based Alternatives for Youth (01.R02.00) - 10/01/2012

"Provides behavioral assistance, care management, clinical services, respite, supported employment, community transition, customized goods and services, expressive clinical services, family peer support, financial support, waiver transportation, youth peer support for individuals w/mental illness ages 18-21 and w/SED ages 4-17."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia New Options Waiver (0175.R06.00) - 10/01/2012

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, FMS, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech/language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for MR/IID "

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program - 03/03/2012

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.        
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver Program (0323.R04.00 - 01/01/2011

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational services, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, financial support services, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech and language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, community residential alternative, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/ID, DD, ages 0 - no max age."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Medicaid Activities “Waivers”

Waiver programs help people who are elderly or have disabilities and need help to live in their home or community instead of an institution such as a nursing home or ICF-MR. Each program offers several "core" services: -service coordination (help with managing care needs and services) -personal support (assistance with daily living activities, i.e. bathing, dressing, meals and housekeeping) -home health services (nursing, home health aide, and occupational, physical and speech therapy) -emergency response systems -respite care (caregiver relief)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver (COMP) - Provider Reference Guide

All providers (agencies) must apply to become a co-employer of services. Enrolled Co-Employer providers can serve in this capacity for the following COMP services, only: • Community Access • Community Guide • Community Living Support • Supported Employment • Transportation

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how Georgia administers its Medicaid program. As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act, the plan was developed by Georgia and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The state plan includes provisions that describes groups of individuals to be covered by Medicaid, Medicaid covered services, reimbursement methodologies for providers and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.  The approved State Plan also provides assurance that Georgia abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Things are looking peachy for workers with disabilities in the great state of Georgia, where high expectations are on the horizon.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Georgia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2016 to 2017
10,429,379
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.56%
Change from
2016 to 2017
661,498
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
227,895
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.45%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.42%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.01%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 13,214,860 10,310,371 10,429,379
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 657,996 698,283 661,498
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 200,764 236,577 227,895
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,145,481 4,227,892 4,329,722
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.51% 33.88% 34.45%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.07% 75.69% 76.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.00% 5.40% 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.90% 21.70% 21.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.40% 15.20% 14.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 580,094 621,469 587,687
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 644,176 680,504 663,272
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 777,690 819,284 784,314
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 380,409 406,273 398,279
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 55,138 64,891 53,476
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,929 5,392 4,548
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 20,568 21,272 22,395
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A 1,155 N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 23,906 29,659 27,788
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 16,233 18,938 13,132

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,488 6,859 7,350
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 2.80% 2.90% 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 285,889 284,601 282,646

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 15,276 15,978 13,859
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 46,821 53,267 45,947
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 112,177 116,662 98,241
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.60% 13.70% 14.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 2.80% 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 3.60% 5.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90% 2.80% 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 2,706.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,653 2,639 4,671
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,670 3,441 2,857
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 2,680 2,665 N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 5,082 4,313 4,929
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.01 0.01 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6 29 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1 20 47
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 17.00% 69.00% 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.01 0.20 0.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,420
6,239
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 230 292 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 405 547 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 689 1,008 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,996 2,545 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 942 1,572 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 158 275 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 32.20% 37.50% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,314 9,312 11,826
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 437,897 441,114 442,689
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 101 124 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 423 548 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $8,646,000 $8,882,000 $8,253,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $17,324,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $117,985,000 $126,851,000 $112,518,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $16,972,000 $16,745,000 $17,188,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 12.00% 12.00% 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,580 4,197 3,960
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 2,939
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 12,429 12,473 10,524
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 23.60 23.00 24.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.87% 64.89% 64.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 14.56% 15.04% 15.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.13% 2.07% 1.97%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.16% 98.40% 99.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.39% 26.00% 25.80%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 53.73% 56.07% 58.75%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 81.04% 78.46% 82.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.34% 30.07% 32.95%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,688,563
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,114
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 239,895
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,043,403
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,283,298
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 214
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,158
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,372
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,823,472
AbilityOne wages (services). $11,757,487

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 28 35 30
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 28 35 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,040 1,604 1,464
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,040 1,604 1,464

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No specific disability related information found.  

Customized Employment

~~• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 247)
DBHDD: GVRA has a formal MOU with DBHDD that utilizes the SE IPS model. This MOU covers both the behavioral health and developmental disabilities divisions of DBHDD to serve those individuals using Supported and Customized Employment.
This agreement allows VR services to collaborate statewide with a network of providers including CSBs for the provision of SES. These agencies prepare VR clients for permanent jobs through supported employment and complementary services. The CSBs provide a wide scope of outpatient, day, residential housing, and community-based services that include SE. The Memorandum of Understanding with DBHDD allows for improved coordination of efforts to serve those with the most significant disabilities. (Page 253)
1. Disability-Specific Topics (including Positive Behavioral Supports training for counselors who have clients with Most Significant Disabilities, Deaf Culture Literacy, and Individualized Placement and Support Training for Counselors Handling Clients with Severe & Persistent Mental Illness.
2. Customized Employment Training.
3. Case Management.
4. Eligibility for Services.
5. IPE Development.
6. Varying Types of Caseloads (including Supported Employment and Transition).
7. Values-based Training for Persons Working with Individuals with Disabilities.
8. Collaborative Training with School Personnel on Creative Individual Assessments.
9. Transition Resource Planning.
10. Road Map for Services Available to Georgians.
11. Job Development.
12. Employment Engagement Training (developing a work plan and work goal).
13. Compliance Training (including Sexual Harassment and Anti-Discrimination).
VR continues to identify current information from research, rehabilitation trends and professional resources. This information is provided to agency staff through a variety of methods, including training at the State, quadrant and local level. Most recently this training has been focused on Customized Employment. (Page 269)
Access to Supported Employment: There are concerns that there is both a paucity of Supported Employment Providers, and that from the supported employment providers’ perspective, SES are cost–prohibitive. Concerns regarding access to Supported Employment have highlighted the following needs for services expansion:
1. Increase in SES, especially for those individuals with significant disabilities. Many of these individuals have limited or no access to SES.
2. Increase in both services and actual Customized Employment opportunities.
3. Increase in the availability in specific skills training that is actually aligned with real jobs within the state and less on generic training. (Page 271)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Describe how the designated State unit will collaborate with the State agency responsible for administering each of the following programs to develop opportunities for competitive integrated employment, to the greatest extent practicable:
1. THE STATE MEDICAID PLAN UNDER TITLE XIX OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT;
GVRA has established collaborative relationships with multiple State agencies in order to more efficiently and effectively assist individuals with disabilities in achieving employment in an integrated setting. In some cases, these collaborative relationships have been developed to enhance the working relationship between the VR program and other State agencies. Several of these relationships have been formalized through Interagency Cooperative Agreements that were described earlier in Sections (e) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations and (f) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of SES. GVRA has identified other State agencies in which formal agreements need to be developed to support collaboration and seamless service delivery statewide. (Page 258)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Through the workforce system, the State will provide youth participants the opportunity to become involved in 14 required youth elements which are listed in the Youth program elements section:
1. Tutoring, Study Skills Training, Instruction and Evidence Based Dropout Prevention and Recovery Strategies can allow a participant to attain their secondary school diploma or a recognized equivalent.
2. Alternative Secondary School Services or Dropout Recovery Services show students alternative learning environments that focus on their skills, abilities, and learning style to prevent them from dropping out of school.
3. Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences are structured learning programs that take place for a specific period.
4. Occupational Skills Training allows participants to become proficient in performing actual tasks and technical functions required by certain occupational fields at all different levels.
5. Education Offered Concurrently with and in the same context as Workforce Preparation integrates training and education.
6. Leadership Development includes the development of positive social and civic behaviors.
7. Supportive Services are in place to allow youth participants to partake in WIOA activities.
8. Adult Mentoring is a 12-month program that matches a youth participant with an adult that will guide the mentee.
9. Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling gives youth participants the opportunity to meet with counselors for career and academic counseling.
10. Financial Literacy Education informs participants of smart financial decisions and habits.
11. Entrepreneurial Skills Training educates youth participants on the skills needed to start and maintain a small business.
12. Labor Market and Employment Information Services provide information about in-demand industry sectors.
13. Activities that Prepare for Transition to Postsecondary Education and Training allows for career exploration and research.
14. Follow-up Services are available to youth participants once they have exited the program. (Page 184)
Services are provided to eligible youth participants through a network of youth service providers, which are competitively procured by Georgia’s 19 LWDAs. Georgia is committed to providing, through LWDAs, the following required youth elements:
1. Tutoring, Study Skills Training, Instruction and Evidence based Drop-out Prevention and Recovery Strategies;
2. Alternative Secondary School Services or Drop-out Recovery Services;
3. Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences;
4. Occupational Skills Training;
5. Education Offered Concurrently with and in the same context as Workforce Preparation;
6. Leadership Development;
7. Supportive Services;
8. Adult Mentoring;
9. Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling;
10. Financial Literacy Education;
11. Entrepreneurial Skills Training;
12. Labor Market and Employment Information Services;
13. Activities that Prepare for Transition to Post-secondary Education and Training; and
14. Follow-up Services. (Page 195)
 

School to Work Transition

~~TAA coordinates and facilitates worker orientations to inform the workers about the benefits and services they may receive as well as the eligibility requirements associated with each benefit. The worker orientations often include LWDA representatives to provide guidance on demand occupations and available training in the LWDA. DOL staff assist workers with TAA registration and filing UI claims. (Page 162)
x. The Georgia SRC strongly supports amending current 361.45(c)(2) by adding a new paragraph (v) that would require a DSU to provide eligible individuals who are entitled to Social Security benefits under titles II or XVI of the Social Security Act, information on available assistance and supports available to them when entering the workforce (i.e., benefits planning and financial supports). (Page 239)
Non–Disability Specific Barriers: There is on–going feedback for assistance to address some of the non–disability specific barriers to employment such as transportation, disincentives through entitlement benefits, and lack of family support for employment. (Page 271)
 

Career Pathways

~~Project SEARCH is only offered in a subset of communities across Georgia. The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, one-year, school-to-work program for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities that takes place entirely at the workplace. This innovative, business-led model of school-to-work transition features total workplace immersion, which facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction; career exploration; and hands-on, worksite-based training and support. The goal for each student is competitive employment. Project SEARCH was developed at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and has been implemented at several sites in Georgia through a statewide initiative involving the collaborative effort of DoDD, a division of GVRA, area school systems, and several of Georgia’s leading employers. GVRA is working to add Project Search partners across the state to create more opportunities for youth with significant disabilities in obtaining real-life work experience that improves successful transitions from school to adult life. (Page 242)
ii. Goal II - Expand transition services to assist more students with disabilities to go from high school to work or post-secondary education/training. (Page 291)
 

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~GVRA has a strong statewide presence with offices located in urban and rural areas to provide vocational rehabilitation services to assist in the workforce development of individuals with disabilities. GVRA intends to focus on both youth with disabilities and students with disabilities to better prepare them to become an integral part of Georgia’s workforce. GVRA plans to offer an array of transition services to every public school district in the state with these services focused on assisting students with disabilities to either continue on to a post-secondary education or into a career pathway that is based on the specific skill requirements of Georgia’s employers. GVRA plans to conduct outreach activities to identify and attract those youth with disabilities who are not in school to participate in community-based alternative career pathways that are also based on the specific skill requirements of Georgia’s employers; or if appropriate, assist these youth in returning to school, either secondary or post-secondary. (Page 61)
Finally, GVRA has partnered with the Department of Education (DOE) in the current federal career pathways demonstration grant to expand transition services to students with disabilities and out-of-school youth that lead to real jobs in their communities. As a part of this partnership, GVRA intends to offer an array of transition services to the 50 intensive school districts identified by DOE as part of DOE’s state systemic improvement plan (SSIP).(Page 78)
Youth with Disabilities
Georgia’s one-stop system engages youth in customized career pathways and SES through collaborative partnerships between VR and other core partner programs in the one-stop system. Georgia recently developed a strategic initiative to expand and improve VR services for youth with disabilities who are either in-school or out-of-school. The purpose of this initiative is to braid existing and new resources to offer a robust, comprehensive array of VR services to all schools. Current VR program policies and procedures are being reviewed and amended to reflect this new way of doing business. The plan includes the provision of pre-employment transition services and timely development and approval of an individualized plan for employment for each youth served. One subset of the proposed plan to expand and improve VR services is a newly awarded, five-year demonstration project entitled “Georgia Pathways to Work” funded through the US Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Services Administration.
The proposed Georgia Pathways to Work program aims to significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with the core program partners, GaDOE, as wells as local employers. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as HDCI to ensure responsiveness to the known workforce demands in Georgia, as well as supporting their efforts to better engage those with disabilities. The overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive integrated employment through improving the 18 existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for out-of-school youth. (Page 104)
1. Provide the vision and mission of the program or organization. Please include a description of the population that the program will serve, including how the program will meet the needs of persons with barriers to employment (e.g. Displaced Homemaker, Low-income Individual, Individuals with Disabilities, Single Parents, and other individuals as described in the law).
2. Provide a description (and supporting documents, when available) of the program’s implementation of career pathways system as well as any cooperative agreements/contracts that the program has with other agencies and service providers for the delivery of adult education and literacy activities. Also, describe ways in which the program coordinates with other service providers to provide wrap-around services to participants (e.g. child care, transportation). (Page 221)
• The depth, intensity, and rigor of the programs and activities offered by the eligible provider. The proposed program must incorporate the basic tenets of reading instruction. Attention will be given to the extent to which the eligible provider incorporates stringent research in the grant proposal submission and the development of the literacy program itself;
• The extent to which the eligible provider’s program is based on intense research and best practices;
• The extent to which the eligible provider demonstrates the effective use of technology for instruction, to include distance education, toward students’ improved performance;
• The eligible provider’s demonstrated integration of contextualized instruction, to blend literacy skills, and preparation for transition to post-secondary education or entry into the workplace. Particular attention will be given to implementation of a career pathways system, activities that promote and lead to economic self-sufficiency, and the ability to exercise the full rights of citizenship; (Page 222)
The GVRA Executive Director provided an update to SRC members for their meeting in October on actions the agency has taken to implement WIOA recommendations for expanding and enhancing services for youth with disabilities. This work includes the receipt of two new federal grant awards:
1. U.S. Department of Labor, ETA’s Disability Employment Initiative Cooperative Agreements: awarded directly to WFD in partnership with GVRA that focuses on the Georgia Disability Employment Initiative, Customized Career Pathways.
2. U.S. Department of Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration’s Demonstration and Training: Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities, Georgia Pathways to Work: awarded directly to GVRA that focuses on career pathways for youth with disabilities who are in school or out-of-school. In addition, GVRA has appointed a Director of Transition Services. This new position emphasizes the importance and significance of services to youth with disabilities before they leave high school. All of these activities are very innovative in preparing high school students with disabilities for competitive employment. The Council would like to see these programs expanded throughout the state as part of VR transition services. (Page 240)
Georgia Pathways to Work will change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as Go Build Georgia and HDCI to be responsive to the known market demands for careers in Georgia, as well as supporting employer efforts to more effectively engage Georgians with disabilities. Furthermore, the overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive, integrated employment through existing and customized pathways. Additionally, this demonstration project will be implemented to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways.
GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows: (Page 248)
In collaboration with GaDOE, Burton Blatt Institute, and Poses Family Foundation, GVRA is customizing the landscape of career pathways for young Georgians with disabilities. The Georgia Pathways to Work program- E3: Explore, Engage, Employ- connects real people to real jobs that fill a real need for employers in their individual communities. The purpose of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to improve the 18 existing career pathways by tailoring them to a variety of work opportunities available in the communities. The program will engage employers in the model design and employ social media strategies to connect youth across the nation. The project impact is to change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. (Page 247)
• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 247)
Georgia Pathways to Work will change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as Go Build Georgia and HDCI to be responsive to the known market demands for careers in Georgia, as well as supporting employer efforts to more effectively engage Georgians with disabilities. Furthermore, the overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive, integrated employment through existing and customized pathways. Additionally, this demonstration project will be implemented to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways.
GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows:
I.   THE VR CSPM STATES THAT TRANSITION SERVICES ARE TO BE PROVIDED TO ELIGIBLE STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES THAT FACILITATE THE TRANSITION FROM THE RECEIPT OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICES IN SECONDARY SCHOOL TO THE RECEIPT OF VR SERVICES ORIENTED TOWARD AN EMPLOYMENT OUTCOME (CSPM 450.1.02). (Page 248)
WFD: GVRA has partnered with WFD to engage youth in customized career pathways and supported employment. This work is funded through the USDOL ETA Disability Employment Initiative Cooperative Agreements. (Page 253)
i.   Implementing the Georgia Pathways to Work grant. As described in Section (d) Coordination with Education Officials, GVRA was awarded a grant through the Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Services Administration. The Georgia Pathways to Work will significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with GaDOE, WFD, and local businesses and employers. The focus of this proposed model will be to increase access for students with disabilities to the existing high school career pathways, as well as customizing those existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for those youth who are not in school. (Page 258)
Based on the feedback that GVRA has received, there were some common statewide needs identified for youth and students with disabilities. These include:
1. Increase and enhance transition services overall, especially to younger students, ages 14-16.
2. Improve the quality of GVRA’s transitional staff who are provided to the local school districts to ensure greater consistency of services.
3. Expand the array of transition services made available to schools.
4. Develop outreach efforts that engage youth with disabilities who have dropped out of school.
5. Improve alignment of GVRA’s transition services with the needs of the local school districts.
6. Improve alignment of the VR program’s training programs with the GaDOE’s occupational clusters and career pathways. (Page 273)
iii.  Develop and implement a career pathway model of services for both in-school students and out-of-school youth that will include Vocational Rehabilitation services that are aligned with the current GaDOE’s Occupational Clusters and curriculum-based career pathways; as well as alternative integrated community-based career pathways for those youth who are not in school.
iv.  Partner with GaDOE, TCSG and USG to develop collaborative arrangements that improve the transition from high school to post-secondary education for students with disabilities. (Page 278)
• Transform how GVRA and the VR services focus on youth and students with disabilities by integrating services agency-wide to make this population the highest focus.
• Partner with GaDOE to increase and deliver a comprehensive array of transitional services to every school district within the state, including a special focus on career pathways and customized career pathways.
• Develop a concentrated outreach effort to identify youth with disabilities that are not enrolled in school, and make the same robust services available to them.
• Partner with the existing VR provider network to create community-based career pathways for youth not enrolled in school.
• Partner with both TCSG and USG to improve post-secondary transition.
Strategies:
• Develop formal third-party agreements with local employers to contribute to all career pathways available to youth with disabilities, both in school and out of school. (Page 286)
GVRA’s goal to improve and expand VR services for students with disabilities by the following:
• Develop and offer a comprehensive array of services to all school districts statewide. Specifically, GVRA will develop all 5 required PETS activities, as well as the 9 authorized activities as may be needed, and offer those to every school district in the state of Georgia. These will include services that are VR Program-provided, as well as services provided through the VR provider network. GVRA’s goal is to establish a minimum number of PETS services offered and provided to each school district within the state. Then as these PETS services are provided, the services will be continually evaluated and changed for improvements that produce the best outcomes, either competitive employment or postsecondary education and training. Where there is a paucity of such PETS services in particular geographic areas of the state, GVRA will solicit both new service providers and/or new services to ensure the minimum of necessary PETS services. It should be noted that all PETS services statewide will also offer both during school and after school hours of availability; and GVRA will work collaboratively with each local school district to best fit the services to the community.
• Develop new and innovative services for both in-school and out-of-school career pathways. As a part of this, GVRA will utilize its current Georgia Career Pathways federal demonstration grant as the method to pilot new services that can be added to the array of PETS services. This will be done in collaboration with GaDOE, the individual local school district, and the local employers and businesses. For example, based on local employer involvement and feedback, GVRA may ask the local school district to tailor its current career pathway curriculum to fit the specific needs of the local employers, or may ask the school to include more opportunities for work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, etc., especially for the PETS students. As new services are piloted, they will be evaluated and improved as needed, with a long range to roll out successful new services statewide. (Page 288)
 

Employer/ Business

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 303)

511

~~The primary data collection and reporting system used by GVRA through the VR program is the Libera System 7 electronic case management system, and the data collected is specific to individuals served through the VR program. At the current time, neither the Libera System 7 case management system, nor its data, is integrated with all the programs and activities present in the one-stop centers. (Page 117)

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.
Georgia’s One-Stop delivery system is focused on ensuring universal access across its workforce system. The State and its local partners, maintain compliance with the provisions of WIOA Section 188 which require programmatic and physical accessibility. Through monitoring performed at both the state and local level, Georgia ensures that all One-Stops are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize Georgia’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual, to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. In addition, the State maintains a Methods of Administration which details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be maintained. The Methods of Administration is a “living” document which ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level as quickly as possible.
Separately, as a component of one-stop certification, the State collects a business plan from each LWDA which details how a new one-stop will satisfy accessibility requirements and the provisions of WIOA Section 188. In order to be certified, each comprehensive one-stop must satisfy the requisite federal criteria. This process ensures universal access to programmatic services and facilities are maintained across the state.
Moreover, the One-Stop Integration Working Group is identifying additional criteria which will be assessed during the one-stop certification process. This may lead to additional accessibility requirements being incorporated into the one-stop certification process. Through the One-Stop Integration Working Group, the State continues to prioritize programmatic and physical accessibility in the one-stop certification process. The One-Stop Integration Working Group will provide guidance and technical assistance to LWDBs prior to the completion of LWDB certification, prior to July 1, 2017. (Page 144-145)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 11 - 20 of 66

Real Careers - 11/13/2018

~~The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) builds on the work of the Jobs for All United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy grant. In addition, The Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights and Assistance Act defines employment as: People get and keep employment consistent with their interest, abilities and needs.

GCDD VisionThe GCDD’s priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as “customized employment.” Click here  https://gcdd.org/news-a-media/videos/75-ihg-employees.html   to view a video.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

2018 WorkSource Georgia Mountains Modification Revisions and Additions - 10/01/2018

~~“WorkSource Georgia Mountains (WSGM) has published Program Year 2018 Revisions to the Program Year (PY) 2016-2020 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Local Plan for the Georgia Mountains Local Workforce Development Region.WSGM receives WIOA funding to coordinate the delivery of employment and training activities in the Georgia Mountains region of Georgia. The Georgia Mountains region includes the following counties: Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Lumpkin, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, and White, along with 38 municipalities within these counties.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disability Providers of State –Funded Developmental Disability Services Fiscal Year 2018 - 07/01/2018

~~“Vision: It is the vision of DBHDD that every person who participates in our services leads a satisfying, independent life with dignity and respect. Mission: The mission of DBHDD is to provide and promote local accessibility and choice of services and programs for individuals, families and communities through partnerships, in order to create a sustainable, self-sufficient and resilient life in the community. Values: The core values of DBHDD are respect, inclusiveness, and transparency. DBHDD believes it is critical that services, supports, treatment and care respect the vision of the individual. Each provider must incorporate this belief and practice into its service delivery to support individuals with developmental disabilities in living a meaningful life in the community. Specifically, the provider must ensure: ➢ Person-centered service planning and delivery that address what is important to and for individuals.➢ Capacity and capabilities, including qualified and competent providers and staff. ➢ Individual safeguards.➢ Satisfactory individual outcomes.➢ Systems of care that have the infrastructure necessary to provide coordinated services, supports, treatment and care.➢ Individuals rights and responsibilities.➢ Individual access.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018” - 07/01/2018

“Community integration and inclusion into the larger natural community is supported and evident. Terms “Integration and Inclusion” mean: a. Use of community resources that are available to other citizens; b. Providing the opportunity to actively participate in community activities and types of employment as citizens without disabilities; c. The organization has community partnerships for capacity building and advocacy of activities to achieve this goal of integration;”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018 ” - 07/01/2018

“Quality Assurance and Standard Compliance Requirements 1.The DD Crisis Providers of the Crisis System shall develop and maintain performance indicators and outcome data as part of their quality management system that will assist DBHDD and Georgia Crisis Access Line (GCAL) to monitor and generate monthly reports of the Georgia Crisis Response System (GCRS-DD) to make quality improvement decisions based on data collected.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Transitioning Youth to Adult Care - 05/19/2018

~~Projects and Activities•Provide leadership training opportunities for youth with special needs to be mentors to other youth in transition across Georgia….•Develop and make available guidance materials for families, public health workers, physicians and healthcare professionals on transitioning youth with special needs to adult health care.•Provide trainings for youth, families, educators, and health care providers on topics such as preparing for higher education or vocational training, independent living, supported employment, recreation and leisure, and how to integrate health goals onto Individualized Education Programs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Governor and the General Assembly; to provide for a short title; to provide for definitions; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes”

Systems
  • Other

Money Follows the Person - 04/22/2018

~~“If you have lived in an inpatient facility (i.e., a hospital, nursing facility or an intermediate care facility for people with developmental disabilities) for at least 90 consecutive days and would rather live in your own home, apartment or group setting, you may be eligible for home-and community-based services (HCBS) through Georgia’s Medicaid programs.Money Follows the Person (MFP) can assist with home- and community-based services.  It is a grant offered through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Georgia Department of Community Health (DCH).” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Facilitated IEP Team Meeting Procedures - 03/01/2018

~~“IEP Team Meeting Facilitation Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team meeting facilitation is all about the student and helping the IEP Team overcome the pressure and anxiety often associated with a contentious meeting. The IEP facilitator makes sure that the focus of the Team remains on the best interests of the student. The facilitator is a skilled individual who has received specialized training in the area of conflict prevention and resolution through the IEP Team Meeting Facilitation process. IEP Team meeting facilitation is voluntary. Both parties must agree to invite an external facilitator into the IEP Team meeting. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. This is achieved by encouraging and directing communication specific to the IEP and assuring that the members of the IEP Team are empowered in their participation and invested in the IEP. The facilitator is not a member of the IEP Team and cannot provide legal advice to any Team member. Rather, the facilitator will help the IEP Team create an agenda, ground rules, and desired outcomes, and address issues during the IEP Team meeting that produce tension within the Team so that the Team is able to find their own solutions. The facilitator will also guide the discussions during the IEP Team meeting by asking student-focused questions.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Options Waiver Program (NOW) Renewal Announcement - 12/19/2017

~~“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has approved renewal of the New Options (NOW) Waiver through September 30, 2022.  The renewal reflects collaborative work by the Georgia Departments of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD) and Community Health (DCH) to align service rates with the Comprehensive Supports (COMP) Waiver Program and enhance supports to families and individuals through changes to respite services, community living support, therapy services and expand options to encourage the use of supported employment.  The frequently asked questions and answers below are designed to assist providers and family members, in understanding specific elements of the NOW Waiver renewal and invite them to participate in implementation plan meetings.  Provider/family forums will be scheduled to begin in January 2018 to answer questions and provide additional information about the implementation schedule….  Provides greater flexibility and assistance to individuals who wish to pursue   supported employment in community settings. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Governor and the General Assembly; to provide for a short title; to provide for definitions; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes”

Systems
  • Other

HB 768 Handicapped persons; ABLE program establishment to use tax exempt accounts to pay for qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; provisions - 05/03/2016

“A BILL to be entitled an Act to amend Title 30 of the O.C.G.A., relating to disabled persons, so as to provide for the establishment of a qualified ABLE program in this state to enable the contribution of funds to tax-exempt accounts to pay for the qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; to amend Code Section 48-7-27 of the O.C.G.A., relating to computation of taxable net income; to amend Code Section 50-13-2 of the O.C.G.A., relating to the definitions for purposes of the Georgia Administrative Procedure Act, so as to exclude the Georgia ABLE Program Corporation from the meaning of "agency"; to provide for related matters; to provide for an effective date; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Georgia House Resolution 642 - 08/17/2015

 “WHEREAS, an ‘Employment First’ policy provides that employment should be the first and preferred option for all people, regardless of their disability, and that employment in the general workforce at or above the minimum wage is the first and preferred option for all working age citizens with disabilities.”   “WHEREAS, an Employment First policy established by the State of Georgia would require the collaboration of all involved state agencies, including the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities, Department of Education, Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency, and the Department of Community Health, in aligning their programs and resources to such end.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 22

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018 ” - 07/01/2018

“Quality Assurance and Standard Compliance Requirements 1.The DD Crisis Providers of the Crisis System shall develop and maintain performance indicators and outcome data as part of their quality management system that will assist DBHDD and Georgia Crisis Access Line (GCAL) to monitor and generate monthly reports of the Georgia Crisis Response System (GCRS-DD) to make quality improvement decisions based on data collected.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Facilitated IEP Team Meeting Procedures - 03/01/2018

~~“IEP Team Meeting Facilitation Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team meeting facilitation is all about the student and helping the IEP Team overcome the pressure and anxiety often associated with a contentious meeting. The IEP facilitator makes sure that the focus of the Team remains on the best interests of the student. The facilitator is a skilled individual who has received specialized training in the area of conflict prevention and resolution through the IEP Team Meeting Facilitation process. IEP Team meeting facilitation is voluntary. Both parties must agree to invite an external facilitator into the IEP Team meeting. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. This is achieved by encouraging and directing communication specific to the IEP and assuring that the members of the IEP Team are empowered in their participation and invested in the IEP. The facilitator is not a member of the IEP Team and cannot provide legal advice to any Team member. Rather, the facilitator will help the IEP Team create an agenda, ground rules, and desired outcomes, and address issues during the IEP Team meeting that produce tension within the Team so that the Team is able to find their own solutions. The facilitator will also guide the discussions during the IEP Team meeting by asking student-focused questions.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Developmental Disabilities “Announcements” - 08/24/2017

~~“There were significant changes to the COMP Waiver that occurred following approval by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in March 2017.  As a result, the four fiscal support services agencies sent an information sheet with the following facts about the transition:

The changes that have occurred are as follows: •CLD has been removed•CLS has two new service codes, CL Basic and CL Extended•CL Basic is used for employees that work a shift of 2.75 hours or less•CL Extended is used for employees that work a shift of 3 or more hours•CLS received a 7.2% increase to the total funds allocated to CLS”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency FY 2017-2019 Strategic Plan (FY 2018 Update) - 08/03/2017

~~“While the Agency’s mission of employment and independence for Georgian with Disabilities remains the same, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), which was signed into law in July 2014, brought changes to the way GVRA serves clients with disabilities. WIOA’s implementing regulations went into effect on October 18, 2016. GVRA has been updating policies and procedures to adhere to the changes and improvements in services to individuals with disabilities.  One major tenant in the Act relates to services to students with disabilities (age 14 to 22) where GVRA will provide pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) to groups of students in secondary education and identified as being served on an IEP or 504 and who are therefore potentially eligible to receive pre-ETS.  Another major focus of the Act is to serve eligible youth with disabilities age 14 to 24 who are not in school or training and provide them with services that will lead to competitive employment. “      

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Deal announces launch of Georgia STABLE - 06/14/2017

~~“June 14, 2017Gov. Nathan Deal today announced the launch of Georgia STABLE, a tax-free savings program for eligible individuals with disabilities. The program is administered by the Georgia Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program Corporation, established through legislation signed in 2016. The Georgia ABLE Act is modeled after the federal ABLE Act of 2014.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

“Public Policy for the People: 13 February 2017” - 02/13/2017

~~“Besides GCDD's Public Policy Team trolling the halls of the Gold Dome to speak with legislators about the need for more DD Waivers and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education, we have also hosted 2 advocacy days so far. On February 1st we spoke about the need for more DD Waiver funding and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education. …

Systems
  • Other

Limitations on Subminimum Wage - 02/08/2017

~~“Any individual hired into subminimum wage employment after July 22, 2016, must receive CC&IR services once every six months the first year of employment and annually thereafter. All individuals employed at subminimum wage prior to July 22, 2016, require CC&IR services once by July 22, 2017, and annually thereafter. Employers should review any documents provided by the employee indicating that such counseling has been provided. The employer is required to verify the employee's completion of these services, and review and obtain any relevant documentation from the employee.

Under the WIOA amendments, employers are prohibited from compensating any individual with a disability who is 24 years of age or younger at subminimum wage, unless the individual has received documentation from GVRA upon completion of the following activities:

Pre-employment transition services or transition services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.Applied for vocational rehabilitation services, and the individual was determined:

Ineligible for vocational rehabilitation services.Eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, has an approved Individualized Plan for Employment, and the individual was unable to achieve an employment outcome in competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • 14(c)/Income Security

“Brush up on GCDD’s 2017 Legislative Priorities” - 01/01/2017

~~“Employment FirstEmployment First means that employment should be the first and preferred option for all people, regardless of their disability. Under Employment First legislation, employment in the general workforce at or above minimum wage is the first and preferred option for all working age citizens with disabilities. Under Employment First policy, state agencies will need to re-align their policies and funding to prioritize employment for all working-age Georgians with disabilities.•Support legislation that addresses employment barriers for people with disabilities, makes Georgia an Employment First state, and prioritizes competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities.

Inclusive Post-Secondary Education (IPSE) – Budget AskIPSE provides opportunities for students with intellectual disabilities to access higher education. This education prepares them to live increasingly independent lives and pursue careers of their choice. Graduates from IPSE programs are more likely to find employment and earn 73% more than their peers who do not receive post-secondary education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) “A New Focus on Transition: New Federal Regulations and New Initiatives Focus on Younger Clients” - 08/01/2016

“Georgia’s Career Pathways to Work: Explore, Engage and Employ (E3) initiative. Funded through a $4.7 million grant —stretched over five years — E3 is broken down into three components, and they follow the path of the student or young person as they prepare for a career. The first “Explore” phase encourages students and youth to begin exploring the world of work and possible career goals, learning about soft skills and how benefits work. The next phase, “Engage,” takes it a step further, allowing students to begin to participate in the world of work. In this phase, they’ll learn self-advocacy and the kind of skills that are required for different jobs. And the last phase, “Employ,” is broken down into two different phases in its own right. The first will focus on pre-employment services, preparing students to submit resumes and applications. The second looks at on-the-job accommodations, continuing education and the possibility of career advancement.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Georgia Career Pathways to Work, E3 Transition Services” - 05/06/2016

E3: Explore, Engage, Employ refers to Transition Services. There are two E3 initiatives in GVRA: -Georgia Career Pathways to Work – E3: Explore, Engage, Employ is a grant through which GVRA will initially work with 5 school districts to connect students and youth with disabilities to pathways that lead to careers. E3 services to these schools with begin 7/1/2016. -Statewide Services will be rolled out gradually to all school districts as information and data is gathered from the 5 districts served initially through the grant which is the pilot on which we will build statewide services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DBHDD/GVRA Supported Employment Collaboration for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities - 12/19/2018

~~“The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD), and Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s (GVRA) Supported Employment Collaboration went live statewide March 1, 2018. The goal of the collaboration is to support individuals with significant Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities in finding and maintaining competitive integrated employment.

GVRA is the funding source for the initial phases of Supported Employment services. DBHDD will be the funding source for long-term Supported Employment services following GVRA Services.

Individuals will be referred to GVRA from DBHDD for the initial phases of Supported Employment. Individuals will be referred from GVRA to DBHDD for long term supports. Long -term supports may be waiver funded, State-funded, or Employment Express funded.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transitioning Youth to Adult Care - 05/19/2018

~~Projects and Activities•Provide leadership training opportunities for youth with special needs to be mentors to other youth in transition across Georgia….•Develop and make available guidance materials for families, public health workers, physicians and healthcare professionals on transitioning youth with special needs to adult health care.•Provide trainings for youth, families, educators, and health care providers on topics such as preparing for higher education or vocational training, independent living, supported employment, recreation and leisure, and how to integrate health goals onto Individualized Education Programs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Gather to SOAR at Self-Employment Seminar” - 09/07/2017

~~“SOAR: A Pathway to Self-Employment seminar in August 2017 at the All About Developmental Disabilities (AADD) Family Support Center in Decatur, Georgia.

The seminar was co-hosted by Synergies Work, Inc., a nonprofit that provides people with disabilities the supports to become financially independent as entrepreneurs and the Georgia Microboards Association (GMA), a nonprofit organization that provides technical assistance to people with disabilities and their families.

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), behavioral health and community service professionals, individuals with disabilities and their families attended the one-day seminar to learn how to successfully be self-employed.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

GA Statewide Transition Steering Committee - Discovering Jobs Pilot Project - 09/04/2014

“The Statewide Transition Steering Committee…comprised of teachers and school vocational counselors, private employment representatives, other service providers, parents and advocacy groups, post-secondary and state agency representatives including VR…developed the Customized Supported Employment pilot project called Discovering Jobs: Linking Discovery to Employment that was launched in four counties. The on-going pilot utilizes a continuum of services and the Discovery process for students with significant cognitive disabilities as strategies to improve employment outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities' Mission

“The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities is the state's leader in advancing public policy on behalf of persons with developmental disabilities. Our mission is to promote public policy that creates an integrated community life for persons with developmental disabilities, their families, friends, neighbors and all who support them. We achieve this mission by sharing information, coordinating public outreach and implementing strategic legislative advocacy.    “The GCDD works with legislators and advocacy groups to influence and support public policy that fosters a positive change in the way education, housing, workplace/careers and community living opportunities are made available to persons with developmental disabilities.”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Georgia’s Explore, Engage, Employ (E3) - 11/01/2017

~~“Georgia VR is implementing E3 (Explore, Engage, Employ) in 7 school districts to serve 3,000 students and youth.  E3 goals are to engage employers to customize existing career pathways and develop alternative pathways for students and out of school youth; involve families to increase youth participation, and utilize social media strategies to develop services and connect youth to career interests.  Partners include the Poses Family Foundation, GA Department of Education, Technical College System of Georgia, Center for Leadership in Disability, Parent to Parent of Georgia, Burton Blatt Institute and Jobs for the Future.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

GVRA provides Career Specialist Pilot for ECCHS - 10/30/2017

~~“Elbert County Comprehensive High School (ECCHS) was selected as one of five Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) Capacity Building Pilots to receive a Career Specialist for Transition funded by GVRA. In collaboration with the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE), Division for Special Education Services and Supports, five pilots were invited to participate including Fulton County, Elbert County, Gainesville City, Henry County and Houston County School Systems….Through the assignment of GVRA funded Career Specialists to five pilot Local Education Agencies (LEA’s), the GaDOE, GVRA and LEA will work collaboratively to provide leadership, planning, technical assistance, and consultation, and to coordinate services and evaluate the effectiveness of a district-based Career Specialist for Transition to meet the requirements of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) as defined by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). One of the new provisions in WIOA requires Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), in collaboration with the LEA, to provide, or arrange for the provision of, pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities in Georgia secondary schools who are eligible or potentially eligible for services.

Services and support will be provided to students with disabilities in 9th -12th grades, ages 14 years through age 21 years statewide. With an expanded scope of work for students with disabilities, collaboration is essential.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Georgia Department of Community Affairs “Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program – Housing for Persons with Disabilities” - 08/01/2016

~~The Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program is designed for individuals with a disability who are at or below 30% of the Area Median Income and between the ages of 18 and 61. Recently, HUD awarded the State of Georgia with $14.4 million to provide long-term rental assistance to individuals who meet these qualifications. In order to be considered for the program, the participant must be referred by either the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities or the State of Georgia Money Follows the Person program.

To find out more on eligibility and how to get connected with the program, visit the DCA Section 811 website to find rental unit locations and program applications.

 

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Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia’s Career Pathways to Work: Explore, Engage and Employ (E3) - 01/08/2016

"GVRA was recently awarded $4.7 million by the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) to improve employment opportunities for students and youth with disabilities. E3 is designed to connect real people to real jobs that fill a real need for employers.  E3 will work with GaDOE identified career pathways by tailoring them to a variety of work opportunities available in the communities.  The program will engage employers and employ social media strategies to connect youth across the nation.  The program impact is to change how organizations support independence, employment and career advancement of students and youth with disabilities. The initial rollout will be in five school districts in Georgia.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia Disability Employment Initiative - 11/05/2015

“The Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD) was awarded $2.4 million by the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) to improve employment opportunities for adults and youth with disabilities. Georgia’s Disability Employment Initiative is a partnership between GDEcD and the Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA). The initiative is designed to improve job placement rates for youth and adults with disabilities that live within two of the state’s 19 Local Workforce Development Areas (LWDA).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…"   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services."  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Money Follows the Person

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…“…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Technical Assistance for Transition - 12/25/2018

~~This page is a list of materials about “Technical Assistance for Transition includes topics such as Transition Compliance, Transition Planning, IEP Development, and topics related to transition andimprovement activities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DBHDD receives federal Mental Health Awareness Training grant - 12/17/2018

~~“The Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD) received a Notice of Award from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for the Mental Health Awareness Training Grant.  The project award is $125,000 annually for three years, running November 30, 2018 through November 29, 2021.“One person, whether young or old, taking his or her own life is too many,” said Commissioner Judy Fitzgerald.  This grant will fuel our collective efforts to raise awareness, educate, train, and intervene so that Georgia will be at the forefront of national strategies to prevent tragic consequences.”  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

GA Department of Behavioral Health & DD - Guide to Supported Employment - 04/25/2015

This Guide to Supported Employment was prepared by the Georgia Division of Developmental Disabilities Statewide Quality Improvement Council. It is intended to: Explain why employment is important; Illustrate through real examples the difference work makes in people’s lives; Answer common questions about pay and health benefits when you work and have an intellectual and/or developmental disability; and Provide information and resources on Supported Employment programs in Georgia.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)

~~“Currently, there is no planned face-to-face district leader training, via the RESAs, for support in completing the initial 2017-2018 CNA report. The GaDOE will deliver on-line training on the CNA process, as already outlined through its webinar series, and face-to-face regional trainings in May 10, 2017….

The GaDOE is currently developing a dedicated webpage on the GaDOE website that will house all resources and information related to the CNA process. The Office of School & District Effectiveness will hold trainings for select groups following a schedule available through their office.”

Systems
  • Department of Education

University of GA, Institute of Human Development & Disability - Consulting/Technical Assistance

The IHDD is available for consultations and technical assistance with professionals, para-professionals, families and family members to create meaningful community activities that highlight people with disabilities and their families. IHDD has been highly sought to provide national consulting to train and develop new skills sets in Customized Employment and its associated Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Toolkit, as well as the Evidence-Based Individual Placement and Supports model of employment. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement

University of GA, Institute of Human Development & Disability - Customized Employment

This web resource defines Customized Employment with examples and provides an overview of the University’s Customized Employment Initiative. It includes sections: What is Customized Employment, Types of Customized Employment, and links to resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

University of GA, Institute on Human Development & Disability - WorkWorks Training

Through service, teaching, and research, the Institute on Human Development and Disability hopes to, “contribute to creating an environment where individuals with disabilities are independent and enjoy careers of choice.” Through WorkWorks, the institute offers a variety of training programs related to integrated employment opportunities for employment specialists and job coaches.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Justice Department Sues Georgia for Unnecessarily Segregating Students with Disabilities - 08/23/2016

The Lawsuit is the First Challenge to a State-Run School System for Segregating Students with Disabilities The Justice Department announced today that it has filed a lawsuit against the state of Georgia alleging that its treatment and segregation of students with disabilities in the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support (GNETS) Program violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Systems
  • Department of Education

Justice Department Reaches Extension Agreement to Improve Georgia’s Development Disability and Mental Health System - 05/18/2016

The extension agreement builds upon a 2010 settlement agreement resolving a lawsuit brought by the department under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Supreme Court’s Olmstead decision. The case involves Georgia’s provision of community services for individuals with mental illness and developmental disabilities. Under the agreement, Georgia will help people with developmental disabilities move from its state hospitals to integrated settings, consistent with their needs and preferences; will identify and address each individual’s needs in the community prior to discharge; and will monitor services and track outcomes for people after their discharge. For individuals who have moved from the state hospitals to the community, Georgia will monitor their health and wellbeing to ensure that emerging needs are met in a timely fashion. The extension agreement also calls for creation of at least 675 new Medicaid home- and community-based waiver slots as alternatives to placement in a facility.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

United States of America v. The State of Georgia, et al. Civil Action NO 1:10-CV-249-CAP - 10/19/2010

“To comply with this Settlement Agreement, the State shall provide the following services to individuals in the target population: … d. Supported Employment i. “Supported Employment will be operated according to an evidence-based supported employment model, and it will be assessed by an established fidelity scale such as the scale included in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) supported tool kit” ii. Enrollment in congregate programs shall not constitute Supported Employment. iii. Pursuant to the following schedule, the State shall provide Supported Employment services to 550 individuals with SPMI by July 1, 2015 .

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Displaying 11 - 18 of 18

New Waiver Rules from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services: Georgia’s Transition Plan - 03/17/2013

Georgia has developed the following Transition Plan to follow in response to the new HCBS Settings Rule. This Statewide Transition Plan will present ways in which the State of Georgia will develop a tool(s) and implement evaluations of its home and community -based (HCBS) settings where 1915(c) waiver program services are currently available. It will also address methodologies used to maximize and enhance the public input process and ongoing compliance monitoring. If it is determined that there are settings that do not meet the final regulations’ HCBS settings requirements, such HCBS settings will be required to make changes that will bring them into compliance . “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Community Based Alternatives for Youth (01.R02.00) - 10/01/2012

"Provides behavioral assistance, care management, clinical services, respite, supported employment, community transition, customized goods and services, expressive clinical services, family peer support, financial support, waiver transportation, youth peer support for individuals w/mental illness ages 18-21 and w/SED ages 4-17."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia New Options Waiver (0175.R06.00) - 10/01/2012

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, FMS, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech/language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for MR/IID "

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program - 03/03/2012

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.        
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver Program (0323.R04.00 - 01/01/2011

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational services, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, financial support services, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech and language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, community residential alternative, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/ID, DD, ages 0 - no max age."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Medicaid Activities “Waivers”

Waiver programs help people who are elderly or have disabilities and need help to live in their home or community instead of an institution such as a nursing home or ICF-MR. Each program offers several "core" services: -service coordination (help with managing care needs and services) -personal support (assistance with daily living activities, i.e. bathing, dressing, meals and housekeeping) -home health services (nursing, home health aide, and occupational, physical and speech therapy) -emergency response systems -respite care (caregiver relief)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver (COMP) - Provider Reference Guide

All providers (agencies) must apply to become a co-employer of services. Enrolled Co-Employer providers can serve in this capacity for the following COMP services, only: • Community Access • Community Guide • Community Living Support • Supported Employment • Transportation

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how Georgia administers its Medicaid program. As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act, the plan was developed by Georgia and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The state plan includes provisions that describes groups of individuals to be covered by Medicaid, Medicaid covered services, reimbursement methodologies for providers and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.  The approved State Plan also provides assurance that Georgia abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phablet

Snapshot

Things are looking peachy for workers with disabilities in the great state of Georgia, where high expectations are on the horizon.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Georgia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2016 to 2017
10,429,379
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.56%
Change from
2016 to 2017
661,498
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
227,895
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.45%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.42%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.01%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 10,429,379
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 661,498
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 227,895
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,329,722
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.45%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 587,687
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 663,272
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 784,314
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 398,279
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 53,476
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,548
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 22,395
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,788
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 13,132

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,350
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 282,646

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 13,859
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 45,947
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 98,241
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 14.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 2,706.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 4,671
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,857
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,929
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 47
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 11,826
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 442,689
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $8,253,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $17,324,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $112,518,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $17,188,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,960
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,939
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 10,524
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 24.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.97%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 25.80%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.75%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.95%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,688,563
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,114
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 239,895
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,043,403
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,283,298
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 214
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,158
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,372
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,823,472
AbilityOne wages (services). $11,757,487

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 30
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,464
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,464

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No specific disability related information found.  

Customized Employment

~~• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 247)
DBHDD: GVRA has a formal MOU with DBHDD that utilizes the SE IPS model. This MOU covers both the behavioral health and developmental disabilities divisions of DBHDD to serve those individuals using Supported and Customized Employment.
This agreement allows VR services to collaborate statewide with a network of providers including CSBs for the provision of SES. These agencies prepare VR clients for permanent jobs through supported employment and complementary services. The CSBs provide a wide scope of outpatient, day, residential housing, and community-based services that include SE. The Memorandum of Understanding with DBHDD allows for improved coordination of efforts to serve those with the most significant disabilities. (Page 253)
1. Disability-Specific Topics (including Positive Behavioral Supports training for counselors who have clients with Most Significant Disabilities, Deaf Culture Literacy, and Individualized Placement and Support Training for Counselors Handling Clients with Severe & Persistent Mental Illness.
2. Customized Employment Training.
3. Case Management.
4. Eligibility for Services.
5. IPE Development.
6. Varying Types of Caseloads (including Supported Employment and Transition).
7. Values-based Training for Persons Working with Individuals with Disabilities.
8. Collaborative Training with School Personnel on Creative Individual Assessments.
9. Transition Resource Planning.
10. Road Map for Services Available to Georgians.
11. Job Development.
12. Employment Engagement Training (developing a work plan and work goal).
13. Compliance Training (including Sexual Harassment and Anti-Discrimination).
VR continues to identify current information from research, rehabilitation trends and professional resources. This information is provided to agency staff through a variety of methods, including training at the State, quadrant and local level. Most recently this training has been focused on Customized Employment. (Page 269)
Access to Supported Employment: There are concerns that there is both a paucity of Supported Employment Providers, and that from the supported employment providers’ perspective, SES are cost–prohibitive. Concerns regarding access to Supported Employment have highlighted the following needs for services expansion:
1. Increase in SES, especially for those individuals with significant disabilities. Many of these individuals have limited or no access to SES.
2. Increase in both services and actual Customized Employment opportunities.
3. Increase in the availability in specific skills training that is actually aligned with real jobs within the state and less on generic training. (Page 271)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Describe how the designated State unit will collaborate with the State agency responsible for administering each of the following programs to develop opportunities for competitive integrated employment, to the greatest extent practicable:
1. THE STATE MEDICAID PLAN UNDER TITLE XIX OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT;
GVRA has established collaborative relationships with multiple State agencies in order to more efficiently and effectively assist individuals with disabilities in achieving employment in an integrated setting. In some cases, these collaborative relationships have been developed to enhance the working relationship between the VR program and other State agencies. Several of these relationships have been formalized through Interagency Cooperative Agreements that were described earlier in Sections (e) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations and (f) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of SES. GVRA has identified other State agencies in which formal agreements need to be developed to support collaboration and seamless service delivery statewide. (Page 258)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Through the workforce system, the State will provide youth participants the opportunity to become involved in 14 required youth elements which are listed in the Youth program elements section:
1. Tutoring, Study Skills Training, Instruction and Evidence Based Dropout Prevention and Recovery Strategies can allow a participant to attain their secondary school diploma or a recognized equivalent.
2. Alternative Secondary School Services or Dropout Recovery Services show students alternative learning environments that focus on their skills, abilities, and learning style to prevent them from dropping out of school.
3. Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences are structured learning programs that take place for a specific period.
4. Occupational Skills Training allows participants to become proficient in performing actual tasks and technical functions required by certain occupational fields at all different levels.
5. Education Offered Concurrently with and in the same context as Workforce Preparation integrates training and education.
6. Leadership Development includes the development of positive social and civic behaviors.
7. Supportive Services are in place to allow youth participants to partake in WIOA activities.
8. Adult Mentoring is a 12-month program that matches a youth participant with an adult that will guide the mentee.
9. Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling gives youth participants the opportunity to meet with counselors for career and academic counseling.
10. Financial Literacy Education informs participants of smart financial decisions and habits.
11. Entrepreneurial Skills Training educates youth participants on the skills needed to start and maintain a small business.
12. Labor Market and Employment Information Services provide information about in-demand industry sectors.
13. Activities that Prepare for Transition to Postsecondary Education and Training allows for career exploration and research.
14. Follow-up Services are available to youth participants once they have exited the program. (Page 184)
Services are provided to eligible youth participants through a network of youth service providers, which are competitively procured by Georgia’s 19 LWDAs. Georgia is committed to providing, through LWDAs, the following required youth elements:
1. Tutoring, Study Skills Training, Instruction and Evidence based Drop-out Prevention and Recovery Strategies;
2. Alternative Secondary School Services or Drop-out Recovery Services;
3. Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences;
4. Occupational Skills Training;
5. Education Offered Concurrently with and in the same context as Workforce Preparation;
6. Leadership Development;
7. Supportive Services;
8. Adult Mentoring;
9. Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling;
10. Financial Literacy Education;
11. Entrepreneurial Skills Training;
12. Labor Market and Employment Information Services;
13. Activities that Prepare for Transition to Post-secondary Education and Training; and
14. Follow-up Services. (Page 195)
 

School to Work Transition

~~TAA coordinates and facilitates worker orientations to inform the workers about the benefits and services they may receive as well as the eligibility requirements associated with each benefit. The worker orientations often include LWDA representatives to provide guidance on demand occupations and available training in the LWDA. DOL staff assist workers with TAA registration and filing UI claims. (Page 162)
x. The Georgia SRC strongly supports amending current 361.45(c)(2) by adding a new paragraph (v) that would require a DSU to provide eligible individuals who are entitled to Social Security benefits under titles II or XVI of the Social Security Act, information on available assistance and supports available to them when entering the workforce (i.e., benefits planning and financial supports). (Page 239)
Non–Disability Specific Barriers: There is on–going feedback for assistance to address some of the non–disability specific barriers to employment such as transportation, disincentives through entitlement benefits, and lack of family support for employment. (Page 271)
 

Career Pathways

~~Project SEARCH is only offered in a subset of communities across Georgia. The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, one-year, school-to-work program for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities that takes place entirely at the workplace. This innovative, business-led model of school-to-work transition features total workplace immersion, which facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction; career exploration; and hands-on, worksite-based training and support. The goal for each student is competitive employment. Project SEARCH was developed at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and has been implemented at several sites in Georgia through a statewide initiative involving the collaborative effort of DoDD, a division of GVRA, area school systems, and several of Georgia’s leading employers. GVRA is working to add Project Search partners across the state to create more opportunities for youth with significant disabilities in obtaining real-life work experience that improves successful transitions from school to adult life. (Page 242)
ii. Goal II - Expand transition services to assist more students with disabilities to go from high school to work or post-secondary education/training. (Page 291)
 

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~GVRA has a strong statewide presence with offices located in urban and rural areas to provide vocational rehabilitation services to assist in the workforce development of individuals with disabilities. GVRA intends to focus on both youth with disabilities and students with disabilities to better prepare them to become an integral part of Georgia’s workforce. GVRA plans to offer an array of transition services to every public school district in the state with these services focused on assisting students with disabilities to either continue on to a post-secondary education or into a career pathway that is based on the specific skill requirements of Georgia’s employers. GVRA plans to conduct outreach activities to identify and attract those youth with disabilities who are not in school to participate in community-based alternative career pathways that are also based on the specific skill requirements of Georgia’s employers; or if appropriate, assist these youth in returning to school, either secondary or post-secondary. (Page 61)
Finally, GVRA has partnered with the Department of Education (DOE) in the current federal career pathways demonstration grant to expand transition services to students with disabilities and out-of-school youth that lead to real jobs in their communities. As a part of this partnership, GVRA intends to offer an array of transition services to the 50 intensive school districts identified by DOE as part of DOE’s state systemic improvement plan (SSIP).(Page 78)
Youth with Disabilities
Georgia’s one-stop system engages youth in customized career pathways and SES through collaborative partnerships between VR and other core partner programs in the one-stop system. Georgia recently developed a strategic initiative to expand and improve VR services for youth with disabilities who are either in-school or out-of-school. The purpose of this initiative is to braid existing and new resources to offer a robust, comprehensive array of VR services to all schools. Current VR program policies and procedures are being reviewed and amended to reflect this new way of doing business. The plan includes the provision of pre-employment transition services and timely development and approval of an individualized plan for employment for each youth served. One subset of the proposed plan to expand and improve VR services is a newly awarded, five-year demonstration project entitled “Georgia Pathways to Work” funded through the US Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Services Administration.
The proposed Georgia Pathways to Work program aims to significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with the core program partners, GaDOE, as wells as local employers. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as HDCI to ensure responsiveness to the known workforce demands in Georgia, as well as supporting their efforts to better engage those with disabilities. The overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive integrated employment through improving the 18 existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for out-of-school youth. (Page 104)
1. Provide the vision and mission of the program or organization. Please include a description of the population that the program will serve, including how the program will meet the needs of persons with barriers to employment (e.g. Displaced Homemaker, Low-income Individual, Individuals with Disabilities, Single Parents, and other individuals as described in the law).
2. Provide a description (and supporting documents, when available) of the program’s implementation of career pathways system as well as any cooperative agreements/contracts that the program has with other agencies and service providers for the delivery of adult education and literacy activities. Also, describe ways in which the program coordinates with other service providers to provide wrap-around services to participants (e.g. child care, transportation). (Page 221)
• The depth, intensity, and rigor of the programs and activities offered by the eligible provider. The proposed program must incorporate the basic tenets of reading instruction. Attention will be given to the extent to which the eligible provider incorporates stringent research in the grant proposal submission and the development of the literacy program itself;
• The extent to which the eligible provider’s program is based on intense research and best practices;
• The extent to which the eligible provider demonstrates the effective use of technology for instruction, to include distance education, toward students’ improved performance;
• The eligible provider’s demonstrated integration of contextualized instruction, to blend literacy skills, and preparation for transition to post-secondary education or entry into the workplace. Particular attention will be given to implementation of a career pathways system, activities that promote and lead to economic self-sufficiency, and the ability to exercise the full rights of citizenship; (Page 222)
The GVRA Executive Director provided an update to SRC members for their meeting in October on actions the agency has taken to implement WIOA recommendations for expanding and enhancing services for youth with disabilities. This work includes the receipt of two new federal grant awards:
1. U.S. Department of Labor, ETA’s Disability Employment Initiative Cooperative Agreements: awarded directly to WFD in partnership with GVRA that focuses on the Georgia Disability Employment Initiative, Customized Career Pathways.
2. U.S. Department of Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration’s Demonstration and Training: Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities, Georgia Pathways to Work: awarded directly to GVRA that focuses on career pathways for youth with disabilities who are in school or out-of-school. In addition, GVRA has appointed a Director of Transition Services. This new position emphasizes the importance and significance of services to youth with disabilities before they leave high school. All of these activities are very innovative in preparing high school students with disabilities for competitive employment. The Council would like to see these programs expanded throughout the state as part of VR transition services. (Page 240)
Georgia Pathways to Work will change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as Go Build Georgia and HDCI to be responsive to the known market demands for careers in Georgia, as well as supporting employer efforts to more effectively engage Georgians with disabilities. Furthermore, the overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive, integrated employment through existing and customized pathways. Additionally, this demonstration project will be implemented to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways.
GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows: (Page 248)
In collaboration with GaDOE, Burton Blatt Institute, and Poses Family Foundation, GVRA is customizing the landscape of career pathways for young Georgians with disabilities. The Georgia Pathways to Work program- E3: Explore, Engage, Employ- connects real people to real jobs that fill a real need for employers in their individual communities. The purpose of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to improve the 18 existing career pathways by tailoring them to a variety of work opportunities available in the communities. The program will engage employers in the model design and employ social media strategies to connect youth across the nation. The project impact is to change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. (Page 247)
• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 247)
Georgia Pathways to Work will change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as Go Build Georgia and HDCI to be responsive to the known market demands for careers in Georgia, as well as supporting employer efforts to more effectively engage Georgians with disabilities. Furthermore, the overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive, integrated employment through existing and customized pathways. Additionally, this demonstration project will be implemented to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways.
GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows:
I.   THE VR CSPM STATES THAT TRANSITION SERVICES ARE TO BE PROVIDED TO ELIGIBLE STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES THAT FACILITATE THE TRANSITION FROM THE RECEIPT OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICES IN SECONDARY SCHOOL TO THE RECEIPT OF VR SERVICES ORIENTED TOWARD AN EMPLOYMENT OUTCOME (CSPM 450.1.02). (Page 248)
WFD: GVRA has partnered with WFD to engage youth in customized career pathways and supported employment. This work is funded through the USDOL ETA Disability Employment Initiative Cooperative Agreements. (Page 253)
i.   Implementing the Georgia Pathways to Work grant. As described in Section (d) Coordination with Education Officials, GVRA was awarded a grant through the Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Services Administration. The Georgia Pathways to Work will significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with GaDOE, WFD, and local businesses and employers. The focus of this proposed model will be to increase access for students with disabilities to the existing high school career pathways, as well as customizing those existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for those youth who are not in school. (Page 258)
Based on the feedback that GVRA has received, there were some common statewide needs identified for youth and students with disabilities. These include:
1. Increase and enhance transition services overall, especially to younger students, ages 14-16.
2. Improve the quality of GVRA’s transitional staff who are provided to the local school districts to ensure greater consistency of services.
3. Expand the array of transition services made available to schools.
4. Develop outreach efforts that engage youth with disabilities who have dropped out of school.
5. Improve alignment of GVRA’s transition services with the needs of the local school districts.
6. Improve alignment of the VR program’s training programs with the GaDOE’s occupational clusters and career pathways. (Page 273)
iii.  Develop and implement a career pathway model of services for both in-school students and out-of-school youth that will include Vocational Rehabilitation services that are aligned with the current GaDOE’s Occupational Clusters and curriculum-based career pathways; as well as alternative integrated community-based career pathways for those youth who are not in school.
iv.  Partner with GaDOE, TCSG and USG to develop collaborative arrangements that improve the transition from high school to post-secondary education for students with disabilities. (Page 278)
• Transform how GVRA and the VR services focus on youth and students with disabilities by integrating services agency-wide to make this population the highest focus.
• Partner with GaDOE to increase and deliver a comprehensive array of transitional services to every school district within the state, including a special focus on career pathways and customized career pathways.
• Develop a concentrated outreach effort to identify youth with disabilities that are not enrolled in school, and make the same robust services available to them.
• Partner with the existing VR provider network to create community-based career pathways for youth not enrolled in school.
• Partner with both TCSG and USG to improve post-secondary transition.
Strategies:
• Develop formal third-party agreements with local employers to contribute to all career pathways available to youth with disabilities, both in school and out of school. (Page 286)
GVRA’s goal to improve and expand VR services for students with disabilities by the following:
• Develop and offer a comprehensive array of services to all school districts statewide. Specifically, GVRA will develop all 5 required PETS activities, as well as the 9 authorized activities as may be needed, and offer those to every school district in the state of Georgia. These will include services that are VR Program-provided, as well as services provided through the VR provider network. GVRA’s goal is to establish a minimum number of PETS services offered and provided to each school district within the state. Then as these PETS services are provided, the services will be continually evaluated and changed for improvements that produce the best outcomes, either competitive employment or postsecondary education and training. Where there is a paucity of such PETS services in particular geographic areas of the state, GVRA will solicit both new service providers and/or new services to ensure the minimum of necessary PETS services. It should be noted that all PETS services statewide will also offer both during school and after school hours of availability; and GVRA will work collaboratively with each local school district to best fit the services to the community.
• Develop new and innovative services for both in-school and out-of-school career pathways. As a part of this, GVRA will utilize its current Georgia Career Pathways federal demonstration grant as the method to pilot new services that can be added to the array of PETS services. This will be done in collaboration with GaDOE, the individual local school district, and the local employers and businesses. For example, based on local employer involvement and feedback, GVRA may ask the local school district to tailor its current career pathway curriculum to fit the specific needs of the local employers, or may ask the school to include more opportunities for work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, etc., especially for the PETS students. As new services are piloted, they will be evaluated and improved as needed, with a long range to roll out successful new services statewide. (Page 288)
 

Employer/ Business

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 303)

511

~~The primary data collection and reporting system used by GVRA through the VR program is the Libera System 7 electronic case management system, and the data collected is specific to individuals served through the VR program. At the current time, neither the Libera System 7 case management system, nor its data, is integrated with all the programs and activities present in the one-stop centers. (Page 117)

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.
Georgia’s One-Stop delivery system is focused on ensuring universal access across its workforce system. The State and its local partners, maintain compliance with the provisions of WIOA Section 188 which require programmatic and physical accessibility. Through monitoring performed at both the state and local level, Georgia ensures that all One-Stops are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize Georgia’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual, to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. In addition, the State maintains a Methods of Administration which details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be maintained. The Methods of Administration is a “living” document which ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level as quickly as possible.
Separately, as a component of one-stop certification, the State collects a business plan from each LWDA which details how a new one-stop will satisfy accessibility requirements and the provisions of WIOA Section 188. In order to be certified, each comprehensive one-stop must satisfy the requisite federal criteria. This process ensures universal access to programmatic services and facilities are maintained across the state.
Moreover, the One-Stop Integration Working Group is identifying additional criteria which will be assessed during the one-stop certification process. This may lead to additional accessibility requirements being incorporated into the one-stop certification process. Through the One-Stop Integration Working Group, the State continues to prioritize programmatic and physical accessibility in the one-stop certification process. The One-Stop Integration Working Group will provide guidance and technical assistance to LWDBs prior to the completion of LWDB certification, prior to July 1, 2017. (Page 144-145)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 11 - 20 of 66

Real Careers - 11/13/2018

~~The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) builds on the work of the Jobs for All United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy grant. In addition, The Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights and Assistance Act defines employment as: People get and keep employment consistent with their interest, abilities and needs.

GCDD VisionThe GCDD’s priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as “customized employment.” Click here  https://gcdd.org/news-a-media/videos/75-ihg-employees.html   to view a video.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

2018 WorkSource Georgia Mountains Modification Revisions and Additions - 10/01/2018

~~“WorkSource Georgia Mountains (WSGM) has published Program Year 2018 Revisions to the Program Year (PY) 2016-2020 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Local Plan for the Georgia Mountains Local Workforce Development Region.WSGM receives WIOA funding to coordinate the delivery of employment and training activities in the Georgia Mountains region of Georgia. The Georgia Mountains region includes the following counties: Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Lumpkin, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, and White, along with 38 municipalities within these counties.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disability Providers of State –Funded Developmental Disability Services Fiscal Year 2018 - 07/01/2018

~~“Vision: It is the vision of DBHDD that every person who participates in our services leads a satisfying, independent life with dignity and respect. Mission: The mission of DBHDD is to provide and promote local accessibility and choice of services and programs for individuals, families and communities through partnerships, in order to create a sustainable, self-sufficient and resilient life in the community. Values: The core values of DBHDD are respect, inclusiveness, and transparency. DBHDD believes it is critical that services, supports, treatment and care respect the vision of the individual. Each provider must incorporate this belief and practice into its service delivery to support individuals with developmental disabilities in living a meaningful life in the community. Specifically, the provider must ensure: ➢ Person-centered service planning and delivery that address what is important to and for individuals.➢ Capacity and capabilities, including qualified and competent providers and staff. ➢ Individual safeguards.➢ Satisfactory individual outcomes.➢ Systems of care that have the infrastructure necessary to provide coordinated services, supports, treatment and care.➢ Individuals rights and responsibilities.➢ Individual access.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018” - 07/01/2018

“Community integration and inclusion into the larger natural community is supported and evident. Terms “Integration and Inclusion” mean: a. Use of community resources that are available to other citizens; b. Providing the opportunity to actively participate in community activities and types of employment as citizens without disabilities; c. The organization has community partnerships for capacity building and advocacy of activities to achieve this goal of integration;”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018 ” - 07/01/2018

“Quality Assurance and Standard Compliance Requirements 1.The DD Crisis Providers of the Crisis System shall develop and maintain performance indicators and outcome data as part of their quality management system that will assist DBHDD and Georgia Crisis Access Line (GCAL) to monitor and generate monthly reports of the Georgia Crisis Response System (GCRS-DD) to make quality improvement decisions based on data collected.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Transitioning Youth to Adult Care - 05/19/2018

~~Projects and Activities•Provide leadership training opportunities for youth with special needs to be mentors to other youth in transition across Georgia….•Develop and make available guidance materials for families, public health workers, physicians and healthcare professionals on transitioning youth with special needs to adult health care.•Provide trainings for youth, families, educators, and health care providers on topics such as preparing for higher education or vocational training, independent living, supported employment, recreation and leisure, and how to integrate health goals onto Individualized Education Programs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Governor and the General Assembly; to provide for a short title; to provide for definitions; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes”

Systems
  • Other

Money Follows the Person - 04/22/2018

~~“If you have lived in an inpatient facility (i.e., a hospital, nursing facility or an intermediate care facility for people with developmental disabilities) for at least 90 consecutive days and would rather live in your own home, apartment or group setting, you may be eligible for home-and community-based services (HCBS) through Georgia’s Medicaid programs.Money Follows the Person (MFP) can assist with home- and community-based services.  It is a grant offered through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Georgia Department of Community Health (DCH).” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Facilitated IEP Team Meeting Procedures - 03/01/2018

~~“IEP Team Meeting Facilitation Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team meeting facilitation is all about the student and helping the IEP Team overcome the pressure and anxiety often associated with a contentious meeting. The IEP facilitator makes sure that the focus of the Team remains on the best interests of the student. The facilitator is a skilled individual who has received specialized training in the area of conflict prevention and resolution through the IEP Team Meeting Facilitation process. IEP Team meeting facilitation is voluntary. Both parties must agree to invite an external facilitator into the IEP Team meeting. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. This is achieved by encouraging and directing communication specific to the IEP and assuring that the members of the IEP Team are empowered in their participation and invested in the IEP. The facilitator is not a member of the IEP Team and cannot provide legal advice to any Team member. Rather, the facilitator will help the IEP Team create an agenda, ground rules, and desired outcomes, and address issues during the IEP Team meeting that produce tension within the Team so that the Team is able to find their own solutions. The facilitator will also guide the discussions during the IEP Team meeting by asking student-focused questions.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Options Waiver Program (NOW) Renewal Announcement - 12/19/2017

~~“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has approved renewal of the New Options (NOW) Waiver through September 30, 2022.  The renewal reflects collaborative work by the Georgia Departments of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD) and Community Health (DCH) to align service rates with the Comprehensive Supports (COMP) Waiver Program and enhance supports to families and individuals through changes to respite services, community living support, therapy services and expand options to encourage the use of supported employment.  The frequently asked questions and answers below are designed to assist providers and family members, in understanding specific elements of the NOW Waiver renewal and invite them to participate in implementation plan meetings.  Provider/family forums will be scheduled to begin in January 2018 to answer questions and provide additional information about the implementation schedule….  Provides greater flexibility and assistance to individuals who wish to pursue   supported employment in community settings. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Governor and the General Assembly; to provide for a short title; to provide for definitions; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes”

Systems
  • Other

HB 768 Handicapped persons; ABLE program establishment to use tax exempt accounts to pay for qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; provisions - 05/03/2016

“A BILL to be entitled an Act to amend Title 30 of the O.C.G.A., relating to disabled persons, so as to provide for the establishment of a qualified ABLE program in this state to enable the contribution of funds to tax-exempt accounts to pay for the qualified expenses of eligible individuals with disabilities; to amend Code Section 48-7-27 of the O.C.G.A., relating to computation of taxable net income; to amend Code Section 50-13-2 of the O.C.G.A., relating to the definitions for purposes of the Georgia Administrative Procedure Act, so as to exclude the Georgia ABLE Program Corporation from the meaning of "agency"; to provide for related matters; to provide for an effective date; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Georgia House Resolution 642 - 08/17/2015

 “WHEREAS, an ‘Employment First’ policy provides that employment should be the first and preferred option for all people, regardless of their disability, and that employment in the general workforce at or above the minimum wage is the first and preferred option for all working age citizens with disabilities.”   “WHEREAS, an Employment First policy established by the State of Georgia would require the collaboration of all involved state agencies, including the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities, Department of Education, Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency, and the Department of Community Health, in aligning their programs and resources to such end.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 20 of 22

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018 ” - 07/01/2018

“Quality Assurance and Standard Compliance Requirements 1.The DD Crisis Providers of the Crisis System shall develop and maintain performance indicators and outcome data as part of their quality management system that will assist DBHDD and Georgia Crisis Access Line (GCAL) to monitor and generate monthly reports of the Georgia Crisis Response System (GCRS-DD) to make quality improvement decisions based on data collected.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Facilitated IEP Team Meeting Procedures - 03/01/2018

~~“IEP Team Meeting Facilitation Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team meeting facilitation is all about the student and helping the IEP Team overcome the pressure and anxiety often associated with a contentious meeting. The IEP facilitator makes sure that the focus of the Team remains on the best interests of the student. The facilitator is a skilled individual who has received specialized training in the area of conflict prevention and resolution through the IEP Team Meeting Facilitation process. IEP Team meeting facilitation is voluntary. Both parties must agree to invite an external facilitator into the IEP Team meeting. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. This is achieved by encouraging and directing communication specific to the IEP and assuring that the members of the IEP Team are empowered in their participation and invested in the IEP. The facilitator is not a member of the IEP Team and cannot provide legal advice to any Team member. Rather, the facilitator will help the IEP Team create an agenda, ground rules, and desired outcomes, and address issues during the IEP Team meeting that produce tension within the Team so that the Team is able to find their own solutions. The facilitator will also guide the discussions during the IEP Team meeting by asking student-focused questions.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Developmental Disabilities “Announcements” - 08/24/2017

~~“There were significant changes to the COMP Waiver that occurred following approval by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in March 2017.  As a result, the four fiscal support services agencies sent an information sheet with the following facts about the transition:

The changes that have occurred are as follows: •CLD has been removed•CLS has two new service codes, CL Basic and CL Extended•CL Basic is used for employees that work a shift of 2.75 hours or less•CL Extended is used for employees that work a shift of 3 or more hours•CLS received a 7.2% increase to the total funds allocated to CLS”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency FY 2017-2019 Strategic Plan (FY 2018 Update) - 08/03/2017

~~“While the Agency’s mission of employment and independence for Georgian with Disabilities remains the same, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), which was signed into law in July 2014, brought changes to the way GVRA serves clients with disabilities. WIOA’s implementing regulations went into effect on October 18, 2016. GVRA has been updating policies and procedures to adhere to the changes and improvements in services to individuals with disabilities.  One major tenant in the Act relates to services to students with disabilities (age 14 to 22) where GVRA will provide pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) to groups of students in secondary education and identified as being served on an IEP or 504 and who are therefore potentially eligible to receive pre-ETS.  Another major focus of the Act is to serve eligible youth with disabilities age 14 to 24 who are not in school or training and provide them with services that will lead to competitive employment. “      

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Deal announces launch of Georgia STABLE - 06/14/2017

~~“June 14, 2017Gov. Nathan Deal today announced the launch of Georgia STABLE, a tax-free savings program for eligible individuals with disabilities. The program is administered by the Georgia Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program Corporation, established through legislation signed in 2016. The Georgia ABLE Act is modeled after the federal ABLE Act of 2014.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

“Public Policy for the People: 13 February 2017” - 02/13/2017

~~“Besides GCDD's Public Policy Team trolling the halls of the Gold Dome to speak with legislators about the need for more DD Waivers and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education, we have also hosted 2 advocacy days so far. On February 1st we spoke about the need for more DD Waiver funding and more funding for Inclusive Post-Secondary Education. …

Systems
  • Other

Limitations on Subminimum Wage - 02/08/2017

~~“Any individual hired into subminimum wage employment after July 22, 2016, must receive CC&IR services once every six months the first year of employment and annually thereafter. All individuals employed at subminimum wage prior to July 22, 2016, require CC&IR services once by July 22, 2017, and annually thereafter. Employers should review any documents provided by the employee indicating that such counseling has been provided. The employer is required to verify the employee's completion of these services, and review and obtain any relevant documentation from the employee.

Under the WIOA amendments, employers are prohibited from compensating any individual with a disability who is 24 years of age or younger at subminimum wage, unless the individual has received documentation from GVRA upon completion of the following activities:

Pre-employment transition services or transition services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.Applied for vocational rehabilitation services, and the individual was determined:

Ineligible for vocational rehabilitation services.Eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, has an approved Individualized Plan for Employment, and the individual was unable to achieve an employment outcome in competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • 14(c)/Income Security

“Brush up on GCDD’s 2017 Legislative Priorities” - 01/01/2017

~~“Employment FirstEmployment First means that employment should be the first and preferred option for all people, regardless of their disability. Under Employment First legislation, employment in the general workforce at or above minimum wage is the first and preferred option for all working age citizens with disabilities. Under Employment First policy, state agencies will need to re-align their policies and funding to prioritize employment for all working-age Georgians with disabilities.•Support legislation that addresses employment barriers for people with disabilities, makes Georgia an Employment First state, and prioritizes competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities.

Inclusive Post-Secondary Education (IPSE) – Budget AskIPSE provides opportunities for students with intellectual disabilities to access higher education. This education prepares them to live increasingly independent lives and pursue careers of their choice. Graduates from IPSE programs are more likely to find employment and earn 73% more than their peers who do not receive post-secondary education.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) “A New Focus on Transition: New Federal Regulations and New Initiatives Focus on Younger Clients” - 08/01/2016

“Georgia’s Career Pathways to Work: Explore, Engage and Employ (E3) initiative. Funded through a $4.7 million grant —stretched over five years — E3 is broken down into three components, and they follow the path of the student or young person as they prepare for a career. The first “Explore” phase encourages students and youth to begin exploring the world of work and possible career goals, learning about soft skills and how benefits work. The next phase, “Engage,” takes it a step further, allowing students to begin to participate in the world of work. In this phase, they’ll learn self-advocacy and the kind of skills that are required for different jobs. And the last phase, “Employ,” is broken down into two different phases in its own right. The first will focus on pre-employment services, preparing students to submit resumes and applications. The second looks at on-the-job accommodations, continuing education and the possibility of career advancement.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Georgia Career Pathways to Work, E3 Transition Services” - 05/06/2016

E3: Explore, Engage, Employ refers to Transition Services. There are two E3 initiatives in GVRA: -Georgia Career Pathways to Work – E3: Explore, Engage, Employ is a grant through which GVRA will initially work with 5 school districts to connect students and youth with disabilities to pathways that lead to careers. E3 services to these schools with begin 7/1/2016. -Statewide Services will be rolled out gradually to all school districts as information and data is gathered from the 5 districts served initially through the grant which is the pilot on which we will build statewide services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

HUD Awards $4.8 Million To Help Low-Income Veterans Rehabiitate Their Homes - 07/18/2019

~~The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) today announced $4.8 million in funding through the Veterans Housing Rehabilitation and Modification Pilot (VHRMP) Program to assist disabled veterans with modifying or rehabilitating their homes, making them more accessible.

Through the VHRMP program, grantees will make necessary physical modifications to address the adaptive housing needs of eligible veterans, including wheelchair ramps, widening exterior and interior doors, reconfiguring and reequipping bathrooms, or adding a bedroom or bathroom for the veteran’s caregiver.

“Our veterans gave everything in service to our country so it’s now our duty to ensure they have a safe and decent place to call home,” said HUD Secretary Ben Carson. “The grants awarded today ensure veterans living with disabilities can make the necessary adaptive modifications to their homes, allowing them to lead self-sufficient lives.”

“Our biggest hope for Veterans is that they fully participate in the country they fought to defend once they return from service,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “These grants further that goal by ensuring Veterans with service-related disabilities don’t just get housing, but live in a home that meets their specific needs. We’re proud to work with our nonprofit partners once again this year to help our Veterans.”

The purpose of this pilot program is to assist our nation’s low-income veterans living with disabilities who need adaptive housing to help them regain or maintain their independence. By partnering with the VA, HUD is addressing these challenges by awarding competitive grants to organizations that primarily serve veterans and low-income people.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DBHDD/GVRA Supported Employment Collaboration for Individuals with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities - 12/19/2018

~~“The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD), Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD), and Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency’s (GVRA) Supported Employment Collaboration went live statewide March 1, 2018. The goal of the collaboration is to support individuals with significant Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities in finding and maintaining competitive integrated employment.

GVRA is the funding source for the initial phases of Supported Employment services. DBHDD will be the funding source for long-term Supported Employment services following GVRA Services.

Individuals will be referred to GVRA from DBHDD for the initial phases of Supported Employment. Individuals will be referred from GVRA to DBHDD for long term supports. Long -term supports may be waiver funded, State-funded, or Employment Express funded.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transitioning Youth to Adult Care - 05/19/2018

~~Projects and Activities•Provide leadership training opportunities for youth with special needs to be mentors to other youth in transition across Georgia….•Develop and make available guidance materials for families, public health workers, physicians and healthcare professionals on transitioning youth with special needs to adult health care.•Provide trainings for youth, families, educators, and health care providers on topics such as preparing for higher education or vocational training, independent living, supported employment, recreation and leisure, and how to integrate health goals onto Individualized Education Programs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Entrepreneurs with Disabilities Gather to SOAR at Self-Employment Seminar” - 09/07/2017

~~“SOAR: A Pathway to Self-Employment seminar in August 2017 at the All About Developmental Disabilities (AADD) Family Support Center in Decatur, Georgia.

The seminar was co-hosted by Synergies Work, Inc., a nonprofit that provides people with disabilities the supports to become financially independent as entrepreneurs and the Georgia Microboards Association (GMA), a nonprofit organization that provides technical assistance to people with disabilities and their families.

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), behavioral health and community service professionals, individuals with disabilities and their families attended the one-day seminar to learn how to successfully be self-employed.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

GA Statewide Transition Steering Committee - Discovering Jobs Pilot Project - 09/04/2014

“The Statewide Transition Steering Committee…comprised of teachers and school vocational counselors, private employment representatives, other service providers, parents and advocacy groups, post-secondary and state agency representatives including VR…developed the Customized Supported Employment pilot project called Discovering Jobs: Linking Discovery to Employment that was launched in four counties. The on-going pilot utilizes a continuum of services and the Discovery process for students with significant cognitive disabilities as strategies to improve employment outcomes.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities' Mission

“The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities is the state's leader in advancing public policy on behalf of persons with developmental disabilities. Our mission is to promote public policy that creates an integrated community life for persons with developmental disabilities, their families, friends, neighbors and all who support them. We achieve this mission by sharing information, coordinating public outreach and implementing strategic legislative advocacy.    “The GCDD works with legislators and advocacy groups to influence and support public policy that fosters a positive change in the way education, housing, workplace/careers and community living opportunities are made available to persons with developmental disabilities.”  

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Georgia’s Explore, Engage, Employ (E3) - 11/01/2017

~~“Georgia VR is implementing E3 (Explore, Engage, Employ) in 7 school districts to serve 3,000 students and youth.  E3 goals are to engage employers to customize existing career pathways and develop alternative pathways for students and out of school youth; involve families to increase youth participation, and utilize social media strategies to develop services and connect youth to career interests.  Partners include the Poses Family Foundation, GA Department of Education, Technical College System of Georgia, Center for Leadership in Disability, Parent to Parent of Georgia, Burton Blatt Institute and Jobs for the Future.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

GVRA provides Career Specialist Pilot for ECCHS - 10/30/2017

~~“Elbert County Comprehensive High School (ECCHS) was selected as one of five Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA) Capacity Building Pilots to receive a Career Specialist for Transition funded by GVRA. In collaboration with the Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE), Division for Special Education Services and Supports, five pilots were invited to participate including Fulton County, Elbert County, Gainesville City, Henry County and Houston County School Systems….Through the assignment of GVRA funded Career Specialists to five pilot Local Education Agencies (LEA’s), the GaDOE, GVRA and LEA will work collaboratively to provide leadership, planning, technical assistance, and consultation, and to coordinate services and evaluate the effectiveness of a district-based Career Specialist for Transition to meet the requirements of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS) as defined by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). One of the new provisions in WIOA requires Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), in collaboration with the LEA, to provide, or arrange for the provision of, pre-employment transition services for students with disabilities in Georgia secondary schools who are eligible or potentially eligible for services.

Services and support will be provided to students with disabilities in 9th -12th grades, ages 14 years through age 21 years statewide. With an expanded scope of work for students with disabilities, collaboration is essential.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Georgia Department of Community Affairs “Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program – Housing for Persons with Disabilities” - 08/01/2016

~~The Section 811 PRA Demonstration Program is designed for individuals with a disability who are at or below 30% of the Area Median Income and between the ages of 18 and 61. Recently, HUD awarded the State of Georgia with $14.4 million to provide long-term rental assistance to individuals who meet these qualifications. In order to be considered for the program, the participant must be referred by either the Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities or the State of Georgia Money Follows the Person program.

To find out more on eligibility and how to get connected with the program, visit the DCA Section 811 website to find rental unit locations and program applications.

 

.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia’s Career Pathways to Work: Explore, Engage and Employ (E3) - 01/08/2016

"GVRA was recently awarded $4.7 million by the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) to improve employment opportunities for students and youth with disabilities. E3 is designed to connect real people to real jobs that fill a real need for employers.  E3 will work with GaDOE identified career pathways by tailoring them to a variety of work opportunities available in the communities.  The program will engage employers and employ social media strategies to connect youth across the nation.  The program impact is to change how organizations support independence, employment and career advancement of students and youth with disabilities. The initial rollout will be in five school districts in Georgia.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia Disability Employment Initiative - 11/05/2015

“The Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD) was awarded $2.4 million by the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) to improve employment opportunities for adults and youth with disabilities. Georgia’s Disability Employment Initiative is a partnership between GDEcD and the Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency (GVRA). The initiative is designed to improve job placement rates for youth and adults with disabilities that live within two of the state’s 19 Local Workforce Development Areas (LWDA).”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…"   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services."  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Money Follows the Person

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…“…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Citations
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Technical Assistance for Transition - 12/25/2018

~~This page is a list of materials about “Technical Assistance for Transition includes topics such as Transition Compliance, Transition Planning, IEP Development, and topics related to transition andimprovement activities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

DBHDD receives federal Mental Health Awareness Training grant - 12/17/2018

~~“The Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD) received a Notice of Award from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for the Mental Health Awareness Training Grant.  The project award is $125,000 annually for three years, running November 30, 2018 through November 29, 2021.“One person, whether young or old, taking his or her own life is too many,” said Commissioner Judy Fitzgerald.  This grant will fuel our collective efforts to raise awareness, educate, train, and intervene so that Georgia will be at the forefront of national strategies to prevent tragic consequences.”  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

GA Department of Behavioral Health & DD - Guide to Supported Employment - 04/25/2015

This Guide to Supported Employment was prepared by the Georgia Division of Developmental Disabilities Statewide Quality Improvement Council. It is intended to: Explain why employment is important; Illustrate through real examples the difference work makes in people’s lives; Answer common questions about pay and health benefits when you work and have an intellectual and/or developmental disability; and Provide information and resources on Supported Employment programs in Georgia.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)

~~“Currently, there is no planned face-to-face district leader training, via the RESAs, for support in completing the initial 2017-2018 CNA report. The GaDOE will deliver on-line training on the CNA process, as already outlined through its webinar series, and face-to-face regional trainings in May 10, 2017….

The GaDOE is currently developing a dedicated webpage on the GaDOE website that will house all resources and information related to the CNA process. The Office of School & District Effectiveness will hold trainings for select groups following a schedule available through their office.”

Systems
  • Department of Education

University of GA, Institute of Human Development & Disability - Consulting/Technical Assistance

The IHDD is available for consultations and technical assistance with professionals, para-professionals, families and family members to create meaningful community activities that highlight people with disabilities and their families. IHDD has been highly sought to provide national consulting to train and develop new skills sets in Customized Employment and its associated Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Toolkit, as well as the Evidence-Based Individual Placement and Supports model of employment. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement

University of GA, Institute of Human Development & Disability - Customized Employment

This web resource defines Customized Employment with examples and provides an overview of the University’s Customized Employment Initiative. It includes sections: What is Customized Employment, Types of Customized Employment, and links to resources.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Provider Transformation

University of GA, Institute on Human Development & Disability - WorkWorks Training

Through service, teaching, and research, the Institute on Human Development and Disability hopes to, “contribute to creating an environment where individuals with disabilities are independent and enjoy careers of choice.” Through WorkWorks, the institute offers a variety of training programs related to integrated employment opportunities for employment specialists and job coaches.  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Justice Department Sues Georgia for Unnecessarily Segregating Students with Disabilities - 08/23/2016

The Lawsuit is the First Challenge to a State-Run School System for Segregating Students with Disabilities The Justice Department announced today that it has filed a lawsuit against the state of Georgia alleging that its treatment and segregation of students with disabilities in the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support (GNETS) Program violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Systems
  • Department of Education

Justice Department Reaches Extension Agreement to Improve Georgia’s Development Disability and Mental Health System - 05/18/2016

The extension agreement builds upon a 2010 settlement agreement resolving a lawsuit brought by the department under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Supreme Court’s Olmstead decision. The case involves Georgia’s provision of community services for individuals with mental illness and developmental disabilities. Under the agreement, Georgia will help people with developmental disabilities move from its state hospitals to integrated settings, consistent with their needs and preferences; will identify and address each individual’s needs in the community prior to discharge; and will monitor services and track outcomes for people after their discharge. For individuals who have moved from the state hospitals to the community, Georgia will monitor their health and wellbeing to ensure that emerging needs are met in a timely fashion. The extension agreement also calls for creation of at least 675 new Medicaid home- and community-based waiver slots as alternatives to placement in a facility.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

United States of America v. The State of Georgia, et al. Civil Action NO 1:10-CV-249-CAP - 10/19/2010

“To comply with this Settlement Agreement, the State shall provide the following services to individuals in the target population: … d. Supported Employment i. “Supported Employment will be operated according to an evidence-based supported employment model, and it will be assessed by an established fidelity scale such as the scale included in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) supported tool kit” ii. Enrollment in congregate programs shall not constitute Supported Employment. iii. Pursuant to the following schedule, the State shall provide Supported Employment services to 550 individuals with SPMI by July 1, 2015 .

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Displaying 11 - 18 of 18

New Waiver Rules from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services: Georgia’s Transition Plan - 03/17/2013

Georgia has developed the following Transition Plan to follow in response to the new HCBS Settings Rule. This Statewide Transition Plan will present ways in which the State of Georgia will develop a tool(s) and implement evaluations of its home and community -based (HCBS) settings where 1915(c) waiver program services are currently available. It will also address methodologies used to maximize and enhance the public input process and ongoing compliance monitoring. If it is determined that there are settings that do not meet the final regulations’ HCBS settings requirements, such HCBS settings will be required to make changes that will bring them into compliance . “

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Community Based Alternatives for Youth (01.R02.00) - 10/01/2012

"Provides behavioral assistance, care management, clinical services, respite, supported employment, community transition, customized goods and services, expressive clinical services, family peer support, financial support, waiver transportation, youth peer support for individuals w/mental illness ages 18-21 and w/SED ages 4-17."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia New Options Waiver (0175.R06.00) - 10/01/2012

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, FMS, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech/language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for MR/IID "

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia’s Balancing Incentives Program - 03/03/2012

“Approved in May 2007 and fully implemented in late 2008, Georgia’s Money Follows the Person program has successfully transitioned…individuals from skilled nursing and intermediate care facilities into community residences and helped to expand the use of community services, rebalancing the long term care expenditures for HCBS.…   “…Georgia’s proposed Balancing Incentives Program will be used to further expand the use of community‐based long term care services.        
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver Program (0323.R04.00 - 01/01/2011

This waiver provides "community living support, prevocational services, respite, support coordination, supported employment, specialized medical equipment, specialized medical supplies, community guide, financial support services, adult dental, adult OT, adult PT, adult speech and language therapy, behavioral supports consultation, community access, community residential alternative, environmental accessibility adaptation, individual directed goods and services, natural support training, transportation, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/ID, DD, ages 0 - no max age."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Georgia Medicaid Activities “Waivers”

Waiver programs help people who are elderly or have disabilities and need help to live in their home or community instead of an institution such as a nursing home or ICF-MR. Each program offers several "core" services: -service coordination (help with managing care needs and services) -personal support (assistance with daily living activities, i.e. bathing, dressing, meals and housekeeping) -home health services (nursing, home health aide, and occupational, physical and speech therapy) -emergency response systems -respite care (caregiver relief)

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

GA Comprehensive Supports Waiver (COMP) - Provider Reference Guide

All providers (agencies) must apply to become a co-employer of services. Enrolled Co-Employer providers can serve in this capacity for the following COMP services, only: • Community Access • Community Guide • Community Living Support • Supported Employment • Transportation

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Medicaid State Plan

The Medicaid State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how Georgia administers its Medicaid program. As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act, the plan was developed by Georgia and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  The state plan includes provisions that describes groups of individuals to be covered by Medicaid, Medicaid covered services, reimbursement methodologies for providers and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.  The approved State Plan also provides assurance that Georgia abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phone

Snapshot

Things are looking peachy for workers with disabilities in the great state of Georgia, where high expectations are on the horizon.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Georgia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2016 to 2017
10,429,379
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.56%
Change from
2016 to 2017
661,498
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
227,895
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2016 to 2017
34.45%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.42%
Change from
2016 to 2017
76.01%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 10,429,379
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 661,498
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 227,895
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,329,722
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.45%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 587,687
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 663,272
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 784,314
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 398,279
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 53,476
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,548
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 22,395
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,788
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 13,132

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,350
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 282,646

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 13,859
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 45,947
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 98,241
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 14.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.90%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.10%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 2,706.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 4,671
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,857
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,929
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 47
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 64.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.46

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 11,826
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 442,689
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $8,253,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $17,324,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $112,518,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $17,188,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 20.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,960
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,939
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 10,524
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 24.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.46%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.11%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.97%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.09%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 25.80%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 58.75%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.95%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,688,563
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,114
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 239,895
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,043,403
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 1,283,298
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 214
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,158
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 1,372
AbilityOne wages (products). $1,823,472
AbilityOne wages (services). $11,757,487

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 30
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 30
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,464
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,464

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No specific disability related information found.  

Customized Employment

~~• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 247)
DBHDD: GVRA has a formal MOU with DBHDD that utilizes the SE IPS model. This MOU covers both the behavioral health and developmental disabilities divisions of DBHDD to serve those individuals using Supported and Customized Employment.
This agreement allows VR services to collaborate statewide with a network of providers including CSBs for the provision of SES. These agencies prepare VR clients for permanent jobs through supported employment and complementary services. The CSBs provide a wide scope of outpatient, day, residential housing, and community-based services that include SE. The Memorandum of Understanding with DBHDD allows for improved coordination of efforts to serve those with the most significant disabilities. (Page 253)
1. Disability-Specific Topics (including Positive Behavioral Supports training for counselors who have clients with Most Significant Disabilities, Deaf Culture Literacy, and Individualized Placement and Support Training for Counselors Handling Clients with Severe & Persistent Mental Illness.
2. Customized Employment Training.
3. Case Management.
4. Eligibility for Services.
5. IPE Development.
6. Varying Types of Caseloads (including Supported Employment and Transition).
7. Values-based Training for Persons Working with Individuals with Disabilities.
8. Collaborative Training with School Personnel on Creative Individual Assessments.
9. Transition Resource Planning.
10. Road Map for Services Available to Georgians.
11. Job Development.
12. Employment Engagement Training (developing a work plan and work goal).
13. Compliance Training (including Sexual Harassment and Anti-Discrimination).
VR continues to identify current information from research, rehabilitation trends and professional resources. This information is provided to agency staff through a variety of methods, including training at the State, quadrant and local level. Most recently this training has been focused on Customized Employment. (Page 269)
Access to Supported Employment: There are concerns that there is both a paucity of Supported Employment Providers, and that from the supported employment providers’ perspective, SES are cost–prohibitive. Concerns regarding access to Supported Employment have highlighted the following needs for services expansion:
1. Increase in SES, especially for those individuals with significant disabilities. Many of these individuals have limited or no access to SES.
2. Increase in both services and actual Customized Employment opportunities.
3. Increase in the availability in specific skills training that is actually aligned with real jobs within the state and less on generic training. (Page 271)
 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Describe how the designated State unit will collaborate with the State agency responsible for administering each of the following programs to develop opportunities for competitive integrated employment, to the greatest extent practicable:
1. THE STATE MEDICAID PLAN UNDER TITLE XIX OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT;
GVRA has established collaborative relationships with multiple State agencies in order to more efficiently and effectively assist individuals with disabilities in achieving employment in an integrated setting. In some cases, these collaborative relationships have been developed to enhance the working relationship between the VR program and other State agencies. Several of these relationships have been formalized through Interagency Cooperative Agreements that were described earlier in Sections (e) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations and (f) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of SES. GVRA has identified other State agencies in which formal agreements need to be developed to support collaboration and seamless service delivery statewide. (Page 258)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Through the workforce system, the State will provide youth participants the opportunity to become involved in 14 required youth elements which are listed in the Youth program elements section:
1. Tutoring, Study Skills Training, Instruction and Evidence Based Dropout Prevention and Recovery Strategies can allow a participant to attain their secondary school diploma or a recognized equivalent.
2. Alternative Secondary School Services or Dropout Recovery Services show students alternative learning environments that focus on their skills, abilities, and learning style to prevent them from dropping out of school.
3. Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences are structured learning programs that take place for a specific period.
4. Occupational Skills Training allows participants to become proficient in performing actual tasks and technical functions required by certain occupational fields at all different levels.
5. Education Offered Concurrently with and in the same context as Workforce Preparation integrates training and education.
6. Leadership Development includes the development of positive social and civic behaviors.
7. Supportive Services are in place to allow youth participants to partake in WIOA activities.
8. Adult Mentoring is a 12-month program that matches a youth participant with an adult that will guide the mentee.
9. Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling gives youth participants the opportunity to meet with counselors for career and academic counseling.
10. Financial Literacy Education informs participants of smart financial decisions and habits.
11. Entrepreneurial Skills Training educates youth participants on the skills needed to start and maintain a small business.
12. Labor Market and Employment Information Services provide information about in-demand industry sectors.
13. Activities that Prepare for Transition to Postsecondary Education and Training allows for career exploration and research.
14. Follow-up Services are available to youth participants once they have exited the program. (Page 184)
Services are provided to eligible youth participants through a network of youth service providers, which are competitively procured by Georgia’s 19 LWDAs. Georgia is committed to providing, through LWDAs, the following required youth elements:
1. Tutoring, Study Skills Training, Instruction and Evidence based Drop-out Prevention and Recovery Strategies;
2. Alternative Secondary School Services or Drop-out Recovery Services;
3. Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences;
4. Occupational Skills Training;
5. Education Offered Concurrently with and in the same context as Workforce Preparation;
6. Leadership Development;
7. Supportive Services;
8. Adult Mentoring;
9. Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling;
10. Financial Literacy Education;
11. Entrepreneurial Skills Training;
12. Labor Market and Employment Information Services;
13. Activities that Prepare for Transition to Post-secondary Education and Training; and
14. Follow-up Services. (Page 195)
 

School to Work Transition

~~TAA coordinates and facilitates worker orientations to inform the workers about the benefits and services they may receive as well as the eligibility requirements associated with each benefit. The worker orientations often include LWDA representatives to provide guidance on demand occupations and available training in the LWDA. DOL staff assist workers with TAA registration and filing UI claims. (Page 162)
x. The Georgia SRC strongly supports amending current 361.45(c)(2) by adding a new paragraph (v) that would require a DSU to provide eligible individuals who are entitled to Social Security benefits under titles II or XVI of the Social Security Act, information on available assistance and supports available to them when entering the workforce (i.e., benefits planning and financial supports). (Page 239)
Non–Disability Specific Barriers: There is on–going feedback for assistance to address some of the non–disability specific barriers to employment such as transportation, disincentives through entitlement benefits, and lack of family support for employment. (Page 271)
 

Career Pathways

~~Project SEARCH is only offered in a subset of communities across Georgia. The Project SEARCH High School Transition Program is a unique, one-year, school-to-work program for young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities that takes place entirely at the workplace. This innovative, business-led model of school-to-work transition features total workplace immersion, which facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction; career exploration; and hands-on, worksite-based training and support. The goal for each student is competitive employment. Project SEARCH was developed at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and has been implemented at several sites in Georgia through a statewide initiative involving the collaborative effort of DoDD, a division of GVRA, area school systems, and several of Georgia’s leading employers. GVRA is working to add Project Search partners across the state to create more opportunities for youth with significant disabilities in obtaining real-life work experience that improves successful transitions from school to adult life. (Page 242)
ii. Goal II - Expand transition services to assist more students with disabilities to go from high school to work or post-secondary education/training. (Page 291)
 

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~GVRA has a strong statewide presence with offices located in urban and rural areas to provide vocational rehabilitation services to assist in the workforce development of individuals with disabilities. GVRA intends to focus on both youth with disabilities and students with disabilities to better prepare them to become an integral part of Georgia’s workforce. GVRA plans to offer an array of transition services to every public school district in the state with these services focused on assisting students with disabilities to either continue on to a post-secondary education or into a career pathway that is based on the specific skill requirements of Georgia’s employers. GVRA plans to conduct outreach activities to identify and attract those youth with disabilities who are not in school to participate in community-based alternative career pathways that are also based on the specific skill requirements of Georgia’s employers; or if appropriate, assist these youth in returning to school, either secondary or post-secondary. (Page 61)
Finally, GVRA has partnered with the Department of Education (DOE) in the current federal career pathways demonstration grant to expand transition services to students with disabilities and out-of-school youth that lead to real jobs in their communities. As a part of this partnership, GVRA intends to offer an array of transition services to the 50 intensive school districts identified by DOE as part of DOE’s state systemic improvement plan (SSIP).(Page 78)
Youth with Disabilities
Georgia’s one-stop system engages youth in customized career pathways and SES through collaborative partnerships between VR and other core partner programs in the one-stop system. Georgia recently developed a strategic initiative to expand and improve VR services for youth with disabilities who are either in-school or out-of-school. The purpose of this initiative is to braid existing and new resources to offer a robust, comprehensive array of VR services to all schools. Current VR program policies and procedures are being reviewed and amended to reflect this new way of doing business. The plan includes the provision of pre-employment transition services and timely development and approval of an individualized plan for employment for each youth served. One subset of the proposed plan to expand and improve VR services is a newly awarded, five-year demonstration project entitled “Georgia Pathways to Work” funded through the US Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Services Administration.
The proposed Georgia Pathways to Work program aims to significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with the core program partners, GaDOE, as wells as local employers. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as HDCI to ensure responsiveness to the known workforce demands in Georgia, as well as supporting their efforts to better engage those with disabilities. The overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive integrated employment through improving the 18 existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for out-of-school youth. (Page 104)
1. Provide the vision and mission of the program or organization. Please include a description of the population that the program will serve, including how the program will meet the needs of persons with barriers to employment (e.g. Displaced Homemaker, Low-income Individual, Individuals with Disabilities, Single Parents, and other individuals as described in the law).
2. Provide a description (and supporting documents, when available) of the program’s implementation of career pathways system as well as any cooperative agreements/contracts that the program has with other agencies and service providers for the delivery of adult education and literacy activities. Also, describe ways in which the program coordinates with other service providers to provide wrap-around services to participants (e.g. child care, transportation). (Page 221)
• The depth, intensity, and rigor of the programs and activities offered by the eligible provider. The proposed program must incorporate the basic tenets of reading instruction. Attention will be given to the extent to which the eligible provider incorporates stringent research in the grant proposal submission and the development of the literacy program itself;
• The extent to which the eligible provider’s program is based on intense research and best practices;
• The extent to which the eligible provider demonstrates the effective use of technology for instruction, to include distance education, toward students’ improved performance;
• The eligible provider’s demonstrated integration of contextualized instruction, to blend literacy skills, and preparation for transition to post-secondary education or entry into the workplace. Particular attention will be given to implementation of a career pathways system, activities that promote and lead to economic self-sufficiency, and the ability to exercise the full rights of citizenship; (Page 222)
The GVRA Executive Director provided an update to SRC members for their meeting in October on actions the agency has taken to implement WIOA recommendations for expanding and enhancing services for youth with disabilities. This work includes the receipt of two new federal grant awards:
1. U.S. Department of Labor, ETA’s Disability Employment Initiative Cooperative Agreements: awarded directly to WFD in partnership with GVRA that focuses on the Georgia Disability Employment Initiative, Customized Career Pathways.
2. U.S. Department of Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration’s Demonstration and Training: Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities, Georgia Pathways to Work: awarded directly to GVRA that focuses on career pathways for youth with disabilities who are in school or out-of-school. In addition, GVRA has appointed a Director of Transition Services. This new position emphasizes the importance and significance of services to youth with disabilities before they leave high school. All of these activities are very innovative in preparing high school students with disabilities for competitive employment. The Council would like to see these programs expanded throughout the state as part of VR transition services. (Page 240)
Georgia Pathways to Work will change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as Go Build Georgia and HDCI to be responsive to the known market demands for careers in Georgia, as well as supporting employer efforts to more effectively engage Georgians with disabilities. Furthermore, the overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive, integrated employment through existing and customized pathways. Additionally, this demonstration project will be implemented to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways.
GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows: (Page 248)
In collaboration with GaDOE, Burton Blatt Institute, and Poses Family Foundation, GVRA is customizing the landscape of career pathways for young Georgians with disabilities. The Georgia Pathways to Work program- E3: Explore, Engage, Employ- connects real people to real jobs that fill a real need for employers in their individual communities. The purpose of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to improve the 18 existing career pathways by tailoring them to a variety of work opportunities available in the communities. The program will engage employers in the model design and employ social media strategies to connect youth across the nation. The project impact is to change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. (Page 247)
• Development of comprehensive array of service for the over 3,000 project participants in either a school or community, integrated setting: Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) (including assessments for determining level of understanding career pathways selection for the participants); CAPI; and. customized employment to address the complexities of individualization. (Page 247)
Georgia Pathways to Work will change how organizations support the independence, employment, and career advancement of Georgians with disabilities. This will be accomplished by working with statewide initiatives such as Go Build Georgia and HDCI to be responsive to the known market demands for careers in Georgia, as well as supporting employer efforts to more effectively engage Georgians with disabilities. Furthermore, the overall goal of the Georgia Pathways to Work program is to increase the number of youth who achieve competitive, integrated employment through existing and customized pathways. Additionally, this demonstration project will be implemented to increase the average weekly wage and employer benefits of participants in each occupational cluster through successful completion of career pathways.
GVRA will develop policies that address the WIOA requirements, ensure coordination of services with GaDOE, and meet the needs of youth with disabilities in and out-of-school. VR program’s current transition policies are as follows:
I.   THE VR CSPM STATES THAT TRANSITION SERVICES ARE TO BE PROVIDED TO ELIGIBLE STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES THAT FACILITATE THE TRANSITION FROM THE RECEIPT OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICES IN SECONDARY SCHOOL TO THE RECEIPT OF VR SERVICES ORIENTED TOWARD AN EMPLOYMENT OUTCOME (CSPM 450.1.02). (Page 248)
WFD: GVRA has partnered with WFD to engage youth in customized career pathways and supported employment. This work is funded through the USDOL ETA Disability Employment Initiative Cooperative Agreements. (Page 253)
i.   Implementing the Georgia Pathways to Work grant. As described in Section (d) Coordination with Education Officials, GVRA was awarded a grant through the Department of Education’s Rehabilitation Services Administration. The Georgia Pathways to Work will significantly change the way GVRA does business statewide in transitioning students and youth with disabilities in partnership with GaDOE, WFD, and local businesses and employers. The focus of this proposed model will be to increase access for students with disabilities to the existing high school career pathways, as well as customizing those existing career pathways for students with disabilities, and creating community-based alternative career pathways for those youth who are not in school. (Page 258)
Based on the feedback that GVRA has received, there were some common statewide needs identified for youth and students with disabilities. These include:
1. Increase and enhance transition services overall, especially to younger students, ages 14-16.
2. Improve the quality of GVRA’s transitional staff who are provided to the local school districts to ensure greater consistency of services.
3. Expand the array of transition services made available to schools.
4. Develop outreach efforts that engage youth with disabilities who have dropped out of school.
5. Improve alignment of GVRA’s transition services with the needs of the local school districts.
6. Improve alignment of the VR program’s training programs with the GaDOE’s occupational clusters and career pathways. (Page 273)
iii.  Develop and implement a career pathway model of services for both in-school students and out-of-school youth that will include Vocational Rehabilitation services that are aligned with the current GaDOE’s Occupational Clusters and curriculum-based career pathways; as well as alternative integrated community-based career pathways for those youth who are not in school.
iv.  Partner with GaDOE, TCSG and USG to develop collaborative arrangements that improve the transition from high school to post-secondary education for students with disabilities. (Page 278)
• Transform how GVRA and the VR services focus on youth and students with disabilities by integrating services agency-wide to make this population the highest focus.
• Partner with GaDOE to increase and deliver a comprehensive array of transitional services to every school district within the state, including a special focus on career pathways and customized career pathways.
• Develop a concentrated outreach effort to identify youth with disabilities that are not enrolled in school, and make the same robust services available to them.
• Partner with the existing VR provider network to create community-based career pathways for youth not enrolled in school.
• Partner with both TCSG and USG to improve post-secondary transition.
Strategies:
• Develop formal third-party agreements with local employers to contribute to all career pathways available to youth with disabilities, both in school and out of school. (Page 286)
GVRA’s goal to improve and expand VR services for students with disabilities by the following:
• Develop and offer a comprehensive array of services to all school districts statewide. Specifically, GVRA will develop all 5 required PETS activities, as well as the 9 authorized activities as may be needed, and offer those to every school district in the state of Georgia. These will include services that are VR Program-provided, as well as services provided through the VR provider network. GVRA’s goal is to establish a minimum number of PETS services offered and provided to each school district within the state. Then as these PETS services are provided, the services will be continually evaluated and changed for improvements that produce the best outcomes, either competitive employment or postsecondary education and training. Where there is a paucity of such PETS services in particular geographic areas of the state, GVRA will solicit both new service providers and/or new services to ensure the minimum of necessary PETS services. It should be noted that all PETS services statewide will also offer both during school and after school hours of availability; and GVRA will work collaboratively with each local school district to best fit the services to the community.
• Develop new and innovative services for both in-school and out-of-school career pathways. As a part of this, GVRA will utilize its current Georgia Career Pathways federal demonstration grant as the method to pilot new services that can be added to the array of PETS services. This will be done in collaboration with GaDOE, the individual local school district, and the local employers and businesses. For example, based on local employer involvement and feedback, GVRA may ask the local school district to tailor its current career pathway curriculum to fit the specific needs of the local employers, or may ask the school to include more opportunities for work-based learning, pre-apprenticeships, etc., especially for the PETS students. As new services are piloted, they will be evaluated and improved as needed, with a long range to roll out successful new services statewide. (Page 288)
 

Employer/ Business

~~Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 303)

511

~~The primary data collection and reporting system used by GVRA through the VR program is the Libera System 7 electronic case management system, and the data collected is specific to individuals served through the VR program. At the current time, neither the Libera System 7 case management system, nor its data, is integrated with all the programs and activities present in the one-stop centers. (Page 117)

Mental Health

~~Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.
Georgia’s One-Stop delivery system is focused on ensuring universal access across its workforce system. The State and its local partners, maintain compliance with the provisions of WIOA Section 188 which require programmatic and physical accessibility. Through monitoring performed at both the state and local level, Georgia ensures that all One-Stops are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize Georgia’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual, to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. In addition, the State maintains a Methods of Administration which details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be maintained. The Methods of Administration is a “living” document which ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level as quickly as possible.
Separately, as a component of one-stop certification, the State collects a business plan from each LWDA which details how a new one-stop will satisfy accessibility requirements and the provisions of WIOA Section 188. In order to be certified, each comprehensive one-stop must satisfy the requisite federal criteria. This process ensures universal access to programmatic services and facilities are maintained across the state.
Moreover, the One-Stop Integration Working Group is identifying additional criteria which will be assessed during the one-stop certification process. This may lead to additional accessibility requirements being incorporated into the one-stop certification process. Through the One-Stop Integration Working Group, the State continues to prioritize programmatic and physical accessibility in the one-stop certification process. The One-Stop Integration Working Group will provide guidance and technical assistance to LWDBs prior to the completion of LWDB certification, prior to July 1, 2017. (Page 144-145)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 11 - 20 of 66

Real Careers - 11/13/2018

~~The Georgia Council on Developmental Disabilities (GCDD) builds on the work of the Jobs for All United States Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy grant. In addition, The Developmental Disabilities Bill of Rights and Assistance Act defines employment as: People get and keep employment consistent with their interest, abilities and needs.

GCDD VisionThe GCDD’s priority for Real Careers is that there needs to be a vision where people with significant developmental disabilities can work by replicating best practices such as “customized employment.” Click here  https://gcdd.org/news-a-media/videos/75-ihg-employees.html   to view a video.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

2018 WorkSource Georgia Mountains Modification Revisions and Additions - 10/01/2018

~~“WorkSource Georgia Mountains (WSGM) has published Program Year 2018 Revisions to the Program Year (PY) 2016-2020 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Local Plan for the Georgia Mountains Local Workforce Development Region.WSGM receives WIOA funding to coordinate the delivery of employment and training activities in the Georgia Mountains region of Georgia. The Georgia Mountains region includes the following counties: Banks, Dawson, Forsyth, Franklin, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Lumpkin, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, and White, along with 38 municipalities within these counties.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disability Providers of State –Funded Developmental Disability Services Fiscal Year 2018 - 07/01/2018

~~“Vision: It is the vision of DBHDD that every person who participates in our services leads a satisfying, independent life with dignity and respect. Mission: The mission of DBHDD is to provide and promote local accessibility and choice of services and programs for individuals, families and communities through partnerships, in order to create a sustainable, self-sufficient and resilient life in the community. Values: The core values of DBHDD are respect, inclusiveness, and transparency. DBHDD believes it is critical that services, supports, treatment and care respect the vision of the individual. Each provider must incorporate this belief and practice into its service delivery to support individuals with developmental disabilities in living a meaningful life in the community. Specifically, the provider must ensure: ➢ Person-centered service planning and delivery that address what is important to and for individuals.➢ Capacity and capabilities, including qualified and competent providers and staff. ➢ Individual safeguards.➢ Satisfactory individual outcomes.➢ Systems of care that have the infrastructure necessary to provide coordinated services, supports, treatment and care.➢ Individuals rights and responsibilities.➢ Individual access.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018” - 07/01/2018

“Community integration and inclusion into the larger natural community is supported and evident. Terms “Integration and Inclusion” mean: a. Use of community resources that are available to other citizens; b. Providing the opportunity to actively participate in community activities and types of employment as citizens without disabilities; c. The organization has community partnerships for capacity building and advocacy of activities to achieve this goal of integration;”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities “Provider Manual for Community Developmental Disabilities Providers Fiscal Year 2018 ” - 07/01/2018

“Quality Assurance and Standard Compliance Requirements 1.The DD Crisis Providers of the Crisis System shall develop and maintain performance indicators and outcome data as part of their quality management system that will assist DBHDD and Georgia Crisis Access Line (GCAL) to monitor and generate monthly reports of the Georgia Crisis Response System (GCRS-DD) to make quality improvement decisions based on data collected.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Transitioning Youth to Adult Care - 05/19/2018

~~Projects and Activities•Provide leadership training opportunities for youth with special needs to be mentors to other youth in transition across Georgia….•Develop and make available guidance materials for families, public health workers, physicians and healthcare professionals on transitioning youth with special needs to adult health care.•Provide trainings for youth, families, educators, and health care providers on topics such as preparing for higher education or vocational training, independent living, supported employment, recreation and leisure, and how to integrate health goals onto Individualized Education Programs. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Governor and the General Assembly; to provide for a short title; to provide for definitions; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes”

Systems
  • Other

Money Follows the Person - 04/22/2018

~~“If you have lived in an inpatient facility (i.e., a hospital, nursing facility or an intermediate care facility for people with developmental disabilities) for at least 90 consecutive days and would rather live in your own home, apartment or group setting, you may be eligible for home-and community-based services (HCBS) through Georgia’s Medicaid programs.Money Follows the Person (MFP) can assist with home- and community-based services.  It is a grant offered through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Georgia Department of Community Health (DCH).” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Facilitated IEP Team Meeting Procedures - 03/01/2018

~~“IEP Team Meeting Facilitation Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team meeting facilitation is all about the student and helping the IEP Team overcome the pressure and anxiety often associated with a contentious meeting. The IEP facilitator makes sure that the focus of the Team remains on the best interests of the student. The facilitator is a skilled individual who has received specialized training in the area of conflict prevention and resolution through the IEP Team Meeting Facilitation process. IEP Team meeting facilitation is voluntary. Both parties must agree to invite an external facilitator into the IEP Team meeting. The facilitator’s primary goal is to assist team members in the thoughtful, productive construction of a quality IEP. This is achieved by encouraging and directing communication specific to the IEP and assuring that the members of the IEP Team are empowered in their participation and invested in the IEP. The facilitator is not a member of the IEP Team and cannot provide legal advice to any Team member. Rather, the facilitator will help the IEP Team create an agenda, ground rules, and desired outcomes, and address issues during the IEP Team meeting that produce tension within the Team so that the Team is able to find their own solutions. The facilitator will also guide the discussions during the IEP Team meeting by asking student-focused questions.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Options Waiver Program (NOW) Renewal Announcement - 12/19/2017

~~“The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has approved renewal of the New Options (NOW) Waiver through September 30, 2022.  The renewal reflects collaborative work by the Georgia Departments of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD) and Community Health (DCH) to align service rates with the Comprehensive Supports (COMP) Waiver Program and enhance supports to families and individuals through changes to respite services, community living support, therapy services and expand options to encourage the use of supported employment.  The frequently asked questions and answers below are designed to assist providers and family members, in understanding specific elements of the NOW Waiver renewal and invite them to participate in implementation plan meetings.  Provider/family forums will be scheduled to begin in January 2018 to answer questions and provide additional information about the implementation schedule….  Provides greater flexibility and assistance to individuals who wish to pursue   supported employment in community settings. “ 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

HB 831 Georgia's Employment First Act - 05/08/2018

~~“To amend Chapter 9 of Title 49 of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated, relating to transfer of the Division of Rehabilitation Services to the Department of Labor, so as to establish the Employment First Georgia Council; to provide for legislative findings and declarations; to provide for membership, duties, terms of office, meeting requirements, committee appointments, compensation, and expense allowances; to provide for a biannual report to the Govern