Hawaii

States - Big Screen

Disability is a respected part of diversity in the Rainbow State of Hawaii, where employees with disabilities are saying "Aloha" to new job opportunities across the state. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Hawaii's VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
-0.5%
Change from
2017 to 2018
1,420,491
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
10.38%
Change from
2017 to 2018
66,355
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
10.37%
Change from
2017 to 2018
28,503
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0%
Change from
2017 to 2018
42.96%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2017 to 2018
80.12%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 1,428,557 1,427,538 1,420,491
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 66,031 59,469 66,355
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 26,356 25,546 28,503
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 602,358 597,818 594,407
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.91% 42.96% 42.96%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.60% 78.80% 80.12%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.00% 2.40% 2.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.10% 16.60% 13.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.50% 8.80% 8.40%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 76,879 72,983 80,714
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 79,244 75,876 77,647
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 41,777 36,361 43,150
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,861 2,095 2,464
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 12,701 9,989 10,888
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 694 465 927
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 65,212 67,317 61,806
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 16,842 15,262 18,520
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 28,729 26,646 30,487
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,008 713 1,007

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 821 849 823
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.40% 4.60% 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 22,275 21,813 21,165

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 356 228 242
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,023 739 742
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 2,703 1,584 1,508
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.20% 14.40% 16.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.10% 0.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 10.20% 6.40% 5.70%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 0.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 52 8 9
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 782 483 435
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A 32
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,007 1,836 1,587
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6 5 10
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 4 4 4
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 67.00% 80.00% 40.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.28 0.28 0.28

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
845
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 77 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 81 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 102 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 317 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 203 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 61 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 28.00% 25.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,134 1,507 1,257
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 38,249 37,035 36,162
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 20 11 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 55 19 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $341,000 $148,000 $453,960
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $18,700,000 $24,072,000 $19,586,588
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $29,175,000 $28,982,000 $15,477,471
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 1.00% 1.00% 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 806 855 1,443
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,276 1,229 1,432
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.20 1.00 2.74

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 36.83% 37.33% 40.63%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 20.24% 20.40% 18.94%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.17% 1.15% 1.11%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 70.32% 74.14% 64.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 35.87% 36.34% 35.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 83.37% 85.04% 85.69%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 89.79% 93.11% 93.05%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 47.50% 48.70% 50.52%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 448,452
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 607
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 268
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 268
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,228,248

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 6 7 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6 7 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 51 63 67
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 51 63 67

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~o Align policies and funding streams across education, workforce, and economic development systems and all levels of government to focus public resources on the training that moves workers into industries with high-quality jobs that lead to better financial outcomes and longer job tenures for workers.
o Take an active role in the development of the “common pathways” for both individuals who desire to pursue secondary education AND for individuals who do not desire to pursue secondary education but desire to learn employment skills through work experience and/or on-the-job training.
o Coordinate a “common” work assessment process between core partners.
o Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff. (Page 110) Title 1

In preparation for WIOA implementation, State-level Partners met regularly for about a year to learn about services provided by each Core Partner (and other Partners), convened joint meetings among Partner stakeholders, and determined how participant data would be shared and tracked through Core Programs. As much as possible during this preparation period, Core Partners were added as key agencies in programs such as DLIR’s Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI), DVR’s Student Transition Employment Program, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) led by DVR, and the American Apprenticeship Initiative Grant led by DLIR. Since then, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) was led by the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and the collaboration continues among agencies serving persons with disabilities. (Page 121) Title 1

Contributing to a more integrated service strategy is the partnership building created by the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a technical assistance grant provided by DOL Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) to increase employment of persons with disabilities. EFSLMP is truly a partnership effort currently led by the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, with Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Council, DLIR Workforce Development Division, Department of Human Services MedQuest Division, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and Department of Education. A Cooperative Agreement is being developed among partners to
formalize cooperative working arrangements and a series of technical assistance and training have been provided to the partners and AJCs by subject matter experts. (Page 130-131) Title I

In addition, underserved populations such as persons with disabilities and offenders will be targeted to expand the job seeker pool. Capacity building obtained through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program and Disability Employment Initiative will enable more staff, in coordination with Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health, and other partners, to assist employers in employing persons with disabilities. These services include customizing employment for individuals with significant barriers to employment. This employment option, combined with federal and state tax credits, will increase the incentives for employers, including federal contractors, to hire persons with disabilities. To assist ex-offenders, the experience and skills obtained through staff’s provision of services to inmates and parolees through a contract with State Department of Public Safety and the partnerships built for this effort will facilitate services to this group. (Page 157) Title I

Wagner-Peyser and leveraged funds will be used for staff training that will increase their capability to deliver high-quality services to both employers and job seekers. For example, Career and Technical Education resources were recently accessed to train AJC staff on all counties in the areas of business services and conflict resolution; and Work Keys assessment tools and training were purchased from different funding sources to increase assessment and training capabilities with corresponding staff training.
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 225-226) Title IV

DVR has implemented evidence-based practices and innovative strategies for addressing key challenges to strengthen employer engagement, including: streamlined employer outreach activities; customization of employer engagement; job development and job negotiation tailored to the unique business needs of each individual employer; and dissemination of technological tools for improving the direct relationship between the employee and the employer.
To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of non-duplicative resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities.
DVR has engaged in the following activities in order to create sustainable employment service models over time. (Page 287) Title IV

The Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a grant through the US Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy that was first given to the Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) and turned over to the Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) for the final year will bring together various core partners. One of the two projects under EFSLMP is to develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, DDD, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from this larger core group. (Page 288) Title IV

Results from the CSNA indicate a need for more CRP’s on neighboring islands which include Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and Kauai. Employment, transportation and housing were identified on the neighbor islands as needed. CRP’s and other entities need to collaborate and communicate with each other to establish a foundation that consumers can rely on. Additionally, CRP’s must embrace the "Employment first" philosophy and move from sheltered employment to competitive integrated employment. (Page 297) Title IV

Goal 2.1 Annually increase the percentage of individuals with most significant disabilities who during a program year participate in work-based learning experiences and internships (by a minimum rate of 1%);
Goal 2.2 Annually increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities in competitive integrated employment during the fourth quarter after exit (by a minimum rate of 1%)
Goal 2.3 Annually increase the percentage of employers providing customized employment to individuals with most significant disabilities. Customized employment means, in general, competitive integrated employment designed to meet both the specific abilities of the individual with a most significant disability and the business needs of an employer (by a minimum rate of 1%). (Page 304) Title IV

Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule): 1. Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes. 2. Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain: 1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. 2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. (Page 318) Title IV

The factors that contributed to our ability to increase the number of individuals that received SE services was our participation in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, (EFSLMP). This program introduced our counseling and employment staff to the customized employment model which supports the long term supports of SE services.
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2017: 108 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services; FY 2016: 70 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. (Page 325) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~3. To develop sector strategies and a career pathways system that will integrate education and training, and move skilled jobseekers into growth industries.
o Use economic data, industry clusters and industry resources to determine growth industries and the skill needs of industries and employers.
o Establish and maintain sector initiatives that facilitate ongoing dialogue between government, employers and other key stakeholders to increase understanding of growth industry needs, foster learning between related businesses and coordinate use of information and resources to formulate and implement effective workforce solutions that meet the skill, recruitment, and retention needs of employers and the training, employment, and career advancement needs of workers.
o Align policies and funding streams across education, workforce, and economic development systems and all levels of government to focus public resources on the training that moves workers into industries with high-quality jobs that lead to better financial outcomes and longer job tenures for workers.
o Take an active role in the development of the “common pathways” for both individuals who desire to pursue secondary education AND for individuals who do not desire to pursue secondary education but desire to learn employment skills through work experience and/or on-the-job training.
o Coordinate a “common” work assessment process between core partners.
o Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff. (Page 110) Title 1

Goal 2.2 Annually increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities in competitive integrated employment during the fourth quarter after exit (by a minimum rate of 1%)
Goal 2.3 Annually increase the percentage of employers providing customized employment to individuals with most significant disabilities. Customized employment means, in general, competitive integrated employment designed to meet both the specific abilities of the individual with a most significant disability and the business needs of an employer (by a minimum rate of 1%). (Page 304) Title IV

Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain: 1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. 2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes.
Strategies to cultivate VR’s effectiveness in serving employers: Developing successful partnerships with local and multi-state businesses in an effort to increase the employment of individuals with disabilities and self-employment. Services include, but not limited to: 1. Train employers on compliance the title I of the American with Disability Act (ADA) of 1990 and other employment-related laws. 2. Inform employers of the existence of the program and availability of services. 3. Educate and provide services to employers who have hired or are interested in hiring individuals with disabilities. 4. Provide training and technical assistance to employers regarding disability awareness. 5. Working with employers to provide opportunities for work-based learning experiences and opportunities. for PRE-ETS services. 6. Train employees who are individuals with disabilities. (Page 318) Title IV

• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Conduct outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, and develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 322) Title IV

Priority 1: Increase the number of clients receiving SE services. Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals that receive SE services. FY 2017: 325 FY: 304 FY 2015: 57 individuals received SE services. FY 2014: 53 individuals received SE services. FY 2013: 98 individuals received SE services.
The factors that contributed to our ability to increase the number of individuals that received SE services was our participation in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, (EFSLMP). This program introduced our counseling and employment staff to the customized employment model which supports the long term supports of SE services.
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. (Page 325) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~PRE-ETS Goals: DVR/WDD/DOE strategies for leveraging resources and funding include; DVR working/contracting with the Core Partners to leverage resources and funding for the provision of job exploration counseling and placement and case management services. Specifically, WDD has agreed to leverage resources and funding from other programs (e.g. a Disability Employment Initiative grant) to the maximum extent possible, to provide individualized services such as job coaching, uniforms, transportation to and from work-based learning sites, safety equipment or assistive technology to participating Pre-ETS students. WDD will partner with Adult Education to provide the workplace readiness training to DVR’s Pre-ETS students in preparation for successful attainment of the work-based learning skills.

DVR is participating and in support of the American Job Center’s One-Stop Single Sign-On registration system to increase access to the services of DOE’s Adult Education, the Workforce Development Division, and other partners for DVR clients on the deferred list to meet their training and job placement needs. (Page 303) Title VI
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~For example, the Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI) program awarded to DLIR in 2015 includes as a goal increasing the number of Business Leadership Networks, which are business-driven groups of employers committed toward promoting the hiring of persons with disabilities. A major partner in DEI is DVR and their providers, and WIOA AJC staff members are the primary recipients of capacity building to serve persons with significant disabilities. Another DEI goal is developing an interagency group of providers with the AJCs for a more coordinated referral system among providers and for more integration of business engagement activities among providers. Adult Education will be part of this group with other partners. Approaching employers and Business Leadership Networks (BLN) in a coordinated manner that represents all agencies is more professional, useful, and productive than each agency operating in its own silo with employers. A coordinated approach also enables providers to offer a fuller array of services as different options to meet different situations. (Page 121) Title I

Although DEI focuses on a specific group of individuals, the successes of the coordinated service strategies is a model for a broader population. (DEI, Round II, was conducted only on the Counties of Hawaii and Maui, and the successful collaboration with employers and providers was the stepping stone for DEI Round VI statewide.) Experience showed that building trust among agencies took time and a disciplined commitment to regular meetings. It also required the lead agency and its contractor, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, to develop meeting agenda, contact agencies for meetings, and include actions relevant to the providers. Similar factors were critical to sustain business interest in participating on the Business Leadership Networks.
Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of AJC staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 122) Title I

The Employer Engagement Committee of the Council is developing a business services framework plan that will coordinate business services of the AJC partner network and will improve the quality of services provided by the system to employers; meet the needs of employers; and meet the effectiveness in serving employers goals of the State.
The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), Round VI, also will help facilitate a coordinated approach with employers among agencies serving persons with disabilities. This approach was very successful on Hawaii County where DEI Round II was carried out. Lessons learned from that experience, including the time it took to build trust and break barriers, helps inform DEI Round VI, which will be implemented Statewide.  (Page 130) Title I

Each self-service resource room located in the AJCs features a minimum of one accessible computer terminal equipped with assistive technology software designed to increase accessibility to all AJC customers, including individuals with multiple challenges and individuals with disabilities. Where needed in the AJCs, assistive technology has been or will be purchased under the Disability Employment Initiative Grants.
The technical assistance provided to Core Partners and AJCs from Employment First State Leadership Mentoring (EFSLMP) projects enabled the creation of interagency teams called Workforce Solutions to collaboratively plan and implement statewide efforts to serve persons with disabilities more effectively. The interagency teams include DVR, Department of Health, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, WDD, and AJCs. A series of training sessions for partner agencies were arranged under EFSLMP to build their capacity for serving persons with disabilities. The training continues under DEI Round VI for Hawaii and Maui; and they will be provided under DEI Round VIII statewide. (Page 175) Title I

As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by itsprovision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 225-226) Title V

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~It is clear from the interviews and the survey results that students and youth with disabilities in Hawaii have a need to receive pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) as identified in the Reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act in WIOA. These services include:
1. Job exploration counseling;
2. Work-based learning experiences;
3. Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs at institutions of higher education;
4. Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living (often referred to as soft skills); and
5. Instruction in self-advocacy, which may include peer mentoring
Each of these Pre-ETS services was noted as a need on a recurring basis when discussing the needs of students and youth in Hawaii.
The Rehabilitation Act as reauthorized in WIOA also indicates that the following authorized services can be provided if funds remain after the provision of the five required services noted above:
1. Implementing effective strategies to increase the likelihood of independent living and inclusion in communities and competitive integrated workplaces;
2. Developing and improving strategies for individuals with intellectual disabilities and individuals with significant disabilities to live independently, participate in postsecondary education experiences, and obtain and retain competitive integrated employment;
3. Providing instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students and youth with disabilities;
4. Disseminating information about innovative, effective, and efficient approaches to achieve the goals of this section;
5. Coordinating activities with transition services provided by local educational agencies under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.);
6. Applying evidence-based findings to improve policy, procedure, practice, and the preparation of personnel, in order to better achieve the goals of this section;
7. Developing model transition demonstration projects;
8. Establishing or supporting multistate or regional partnerships involving States, local educational agencies, designated State units, developmental disability agencies, private businesses, or other participants to achieve the goals of this section; and
9. Disseminating information and strategies to improve the transition to postsecondary activities of individuals who are members of traditionally unserved populations. (Page 77) Title I

DVR can assist a VR eligible individual with only those activities that are included in their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). All activities that are required for a VR eligible individual to prepare, obtain, maintain/regain employment (of their informed choice) will be listed on their IPE. If an activity that is required, is identified after the IPE is completed, then the VR eligible individual and the VR counselor, in agreement, can amend the IPE to include the activity and make any other changes as determined to be necessary to obtain employment. DVR and the Core partners are working on MOA’s which details the responsibilities of each partner which will help in the management and avoid duplication among these activities. In so far as duplication of activities by other optional AJC partners, VR would have minimal involvement as those services would not be listed on the IPE since those services would not be necessary for the VR eligible individual to obtain employment. (Page 123-124) Title I

The DLIR Director, along with the Superintendent of Education and the University of Hawaii President, is a voting member of the P-20 Statewide Longitudinal Data System (aka Data Exchange Partnership or DXP) Executive Committee. The Workforce Development Council Executive Director is an attending member of the Executive Committee. WDC staff are members of the DXP’s Data Governance and Access Committee (formerly known as the Steering Committee) and the Research and Data Request Sub-Committee.
In support of the WIOA state plan, the state CTE office is supporting two new positions to be hired in the spring of 2018. One is a CTE and Workforce Data Analyst and the other is a Workforce Alignment and Learning Opportunities Specialist. They will be housed in the P20 office and will address data and work-based learning across all WIOA stakeholders.
DVR already has a Special Education/Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR) program. The primary purpose of the program is for students ages 14 - 21 who have been found eligible for VR services to participate gain work experience in an integrated setting, while still enrolled in school.
DVR is also working with Adult Literacy and Community Colleges to develop career pathways which include Pre-ETS with work-based learning experiences for VR students between 14-21 years of age. We are working with Adult Education to provide career pathways for VR clients which includes remedial reading and math classes; PETS and work experience for those clients who desire to enter directly into the labor force. We are working with the Community Colleges to provide career pathways for VR clients ages 14 and above who desire to enter secondary education prior to entering the workforce. (Page 132) Title I

In support of the WIOA state plan, the state CTE office is supporting two new positions to be hired in the spring of 2018. One is a CTE and Workforce Data Analyst and the other is a Workforce Alignment and Learning Opportunities Specialist. They will be housed in the P20 office and will address data and work-based learning across all WIOA stakeholders. (Page 133) Title I
The Sector Strategies and Career Pathways committee will convene sub-committees based on key industry sectors identified in the Unified Plan. These sub-committees will provide employer and industry perspective. The objectives of the sub-committees are:
• Assess training needs and skills gaps, inventory current resources and services, identify high priority gaps;
• Build stronger networks between firms and among education and training partners to identify high-priority skill gaps and in-demand sectors;
• Review and provide feedback on HIDOE and UHCC’s standards and assessments, academic and career technical content and work skills;
• Increase high quality, work-based learning opportunities for secondary and postsecondary students that lead to industry recognized credentials;
• Identify new industry-recognized credentials or work-based programs that give companies confidence in skills of new hires and provide workers with more mobility;
• Develop opportunities for professional development training for teachers, school/job counselors, training providers, etc.;
• Identify policies and/or strategies to sustain the model. (Page 153) Title I

• State and federal funds from DHS—for job development. job readiness, and placement of TANF recipients and SNAP recipients into jobs.
• State and federal funds from State DHS, DVR to WDD to implement a 2016 Summer Youth Employment program for youth with a disability on Counties of Oahu, Hawaii, and Maui; also supports a year-round WDD staff on Big Island for business outreach and employment assistance for DVR clients. With DVR, WDD is developing a plan for year-round work-based learning services to youth with disabilities using DVR Pre-Employment Transition Services fund for Oahu; and a plan for DVR youth referrals for a Summer Youth Employment Program on Hawaii and Maui Counties. (Page 162) Title I

In the case of a State that, under section 101(a)(2)(A)(i)of the Rehabilitation Act designates a State agency to administer the part of the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services portion of the Unified or Combined State Plan under which VR services are provided for individuals who are blind, describe the process and the factors used by the State to determine the distribution of funds among the two VR agencies in the State.
o Vocational Rehabilitation Basic Support Grant. The purpose of this grant is to assist Hawaii in operating statewide comprehensive, coordinated, effective, efficient, and accountable programs of vocational rehabilitation, which is an integral part of a statewide workforce investment system designed to assess, plan, develop, and provide vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities to prepare for and engage in gainful employment.
o Hawaii DVR is a combined agency which means that we receive one Basic Support Grant which funds the General and Blind agency.
o DVR supports the WDD staff and the American Job Center staff on all islands for business outreach and employment assistance for DVR clients. Along with DVR staff, employers will be provided training and technical assistance to include, but not limited to (1) disability awareness; (2) compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); (3) VR services; (4) recruitment and hiring of persons with disabilities and (5) support for current employees with disabilities.
o DVR has a current State Educational Agency (SEA) Agreement with the DOE and is currently developing an updated SEA agreement to include the WIOA regulations.
o Upon exit from the DOE/Special Education Program, DVR’s clients attend DOE/Adult Education classes. DVR and Adult Education management staff have been meeting to significantly increase the number of DVR clients attending Adult Education classes in 2018. (Page 167) Title I

Following receipt of student referrals, VR counselors complete applications with students and their families, and determine eligibility. When a student is found eligible for VR Services, the VR counselor will attend the IEP meeting at the request of the DOE, when possible. At the request of the IEP team, the VR counselor will review and allow for amendments to the student’s IPE. Pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) include: job exploration counseling, counseling related to transition or post-secondary training/education, instruction in self-advocacy, workplace readiness training and work-based learning experiences. VR counselors provide counseling in job exploration and transition or post-secondary training/education. Service providers (e.g. community rehabilitation programs, partnering public sector agencies) are contracted for workplace readiness training and work-based learning experiences, and instruction in self-advocacy. (Pages 281-282) Title IV

VR counselors receive direct referrals of students with disabilities from the school, at any time during the school year. They provide consultation and technical assistance to schools during their visits, and during IEP meetings for students who were found eligible. When a student is found eligible for VR services the VR counselor will attend IEP meetings, at the request of the DOE when possible and agreed to with stakeholders. If unable to attend, VR information is provided. The VR counselor will review the student’s IPE and allow for amendments at the request of an IEP team.
Transition counselors provide introduction and guidance to post-school alternatives, and planning and coordination for work experiences in a work based setting to improve employment outcomes.
VR counselors receive direct referrals of students with disabilities from the school, at any time during the school year. They provide consultation and technical assistance to school staff during their school visits, and during IEP meetings for students and their families who were found eligible. When a student is found eligible for VR Services the VR counselor will attend IEP meetings, at the request of the DOE when possible. If unable to attend, VR information is provided. The VR counselor will review the student’s IPE and allow for amendments at the request of an IEP team. (Page 282) Title IV

DVR and DOE are agreed to work collaboratively to assist transition aged youth (TAY) in development and completion of their individualized education program (IEP). Transition planning includes, but is not limited to: DVR Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist (VRS) invitation to participate in DOE’s IEP meeting for shared TAYs, DVR VRS collaboration with and assistance to DOE teachers in transition planning for TAY, introduction and guidance of TAY to post-school alternatives by DOE transition coordinator and DVR VRS. Planning also includes coordination of experiences for TAY in work—based settings to improve employment outcomes.
DVR will provide transition planning which facilitates the development and completion of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and development of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) within 90 days from the date of eligibility, and prior to exit from high school for students served by the VR program (34 CFR §361.22(a)).
DOE facilitates annual IEP meetings for every student receiving Special Education services. Should the IEP team agree to submit a referral to DVR; the DOE Transition teacher will be responsible for submitting a referral for VR Services at the conclusion of the IEP meeting.
IEP meetings are facilitated by DOE. At IEP meetings, the VR Counselor provides an overview of the agency’s goal/mission, eligibility criteria, scope of services, rights/remedies, and other information specific to the student’s IPE. Once a student is found eligible for VR Services, the VR Counselor will attend the annual IEP meetings at the request of the DOE, when possible. If the VR Counselor is unable to attend this meeting, information will be provided to the family. The VR Counselor reviews the student’s IPE and allows for amendments at the request of the IEP team. DVR is represented on a variety of committees (Special Education Advisory Council, Developmental Disabilities Council) which enable parents and members of the community to gather information and provide input to DVR. (Page 283-284) Title IV

DVR works with employers to provide VR services through disability and diversity etiquette training, ADA advising, workshops on Emotional Intelligence and Job Readiness Training “Ho’ala” contracted through City and County, Department of Community Service Work Hawaii. Pre-employment transition services are offered through contracts with the Department of Education through Special Education Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR). SEVR provides unique work experience opportunities with employers in the community. Our network of over 600 employers are informed of various DVR programs that allow them to utilize internships, OJTs, apprenticeships in collaboration with the local Community Colleges, and Adult Education programs to access work-based learning experiences. Ongoing workshops and forums with employers are conducted on a quarterly basis with Work Hawaii from Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) to inform employers of changes in legislation and workforce diversification. (Page 288) Title II

Hawaii DVR will coordinate CSPD activities with those provided under the IDEA through the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). A representative of the State Educational Agency responsible for the public education of students with disabilities who are eligible to receive services under this title and part B of the IDEA is appointed by the Governor to be a member of the SRC. Program and financial information are disseminated at SRC meetings and orientation and trainings with VR and DOE, Special Education staff are coordinated at SRC meetings. Joint trainings for DOE /DVR staff are scheduled when necessary (e.g. training for revised procedures for current services or new services.). The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, WIOA, regulations are shared with the DOE staff during the joint quarterly meetings and other meetings needed to address concerns/clarifications as they arise. The transition counselor’s role is to have a presence at their designated schools. The counselors provide consultation and technical assistance to the Department of Education (DOE) staff, students and their families with information regarding DVR’s goal/mission, eligibility criteria, scope of services, rights/remedies and the Special Education-Vocational Rehabilitation (SE-VR) program during their regularly scheduled visits and during IEP meetings. (Page 294) Title IV

DVR investigated the needs of youth and students with disabilities in their 2015 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA). It is clear from the interviews and the survey results that students in Hawaii have a need to receive pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS). Each of the Pre-ETS categories of activities were noted as a need on a recurring basis when discussing the needs of students.
B. Required Activities
• Job exploration counseling;
• Work-based learning experiences, which may include in-school or afterschool opportunities, or experience outside the traditional school setting (including internships), provided in an integrated environment to the maximum extent possible;
• Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs at institutions of higher education;
• Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living skills; and
• Instruction in self-advocacy, which may include peer mentoring.
C. Target Populations: Students receiving transition services pursuant to IDEA or a student who is an individual with a disability under Section 504 aged 14 - 21. (Page 302) Title IV
PRE-ETS Goals: DVR/WDD/DOE strategies for leveraging resources and funding include; DVR working/contracting with the Core Partners to leverage resources and funding for the provision of job exploration counseling and placement and case management services. Specifically, WDD has agreed to leverage resources and funding from other programs (e.g. a Disability Employment Initiative grant) to the maximum extent possible, to provide individualized services such as job coaching, uniforms, transportation to and from work-based learning sites, safety equipment or assistive technology to participating Pre-ETS students. WDD will partner with Adult Education to provide the workplace readiness training to DVR’s Pre-ETS students in preparation for successful attainment of the work-based learning skills. (Page 303) title IV

VR counselors receive direct referrals of students with disabilities from the school, at any time during the school year. They provide consultation and technical assistance to schools during their visits, and during IEP meetings for students who were found eligible. When a student is found eligible for VR services, the VR counselor will attend IEP meetings, at the request of the DOE when possible. If VR counselor is unable to attend the IEP meeting, the transition counselor provides VR information to the student. The VR counselor will review the student’s IPE and allow for amendments at the request of an IEP team. Transition counselors provide introduction and guidance to post school alternatives, and planning and coordination for work experiences in a work-based setting to improve employment outcomes. VR counselors provide counseling in job exploration and transition or post-secondary training/education. Service providers (e.g. community rehabilitation programs, public sector agencies) are contracted for workplace readiness training, work-based learning experiences, and instruction in self-advocacy. DVR continues a long-standing collaboration with the Department of Education to deliver the Special Education — Vocational Rehabilitation (SE-VR) Work Study Program. SE-VR is a work-based learning experience designed to deliver three inter-related components: classroom experience, in-school work experiences and community work experience. The DOE classroom experience is designed with a workplace readiness component. DOE in-school experience is designed to continue work place readiness training with hands-on experience at the DOE school. Finally, community work experience is designed to provide work-based learning experiences in the community. DVR has implemented a Summer Youth Program to provide work-based learning experiences in State, City and County, Federal and private sector work places. (Page 317) Title IV

Improve Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Disabilities by:
1.Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes. • Incentivize timely service delivery by implementing new performance measures for VR counselors which ensure that 90% of eligibility determinations will be completed within 90 days of customers’ application dates and that 90% of Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs) are developed within 60 days of customers’ eligibility determination dates. • Provide high-quality training and support, ensuring staff have the knowledge and skills needed to deliver high-quality vocational rehabilitation services. • Through statewide case file reviews, build an organizational culture of quality to strengthen substantial counseling and guidance.
2.Conduct outreach to key populations, including students with disabilities, to ensure thatall with persons with disabilities have access to services and supports needed to prepare forand obtain employment. (Page 318) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~DVR already has a Special Education/Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR) program. The primary purpose of the program is for students ages 14 - 21 who have been found eligible for VR services to participate gain work experience in an integrated setting, while still enrolled in school.
DVR is also working with Adult Literacy and Community Colleges to develop career pathways which include Pre-ETS with work-based learning experiences for VR students between 14-21 years of age. We are working with Adult Education to provide career pathways for VR clients which includes remedial reading and math classes; PETS and work experience for those clients who desire to enter directly into the labor force. We are working with the Community Colleges to provide career pathways for VR clients ages 14 and above who desire to enter secondary education prior to entering the workforce. (Page 132) Title I

• Data in Hawaii’s ETPL including those providing non-traditional training services and ETPs of registered apprenticeship programs;
• Information identifying eligible providers of on-the-job training (OJT), customized training, incumbent worker training, internships, paid or unpaid work experience opportunities and transitional jobs. WIOA sec. 122(h) exempts providers of on-the-job training and other employer-based training from the requirements at WIOA sec. 122(a)-(f). However, the identity of employers that access WIOA funds for employer-based training, as well as any performance information required by the State under WIOA sec. 122(h)(2) is disclosable;
• Information on effective outreach and partnerships with business;
• Information on effective service delivery strategies and promising practices to serve workers and job seekers;
• Performance information and information on the cost of attendance, including tuition and fees;
• A list of eligible providers of youth activities;
• Information on physical and programmatic accessibility for individuals with disabilities; and
• Access to providers’ past performance information to maximize consumer choice. (Page 189) Title I

DVR works with employers to provide VR services through disability and diversity etiquette training, ADA advising, workshops on Emotional Intelligence and Job Readiness Training “Ho’ala” contracted through City and County, Department of Community Service Work Hawaii. Pre-employment transition services are offered through contracts with the Department of Education through Special Education Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR). SEVR provides unique work experience opportunities with employers in the community. Our network of over 600 employers are informed of various DVR programs that allow them to utilize internships, OJTs, apprenticeships in collaboration with the local Community Colleges, and Adult Education programs to access work-based learning experiences. Ongoing workshops and forums with employers are conducted on a quarterly basis with Work Hawaii from Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) to inform employers of changes in legislation and workforce diversification. (Page 288) Title I

Apprenticeship

In preparation for WIOA implementation, State-level Partners met regularly for about a year to learn about services provided by each Core Partner (and other Partners), convened joint meetings among Partner stakeholders, and determined how participant data would be shared and tracked through Core Programs. As much as possible during this preparation period, Core Partners were added as key agencies in programs such as DLIR’s Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI), DVR’s Student Transition Employment Program, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) led by DVR, and the American Apprenticeship Initiative Grant led by DLIR. Since then, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) was led by the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and the collaboration continues among agencies serving persons with disabilities. (Page 121) Title II

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Although DEI focuses on a specific group of individuals, the successes of the coordinated service strategies is a model for a broader population. (DEI, Round II, was conducted only on the Counties of Hawaii and Maui, and the successful collaboration with employers and providers was the stepping stone for DEI Round VI statewide.) Experience showed that building trust among agencies took time and a disciplined commitment to regular meetings. It also required the lead agency and its contractor, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, to develop meeting agenda, contact agencies for meetings, and include actions relevant to the providers. Similar factors were critical to sustain business interest in participating on the Business Leadership Networks.
Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of AJC staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 122) Title I

USDOL Foreign Labor Certifications—assists employers with housing inspections, job order recruitments, and labor certification applications to hire foreign workers for temporary agriculture labor (H-2A); and assists employers with job order recruitments and labor certification applications to hire foreign workers to perform temporary non-agriculture labor (H-2B).
USDOL ODEP funds for Disability Employment Initiative, Round VI—provides AJC and partner staff training from University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies to increase capability to serve persons with significant disabilities; help establish and maintain Business Leadership Networks and interagency provider collaborations; and increase number of SSI and SSDI beneficiaries getting employment and remaining employed. Round VIII targets youth with disabilities. (Page 161) Title I

4. The VR Classroom Experience - SE Clients will have access to Job Empowerment Training (JET), a classroom-based job readiness course. JET is designed to address the various barriers to employment and to teach the basic skills to find, gain, and maintain employment.
5. VR Placement - Assist clients in gaining competitive employment in the community.
6. SE Retention and Ongoing Supports - Assist in retaining competitive employment in the community via job coaching and regular follow-up. Though purely based on need, most SE clients will receive 100% Job Coaching at first, then will taper off to less than 50% with the goal of final independence. In addition, DVR partners with Developmental Disabilities Division case managers and Ticket to Work Employment Networks to provide extended services to sustain employment. (Page 315) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Dislocated Worker Eligible Training Provider
WDC staff along with LWDB staff are working to increase the number of Eligible Training Providers approved in the State. Each LWDB will work with their local UH System Community College(s) to add programs of study, credit and non-credit courses that meet WIOA requirements. In addition, out-ot-state providers of on-line courses have been added to the eligible education and training providers that can be funded, at least in part, through WIOA. These providers work in cooperation with the American Job Centers located through the state of Hawaii and offer both specialized training as well as credit and non-credit pathways to higher-level employment opportunities. (Page 101) Title I

As required by WIOA, registered apprenticeship program sponsors are informed of their automatic qualification to the Eligible Training Provider List.
DVR can assist a VR eligible individual with only those activities that are included in their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). All activities that are required for a VR eligible individual to prepare, obtain, maintain/regain employment (of their informed choice) will be listed on their IPE. If an activity that is required, is identified after the IPE is completed, then the VR eligible individual and the VR counselor, in agreement, can amend the IPE to include the activity and make any other changes as determined to be necessary to obtain employment. DVR and the Core partners are working on MOA’s which details the responsibilities of each partner which will help in the management and avoid duplication among these activities. In so far as duplication of activities by other optional AJC partners, VR would have minimal involvement as those services would not be listed on the IPE since those services would not be necessary for the VR eligible individual to obtain employment. (Page 123-124) Title I

Core Partner staff also will have access to employer and job order information in the PMIS so they can analyze business services being performed by their providers and offices and improve coordination and management of employer engagement activities.
DVR is currently in the process of getting internal approvals for contracting with the current PMIS vendor and targets having an executed contract in place by July 1, 2016. Adult Education similarly plans to finalize their plans and have any necessary contract in place with Geographic Solutions by July 1, 2016 or shortly thereafter. These contracts will enable the importation of data from DVR and Adult Education file extracts and the development and maintenance of separate portals for DVR and Adult Education participants into HireNet Hawaii. For WIOA, Wagner-Peyser, Veteran, and Trade Adjustment Act reports, Geographic Solutions has been preparing updates to HireNet Hawaii specifications based on federal draft reporting instructions. The vendor will update the specifications based on changes made in the final instructions on a timely basis. (Page 170) Title I

Employer Engagement Goals: DVR's Statewide Employment Staff Specialist has been invited and will participate in the sector strategies by the Chamber of Commerce of Hawaii and will participate in WDC's Employment Committee. DVR's Employment Specialist will continue to be a resource to employers to provide training and education to employers on the skills and abilities of persons with disabilities, reasonable accommodations, tax incentives, etc.
Goal 3.1 Annually increase the number of employers who provide opportunities for individuals with disabilities to participate in work-based employment experiences and internships (by 1%). (Page 304) Title IV

Data Collection

For Section (l) State Goals and Priorities: Priority 1: Pre-Employment Transition Services we want to know how to leverage the funding in pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) with other Core Partners. What specific actions will be taken by the DVR to ensure a stronger relationship between the Core Partners in support of DVR Pre-ETS recipients? We recommend amending priorities to list specifically how the DVR will work with the Core Partners to try to mitigate the Order of Selection, and how the DVR can work with the Core Partners to address Priority Category 2 and 3 clients. Tapping into the Core Partners resources is a recommended focus as well. Priority 3: (Employer Engagement) SRC recommends including specific examples of work that have been done to ensure employer engagement. For Priority 4: (Common Data Collection for Unified State Plan), it is recommended DVR include the WDC Data Integration and Single Sign-On project among the priorities. (Page 278) Title IV

4. Coordination with Employers: DVR’s ongoing coordination efforts will include participation in sector strategies and training employers and state agencies on reasonable accommodations as supports that will be provided to improve partnerships with employers. We will continue to partner with DOE and DLIR’s WDD to leverage resources and funding to provide employers with qualified employees. 5. The Annual Estimates section will be updated as recommended. 6. State Goals and Priorities - Pre-Employment Transition Services; Employer Engagement and Common Data Collection for Unified State Plan: More details will be included in description (l) on how DVR will accomplish the goals. 7. Order of Selection section has been updated. 8. Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title IV funds section will be reviewed and aligned with the goals and priorities as listed in description (l). DVR is very appreciative of the continuing working partnership with SRC to develop strategic elements of planning and achieving financial stability to ensure that we are focusing on the right targets and are proactive instead of reactive to ensure effectiveness. (Page 279 278 ) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

As a condition to the award of financial assistance from the Department of Labor under Title I of WIOA, the grant applicant assures that it has the ability to comply with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of the following laws and will remain in compliance for the duration of the award of federal financial assistance: • Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status and gender identity), national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship status or participation in any WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity; • Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the bases of race, color and national origin; • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, which prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities; • The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age; and • Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs. (Page 145) Title I

AJC partners will collaborate to develop policies, procedures, proven and promising practices, and templates to aid local boards in the AJC Certification process. Additional criteria will be developed by the core partners, customer representatives, additional partners and other key stakeholders, including job-seekers. Multiple avenues will be utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of AJC services including: • Development of a shared AJC Operations Manual • Monitoring checklist • Development of self-evaluation training, toolkit and ongoing guidance • A system for obtaining client feedback which is user-friendly, streamlined and accessible • Surveys will be accessible in multiple formats, provided in a variety of ways, and can be submitted anonymously - at no cost or inconvenience to the client. • Office Peer Review tool • Timely survey evaluation and dissemination to local programs • Dedicated Technical Assistance (TA) personnel available for on-site and remote TA. (Page 155) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) defines a person with a disability as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activity. Nearly 1 in 5 people have a disability in the U.S. About 56.7 million people — 19 percent of the population —with more than half of them reporting the disability was severe, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, 2010. (Page 174) Title II

Vets

Hawaii’s veterans will compete with non-veterans for the same jobs especially those that pay well, are full-time, and have good benefits. Veterans will leverage their military service, service-connected disability, VA educational benefits, and federal government regulations and statutes to gain hiring preference over non-veterans for jobs with the federal, state, local governments and with federal contractors. Any shortfalls in relevant credentials, transferrable skills, and work experience can be mitigated, in part, with veterans leveraging their Post 9-11 GI Bill Educational benefits. In Hawaii, eligible veterans can receive over $100,000 in Post 9-11 GI Bill financial aid to pursue a college degree or a vocational training credential. Hawaii employment opportunities will grow by 43,930 to 740,540 jobs from 2014 to 2024, averaging a modest growth of 0.6 percent annually. Service-providing industries (trade, transportation, and utilities; information; financial activities; professional and business services; education and health services; leisure and hospitality; other services; and government) will represent over 83 percent of the total workforce throughout the projection period, and will generate slightly more than four-fifths of the total job gains. The top four largest industries within this sector (education and health services; trade, transportation, and utilities; professional and business services; and leisure and hospitality) will provide 75 percent of the total statewide job gains. Government is the only industry projected to decline. (Page 60) Title I

…access to an array of formidable tools in the veterans’ transition tool kit. Military transitional services, employment, training and priority of services delivered by the American Job Centers, and U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs education programs will be integral components of a veteran’s tool kit. Veterans will leverage federal regulations that require American Job Centers and employment programs, funded in part by U.S. DOL, to serve veterans ahead of non-veterans; this rule is known as priority of service. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Labor funds the Hawaii Department of Labor’s Workforce Development Division, in part, with the Jobs for Veterans State Grant, to hire specialized and trained staffs, Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists and Local Veterans Employment Representatives, to serve veterans with significant barriers to employment and to reach out to employers to promote the hiring of veterans. (Page 61) Title I

• USDOL, Veterans Employment Training Services -- supports WDD Disabled Veterans Outreach Program counselors for employment planning, job counseling, and case management to address employment issues of veterans with service-connected disabilities or other significant barriers to employment; and WDD Local Veteran Employment Representatives to conduct continual outreach to businesses to promote hiring of veterans, and with human resource professionals, conduct job search workshops for veterans. • USDOL, Senior Community Services Employment Program—supports providers serving low-income residents 55 years and older with employment planning and assessments, part-time community service jobs, and job placement assistance; providers include Hawaii County Office on Aging, Honolulu Community Action Program, DHS, Maui Economic Opportunity, and Kauai Branch of WDD. • USDOL, Work Opportunity Tax Credit—supports processing employer requests for certifications of the Work Opportunity Tax Credit for certain eligible new hires (also funded by Wagner-Peyser) (Page 161) Title I

Participant performance in all Core Programs (WIOA Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth Programs; Wagner-Peyser programs, Adult Education, Vocational Rehabilitation), Disabled Veterans Outreach Program, Local Veterans Employment Representative, and Trade Adjustment Act will be measured through data stored in the PMIS. All staff users and their providers are responsible to accurately enter data into the PMIS in a timely manner. All quarterly and annual reports required by the federal government are generated from HireNet Hawaii data and electronically transmitted to the USDOL. DLIR extracts information on employment status and average earnings for all exiters from UI wage records. Local area staff and Core Partner staff also may enter supplementary information on jobs obtained by participants. At the end of each quarter and year, DLIR will transmit to each county and Core Partner their performance reports in the same format as the federal statewide report. Counties, Local Boards, and Core Partners will review their performance at least on a quarterly basis and take any necessary corrective actions to resolve deficiencies. Staff users can produce PMIS reports to assess and correct performance on an on-going basis. These reports, filtered by different criteria, dates, and target groups, enable staff to review different aspects of performance prior to or after outcomes are reported with the goal of continually improving performance. (Page 170) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist. The State shall ensure priority of service to veterans and eligible spouses in its program delivery and services that are directly funded in whole or part, by the Department of Labor, in accordance with all federal guidance letters and notices, including 20 CRF Part 1010, Employment and Training Administration’s Training and Employment Guidance Letter No. 10-09, and Training and Employment Notice 15-10. This applies to all services in the AJCs. Procedures are in place in each AJC office for staff to identify veterans and eligible spouses at every point of entry in the service delivery system. Staff at all levels of WDD operations and in AJCs have been trained in priority of service requirements. (Page 173) Title I

Staff shall refer individuals identified as VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE SPOUSES WITH SIGNIFICANT BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist for intensive service. If a DVOP specialist is not available, the client shall be referred to the AJC staff assigned to provide intensive service. In circumstances when it is not practical to refer a client to a DVOP for intensive service and to a Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER) for job development service, the local office/AJC manager shall designate appropriate staff to assist the client. Services received by the client shall be the same service he or she would receive if a DVOP and LVER were available. AJC Managers and WDD Managers shall periodically review the State policies and guidance for identifying and serving veterans with significant barriers to employment to ensure that staff continues to be aware of and continues implementing correct procedures for serving veterans with significant disabilities. State policies include Job Service Bulletin No. 01-15, Change 1, and its updates. (Page 173) Title I

Mental Health

~~Other Rapid Response topics, such as the following, will be included for group sessions, as appropriate:
• COBRA;
• Credit counseling and loan assistance;
• Grief/trauma counseling, or other mental health services;
• Housing assistance, and/or
• Social services provided by Community-Based Organizations.
Because of the breadth of topics covered during Rapid Response sessions, only those staff members who are experienced and knowledgeable will participate as presenters. Services for individuals, such as filing for UI (after layoff), registration in the PMIS, and applying for financial assistance may be provided immediately following group sessions, if workers need assistance for these services. Job fairs also will be scheduled, as appropriate, specifically for the laid-off workers in conjunction with, or shortly after Rapid Response sessions. In addition, job search workshops and literacy or skills training may be provided for the workers to prepare them for the job market prior to or shortly after layoff.
In addition to reacting to layoff notices, Rapid Response will include business service teams to expand the rapid response infrastructure in each local area so that Rapid Response becomes pro-active and on-going to serve businesses and their workers more effectively. (Page 198) Title IV

Outreach at the State Level: In collaborative partnership with other agencies, DVR administrative level staff serves on boards and councils to address joint responsibilities for provision of vocational services to eligible TAY. These partnerships include, but are not limited to: Special Education Advisory Council (SEAC), State Council on Developmental Disabilities, State Council on Mental Health, State Workforce Development Board, Services for the Blind Branch Advisory Council, and Deaf & Hard of Hearing Advisory Board. Outreach at the Local Level: As designated, DVR branch managers, section supervisors and VRS assist with identification of TAY who may be eligible for services. Between DVR and DOE, referrals for DVR services can occur at any time during the school year. DVR will maintain a presence and receive referrals of potential applicants at: transition fairs, job and career fairs, parent support groups, and forums hosted by high schools, organizations serving youth with disabilities and independent living skills training programs. DVR continues to identify opportunities to conduct outreach to potentially eligible and eligible students in need of pre-employment transition services and transition services. (Page 284) Title IV

The Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a grant through the US Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy that was first given to the Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) and turned over to the Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) for the final year will bring together various core partners. One of the two projects under EFSLMP is to develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, DDD, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from this larger core group. (Page 288) Title IV

Earlier in 2016, working arrangements between DVR and Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD) once again started. This specifically addresses clients involved in the clubhouse programs through AMHD and development of transitional employment opportunities for persons with significant mental health barriers. This was a program that had moderate success in the past and is hoped to achieve in greater success as the two agencies reignite the relationship. (Page 289) Title IV

Strategies for increasing percentage of program participants employed during the send and fourth quarter after exit: 1. Increase support services in postsecondary settings thereby increasing graduation rate. 2. Increase pre-employment transitions services to better prepare transitioning students with disabilities into the workforce. 3. Support the provision of summer youth employment for transitioning high school students as well as those in postsecondary training. 4. Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues. Temporary Employment Opportunities Paid and Unpaid Work Experience
Strategies to increase the median earning of program participants: 1. Assist in the development of Career Pathways based upon Hawaii’s labor market for individuals interested in postsecondary education or direct job placement or both. Identify Career Pathways and job opportunities that are specific to each county. (Page 317) Title IV

Complete agreement between DVR and Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD) for clients involved in the clubhouse programs through AMHD and development of transitional employment opportunities for persons with significant mental health barriers. This was a program that had moderate success in the past and is hoped to achieve in greater success as the two agencies reignite the relationship.
• Initiated in 2015 is an agreement between the DVR and the DOE to provide pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities. These are programs which counsels students in exploring vocational options, training in soft-skills and provides paid and unpaid work experience both on and off campus. One project in particular utilizes the general learning objectives developed by the DOE in providing the instructional material allowing students with disabilities to explore work within the visitor industry. After which students are placed into paid work experiences in a hotel. DVR and the DOE are looking to expand this project in the upcoming school year. (Page 320-321) Title IV

Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues.
o Temporary Employment Opportunities
o Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences
• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group. (Page 322) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

DVR does not use the Supported Employment model frequently for clients, and when it is used, the length of time the case is open after employment with Supported Employment services provided rarely has exceeded 90 days, even though Supported Employment services may be made available for a period of time not to exceed 24 months , unless under special circumstances the eligible individual and the rehabilitation counselor jointly agree to extend the time to achieve the employment outcome identified in the IPE.; • A large majority of DVR consumers receive SSA benefits and fear of benefit loss significantly affects their return-to-work choices and behaviors; • DVR’s relationship with the Developmental Disabilities Division is critical to the success and expansion of the SE program. The relationship has been improving in the last 18 months, which is viewed as a positive sign for the sustainability of high-quality Supported Employment services. (Page 295) Title IV Wagner-Peyser staff members, including LOMAs, are provide an array of Wagner-Peyser services, and either directly provide WIOA services, or at a minimum, provide information about WIOA services. They are also aware of the Job Service Complaint system and familiar with AJC services, including but not limited to, training programs and their referral procedures; Career Services such as labor market information, vocational counseling, and assessments; supportive services; and referrals to jobs. Because WDD staff works with other agencies, the staff members regularly make referrals to other resources such UI, TANF, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, temporary shelters, and services for the homeless population. As WDD is part of the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, which also contains the Disability Compensation (workers’ compensation) Division, and Wage Standards Division (wage standard enforcers), WDD staff will be able to refer farmworkers to these agencies as applicable. The LOMAs and AJC staff periodically meet with MEO, and know how they may refer MSFWs to MEO for more services. (Page 235-236) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

Proclamation: Apprenticeship week 2019 - 11/01/2019

“WHEREAS, apprenticeships are unique, long-term training programs that allow job seekers to learn specialized skills for various trades, combining classroom instruction with on-the-job training; and

WHEREAS, apprenticeship programs tap into a wider pool of talent, including people with disabilities, veterans, women and minorities…

THEREFORE I, DAVID Y. IGE, Governor, and I, JOSHUA B. GREEN, Lieutenant Governor of the State of Hawai'i, do hereby proclaim November 11-17, 2019 as "APPRENTICESHIP WEEK."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Apprenticeship
  • Veterans

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid Society Hawaii was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving consumers in the vulnerable and “left behind” populations, as well as those with limited English proficiency; consumers from the Compact of Free Association Countries; low income consumers; and geographically and culturally isolated consumers.   There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with the Compact of Free Association Countries (COFA), Consulate offices, local community groups such as: Churches, Health centers, Social service agencies, Women’s and homeless shelters, and Community center9/3/2019s. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Sergio Alcubilla Phone: (808) 527-8063Email: Sergio.alcubilla@legalaidhawaii.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

S.B. 1240 A BILL FOR AN ACT RELATING TO MEDICAID WAIVER - 06/29/2019

~~“Removes the sunset date of Act 21, Special Session Laws of Hawaii 2009, which requires the Department of Health to license home care agencies.  Adds exception for Medicaid waiver provider agencies providing services to Medicaid waiver participants”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Four-Year Area Plan on Aging - 06/04/2019

~~“Current statewide initiatives spearheaded by the Governor’s office include the expansion of the ADRC system to increase active collaboration with state agencies such as the Department of Human Services MedQUEST and Vocational Rehabilitation Divisions; the Department of Health Executive Office on Aging, Adult Mental Health Division, Developmental Disabilities Division, Disability and Communication Access Board, Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Language Access Advisory Council; the Hawaii Department of Defense Office of Veterans Services; and with community organizations and councils such as Centers for Independent Living. The goal of this collaborative effort is to build upon the ADRC Systems Change to create a No Wrong Door (NWD) System in the state. The NWD Initiative will enhance existing ADRC processes to expand assistance to all populations and payers in accessing long term services and supports, thereby making it easier for people of all ages, disabilities, and income levels to learn about and obtain the help they need. A reasonable expected outcome of the NWD Initiative also includes the removal of silos and the increase of integrated efforts among various State and local agencies that serve these populations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Individualized Education Program - 04/10/2019

~~ “An IEP is a written statement about the educational program for a child with a disability. It serves as a management tool used to ensure that the child receives the needed special education and related services. It also serves as an evaluation device when used to determine the extent of the child's progress toward accomplishing projected goals. The contents of an IEP are listed and available by accessing the web-link.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hawaii’s IDEA Part B Profile - 04/10/2019

~~“The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) has created an IDEA Part B Profile for Hawaii that provides a resource for IDEA-related, State-specific information. Hawai‘i's state profile includes:• the most recent State Performance Plan/Annual Performance Report (SPP/APR) and OSEP’s response;• the State’s determination letter;• the State’s Results Driven Accountability Matrix;• and the approved submission for the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP).OSEP will be adding additional information about the State in the future. Hawaii’s profile can be accessed here: https://osep.grads360.org/#report/apr/2016B/publicView?state=HI&ispublic=true ” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

REPORT IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 348-8(c), HAWAII REVISED STATUTE - 01/04/2019

~~“1. In June 2018, a reverse job fair was held at America’s Job Center at Dillingham on Oahu.  As a result of this successful event, employers requested another be held.2.In response to #1, in October 2018 the Employment First Hawaii sponsored an Empowering All Abilities Reverse Job Fair held at the State Capitol.  There were 54 students from various high schools prepared with resumes and display boards showing their abilities, interests and skills.  Employers met with those students who met their current hiring and future hiring need.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Report to the Governor in Accordance with the Provisions of Section 348-8(c), 'Special Education Agreement" - 01/04/2019

~~” DVR - Special Education Agreement and Transitional student services have been reviewed with updates to MOA between DVR and DOE in final review to support ongoing partnership for students to explore careers and work-based learning experiences.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Report to the Governor in Accordance with the Provisions of Section 348-8(c), "Pre-ETS Program" - 01/04/2019

~~“Through DVR’s Pre-ETS program, work experience is subsidized in the Summer Youth Employment Programs.  Leveraging funding among Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) formal/informal partners continues to be explored to enhance work-based learning experiences statewide.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

State of Hawaii Office of Veterans' Services - 01/01/2019

~~“List of Services for Veterans, Active Military, Spouses & Dependents

    Assist in preparation of VA claims;    Assist with burials of indigent veterans;    Employment and Re-employment;…;    Help individuals file VA Appeals;….”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Hawaii HB 119 - 07/01/2015

"It is the intent and purpose of the legislature to establish a qualified tax exempt savings program to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities pursuant to section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or successor legislation, and any regulations promulgated thereunder.  It is the further intent of the legislature that the program established by this Act be and remain in conformance with the Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act [ABLE] of 2014, Division B of Public Law No. 113-295"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

House Bill 860: Related to Persons with Disabilities - 01/28/2015

 “Establishes an employment first policy for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Requires the DOH to establish an employment first committee.” (Introduced in the Hawaii state legislature 1/28/15; sent to committees and status is pending.)

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Proclamation: Apprenticeship week 2019 - 11/01/2019

“WHEREAS, apprenticeships are unique, long-term training programs that allow job seekers to learn specialized skills for various trades, combining classroom instruction with on-the-job training; and

WHEREAS, apprenticeship programs tap into a wider pool of talent, including people with disabilities, veterans, women and minorities…

THEREFORE I, DAVID Y. IGE, Governor, and I, JOSHUA B. GREEN, Lieutenant Governor of the State of Hawai'i, do hereby proclaim November 11-17, 2019 as "APPRENTICESHIP WEEK."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Apprenticeship
  • Veterans

Day at the Capitol event highlights Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month in March - 03/08/2018

~~“A proclamation signing by Governor David Ige at 9 a.m. in the governor’s ceremonial room. Gov. Ige will proclaim March as Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month in Hawaii, urging all citizens to recognize the abilities and contributions of people with developmental disabilities and engage and encourage them in their endeavors. Participants from Maui, Molokai, Lanai, Kauai, and Kona will attend the proclamation signing.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Individualized Education Program - 04/10/2019

~~ “An IEP is a written statement about the educational program for a child with a disability. It serves as a management tool used to ensure that the child receives the needed special education and related services. It also serves as an evaluation device when used to determine the extent of the child's progress toward accomplishing projected goals. The contents of an IEP are listed and available by accessing the web-link.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hawaii’s IDEA Part B Profile - 04/10/2019

~~“The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) has created an IDEA Part B Profile for Hawaii that provides a resource for IDEA-related, State-specific information. Hawai‘i's state profile includes:• the most recent State Performance Plan/Annual Performance Report (SPP/APR) and OSEP’s response;• the State’s determination letter;• the State’s Results Driven Accountability Matrix;• and the approved submission for the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP).OSEP will be adding additional information about the State in the future. Hawaii’s profile can be accessed here: https://osep.grads360.org/#report/apr/2016B/publicView?state=HI&ispublic=true ” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State of Hawaii Office of Veterans' Services - 01/01/2019

~~“List of Services for Veterans, Active Military, Spouses & Dependents

    Assist in preparation of VA claims;    Assist with burials of indigent veterans;    Employment and Re-employment;…;    Help individuals file VA Appeals;….”

Systems
  • Other

Employment First - 07/20/2018

~~The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities believes that all people, regardless of disability, should have the opportunity to work and recognizes that individuals with I/DD achieve successful employment outcomes when:•They are empowered to drive their job search process;•They have access to services and supports; and•They are given the opportunity to engage in a Customized Employment

In 2017 Governor David Y. Ige signed a Proclamation identifying October as Disability Employment Awareness month, and endorsed Hawai’i’s designation as an Employment First state.  In this proclamation, Governor Ige encouraged all citizens of the Aloha State to fully participate in the workforce and bring their individual strengths and talents to augment Hawai’i’s business and industry.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

Medicaid I/DD Waiver - 07/20/2018

~~“Medicaid is a jointly funded, Federal-State health insurance program for people with limited income and resources who meet eligibility requirements.  The Medicaid 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) is authorized under Section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act.  These services are designed to implement creative person-centered alternatives to long-term institutionalized care.

Quest Hawaii: More Choices for Your Healthcare

Hawaii’s state Medicaid program is called Med-QUEST. It is administered by the Department of Human Services, Med-QUEST Division (MQD), and is financed through the State of Hawai‘i and the Federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). MQD works in partnership with DDD and stakeholders to design a waiver that meets the needs of Hawai‘i residents with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (I/DD). MQD and DDD ensure the waiver is implemented in compliance with all waiver requirements, federal and state laws, and waiver standards.

Individuals who are eligible for DDD services, are Medicaid eligible, and meet the level of care criteria can apply for the Medicaid I/DD Waiver.  Services and supports are identified through a person-centered planning process with case managers who coordinate and assist individuals in accessing waiver services from qualified providers or through the Consumer-Directed (CD) Option.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Employment Services and Supports - 07/20/2018

~~This page has information on the following services and supports:Discovery and Career PlanningBenefits CounselingHawaii Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (WIPA)Individual Employment Supports•Job Development•Job Coaching 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WorkHawaii Ticket to Work - 04/06/2018

~~“American Job Center Hawaii is an employment network that provides assistance to persons with disabilities who are receiving Social Security benefits with the intent to obtain employment through our supportive services, which includes career and benefits planning; job development through work readiness and skills workshops; resume building and cover letter writing; and job search assistance to return to work.  Phone: (808)768-5720”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Report to the Twenty-Ninth Legislature State of Hawaii 2018 on Long Term Adult Supports and Resources - 12/30/2017

~~“Long Term Adult Supports and Resources (LASR)This program provides supports for individuals who are eligible for DDD but not eligible for Medicaid services under the I/DD Waiver, or do not choose to receive Waiver services.  The LASR Program assists individuals with I/DD and families to increase independence and interdependence in daily life activities.  The LASR program services include but are not limited to: discovery and career planning, volunteer work, senior activities (if applicable), competitive, integrated employment opportunities, activities to increase skills necessary to perform typical daily activities, activities to increase and strengthen social roles, building communications skills with members of the community, developing friendships and relationships with community members, and practicing skills in activities of daily living.

There was no waitlist for the LASR program during FY 2017. There were 83 individuals served by the LASR program with an expenditure of $720,231 from state general funds.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Hawaii Uniform Application FY 2018/2019 – State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Community Mental Health Services Block Grant - 08/29/2017

~~“The Clubhouse Model seeks to demonstrate that people with mental illness can successfully live productive lives and work in the community, regardless of the nature or severity of their mental illness. Clubhouse services include Transitional Employment (TE), Group Transitional Employment (GTE), Supported Employment (SE), Supported Education (SE), Advocacy and Case Management”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

HAWAII RESIDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CELEBRATE 30 YEARS OF SELF-DETERMINATION AT “DAY AT THE CAPITOL" - 03/16/2017

~~“Today, Hawaii is one of nine states that does  not have a waiting list for home and community based services. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes. Currently, 99 percent of people served by the Department of Health’s Developmental Disabilities Division live in residences serving one to six people, and 61 percent in settings with one to three people. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes.

By law, the Department of Health is mandated to develop, lead, administer, coordinate, monitor, evaluate, and set direction for a comprehensive system of supports and services for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Current services include: personal assistance/habilitation, emergency services, respite, employment supports, chore, training and consultation, specialized medical equipment, adult day health, skilled nursing, environmental accessibility and vehicular modifications, assistive technology, personal emergency response systems and non-medical transportation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Four-Year Area Plan on Aging - 06/04/2019

~~“Current statewide initiatives spearheaded by the Governor’s office include the expansion of the ADRC system to increase active collaboration with state agencies such as the Department of Human Services MedQUEST and Vocational Rehabilitation Divisions; the Department of Health Executive Office on Aging, Adult Mental Health Division, Developmental Disabilities Division, Disability and Communication Access Board, Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Language Access Advisory Council; the Hawaii Department of Defense Office of Veterans Services; and with community organizations and councils such as Centers for Independent Living. The goal of this collaborative effort is to build upon the ADRC Systems Change to create a No Wrong Door (NWD) System in the state. The NWD Initiative will enhance existing ADRC processes to expand assistance to all populations and payers in accessing long term services and supports, thereby making it easier for people of all ages, disabilities, and income levels to learn about and obtain the help they need. A reasonable expected outcome of the NWD Initiative also includes the removal of silos and the increase of integrated efforts among various State and local agencies that serve these populations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Report to the Governor in Accordance with the Provisions of Section 348-8(c), 'Special Education Agreement" - 01/04/2019

~~” DVR - Special Education Agreement and Transitional student services have been reviewed with updates to MOA between DVR and DOE in final review to support ongoing partnership for students to explore careers and work-based learning experiences.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Report to the Governor in Accordance with the Provisions of Section 348-8(c), "Pre-ETS Program" - 01/04/2019

~~“Through DVR’s Pre-ETS program, work experience is subsidized in the Summer Youth Employment Programs.  Leveraging funding among Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) formal/informal partners continues to be explored to enhance work-based learning experiences statewide.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Hawaii Disability Rights Center “Employment” - 11/30/2018

~~The rights of persons with disabilities were reaffirmed as follows: “People with disabilities have the right to freedom from discrimination in:

Being employed, provided reasonable accommodation in training for a job or in the workplace, the opportunity for career advancement, termination of supported or sheltered employment for placement in competitive, integrated employment at fair wages.

People with disabilities have the right to assistance to resolve problems or issues arising from programs or services funded under the Rehabilitation Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

*UPDATED* Supported Employment Services for VR Consumers - 07/04/2017

~~This is a call for bids for a program that will “Provide supported employment (SE) services to individuals with disabilities, both physical and mental. Individualized services are to be provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with the consumer’s strengths, resources, priortiespriorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice.  The contract term will be from October 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019 with four (4) additional 12-month option periods.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division - Strategic Plan 2015-2017 Progress Report - 09/23/2015

“The Strategic Plan was adopted on December 2014. In the ensuing months Team Leaders have been convening meetings with advocates, providers, partners, and Division staff to plan specific activities for attaining goals and objectives of the Strategic Plan. Teams have also developed performance measures to track progress and measure results.” Goal number 3 outlines that “DDD will ensure individuals with I/DD have opportunities to seek employment and achieve personal outcomes to work in competitive integrated settings.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Full Life Sponsors Disability Legislative Forum

EHDDC to host the 2016 East Hawaii Disability Legislative Forum “You cannot have Inclusion without Us” Full Life is sponsoring both East and West Hawai’i Island Disability Legislative Forums! The public, especially family members and persons with disabilities, are invited to come and meet Hawaii Island’s State legislators and County officials. These free events will feature a forum where policymakers will answer questions about disability-related issues such as employment, housing, transportation, and health. Special activities include the opportunities to express your opinion on topics important to you and to meet and talk story with State legislators and County officials. Provider agencies have prepared booths with information about many available services and supports.

Systems
  • Other

Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities

~~“The Council is responsible to engage in advocacy , capacity-building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the policy in the federal law; and contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered and consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system that includes needed community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that promote self-determination for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

The Council carries out its responsibilities through policy development, implementation and analysis; researching and promoting new approaches and best practices to services and supports; educating and informing policymakers and the public about developmental disabilities; developing and supporting coalitions; fostering interagency collaboration and coordination; providing training in leadership development and legislative advocacy; and eliminating barriers and enhancing design and redesign of systems.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hire Abilities Hawai'i

“Hire Abilities Hawaii represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`’ College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council.“

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

DLIR NEWS RELEASE: State awarded $2.25 million for youth disability workforce development - 10/16/2017

~~"Hawaii Youth At Work! Program Expands to Year AroundThe Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) was awarded $2.25 million in federal funds to help prepare youth with disabilities to enter the workforce or post-secondary education. The funding enables Hawaii Youth At Work! summer participants to obtain paid work experience during the year, coupled with employment preparation activities….

The program is a collaboration between the Department of Human Services (DHS) and DLIR. DHS’s Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), Benefit, Employment and Support Services Division, and Social Services Division counselors and staff work with DLIR workforce staff to place participants in temporary jobs with the State and Counties…..

In 2016, the Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP) provided 153 youth with disabilities paid work experience in State and County offices on the islands of Oahu, Maui, Molokai, Lanai and Hawaii. Youth were paid $10.00 an hour and worked up to twenty hours per week during the summer months. SYEP 2017 expanded referrals to include youth participants from the DHS’s Benefit, Employment and Support Services Division and Social Services Division in addition to VR. 125 participants were placed in State and City offices on the islands of Oahu, Maui, Molokai, Lanai and Hawaii.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii DEI - Round 6 Grant Abstracts - 11/01/2015

The U.S. Department of Labor awarded Hawaii a Round 6 DEI grant to improve employment opportunities for youth and/or adults with disabilities. “HIDEI [Hawaii DEI] will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and build upon the promising practices of the HIDEI 2 [Round 2] project to incorporate career pathways into its service to individuals with significant disabilities to better prepare participants to obtain meaningful employment and achieve self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii DEI - Round 2 Grants - 11/01/2015

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2010, Hawaii was awarded a Round 1 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The Round 1 grant ended in 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Hawaii Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“In 2006, Hawaii received a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, known as Hire Abilities Hawaii, ran from 2006 to 2009. It was authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. MIG provided funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that built supports for people with disabilities seeking employment. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. The Hire Abilities website grew out of these goals and objectives.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid Society Hawaii was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving consumers in the vulnerable and “left behind” populations, as well as those with limited English proficiency; consumers from the Compact of Free Association Countries; low income consumers; and geographically and culturally isolated consumers.   There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with the Compact of Free Association Countries (COFA), Consulate offices, local community groups such as: Churches, Health centers, Social service agencies, Women’s and homeless shelters, and Community center9/3/2019s. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Sergio Alcubilla Phone: (808) 527-8063Email: Sergio.alcubilla@legalaidhawaii.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

REPORT IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 348-8(c), HAWAII REVISED STATUTE - 01/04/2019

~~“1. In June 2018, a reverse job fair was held at America’s Job Center at Dillingham on Oahu.  As a result of this successful event, employers requested another be held.2.In response to #1, in October 2018 the Employment First Hawaii sponsored an Empowering All Abilities Reverse Job Fair held at the State Capitol.  There were 54 students from various high schools prepared with resumes and display boards showing their abilities, interests and skills.  Employers met with those students who met their current hiring and future hiring need.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

RealChoices Hawaii - Guide to Employment for Job Seekers - 01/22/2016

This guide to employment for people with disabilities provides information and additional links on job centers, employment for seniors and employment for youth.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Hawaii’s Disability Employment Initiative

~~“Hawaii’s DEI will focus its effort on the following strategies:•Increase American Job Center (AJC) staff competencies through training on Disability 101, Customized Employment, Career Pathway Systems, Job Accommodation, Asset Development, Individualized Learning Plans, and Disability Benefits Planning.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maui Youth and Family Services, Inc

~~“MYFS was established in 1978 by Maui County as the Maunaolu Youth Residential Shelter to provide a safe place for Maui’s homeless, abused and runaway children. Incorporated as a private non-profit agency in 1982, MYFS has expanded to include a range of behavioral and mental health programs to support young people and their families’ personal growth and emotional stability.Maui Youth and Family Services is accredited by CARF, the Commission on the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.”

Systems
  • Other

Hawaii Employers Council In-house Training

As a service exclusively for members, any or all of the Fundamentals of Supervision workshops can be brought to your company’s site or held at the HEC training room. The content of these workshops can be designed to fit your company’s unique culture and tailored to highlight issues that are important to your workplace. The workshops combine lectures, videos and case studies, with longer sessions including role-play exercises. We will use your company's forms, policies and procedures to the extent possible. In addition what is presented in the Fundamentals of Supervision Workshops, the following topics are also available for in-house programs: -ABCs of Collective Bargaining -Americans with Disabilities Act -Effective Employee Relations: Remaining Union Free -Family and Medical Leave Act (for members with 50 or more employees) -Preparing for Unemployment Appeals Hearings -Preventive Discipline for Unionized Work Groups

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - Customized Employment Videos

“These Customized Employment (CE) videos, each specifically focused on Employers, Youth, or a General audience, highlight the benefits of CE, an employment strategy which matches the skills and preferences of the individual with the specific business needs of the employer. This process results in expanded employment opportunities for those who utilize and engage in this innovative, evidenced-based approach to employment. The General audience video has been created in both English and Spanish.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

HireAbilities Hawai'i

This website is intended to provide resources to support employment for individuals with disabilities. It is intended to be used by job seekers with disabilities, service providers, agencies and businesses. This site was revamped December 2013 and now has many new features and content. Some major additions to the website include: -The Benefits Finder can search for eligibility and work incentive information for Hawaii’s state and federal disability programs. -Use our Resource Finder to search a database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. -Learn more about how Hawaii’s proposed Medicaid Buy-In Program could help workers with a disability who require Medicaid . Hire Abilities Hawaii is a comprehensive database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. It represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`i College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council. Originally started through a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - "What is Customized Employment?"

This brief article defines customized employment and outlines the case for using it with job seekers with disabilities. It outlines the different forms customized employment can take, including "task reassignment," "job carving," and "job negotiation."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

S.B. 1240 A BILL FOR AN ACT RELATING TO MEDICAID WAIVER - 06/29/2019

~~“Removes the sunset date of Act 21, Special Session Laws of Hawaii 2009, which requires the Department of Health to license home care agencies.  Adds exception for Medicaid waiver provider agencies providing services to Medicaid waiver participants”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WAIVER PROVIDER STANDARDS MANUAL Version B-3 - 11/02/2018

~~“Remediation for HCBS Final Rule (79 FR 2947) on Community Integration Through its process of validation and monitoring of Providers, DOH-DDD will ensure that settings meet HCBS final rule requirements by maximizing opportunities for participants to have access to the benefits of community living and opportunities to receive services in the most integrated setting.a. Setting requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1)The setting is integrated in and supports access to the greater community;2)The setting provides opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings if Discovery and Career Planning and Individual Employment Supports services are part of the Provider’s service array; 3)The setting provides opportunities to engage in community life, and control personal resources; and4)The setting ensures the participant receives services in the community to the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid I/DD Waiver.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Updated Medicaid Waiver Provider Standards For Individuals With Intellectual And Developmental Disabilities - 10/19/2018

~~“The Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Division, has issued the updated Medicaid Waiver Provider Standards for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (Medicaid I/DD Waiver), Version B-3. The Standards reflect changes based on the CMS-Approved I/DD Waiver Amendment #2 and are effective in November 2018.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

QUEST Integration §1115 Waiver Renewal Application - 07/27/2018

~~Pursuant to Section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act, the State of Hawai‘i, Department of Human Services (the State) is seeking a five-year renewal of the QUEST Integration Section 1115 demonstration project from CMS. Absent a renewal, the demonstration will expire on December 31, 2018.For nearly two decades, the demonstration has efficiently and effectively delivered comprehensive benefits to a large number of beneficiaries, including expansion populations, through a competitive managed care delivery system. Under the renewal, “QUEST Integration” (QI) will continue to build on this success by delivering services through managed care, while integrating the demonstration’s programs and benefits to have a more patient-centered care delivery.All eligible beneficiaries will continue to be enrolled under QUEST Integration, and access to services will be determined by clinical criteria and medical necessity. The renewal will continue to incorporate the simplified Medicaid eligibility structure under the ACA into the demonstration. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid I/DD Waiver Providers - 07/19/2018

~~Services are provided through the Medicaid 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (Medicaid I/DD Waiver). The purpose of the Medicaid I/DD Waiver is to support people to have a full life in the community.

Life Course Tools Diagram

Services and supports are identified through a person-centered planning process with case managers to develop the Individualized Service Plan (ISP) with the individual’s desired outcomes and goals. The case manager assists the individual and family in accessing these services from qualified Medicaid I/DD Waiver providers chosen by the individual.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR SECTION 1115(a) RENEWAL OF HAWAII’S SECTION 1115 DEMONSTRATION (11-W-00001/9) - 03/02/2018

~~“The State of Hawaii, Department of Human Services (the State), hereby notifies the public that it intends to seek a five-year renewal of its Section 1115 Demonstration from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).  This renewal, which will be effective January 1, 2019, will be entitled “QUEST Integration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Standards Manual Version B – Draft Pending DHS-MQD Approval - 03/01/2018

~"The Waiver Standards Manual Version B includes services that the participant may receive after their Individualized Service Plan (ISP) meeting is held during Year 1 of the phase-in (July 1,2017 through June 30, 2018). Waiver Standards Manual Version B is the manual that includes services available to participants as they transition to new services, fee schedules and billing codes based on their date of ISP and their cohort group. By the end of fiscal year 2018, Standards A will be sunset and Standards B will be in use for the Medicaid I/DD Waiver."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawai’i Behavioral Health Employment Services - 02/21/2018

~~“Under the guidance of the My Choice My Way plan, Hawaii Behavioral Health works with The Department of Health, and other stakeholders, on providing employment services to qualified participants. Our goal is to help participants attain competitive, integrated employment. We believe that all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities have the capacity to find their life’s work.

Discovery and Career Planning (DCP)During the Discovery and Career Planning Program (DCP), Hawaii Behavioral Health works with participants to explore their strengths, abilities, and interests. Our DCP services are designed to help participants explore future careers, build their skills, and realize their talents. Once participants are ready to enter the employment market, HBH transitions them into Individual Employment Supports.

Individual Employment Supports (IES)Hawaii Behavioral Health’s Individual Employment Supports Program (IES) works with all stakeholders, while helping participants access and maintain employment in the community. HBH consults with employers, discovering their business needs, and finding mutually-beneficial employment opportunities for our participants. HBH also continues to develop our participants, providing person-centered employment planning, job coaching, and problem solving.Available on Oahu, and the Big Island”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Resource Leveraging

Hawai'i Medicaid State Plan and Demonstration - 02/15/2018

~~“The Hawaiʻi Medicaid State Plan is an agreement between Hawaii and the Federal government describing how that Hawaiʻi administers its Medicaid programs.  Department of Human Services is the single State agency designated to administer the Medicaid program under Title XIX of the Social Security Act.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a 1915(c) HCBS Waiver: - 12/21/2017

~~“The State of Hawaii requests approval of an amendment to the following Medicaid home and community based services waiver approved under authority of  1915© of the Social Security Act.Program Title: HCB Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD WaiverWaiver Name: HI.0013Amendment Number:Proposed Effective Date 06/01/18Approved Effective Date of Waiver being amended: 07/01/16Purpose(s) of the Amendment:This is a technical amendment to address items that were enot included in the waiver renewal approved effective July 1, 2016 and the amendment approved effective June 1, 2017. The amendment will add services mixes   and supports budgets to enable participants to have choice, flexibility and control over their services. The amendment also adds a new service, phases-out one service and clarifies language in several services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Disability is a respected part of diversity in the Rainbow State of Hawaii, where employees with disabilities are saying "Aloha" to new job opportunities across the state. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Hawaii's VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
-0.5%
Change from
2017 to 2018
1,420,491
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
10.38%
Change from
2017 to 2018
66,355
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
10.37%
Change from
2017 to 2018
28,503
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0%
Change from
2017 to 2018
42.96%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2017 to 2018
80.12%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 1,428,557 1,427,538 1,420,491
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 66,031 59,469 66,355
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 26,356 25,546 28,503
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 602,358 597,818 594,407
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.91% 42.96% 42.96%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.60% 78.80% 80.12%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.00% 2.40% 2.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.10% 16.60% 13.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.50% 8.80% 8.40%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 76,879 72,983 80,714
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 79,244 75,876 77,647
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 41,777 36,361 43,150
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,861 2,095 2,464
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 12,701 9,989 10,888
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 694 465 927
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 65,212 67,317 61,806
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 16,842 15,262 18,520
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 28,729 26,646 30,487
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,008 713 1,007

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 821 849 823
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.40% 4.60% 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 22,275 21,813 21,165

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 356 228 242
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,023 739 742
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 2,703 1,584 1,508
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.20% 14.40% 16.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.10% 0.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 10.20% 6.40% 5.70%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 0.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 52 8 9
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 782 483 435
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A 32
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,007 1,836 1,587
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6 5 10
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 4 4 4
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 67.00% 80.00% 40.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.28 0.28 0.28

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
845
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 77 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 81 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 102 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 317 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 203 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 61 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 28.00% 25.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,134 1,507 1,257
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 38,249 37,035 36,162
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 20 11 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 55 19 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $341,000 $148,000 $453,960
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $18,700,000 $24,072,000 $19,586,588
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $29,175,000 $28,982,000 $15,477,471
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 1.00% 1.00% 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 806 855 1,443
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,276 1,229 1,432
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.20 1.00 2.74

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 36.83% 37.33% 40.63%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 20.24% 20.40% 18.94%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.17% 1.15% 1.11%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 70.32% 74.14% 64.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 35.87% 36.34% 35.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 83.37% 85.04% 85.69%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 89.79% 93.11% 93.05%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 47.50% 48.70% 50.52%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 448,452
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 607
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 268
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 268
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,228,248

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 6 7 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6 7 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 51 63 67
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 51 63 67

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~o Align policies and funding streams across education, workforce, and economic development systems and all levels of government to focus public resources on the training that moves workers into industries with high-quality jobs that lead to better financial outcomes and longer job tenures for workers.
o Take an active role in the development of the “common pathways” for both individuals who desire to pursue secondary education AND for individuals who do not desire to pursue secondary education but desire to learn employment skills through work experience and/or on-the-job training.
o Coordinate a “common” work assessment process between core partners.
o Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff. (Page 110) Title 1

In preparation for WIOA implementation, State-level Partners met regularly for about a year to learn about services provided by each Core Partner (and other Partners), convened joint meetings among Partner stakeholders, and determined how participant data would be shared and tracked through Core Programs. As much as possible during this preparation period, Core Partners were added as key agencies in programs such as DLIR’s Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI), DVR’s Student Transition Employment Program, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) led by DVR, and the American Apprenticeship Initiative Grant led by DLIR. Since then, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) was led by the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and the collaboration continues among agencies serving persons with disabilities. (Page 121) Title 1

Contributing to a more integrated service strategy is the partnership building created by the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a technical assistance grant provided by DOL Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) to increase employment of persons with disabilities. EFSLMP is truly a partnership effort currently led by the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, with Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Council, DLIR Workforce Development Division, Department of Human Services MedQuest Division, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and Department of Education. A Cooperative Agreement is being developed among partners to
formalize cooperative working arrangements and a series of technical assistance and training have been provided to the partners and AJCs by subject matter experts. (Page 130-131) Title I

In addition, underserved populations such as persons with disabilities and offenders will be targeted to expand the job seeker pool. Capacity building obtained through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program and Disability Employment Initiative will enable more staff, in coordination with Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health, and other partners, to assist employers in employing persons with disabilities. These services include customizing employment for individuals with significant barriers to employment. This employment option, combined with federal and state tax credits, will increase the incentives for employers, including federal contractors, to hire persons with disabilities. To assist ex-offenders, the experience and skills obtained through staff’s provision of services to inmates and parolees through a contract with State Department of Public Safety and the partnerships built for this effort will facilitate services to this group. (Page 157) Title I

Wagner-Peyser and leveraged funds will be used for staff training that will increase their capability to deliver high-quality services to both employers and job seekers. For example, Career and Technical Education resources were recently accessed to train AJC staff on all counties in the areas of business services and conflict resolution; and Work Keys assessment tools and training were purchased from different funding sources to increase assessment and training capabilities with corresponding staff training.
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 225-226) Title IV

DVR has implemented evidence-based practices and innovative strategies for addressing key challenges to strengthen employer engagement, including: streamlined employer outreach activities; customization of employer engagement; job development and job negotiation tailored to the unique business needs of each individual employer; and dissemination of technological tools for improving the direct relationship between the employee and the employer.
To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of non-duplicative resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities.
DVR has engaged in the following activities in order to create sustainable employment service models over time. (Page 287) Title IV

The Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a grant through the US Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy that was first given to the Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) and turned over to the Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) for the final year will bring together various core partners. One of the two projects under EFSLMP is to develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, DDD, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from this larger core group. (Page 288) Title IV

Results from the CSNA indicate a need for more CRP’s on neighboring islands which include Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and Kauai. Employment, transportation and housing were identified on the neighbor islands as needed. CRP’s and other entities need to collaborate and communicate with each other to establish a foundation that consumers can rely on. Additionally, CRP’s must embrace the "Employment first" philosophy and move from sheltered employment to competitive integrated employment. (Page 297) Title IV

Goal 2.1 Annually increase the percentage of individuals with most significant disabilities who during a program year participate in work-based learning experiences and internships (by a minimum rate of 1%);
Goal 2.2 Annually increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities in competitive integrated employment during the fourth quarter after exit (by a minimum rate of 1%)
Goal 2.3 Annually increase the percentage of employers providing customized employment to individuals with most significant disabilities. Customized employment means, in general, competitive integrated employment designed to meet both the specific abilities of the individual with a most significant disability and the business needs of an employer (by a minimum rate of 1%). (Page 304) Title IV

Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule): 1. Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes. 2. Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain: 1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. 2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. (Page 318) Title IV

The factors that contributed to our ability to increase the number of individuals that received SE services was our participation in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, (EFSLMP). This program introduced our counseling and employment staff to the customized employment model which supports the long term supports of SE services.
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2017: 108 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services; FY 2016: 70 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. (Page 325) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~3. To develop sector strategies and a career pathways system that will integrate education and training, and move skilled jobseekers into growth industries.
o Use economic data, industry clusters and industry resources to determine growth industries and the skill needs of industries and employers.
o Establish and maintain sector initiatives that facilitate ongoing dialogue between government, employers and other key stakeholders to increase understanding of growth industry needs, foster learning between related businesses and coordinate use of information and resources to formulate and implement effective workforce solutions that meet the skill, recruitment, and retention needs of employers and the training, employment, and career advancement needs of workers.
o Align policies and funding streams across education, workforce, and economic development systems and all levels of government to focus public resources on the training that moves workers into industries with high-quality jobs that lead to better financial outcomes and longer job tenures for workers.
o Take an active role in the development of the “common pathways” for both individuals who desire to pursue secondary education AND for individuals who do not desire to pursue secondary education but desire to learn employment skills through work experience and/or on-the-job training.
o Coordinate a “common” work assessment process between core partners.
o Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff. (Page 110) Title 1

Goal 2.2 Annually increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities in competitive integrated employment during the fourth quarter after exit (by a minimum rate of 1%)
Goal 2.3 Annually increase the percentage of employers providing customized employment to individuals with most significant disabilities. Customized employment means, in general, competitive integrated employment designed to meet both the specific abilities of the individual with a most significant disability and the business needs of an employer (by a minimum rate of 1%). (Page 304) Title IV

Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain: 1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. 2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes.
Strategies to cultivate VR’s effectiveness in serving employers: Developing successful partnerships with local and multi-state businesses in an effort to increase the employment of individuals with disabilities and self-employment. Services include, but not limited to: 1. Train employers on compliance the title I of the American with Disability Act (ADA) of 1990 and other employment-related laws. 2. Inform employers of the existence of the program and availability of services. 3. Educate and provide services to employers who have hired or are interested in hiring individuals with disabilities. 4. Provide training and technical assistance to employers regarding disability awareness. 5. Working with employers to provide opportunities for work-based learning experiences and opportunities. for PRE-ETS services. 6. Train employees who are individuals with disabilities. (Page 318) Title IV

• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Conduct outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, and develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 322) Title IV

Priority 1: Increase the number of clients receiving SE services. Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals that receive SE services. FY 2017: 325 FY: 304 FY 2015: 57 individuals received SE services. FY 2014: 53 individuals received SE services. FY 2013: 98 individuals received SE services.
The factors that contributed to our ability to increase the number of individuals that received SE services was our participation in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, (EFSLMP). This program introduced our counseling and employment staff to the customized employment model which supports the long term supports of SE services.
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. (Page 325) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~PRE-ETS Goals: DVR/WDD/DOE strategies for leveraging resources and funding include; DVR working/contracting with the Core Partners to leverage resources and funding for the provision of job exploration counseling and placement and case management services. Specifically, WDD has agreed to leverage resources and funding from other programs (e.g. a Disability Employment Initiative grant) to the maximum extent possible, to provide individualized services such as job coaching, uniforms, transportation to and from work-based learning sites, safety equipment or assistive technology to participating Pre-ETS students. WDD will partner with Adult Education to provide the workplace readiness training to DVR’s Pre-ETS students in preparation for successful attainment of the work-based learning skills.

DVR is participating and in support of the American Job Center’s One-Stop Single Sign-On registration system to increase access to the services of DOE’s Adult Education, the Workforce Development Division, and other partners for DVR clients on the deferred list to meet their training and job placement needs. (Page 303) Title VI
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~For example, the Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI) program awarded to DLIR in 2015 includes as a goal increasing the number of Business Leadership Networks, which are business-driven groups of employers committed toward promoting the hiring of persons with disabilities. A major partner in DEI is DVR and their providers, and WIOA AJC staff members are the primary recipients of capacity building to serve persons with significant disabilities. Another DEI goal is developing an interagency group of providers with the AJCs for a more coordinated referral system among providers and for more integration of business engagement activities among providers. Adult Education will be part of this group with other partners. Approaching employers and Business Leadership Networks (BLN) in a coordinated manner that represents all agencies is more professional, useful, and productive than each agency operating in its own silo with employers. A coordinated approach also enables providers to offer a fuller array of services as different options to meet different situations. (Page 121) Title I

Although DEI focuses on a specific group of individuals, the successes of the coordinated service strategies is a model for a broader population. (DEI, Round II, was conducted only on the Counties of Hawaii and Maui, and the successful collaboration with employers and providers was the stepping stone for DEI Round VI statewide.) Experience showed that building trust among agencies took time and a disciplined commitment to regular meetings. It also required the lead agency and its contractor, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, to develop meeting agenda, contact agencies for meetings, and include actions relevant to the providers. Similar factors were critical to sustain business interest in participating on the Business Leadership Networks.
Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of AJC staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 122) Title I

The Employer Engagement Committee of the Council is developing a business services framework plan that will coordinate business services of the AJC partner network and will improve the quality of services provided by the system to employers; meet the needs of employers; and meet the effectiveness in serving employers goals of the State.
The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), Round VI, also will help facilitate a coordinated approach with employers among agencies serving persons with disabilities. This approach was very successful on Hawaii County where DEI Round II was carried out. Lessons learned from that experience, including the time it took to build trust and break barriers, helps inform DEI Round VI, which will be implemented Statewide.  (Page 130) Title I

Each self-service resource room located in the AJCs features a minimum of one accessible computer terminal equipped with assistive technology software designed to increase accessibility to all AJC customers, including individuals with multiple challenges and individuals with disabilities. Where needed in the AJCs, assistive technology has been or will be purchased under the Disability Employment Initiative Grants.
The technical assistance provided to Core Partners and AJCs from Employment First State Leadership Mentoring (EFSLMP) projects enabled the creation of interagency teams called Workforce Solutions to collaboratively plan and implement statewide efforts to serve persons with disabilities more effectively. The interagency teams include DVR, Department of Health, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, WDD, and AJCs. A series of training sessions for partner agencies were arranged under EFSLMP to build their capacity for serving persons with disabilities. The training continues under DEI Round VI for Hawaii and Maui; and they will be provided under DEI Round VIII statewide. (Page 175) Title I

As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by itsprovision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 225-226) Title V

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~It is clear from the interviews and the survey results that students and youth with disabilities in Hawaii have a need to receive pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) as identified in the Reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act in WIOA. These services include:
1. Job exploration counseling;
2. Work-based learning experiences;
3. Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs at institutions of higher education;
4. Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living (often referred to as soft skills); and
5. Instruction in self-advocacy, which may include peer mentoring
Each of these Pre-ETS services was noted as a need on a recurring basis when discussing the needs of students and youth in Hawaii.
The Rehabilitation Act as reauthorized in WIOA also indicates that the following authorized services can be provided if funds remain after the provision of the five required services noted above:
1. Implementing effective strategies to increase the likelihood of independent living and inclusion in communities and competitive integrated workplaces;
2. Developing and improving strategies for individuals with intellectual disabilities and individuals with significant disabilities to live independently, participate in postsecondary education experiences, and obtain and retain competitive integrated employment;
3. Providing instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students and youth with disabilities;
4. Disseminating information about innovative, effective, and efficient approaches to achieve the goals of this section;
5. Coordinating activities with transition services provided by local educational agencies under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.);
6. Applying evidence-based findings to improve policy, procedure, practice, and the preparation of personnel, in order to better achieve the goals of this section;
7. Developing model transition demonstration projects;
8. Establishing or supporting multistate or regional partnerships involving States, local educational agencies, designated State units, developmental disability agencies, private businesses, or other participants to achieve the goals of this section; and
9. Disseminating information and strategies to improve the transition to postsecondary activities of individuals who are members of traditionally unserved populations. (Page 77) Title I

DVR can assist a VR eligible individual with only those activities that are included in their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). All activities that are required for a VR eligible individual to prepare, obtain, maintain/regain employment (of their informed choice) will be listed on their IPE. If an activity that is required, is identified after the IPE is completed, then the VR eligible individual and the VR counselor, in agreement, can amend the IPE to include the activity and make any other changes as determined to be necessary to obtain employment. DVR and the Core partners are working on MOA’s which details the responsibilities of each partner which will help in the management and avoid duplication among these activities. In so far as duplication of activities by other optional AJC partners, VR would have minimal involvement as those services would not be listed on the IPE since those services would not be necessary for the VR eligible individual to obtain employment. (Page 123-124) Title I

The DLIR Director, along with the Superintendent of Education and the University of Hawaii President, is a voting member of the P-20 Statewide Longitudinal Data System (aka Data Exchange Partnership or DXP) Executive Committee. The Workforce Development Council Executive Director is an attending member of the Executive Committee. WDC staff are members of the DXP’s Data Governance and Access Committee (formerly known as the Steering Committee) and the Research and Data Request Sub-Committee.
In support of the WIOA state plan, the state CTE office is supporting two new positions to be hired in the spring of 2018. One is a CTE and Workforce Data Analyst and the other is a Workforce Alignment and Learning Opportunities Specialist. They will be housed in the P20 office and will address data and work-based learning across all WIOA stakeholders.
DVR already has a Special Education/Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR) program. The primary purpose of the program is for students ages 14 - 21 who have been found eligible for VR services to participate gain work experience in an integrated setting, while still enrolled in school.
DVR is also working with Adult Literacy and Community Colleges to develop career pathways which include Pre-ETS with work-based learning experiences for VR students between 14-21 years of age. We are working with Adult Education to provide career pathways for VR clients which includes remedial reading and math classes; PETS and work experience for those clients who desire to enter directly into the labor force. We are working with the Community Colleges to provide career pathways for VR clients ages 14 and above who desire to enter secondary education prior to entering the workforce. (Page 132) Title I

In support of the WIOA state plan, the state CTE office is supporting two new positions to be hired in the spring of 2018. One is a CTE and Workforce Data Analyst and the other is a Workforce Alignment and Learning Opportunities Specialist. They will be housed in the P20 office and will address data and work-based learning across all WIOA stakeholders. (Page 133) Title I
The Sector Strategies and Career Pathways committee will convene sub-committees based on key industry sectors identified in the Unified Plan. These sub-committees will provide employer and industry perspective. The objectives of the sub-committees are:
• Assess training needs and skills gaps, inventory current resources and services, identify high priority gaps;
• Build stronger networks between firms and among education and training partners to identify high-priority skill gaps and in-demand sectors;
• Review and provide feedback on HIDOE and UHCC’s standards and assessments, academic and career technical content and work skills;
• Increase high quality, work-based learning opportunities for secondary and postsecondary students that lead to industry recognized credentials;
• Identify new industry-recognized credentials or work-based programs that give companies confidence in skills of new hires and provide workers with more mobility;
• Develop opportunities for professional development training for teachers, school/job counselors, training providers, etc.;
• Identify policies and/or strategies to sustain the model. (Page 153) Title I

• State and federal funds from DHS—for job development. job readiness, and placement of TANF recipients and SNAP recipients into jobs.
• State and federal funds from State DHS, DVR to WDD to implement a 2016 Summer Youth Employment program for youth with a disability on Counties of Oahu, Hawaii, and Maui; also supports a year-round WDD staff on Big Island for business outreach and employment assistance for DVR clients. With DVR, WDD is developing a plan for year-round work-based learning services to youth with disabilities using DVR Pre-Employment Transition Services fund for Oahu; and a plan for DVR youth referrals for a Summer Youth Employment Program on Hawaii and Maui Counties. (Page 162) Title I

In the case of a State that, under section 101(a)(2)(A)(i)of the Rehabilitation Act designates a State agency to administer the part of the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services portion of the Unified or Combined State Plan under which VR services are provided for individuals who are blind, describe the process and the factors used by the State to determine the distribution of funds among the two VR agencies in the State.
o Vocational Rehabilitation Basic Support Grant. The purpose of this grant is to assist Hawaii in operating statewide comprehensive, coordinated, effective, efficient, and accountable programs of vocational rehabilitation, which is an integral part of a statewide workforce investment system designed to assess, plan, develop, and provide vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities to prepare for and engage in gainful employment.
o Hawaii DVR is a combined agency which means that we receive one Basic Support Grant which funds the General and Blind agency.
o DVR supports the WDD staff and the American Job Center staff on all islands for business outreach and employment assistance for DVR clients. Along with DVR staff, employers will be provided training and technical assistance to include, but not limited to (1) disability awareness; (2) compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); (3) VR services; (4) recruitment and hiring of persons with disabilities and (5) support for current employees with disabilities.
o DVR has a current State Educational Agency (SEA) Agreement with the DOE and is currently developing an updated SEA agreement to include the WIOA regulations.
o Upon exit from the DOE/Special Education Program, DVR’s clients attend DOE/Adult Education classes. DVR and Adult Education management staff have been meeting to significantly increase the number of DVR clients attending Adult Education classes in 2018. (Page 167) Title I

Following receipt of student referrals, VR counselors complete applications with students and their families, and determine eligibility. When a student is found eligible for VR Services, the VR counselor will attend the IEP meeting at the request of the DOE, when possible. At the request of the IEP team, the VR counselor will review and allow for amendments to the student’s IPE. Pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) include: job exploration counseling, counseling related to transition or post-secondary training/education, instruction in self-advocacy, workplace readiness training and work-based learning experiences. VR counselors provide counseling in job exploration and transition or post-secondary training/education. Service providers (e.g. community rehabilitation programs, partnering public sector agencies) are contracted for workplace readiness training and work-based learning experiences, and instruction in self-advocacy. (Pages 281-282) Title IV

VR counselors receive direct referrals of students with disabilities from the school, at any time during the school year. They provide consultation and technical assistance to schools during their visits, and during IEP meetings for students who were found eligible. When a student is found eligible for VR services the VR counselor will attend IEP meetings, at the request of the DOE when possible and agreed to with stakeholders. If unable to attend, VR information is provided. The VR counselor will review the student’s IPE and allow for amendments at the request of an IEP team.
Transition counselors provide introduction and guidance to post-school alternatives, and planning and coordination for work experiences in a work based setting to improve employment outcomes.
VR counselors receive direct referrals of students with disabilities from the school, at any time during the school year. They provide consultation and technical assistance to school staff during their school visits, and during IEP meetings for students and their families who were found eligible. When a student is found eligible for VR Services the VR counselor will attend IEP meetings, at the request of the DOE when possible. If unable to attend, VR information is provided. The VR counselor will review the student’s IPE and allow for amendments at the request of an IEP team. (Page 282) Title IV

DVR and DOE are agreed to work collaboratively to assist transition aged youth (TAY) in development and completion of their individualized education program (IEP). Transition planning includes, but is not limited to: DVR Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist (VRS) invitation to participate in DOE’s IEP meeting for shared TAYs, DVR VRS collaboration with and assistance to DOE teachers in transition planning for TAY, introduction and guidance of TAY to post-school alternatives by DOE transition coordinator and DVR VRS. Planning also includes coordination of experiences for TAY in work—based settings to improve employment outcomes.
DVR will provide transition planning which facilitates the development and completion of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and development of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) within 90 days from the date of eligibility, and prior to exit from high school for students served by the VR program (34 CFR §361.22(a)).
DOE facilitates annual IEP meetings for every student receiving Special Education services. Should the IEP team agree to submit a referral to DVR; the DOE Transition teacher will be responsible for submitting a referral for VR Services at the conclusion of the IEP meeting.
IEP meetings are facilitated by DOE. At IEP meetings, the VR Counselor provides an overview of the agency’s goal/mission, eligibility criteria, scope of services, rights/remedies, and other information specific to the student’s IPE. Once a student is found eligible for VR Services, the VR Counselor will attend the annual IEP meetings at the request of the DOE, when possible. If the VR Counselor is unable to attend this meeting, information will be provided to the family. The VR Counselor reviews the student’s IPE and allows for amendments at the request of the IEP team. DVR is represented on a variety of committees (Special Education Advisory Council, Developmental Disabilities Council) which enable parents and members of the community to gather information and provide input to DVR. (Page 283-284) Title IV

DVR works with employers to provide VR services through disability and diversity etiquette training, ADA advising, workshops on Emotional Intelligence and Job Readiness Training “Ho’ala” contracted through City and County, Department of Community Service Work Hawaii. Pre-employment transition services are offered through contracts with the Department of Education through Special Education Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR). SEVR provides unique work experience opportunities with employers in the community. Our network of over 600 employers are informed of various DVR programs that allow them to utilize internships, OJTs, apprenticeships in collaboration with the local Community Colleges, and Adult Education programs to access work-based learning experiences. Ongoing workshops and forums with employers are conducted on a quarterly basis with Work Hawaii from Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) to inform employers of changes in legislation and workforce diversification. (Page 288) Title II

Hawaii DVR will coordinate CSPD activities with those provided under the IDEA through the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). A representative of the State Educational Agency responsible for the public education of students with disabilities who are eligible to receive services under this title and part B of the IDEA is appointed by the Governor to be a member of the SRC. Program and financial information are disseminated at SRC meetings and orientation and trainings with VR and DOE, Special Education staff are coordinated at SRC meetings. Joint trainings for DOE /DVR staff are scheduled when necessary (e.g. training for revised procedures for current services or new services.). The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, WIOA, regulations are shared with the DOE staff during the joint quarterly meetings and other meetings needed to address concerns/clarifications as they arise. The transition counselor’s role is to have a presence at their designated schools. The counselors provide consultation and technical assistance to the Department of Education (DOE) staff, students and their families with information regarding DVR’s goal/mission, eligibility criteria, scope of services, rights/remedies and the Special Education-Vocational Rehabilitation (SE-VR) program during their regularly scheduled visits and during IEP meetings. (Page 294) Title IV

DVR investigated the needs of youth and students with disabilities in their 2015 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA). It is clear from the interviews and the survey results that students in Hawaii have a need to receive pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS). Each of the Pre-ETS categories of activities were noted as a need on a recurring basis when discussing the needs of students.
B. Required Activities
• Job exploration counseling;
• Work-based learning experiences, which may include in-school or afterschool opportunities, or experience outside the traditional school setting (including internships), provided in an integrated environment to the maximum extent possible;
• Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs at institutions of higher education;
• Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living skills; and
• Instruction in self-advocacy, which may include peer mentoring.
C. Target Populations: Students receiving transition services pursuant to IDEA or a student who is an individual with a disability under Section 504 aged 14 - 21. (Page 302) Title IV
PRE-ETS Goals: DVR/WDD/DOE strategies for leveraging resources and funding include; DVR working/contracting with the Core Partners to leverage resources and funding for the provision of job exploration counseling and placement and case management services. Specifically, WDD has agreed to leverage resources and funding from other programs (e.g. a Disability Employment Initiative grant) to the maximum extent possible, to provide individualized services such as job coaching, uniforms, transportation to and from work-based learning sites, safety equipment or assistive technology to participating Pre-ETS students. WDD will partner with Adult Education to provide the workplace readiness training to DVR’s Pre-ETS students in preparation for successful attainment of the work-based learning skills. (Page 303) title IV

VR counselors receive direct referrals of students with disabilities from the school, at any time during the school year. They provide consultation and technical assistance to schools during their visits, and during IEP meetings for students who were found eligible. When a student is found eligible for VR services, the VR counselor will attend IEP meetings, at the request of the DOE when possible. If VR counselor is unable to attend the IEP meeting, the transition counselor provides VR information to the student. The VR counselor will review the student’s IPE and allow for amendments at the request of an IEP team. Transition counselors provide introduction and guidance to post school alternatives, and planning and coordination for work experiences in a work-based setting to improve employment outcomes. VR counselors provide counseling in job exploration and transition or post-secondary training/education. Service providers (e.g. community rehabilitation programs, public sector agencies) are contracted for workplace readiness training, work-based learning experiences, and instruction in self-advocacy. DVR continues a long-standing collaboration with the Department of Education to deliver the Special Education — Vocational Rehabilitation (SE-VR) Work Study Program. SE-VR is a work-based learning experience designed to deliver three inter-related components: classroom experience, in-school work experiences and community work experience. The DOE classroom experience is designed with a workplace readiness component. DOE in-school experience is designed to continue work place readiness training with hands-on experience at the DOE school. Finally, community work experience is designed to provide work-based learning experiences in the community. DVR has implemented a Summer Youth Program to provide work-based learning experiences in State, City and County, Federal and private sector work places. (Page 317) Title IV

Improve Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Disabilities by:
1.Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes. • Incentivize timely service delivery by implementing new performance measures for VR counselors which ensure that 90% of eligibility determinations will be completed within 90 days of customers’ application dates and that 90% of Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs) are developed within 60 days of customers’ eligibility determination dates. • Provide high-quality training and support, ensuring staff have the knowledge and skills needed to deliver high-quality vocational rehabilitation services. • Through statewide case file reviews, build an organizational culture of quality to strengthen substantial counseling and guidance.
2.Conduct outreach to key populations, including students with disabilities, to ensure thatall with persons with disabilities have access to services and supports needed to prepare forand obtain employment. (Page 318) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~DVR already has a Special Education/Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR) program. The primary purpose of the program is for students ages 14 - 21 who have been found eligible for VR services to participate gain work experience in an integrated setting, while still enrolled in school.
DVR is also working with Adult Literacy and Community Colleges to develop career pathways which include Pre-ETS with work-based learning experiences for VR students between 14-21 years of age. We are working with Adult Education to provide career pathways for VR clients which includes remedial reading and math classes; PETS and work experience for those clients who desire to enter directly into the labor force. We are working with the Community Colleges to provide career pathways for VR clients ages 14 and above who desire to enter secondary education prior to entering the workforce. (Page 132) Title I

• Data in Hawaii’s ETPL including those providing non-traditional training services and ETPs of registered apprenticeship programs;
• Information identifying eligible providers of on-the-job training (OJT), customized training, incumbent worker training, internships, paid or unpaid work experience opportunities and transitional jobs. WIOA sec. 122(h) exempts providers of on-the-job training and other employer-based training from the requirements at WIOA sec. 122(a)-(f). However, the identity of employers that access WIOA funds for employer-based training, as well as any performance information required by the State under WIOA sec. 122(h)(2) is disclosable;
• Information on effective outreach and partnerships with business;
• Information on effective service delivery strategies and promising practices to serve workers and job seekers;
• Performance information and information on the cost of attendance, including tuition and fees;
• A list of eligible providers of youth activities;
• Information on physical and programmatic accessibility for individuals with disabilities; and
• Access to providers’ past performance information to maximize consumer choice. (Page 189) Title I

DVR works with employers to provide VR services through disability and diversity etiquette training, ADA advising, workshops on Emotional Intelligence and Job Readiness Training “Ho’ala” contracted through City and County, Department of Community Service Work Hawaii. Pre-employment transition services are offered through contracts with the Department of Education through Special Education Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR). SEVR provides unique work experience opportunities with employers in the community. Our network of over 600 employers are informed of various DVR programs that allow them to utilize internships, OJTs, apprenticeships in collaboration with the local Community Colleges, and Adult Education programs to access work-based learning experiences. Ongoing workshops and forums with employers are conducted on a quarterly basis with Work Hawaii from Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) to inform employers of changes in legislation and workforce diversification. (Page 288) Title I

Apprenticeship

In preparation for WIOA implementation, State-level Partners met regularly for about a year to learn about services provided by each Core Partner (and other Partners), convened joint meetings among Partner stakeholders, and determined how participant data would be shared and tracked through Core Programs. As much as possible during this preparation period, Core Partners were added as key agencies in programs such as DLIR’s Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI), DVR’s Student Transition Employment Program, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) led by DVR, and the American Apprenticeship Initiative Grant led by DLIR. Since then, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) was led by the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and the collaboration continues among agencies serving persons with disabilities. (Page 121) Title II

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Although DEI focuses on a specific group of individuals, the successes of the coordinated service strategies is a model for a broader population. (DEI, Round II, was conducted only on the Counties of Hawaii and Maui, and the successful collaboration with employers and providers was the stepping stone for DEI Round VI statewide.) Experience showed that building trust among agencies took time and a disciplined commitment to regular meetings. It also required the lead agency and its contractor, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, to develop meeting agenda, contact agencies for meetings, and include actions relevant to the providers. Similar factors were critical to sustain business interest in participating on the Business Leadership Networks.
Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of AJC staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 122) Title I

USDOL Foreign Labor Certifications—assists employers with housing inspections, job order recruitments, and labor certification applications to hire foreign workers for temporary agriculture labor (H-2A); and assists employers with job order recruitments and labor certification applications to hire foreign workers to perform temporary non-agriculture labor (H-2B).
USDOL ODEP funds for Disability Employment Initiative, Round VI—provides AJC and partner staff training from University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies to increase capability to serve persons with significant disabilities; help establish and maintain Business Leadership Networks and interagency provider collaborations; and increase number of SSI and SSDI beneficiaries getting employment and remaining employed. Round VIII targets youth with disabilities. (Page 161) Title I

4. The VR Classroom Experience - SE Clients will have access to Job Empowerment Training (JET), a classroom-based job readiness course. JET is designed to address the various barriers to employment and to teach the basic skills to find, gain, and maintain employment.
5. VR Placement - Assist clients in gaining competitive employment in the community.
6. SE Retention and Ongoing Supports - Assist in retaining competitive employment in the community via job coaching and regular follow-up. Though purely based on need, most SE clients will receive 100% Job Coaching at first, then will taper off to less than 50% with the goal of final independence. In addition, DVR partners with Developmental Disabilities Division case managers and Ticket to Work Employment Networks to provide extended services to sustain employment. (Page 315) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Dislocated Worker Eligible Training Provider
WDC staff along with LWDB staff are working to increase the number of Eligible Training Providers approved in the State. Each LWDB will work with their local UH System Community College(s) to add programs of study, credit and non-credit courses that meet WIOA requirements. In addition, out-ot-state providers of on-line courses have been added to the eligible education and training providers that can be funded, at least in part, through WIOA. These providers work in cooperation with the American Job Centers located through the state of Hawaii and offer both specialized training as well as credit and non-credit pathways to higher-level employment opportunities. (Page 101) Title I

As required by WIOA, registered apprenticeship program sponsors are informed of their automatic qualification to the Eligible Training Provider List.
DVR can assist a VR eligible individual with only those activities that are included in their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). All activities that are required for a VR eligible individual to prepare, obtain, maintain/regain employment (of their informed choice) will be listed on their IPE. If an activity that is required, is identified after the IPE is completed, then the VR eligible individual and the VR counselor, in agreement, can amend the IPE to include the activity and make any other changes as determined to be necessary to obtain employment. DVR and the Core partners are working on MOA’s which details the responsibilities of each partner which will help in the management and avoid duplication among these activities. In so far as duplication of activities by other optional AJC partners, VR would have minimal involvement as those services would not be listed on the IPE since those services would not be necessary for the VR eligible individual to obtain employment. (Page 123-124) Title I

Core Partner staff also will have access to employer and job order information in the PMIS so they can analyze business services being performed by their providers and offices and improve coordination and management of employer engagement activities.
DVR is currently in the process of getting internal approvals for contracting with the current PMIS vendor and targets having an executed contract in place by July 1, 2016. Adult Education similarly plans to finalize their plans and have any necessary contract in place with Geographic Solutions by July 1, 2016 or shortly thereafter. These contracts will enable the importation of data from DVR and Adult Education file extracts and the development and maintenance of separate portals for DVR and Adult Education participants into HireNet Hawaii. For WIOA, Wagner-Peyser, Veteran, and Trade Adjustment Act reports, Geographic Solutions has been preparing updates to HireNet Hawaii specifications based on federal draft reporting instructions. The vendor will update the specifications based on changes made in the final instructions on a timely basis. (Page 170) Title I

Employer Engagement Goals: DVR's Statewide Employment Staff Specialist has been invited and will participate in the sector strategies by the Chamber of Commerce of Hawaii and will participate in WDC's Employment Committee. DVR's Employment Specialist will continue to be a resource to employers to provide training and education to employers on the skills and abilities of persons with disabilities, reasonable accommodations, tax incentives, etc.
Goal 3.1 Annually increase the number of employers who provide opportunities for individuals with disabilities to participate in work-based employment experiences and internships (by 1%). (Page 304) Title IV

Data Collection

For Section (l) State Goals and Priorities: Priority 1: Pre-Employment Transition Services we want to know how to leverage the funding in pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) with other Core Partners. What specific actions will be taken by the DVR to ensure a stronger relationship between the Core Partners in support of DVR Pre-ETS recipients? We recommend amending priorities to list specifically how the DVR will work with the Core Partners to try to mitigate the Order of Selection, and how the DVR can work with the Core Partners to address Priority Category 2 and 3 clients. Tapping into the Core Partners resources is a recommended focus as well. Priority 3: (Employer Engagement) SRC recommends including specific examples of work that have been done to ensure employer engagement. For Priority 4: (Common Data Collection for Unified State Plan), it is recommended DVR include the WDC Data Integration and Single Sign-On project among the priorities. (Page 278) Title IV

4. Coordination with Employers: DVR’s ongoing coordination efforts will include participation in sector strategies and training employers and state agencies on reasonable accommodations as supports that will be provided to improve partnerships with employers. We will continue to partner with DOE and DLIR’s WDD to leverage resources and funding to provide employers with qualified employees. 5. The Annual Estimates section will be updated as recommended. 6. State Goals and Priorities - Pre-Employment Transition Services; Employer Engagement and Common Data Collection for Unified State Plan: More details will be included in description (l) on how DVR will accomplish the goals. 7. Order of Selection section has been updated. 8. Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title IV funds section will be reviewed and aligned with the goals and priorities as listed in description (l). DVR is very appreciative of the continuing working partnership with SRC to develop strategic elements of planning and achieving financial stability to ensure that we are focusing on the right targets and are proactive instead of reactive to ensure effectiveness. (Page 279 278 ) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

As a condition to the award of financial assistance from the Department of Labor under Title I of WIOA, the grant applicant assures that it has the ability to comply with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of the following laws and will remain in compliance for the duration of the award of federal financial assistance: • Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status and gender identity), national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship status or participation in any WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity; • Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the bases of race, color and national origin; • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, which prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities; • The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age; and • Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs. (Page 145) Title I

AJC partners will collaborate to develop policies, procedures, proven and promising practices, and templates to aid local boards in the AJC Certification process. Additional criteria will be developed by the core partners, customer representatives, additional partners and other key stakeholders, including job-seekers. Multiple avenues will be utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of AJC services including: • Development of a shared AJC Operations Manual • Monitoring checklist • Development of self-evaluation training, toolkit and ongoing guidance • A system for obtaining client feedback which is user-friendly, streamlined and accessible • Surveys will be accessible in multiple formats, provided in a variety of ways, and can be submitted anonymously - at no cost or inconvenience to the client. • Office Peer Review tool • Timely survey evaluation and dissemination to local programs • Dedicated Technical Assistance (TA) personnel available for on-site and remote TA. (Page 155) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) defines a person with a disability as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activity. Nearly 1 in 5 people have a disability in the U.S. About 56.7 million people — 19 percent of the population —with more than half of them reporting the disability was severe, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, 2010. (Page 174) Title II

Vets

Hawaii’s veterans will compete with non-veterans for the same jobs especially those that pay well, are full-time, and have good benefits. Veterans will leverage their military service, service-connected disability, VA educational benefits, and federal government regulations and statutes to gain hiring preference over non-veterans for jobs with the federal, state, local governments and with federal contractors. Any shortfalls in relevant credentials, transferrable skills, and work experience can be mitigated, in part, with veterans leveraging their Post 9-11 GI Bill Educational benefits. In Hawaii, eligible veterans can receive over $100,000 in Post 9-11 GI Bill financial aid to pursue a college degree or a vocational training credential. Hawaii employment opportunities will grow by 43,930 to 740,540 jobs from 2014 to 2024, averaging a modest growth of 0.6 percent annually. Service-providing industries (trade, transportation, and utilities; information; financial activities; professional and business services; education and health services; leisure and hospitality; other services; and government) will represent over 83 percent of the total workforce throughout the projection period, and will generate slightly more than four-fifths of the total job gains. The top four largest industries within this sector (education and health services; trade, transportation, and utilities; professional and business services; and leisure and hospitality) will provide 75 percent of the total statewide job gains. Government is the only industry projected to decline. (Page 60) Title I

…access to an array of formidable tools in the veterans’ transition tool kit. Military transitional services, employment, training and priority of services delivered by the American Job Centers, and U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs education programs will be integral components of a veteran’s tool kit. Veterans will leverage federal regulations that require American Job Centers and employment programs, funded in part by U.S. DOL, to serve veterans ahead of non-veterans; this rule is known as priority of service. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Labor funds the Hawaii Department of Labor’s Workforce Development Division, in part, with the Jobs for Veterans State Grant, to hire specialized and trained staffs, Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists and Local Veterans Employment Representatives, to serve veterans with significant barriers to employment and to reach out to employers to promote the hiring of veterans. (Page 61) Title I

• USDOL, Veterans Employment Training Services -- supports WDD Disabled Veterans Outreach Program counselors for employment planning, job counseling, and case management to address employment issues of veterans with service-connected disabilities or other significant barriers to employment; and WDD Local Veteran Employment Representatives to conduct continual outreach to businesses to promote hiring of veterans, and with human resource professionals, conduct job search workshops for veterans. • USDOL, Senior Community Services Employment Program—supports providers serving low-income residents 55 years and older with employment planning and assessments, part-time community service jobs, and job placement assistance; providers include Hawaii County Office on Aging, Honolulu Community Action Program, DHS, Maui Economic Opportunity, and Kauai Branch of WDD. • USDOL, Work Opportunity Tax Credit—supports processing employer requests for certifications of the Work Opportunity Tax Credit for certain eligible new hires (also funded by Wagner-Peyser) (Page 161) Title I

Participant performance in all Core Programs (WIOA Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth Programs; Wagner-Peyser programs, Adult Education, Vocational Rehabilitation), Disabled Veterans Outreach Program, Local Veterans Employment Representative, and Trade Adjustment Act will be measured through data stored in the PMIS. All staff users and their providers are responsible to accurately enter data into the PMIS in a timely manner. All quarterly and annual reports required by the federal government are generated from HireNet Hawaii data and electronically transmitted to the USDOL. DLIR extracts information on employment status and average earnings for all exiters from UI wage records. Local area staff and Core Partner staff also may enter supplementary information on jobs obtained by participants. At the end of each quarter and year, DLIR will transmit to each county and Core Partner their performance reports in the same format as the federal statewide report. Counties, Local Boards, and Core Partners will review their performance at least on a quarterly basis and take any necessary corrective actions to resolve deficiencies. Staff users can produce PMIS reports to assess and correct performance on an on-going basis. These reports, filtered by different criteria, dates, and target groups, enable staff to review different aspects of performance prior to or after outcomes are reported with the goal of continually improving performance. (Page 170) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist. The State shall ensure priority of service to veterans and eligible spouses in its program delivery and services that are directly funded in whole or part, by the Department of Labor, in accordance with all federal guidance letters and notices, including 20 CRF Part 1010, Employment and Training Administration’s Training and Employment Guidance Letter No. 10-09, and Training and Employment Notice 15-10. This applies to all services in the AJCs. Procedures are in place in each AJC office for staff to identify veterans and eligible spouses at every point of entry in the service delivery system. Staff at all levels of WDD operations and in AJCs have been trained in priority of service requirements. (Page 173) Title I

Staff shall refer individuals identified as VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE SPOUSES WITH SIGNIFICANT BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist for intensive service. If a DVOP specialist is not available, the client shall be referred to the AJC staff assigned to provide intensive service. In circumstances when it is not practical to refer a client to a DVOP for intensive service and to a Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER) for job development service, the local office/AJC manager shall designate appropriate staff to assist the client. Services received by the client shall be the same service he or she would receive if a DVOP and LVER were available. AJC Managers and WDD Managers shall periodically review the State policies and guidance for identifying and serving veterans with significant barriers to employment to ensure that staff continues to be aware of and continues implementing correct procedures for serving veterans with significant disabilities. State policies include Job Service Bulletin No. 01-15, Change 1, and its updates. (Page 173) Title I

Mental Health

~~Other Rapid Response topics, such as the following, will be included for group sessions, as appropriate:
• COBRA;
• Credit counseling and loan assistance;
• Grief/trauma counseling, or other mental health services;
• Housing assistance, and/or
• Social services provided by Community-Based Organizations.
Because of the breadth of topics covered during Rapid Response sessions, only those staff members who are experienced and knowledgeable will participate as presenters. Services for individuals, such as filing for UI (after layoff), registration in the PMIS, and applying for financial assistance may be provided immediately following group sessions, if workers need assistance for these services. Job fairs also will be scheduled, as appropriate, specifically for the laid-off workers in conjunction with, or shortly after Rapid Response sessions. In addition, job search workshops and literacy or skills training may be provided for the workers to prepare them for the job market prior to or shortly after layoff.
In addition to reacting to layoff notices, Rapid Response will include business service teams to expand the rapid response infrastructure in each local area so that Rapid Response becomes pro-active and on-going to serve businesses and their workers more effectively. (Page 198) Title IV

Outreach at the State Level: In collaborative partnership with other agencies, DVR administrative level staff serves on boards and councils to address joint responsibilities for provision of vocational services to eligible TAY. These partnerships include, but are not limited to: Special Education Advisory Council (SEAC), State Council on Developmental Disabilities, State Council on Mental Health, State Workforce Development Board, Services for the Blind Branch Advisory Council, and Deaf & Hard of Hearing Advisory Board. Outreach at the Local Level: As designated, DVR branch managers, section supervisors and VRS assist with identification of TAY who may be eligible for services. Between DVR and DOE, referrals for DVR services can occur at any time during the school year. DVR will maintain a presence and receive referrals of potential applicants at: transition fairs, job and career fairs, parent support groups, and forums hosted by high schools, organizations serving youth with disabilities and independent living skills training programs. DVR continues to identify opportunities to conduct outreach to potentially eligible and eligible students in need of pre-employment transition services and transition services. (Page 284) Title IV

The Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a grant through the US Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy that was first given to the Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) and turned over to the Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) for the final year will bring together various core partners. One of the two projects under EFSLMP is to develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, DDD, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from this larger core group. (Page 288) Title IV

Earlier in 2016, working arrangements between DVR and Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD) once again started. This specifically addresses clients involved in the clubhouse programs through AMHD and development of transitional employment opportunities for persons with significant mental health barriers. This was a program that had moderate success in the past and is hoped to achieve in greater success as the two agencies reignite the relationship. (Page 289) Title IV

Strategies for increasing percentage of program participants employed during the send and fourth quarter after exit: 1. Increase support services in postsecondary settings thereby increasing graduation rate. 2. Increase pre-employment transitions services to better prepare transitioning students with disabilities into the workforce. 3. Support the provision of summer youth employment for transitioning high school students as well as those in postsecondary training. 4. Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues. Temporary Employment Opportunities Paid and Unpaid Work Experience
Strategies to increase the median earning of program participants: 1. Assist in the development of Career Pathways based upon Hawaii’s labor market for individuals interested in postsecondary education or direct job placement or both. Identify Career Pathways and job opportunities that are specific to each county. (Page 317) Title IV

Complete agreement between DVR and Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD) for clients involved in the clubhouse programs through AMHD and development of transitional employment opportunities for persons with significant mental health barriers. This was a program that had moderate success in the past and is hoped to achieve in greater success as the two agencies reignite the relationship.
• Initiated in 2015 is an agreement between the DVR and the DOE to provide pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities. These are programs which counsels students in exploring vocational options, training in soft-skills and provides paid and unpaid work experience both on and off campus. One project in particular utilizes the general learning objectives developed by the DOE in providing the instructional material allowing students with disabilities to explore work within the visitor industry. After which students are placed into paid work experiences in a hotel. DVR and the DOE are looking to expand this project in the upcoming school year. (Page 320-321) Title IV

Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues.
o Temporary Employment Opportunities
o Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences
• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group. (Page 322) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

DVR does not use the Supported Employment model frequently for clients, and when it is used, the length of time the case is open after employment with Supported Employment services provided rarely has exceeded 90 days, even though Supported Employment services may be made available for a period of time not to exceed 24 months , unless under special circumstances the eligible individual and the rehabilitation counselor jointly agree to extend the time to achieve the employment outcome identified in the IPE.; • A large majority of DVR consumers receive SSA benefits and fear of benefit loss significantly affects their return-to-work choices and behaviors; • DVR’s relationship with the Developmental Disabilities Division is critical to the success and expansion of the SE program. The relationship has been improving in the last 18 months, which is viewed as a positive sign for the sustainability of high-quality Supported Employment services. (Page 295) Title IV Wagner-Peyser staff members, including LOMAs, are provide an array of Wagner-Peyser services, and either directly provide WIOA services, or at a minimum, provide information about WIOA services. They are also aware of the Job Service Complaint system and familiar with AJC services, including but not limited to, training programs and their referral procedures; Career Services such as labor market information, vocational counseling, and assessments; supportive services; and referrals to jobs. Because WDD staff works with other agencies, the staff members regularly make referrals to other resources such UI, TANF, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, temporary shelters, and services for the homeless population. As WDD is part of the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, which also contains the Disability Compensation (workers’ compensation) Division, and Wage Standards Division (wage standard enforcers), WDD staff will be able to refer farmworkers to these agencies as applicable. The LOMAs and AJC staff periodically meet with MEO, and know how they may refer MSFWs to MEO for more services. (Page 235-236) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

Proclamation: Apprenticeship week 2019 - 11/01/2019

“WHEREAS, apprenticeships are unique, long-term training programs that allow job seekers to learn specialized skills for various trades, combining classroom instruction with on-the-job training; and

WHEREAS, apprenticeship programs tap into a wider pool of talent, including people with disabilities, veterans, women and minorities…

THEREFORE I, DAVID Y. IGE, Governor, and I, JOSHUA B. GREEN, Lieutenant Governor of the State of Hawai'i, do hereby proclaim November 11-17, 2019 as "APPRENTICESHIP WEEK."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Apprenticeship
  • Veterans

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid Society Hawaii was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving consumers in the vulnerable and “left behind” populations, as well as those with limited English proficiency; consumers from the Compact of Free Association Countries; low income consumers; and geographically and culturally isolated consumers.   There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with the Compact of Free Association Countries (COFA), Consulate offices, local community groups such as: Churches, Health centers, Social service agencies, Women’s and homeless shelters, and Community center9/3/2019s. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Sergio Alcubilla Phone: (808) 527-8063Email: Sergio.alcubilla@legalaidhawaii.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

S.B. 1240 A BILL FOR AN ACT RELATING TO MEDICAID WAIVER - 06/29/2019

~~“Removes the sunset date of Act 21, Special Session Laws of Hawaii 2009, which requires the Department of Health to license home care agencies.  Adds exception for Medicaid waiver provider agencies providing services to Medicaid waiver participants”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Four-Year Area Plan on Aging - 06/04/2019

~~“Current statewide initiatives spearheaded by the Governor’s office include the expansion of the ADRC system to increase active collaboration with state agencies such as the Department of Human Services MedQUEST and Vocational Rehabilitation Divisions; the Department of Health Executive Office on Aging, Adult Mental Health Division, Developmental Disabilities Division, Disability and Communication Access Board, Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Language Access Advisory Council; the Hawaii Department of Defense Office of Veterans Services; and with community organizations and councils such as Centers for Independent Living. The goal of this collaborative effort is to build upon the ADRC Systems Change to create a No Wrong Door (NWD) System in the state. The NWD Initiative will enhance existing ADRC processes to expand assistance to all populations and payers in accessing long term services and supports, thereby making it easier for people of all ages, disabilities, and income levels to learn about and obtain the help they need. A reasonable expected outcome of the NWD Initiative also includes the removal of silos and the increase of integrated efforts among various State and local agencies that serve these populations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Individualized Education Program - 04/10/2019

~~ “An IEP is a written statement about the educational program for a child with a disability. It serves as a management tool used to ensure that the child receives the needed special education and related services. It also serves as an evaluation device when used to determine the extent of the child's progress toward accomplishing projected goals. The contents of an IEP are listed and available by accessing the web-link.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hawaii’s IDEA Part B Profile - 04/10/2019

~~“The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) has created an IDEA Part B Profile for Hawaii that provides a resource for IDEA-related, State-specific information. Hawai‘i's state profile includes:• the most recent State Performance Plan/Annual Performance Report (SPP/APR) and OSEP’s response;• the State’s determination letter;• the State’s Results Driven Accountability Matrix;• and the approved submission for the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP).OSEP will be adding additional information about the State in the future. Hawaii’s profile can be accessed here: https://osep.grads360.org/#report/apr/2016B/publicView?state=HI&ispublic=true ” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

REPORT IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 348-8(c), HAWAII REVISED STATUTE - 01/04/2019

~~“1. In June 2018, a reverse job fair was held at America’s Job Center at Dillingham on Oahu.  As a result of this successful event, employers requested another be held.2.In response to #1, in October 2018 the Employment First Hawaii sponsored an Empowering All Abilities Reverse Job Fair held at the State Capitol.  There were 54 students from various high schools prepared with resumes and display boards showing their abilities, interests and skills.  Employers met with those students who met their current hiring and future hiring need.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Report to the Governor in Accordance with the Provisions of Section 348-8(c), 'Special Education Agreement" - 01/04/2019

~~” DVR - Special Education Agreement and Transitional student services have been reviewed with updates to MOA between DVR and DOE in final review to support ongoing partnership for students to explore careers and work-based learning experiences.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Report to the Governor in Accordance with the Provisions of Section 348-8(c), "Pre-ETS Program" - 01/04/2019

~~“Through DVR’s Pre-ETS program, work experience is subsidized in the Summer Youth Employment Programs.  Leveraging funding among Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) formal/informal partners continues to be explored to enhance work-based learning experiences statewide.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

State of Hawaii Office of Veterans' Services - 01/01/2019

~~“List of Services for Veterans, Active Military, Spouses & Dependents

    Assist in preparation of VA claims;    Assist with burials of indigent veterans;    Employment and Re-employment;…;    Help individuals file VA Appeals;….”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Hawaii HB 119 - 07/01/2015

"It is the intent and purpose of the legislature to establish a qualified tax exempt savings program to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities pursuant to section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or successor legislation, and any regulations promulgated thereunder.  It is the further intent of the legislature that the program established by this Act be and remain in conformance with the Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act [ABLE] of 2014, Division B of Public Law No. 113-295"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

House Bill 860: Related to Persons with Disabilities - 01/28/2015

 “Establishes an employment first policy for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Requires the DOH to establish an employment first committee.” (Introduced in the Hawaii state legislature 1/28/15; sent to committees and status is pending.)

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Proclamation: Apprenticeship week 2019 - 11/01/2019

“WHEREAS, apprenticeships are unique, long-term training programs that allow job seekers to learn specialized skills for various trades, combining classroom instruction with on-the-job training; and

WHEREAS, apprenticeship programs tap into a wider pool of talent, including people with disabilities, veterans, women and minorities…

THEREFORE I, DAVID Y. IGE, Governor, and I, JOSHUA B. GREEN, Lieutenant Governor of the State of Hawai'i, do hereby proclaim November 11-17, 2019 as "APPRENTICESHIP WEEK."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Apprenticeship
  • Veterans

Day at the Capitol event highlights Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month in March - 03/08/2018

~~“A proclamation signing by Governor David Ige at 9 a.m. in the governor’s ceremonial room. Gov. Ige will proclaim March as Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month in Hawaii, urging all citizens to recognize the abilities and contributions of people with developmental disabilities and engage and encourage them in their endeavors. Participants from Maui, Molokai, Lanai, Kauai, and Kona will attend the proclamation signing.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Individualized Education Program - 04/10/2019

~~ “An IEP is a written statement about the educational program for a child with a disability. It serves as a management tool used to ensure that the child receives the needed special education and related services. It also serves as an evaluation device when used to determine the extent of the child's progress toward accomplishing projected goals. The contents of an IEP are listed and available by accessing the web-link.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hawaii’s IDEA Part B Profile - 04/10/2019

~~“The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) has created an IDEA Part B Profile for Hawaii that provides a resource for IDEA-related, State-specific information. Hawai‘i's state profile includes:• the most recent State Performance Plan/Annual Performance Report (SPP/APR) and OSEP’s response;• the State’s determination letter;• the State’s Results Driven Accountability Matrix;• and the approved submission for the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP).OSEP will be adding additional information about the State in the future. Hawaii’s profile can be accessed here: https://osep.grads360.org/#report/apr/2016B/publicView?state=HI&ispublic=true ” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State of Hawaii Office of Veterans' Services - 01/01/2019

~~“List of Services for Veterans, Active Military, Spouses & Dependents

    Assist in preparation of VA claims;    Assist with burials of indigent veterans;    Employment and Re-employment;…;    Help individuals file VA Appeals;….”

Systems
  • Other

Employment First - 07/20/2018

~~The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities believes that all people, regardless of disability, should have the opportunity to work and recognizes that individuals with I/DD achieve successful employment outcomes when:•They are empowered to drive their job search process;•They have access to services and supports; and•They are given the opportunity to engage in a Customized Employment

In 2017 Governor David Y. Ige signed a Proclamation identifying October as Disability Employment Awareness month, and endorsed Hawai’i’s designation as an Employment First state.  In this proclamation, Governor Ige encouraged all citizens of the Aloha State to fully participate in the workforce and bring their individual strengths and talents to augment Hawai’i’s business and industry.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

Medicaid I/DD Waiver - 07/20/2018

~~“Medicaid is a jointly funded, Federal-State health insurance program for people with limited income and resources who meet eligibility requirements.  The Medicaid 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) is authorized under Section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act.  These services are designed to implement creative person-centered alternatives to long-term institutionalized care.

Quest Hawaii: More Choices for Your Healthcare

Hawaii’s state Medicaid program is called Med-QUEST. It is administered by the Department of Human Services, Med-QUEST Division (MQD), and is financed through the State of Hawai‘i and the Federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). MQD works in partnership with DDD and stakeholders to design a waiver that meets the needs of Hawai‘i residents with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (I/DD). MQD and DDD ensure the waiver is implemented in compliance with all waiver requirements, federal and state laws, and waiver standards.

Individuals who are eligible for DDD services, are Medicaid eligible, and meet the level of care criteria can apply for the Medicaid I/DD Waiver.  Services and supports are identified through a person-centered planning process with case managers who coordinate and assist individuals in accessing waiver services from qualified providers or through the Consumer-Directed (CD) Option.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Employment Services and Supports - 07/20/2018

~~This page has information on the following services and supports:Discovery and Career PlanningBenefits CounselingHawaii Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (WIPA)Individual Employment Supports•Job Development•Job Coaching 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WorkHawaii Ticket to Work - 04/06/2018

~~“American Job Center Hawaii is an employment network that provides assistance to persons with disabilities who are receiving Social Security benefits with the intent to obtain employment through our supportive services, which includes career and benefits planning; job development through work readiness and skills workshops; resume building and cover letter writing; and job search assistance to return to work.  Phone: (808)768-5720”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Report to the Twenty-Ninth Legislature State of Hawaii 2018 on Long Term Adult Supports and Resources - 12/30/2017

~~“Long Term Adult Supports and Resources (LASR)This program provides supports for individuals who are eligible for DDD but not eligible for Medicaid services under the I/DD Waiver, or do not choose to receive Waiver services.  The LASR Program assists individuals with I/DD and families to increase independence and interdependence in daily life activities.  The LASR program services include but are not limited to: discovery and career planning, volunteer work, senior activities (if applicable), competitive, integrated employment opportunities, activities to increase skills necessary to perform typical daily activities, activities to increase and strengthen social roles, building communications skills with members of the community, developing friendships and relationships with community members, and practicing skills in activities of daily living.

There was no waitlist for the LASR program during FY 2017. There were 83 individuals served by the LASR program with an expenditure of $720,231 from state general funds.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Hawaii Uniform Application FY 2018/2019 – State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Community Mental Health Services Block Grant - 08/29/2017

~~“The Clubhouse Model seeks to demonstrate that people with mental illness can successfully live productive lives and work in the community, regardless of the nature or severity of their mental illness. Clubhouse services include Transitional Employment (TE), Group Transitional Employment (GTE), Supported Employment (SE), Supported Education (SE), Advocacy and Case Management”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

HAWAII RESIDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CELEBRATE 30 YEARS OF SELF-DETERMINATION AT “DAY AT THE CAPITOL" - 03/16/2017

~~“Today, Hawaii is one of nine states that does  not have a waiting list for home and community based services. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes. Currently, 99 percent of people served by the Department of Health’s Developmental Disabilities Division live in residences serving one to six people, and 61 percent in settings with one to three people. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes.

By law, the Department of Health is mandated to develop, lead, administer, coordinate, monitor, evaluate, and set direction for a comprehensive system of supports and services for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Current services include: personal assistance/habilitation, emergency services, respite, employment supports, chore, training and consultation, specialized medical equipment, adult day health, skilled nursing, environmental accessibility and vehicular modifications, assistive technology, personal emergency response systems and non-medical transportation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Four-Year Area Plan on Aging - 06/04/2019

~~“Current statewide initiatives spearheaded by the Governor’s office include the expansion of the ADRC system to increase active collaboration with state agencies such as the Department of Human Services MedQUEST and Vocational Rehabilitation Divisions; the Department of Health Executive Office on Aging, Adult Mental Health Division, Developmental Disabilities Division, Disability and Communication Access Board, Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Language Access Advisory Council; the Hawaii Department of Defense Office of Veterans Services; and with community organizations and councils such as Centers for Independent Living. The goal of this collaborative effort is to build upon the ADRC Systems Change to create a No Wrong Door (NWD) System in the state. The NWD Initiative will enhance existing ADRC processes to expand assistance to all populations and payers in accessing long term services and supports, thereby making it easier for people of all ages, disabilities, and income levels to learn about and obtain the help they need. A reasonable expected outcome of the NWD Initiative also includes the removal of silos and the increase of integrated efforts among various State and local agencies that serve these populations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Report to the Governor in Accordance with the Provisions of Section 348-8(c), 'Special Education Agreement" - 01/04/2019

~~” DVR - Special Education Agreement and Transitional student services have been reviewed with updates to MOA between DVR and DOE in final review to support ongoing partnership for students to explore careers and work-based learning experiences.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Report to the Governor in Accordance with the Provisions of Section 348-8(c), "Pre-ETS Program" - 01/04/2019

~~“Through DVR’s Pre-ETS program, work experience is subsidized in the Summer Youth Employment Programs.  Leveraging funding among Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) formal/informal partners continues to be explored to enhance work-based learning experiences statewide.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Hawaii Disability Rights Center “Employment” - 11/30/2018

~~The rights of persons with disabilities were reaffirmed as follows: “People with disabilities have the right to freedom from discrimination in:

Being employed, provided reasonable accommodation in training for a job or in the workplace, the opportunity for career advancement, termination of supported or sheltered employment for placement in competitive, integrated employment at fair wages.

People with disabilities have the right to assistance to resolve problems or issues arising from programs or services funded under the Rehabilitation Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

*UPDATED* Supported Employment Services for VR Consumers - 07/04/2017

~~This is a call for bids for a program that will “Provide supported employment (SE) services to individuals with disabilities, both physical and mental. Individualized services are to be provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with the consumer’s strengths, resources, priortiespriorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice.  The contract term will be from October 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019 with four (4) additional 12-month option periods.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division - Strategic Plan 2015-2017 Progress Report - 09/23/2015

“The Strategic Plan was adopted on December 2014. In the ensuing months Team Leaders have been convening meetings with advocates, providers, partners, and Division staff to plan specific activities for attaining goals and objectives of the Strategic Plan. Teams have also developed performance measures to track progress and measure results.” Goal number 3 outlines that “DDD will ensure individuals with I/DD have opportunities to seek employment and achieve personal outcomes to work in competitive integrated settings.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Full Life Sponsors Disability Legislative Forum

EHDDC to host the 2016 East Hawaii Disability Legislative Forum “You cannot have Inclusion without Us” Full Life is sponsoring both East and West Hawai’i Island Disability Legislative Forums! The public, especially family members and persons with disabilities, are invited to come and meet Hawaii Island’s State legislators and County officials. These free events will feature a forum where policymakers will answer questions about disability-related issues such as employment, housing, transportation, and health. Special activities include the opportunities to express your opinion on topics important to you and to meet and talk story with State legislators and County officials. Provider agencies have prepared booths with information about many available services and supports.

Systems
  • Other

Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities

~~“The Council is responsible to engage in advocacy , capacity-building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the policy in the federal law; and contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered and consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system that includes needed community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that promote self-determination for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

The Council carries out its responsibilities through policy development, implementation and analysis; researching and promoting new approaches and best practices to services and supports; educating and informing policymakers and the public about developmental disabilities; developing and supporting coalitions; fostering interagency collaboration and coordination; providing training in leadership development and legislative advocacy; and eliminating barriers and enhancing design and redesign of systems.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hire Abilities Hawai'i

“Hire Abilities Hawaii represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`’ College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council.“

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

DLIR NEWS RELEASE: State awarded $2.25 million for youth disability workforce development - 10/16/2017

~~"Hawaii Youth At Work! Program Expands to Year AroundThe Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) was awarded $2.25 million in federal funds to help prepare youth with disabilities to enter the workforce or post-secondary education. The funding enables Hawaii Youth At Work! summer participants to obtain paid work experience during the year, coupled with employment preparation activities….

The program is a collaboration between the Department of Human Services (DHS) and DLIR. DHS’s Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), Benefit, Employment and Support Services Division, and Social Services Division counselors and staff work with DLIR workforce staff to place participants in temporary jobs with the State and Counties…..

In 2016, the Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP) provided 153 youth with disabilities paid work experience in State and County offices on the islands of Oahu, Maui, Molokai, Lanai and Hawaii. Youth were paid $10.00 an hour and worked up to twenty hours per week during the summer months. SYEP 2017 expanded referrals to include youth participants from the DHS’s Benefit, Employment and Support Services Division and Social Services Division in addition to VR. 125 participants were placed in State and City offices on the islands of Oahu, Maui, Molokai, Lanai and Hawaii.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii DEI - Round 6 Grant Abstracts - 11/01/2015

The U.S. Department of Labor awarded Hawaii a Round 6 DEI grant to improve employment opportunities for youth and/or adults with disabilities. “HIDEI [Hawaii DEI] will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and build upon the promising practices of the HIDEI 2 [Round 2] project to incorporate career pathways into its service to individuals with significant disabilities to better prepare participants to obtain meaningful employment and achieve self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii DEI - Round 2 Grants - 11/01/2015

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2010, Hawaii was awarded a Round 1 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The Round 1 grant ended in 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Hawaii Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“In 2006, Hawaii received a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, known as Hire Abilities Hawaii, ran from 2006 to 2009. It was authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. MIG provided funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that built supports for people with disabilities seeking employment. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. The Hire Abilities website grew out of these goals and objectives.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid Society Hawaii was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving consumers in the vulnerable and “left behind” populations, as well as those with limited English proficiency; consumers from the Compact of Free Association Countries; low income consumers; and geographically and culturally isolated consumers.   There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with the Compact of Free Association Countries (COFA), Consulate offices, local community groups such as: Churches, Health centers, Social service agencies, Women’s and homeless shelters, and Community center9/3/2019s. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Sergio Alcubilla Phone: (808) 527-8063Email: Sergio.alcubilla@legalaidhawaii.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

REPORT IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 348-8(c), HAWAII REVISED STATUTE - 01/04/2019

~~“1. In June 2018, a reverse job fair was held at America’s Job Center at Dillingham on Oahu.  As a result of this successful event, employers requested another be held.2.In response to #1, in October 2018 the Employment First Hawaii sponsored an Empowering All Abilities Reverse Job Fair held at the State Capitol.  There were 54 students from various high schools prepared with resumes and display boards showing their abilities, interests and skills.  Employers met with those students who met their current hiring and future hiring need.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

RealChoices Hawaii - Guide to Employment for Job Seekers - 01/22/2016

This guide to employment for people with disabilities provides information and additional links on job centers, employment for seniors and employment for youth.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Hawaii’s Disability Employment Initiative

~~“Hawaii’s DEI will focus its effort on the following strategies:•Increase American Job Center (AJC) staff competencies through training on Disability 101, Customized Employment, Career Pathway Systems, Job Accommodation, Asset Development, Individualized Learning Plans, and Disability Benefits Planning.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maui Youth and Family Services, Inc

~~“MYFS was established in 1978 by Maui County as the Maunaolu Youth Residential Shelter to provide a safe place for Maui’s homeless, abused and runaway children. Incorporated as a private non-profit agency in 1982, MYFS has expanded to include a range of behavioral and mental health programs to support young people and their families’ personal growth and emotional stability.Maui Youth and Family Services is accredited by CARF, the Commission on the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.”

Systems
  • Other

Hawaii Employers Council In-house Training

As a service exclusively for members, any or all of the Fundamentals of Supervision workshops can be brought to your company’s site or held at the HEC training room. The content of these workshops can be designed to fit your company’s unique culture and tailored to highlight issues that are important to your workplace. The workshops combine lectures, videos and case studies, with longer sessions including role-play exercises. We will use your company's forms, policies and procedures to the extent possible. In addition what is presented in the Fundamentals of Supervision Workshops, the following topics are also available for in-house programs: -ABCs of Collective Bargaining -Americans with Disabilities Act -Effective Employee Relations: Remaining Union Free -Family and Medical Leave Act (for members with 50 or more employees) -Preparing for Unemployment Appeals Hearings -Preventive Discipline for Unionized Work Groups

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - Customized Employment Videos

“These Customized Employment (CE) videos, each specifically focused on Employers, Youth, or a General audience, highlight the benefits of CE, an employment strategy which matches the skills and preferences of the individual with the specific business needs of the employer. This process results in expanded employment opportunities for those who utilize and engage in this innovative, evidenced-based approach to employment. The General audience video has been created in both English and Spanish.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

HireAbilities Hawai'i

This website is intended to provide resources to support employment for individuals with disabilities. It is intended to be used by job seekers with disabilities, service providers, agencies and businesses. This site was revamped December 2013 and now has many new features and content. Some major additions to the website include: -The Benefits Finder can search for eligibility and work incentive information for Hawaii’s state and federal disability programs. -Use our Resource Finder to search a database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. -Learn more about how Hawaii’s proposed Medicaid Buy-In Program could help workers with a disability who require Medicaid . Hire Abilities Hawaii is a comprehensive database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. It represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`i College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council. Originally started through a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - "What is Customized Employment?"

This brief article defines customized employment and outlines the case for using it with job seekers with disabilities. It outlines the different forms customized employment can take, including "task reassignment," "job carving," and "job negotiation."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

S.B. 1240 A BILL FOR AN ACT RELATING TO MEDICAID WAIVER - 06/29/2019

~~“Removes the sunset date of Act 21, Special Session Laws of Hawaii 2009, which requires the Department of Health to license home care agencies.  Adds exception for Medicaid waiver provider agencies providing services to Medicaid waiver participants”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WAIVER PROVIDER STANDARDS MANUAL Version B-3 - 11/02/2018

~~“Remediation for HCBS Final Rule (79 FR 2947) on Community Integration Through its process of validation and monitoring of Providers, DOH-DDD will ensure that settings meet HCBS final rule requirements by maximizing opportunities for participants to have access to the benefits of community living and opportunities to receive services in the most integrated setting.a. Setting requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1)The setting is integrated in and supports access to the greater community;2)The setting provides opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings if Discovery and Career Planning and Individual Employment Supports services are part of the Provider’s service array; 3)The setting provides opportunities to engage in community life, and control personal resources; and4)The setting ensures the participant receives services in the community to the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid I/DD Waiver.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Updated Medicaid Waiver Provider Standards For Individuals With Intellectual And Developmental Disabilities - 10/19/2018

~~“The Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Division, has issued the updated Medicaid Waiver Provider Standards for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (Medicaid I/DD Waiver), Version B-3. The Standards reflect changes based on the CMS-Approved I/DD Waiver Amendment #2 and are effective in November 2018.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

QUEST Integration §1115 Waiver Renewal Application - 07/27/2018

~~Pursuant to Section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act, the State of Hawai‘i, Department of Human Services (the State) is seeking a five-year renewal of the QUEST Integration Section 1115 demonstration project from CMS. Absent a renewal, the demonstration will expire on December 31, 2018.For nearly two decades, the demonstration has efficiently and effectively delivered comprehensive benefits to a large number of beneficiaries, including expansion populations, through a competitive managed care delivery system. Under the renewal, “QUEST Integration” (QI) will continue to build on this success by delivering services through managed care, while integrating the demonstration’s programs and benefits to have a more patient-centered care delivery.All eligible beneficiaries will continue to be enrolled under QUEST Integration, and access to services will be determined by clinical criteria and medical necessity. The renewal will continue to incorporate the simplified Medicaid eligibility structure under the ACA into the demonstration. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid I/DD Waiver Providers - 07/19/2018

~~Services are provided through the Medicaid 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (Medicaid I/DD Waiver). The purpose of the Medicaid I/DD Waiver is to support people to have a full life in the community.

Life Course Tools Diagram

Services and supports are identified through a person-centered planning process with case managers to develop the Individualized Service Plan (ISP) with the individual’s desired outcomes and goals. The case manager assists the individual and family in accessing these services from qualified Medicaid I/DD Waiver providers chosen by the individual.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR SECTION 1115(a) RENEWAL OF HAWAII’S SECTION 1115 DEMONSTRATION (11-W-00001/9) - 03/02/2018

~~“The State of Hawaii, Department of Human Services (the State), hereby notifies the public that it intends to seek a five-year renewal of its Section 1115 Demonstration from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).  This renewal, which will be effective January 1, 2019, will be entitled “QUEST Integration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Standards Manual Version B – Draft Pending DHS-MQD Approval - 03/01/2018

~"The Waiver Standards Manual Version B includes services that the participant may receive after their Individualized Service Plan (ISP) meeting is held during Year 1 of the phase-in (July 1,2017 through June 30, 2018). Waiver Standards Manual Version B is the manual that includes services available to participants as they transition to new services, fee schedules and billing codes based on their date of ISP and their cohort group. By the end of fiscal year 2018, Standards A will be sunset and Standards B will be in use for the Medicaid I/DD Waiver."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawai’i Behavioral Health Employment Services - 02/21/2018

~~“Under the guidance of the My Choice My Way plan, Hawaii Behavioral Health works with The Department of Health, and other stakeholders, on providing employment services to qualified participants. Our goal is to help participants attain competitive, integrated employment. We believe that all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities have the capacity to find their life’s work.

Discovery and Career Planning (DCP)During the Discovery and Career Planning Program (DCP), Hawaii Behavioral Health works with participants to explore their strengths, abilities, and interests. Our DCP services are designed to help participants explore future careers, build their skills, and realize their talents. Once participants are ready to enter the employment market, HBH transitions them into Individual Employment Supports.

Individual Employment Supports (IES)Hawaii Behavioral Health’s Individual Employment Supports Program (IES) works with all stakeholders, while helping participants access and maintain employment in the community. HBH consults with employers, discovering their business needs, and finding mutually-beneficial employment opportunities for our participants. HBH also continues to develop our participants, providing person-centered employment planning, job coaching, and problem solving.Available on Oahu, and the Big Island”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Resource Leveraging

Hawai'i Medicaid State Plan and Demonstration - 02/15/2018

~~“The Hawaiʻi Medicaid State Plan is an agreement between Hawaii and the Federal government describing how that Hawaiʻi administers its Medicaid programs.  Department of Human Services is the single State agency designated to administer the Medicaid program under Title XIX of the Social Security Act.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a 1915(c) HCBS Waiver: - 12/21/2017

~~“The State of Hawaii requests approval of an amendment to the following Medicaid home and community based services waiver approved under authority of  1915© of the Social Security Act.Program Title: HCB Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD WaiverWaiver Name: HI.0013Amendment Number:Proposed Effective Date 06/01/18Approved Effective Date of Waiver being amended: 07/01/16Purpose(s) of the Amendment:This is a technical amendment to address items that were enot included in the waiver renewal approved effective July 1, 2016 and the amendment approved effective June 1, 2017. The amendment will add services mixes   and supports budgets to enable participants to have choice, flexibility and control over their services. The amendment also adds a new service, phases-out one service and clarifies language in several services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Disability is a respected part of diversity in the Rainbow State of Hawaii, where employees with disabilities are saying "Aloha" to new job opportunities across the state. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Hawaii's VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
-0.5%
Change from
2017 to 2018
1,420,491
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
10.38%
Change from
2017 to 2018
66,355
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
10.37%
Change from
2017 to 2018
28,503
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0%
Change from
2017 to 2018
42.96%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2017 to 2018
80.12%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 1,428,557 1,427,538 1,420,491
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 66,031 59,469 66,355
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 26,356 25,546 28,503
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 602,358 597,818 594,407
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.91% 42.96% 42.96%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.60% 78.80% 80.12%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.00% 2.40% 2.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.10% 16.60% 13.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.50% 8.80% 8.40%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 76,879 72,983 80,714
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 79,244 75,876 77,647
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 41,777 36,361 43,150
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,861 2,095 2,464
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 12,701 9,989 10,888
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 694 465 927
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 65,212 67,317 61,806
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 16,842 15,262 18,520
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 28,729 26,646 30,487
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,008 713 1,007

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 821 849 823
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.40% 4.60% 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 22,275 21,813 21,165

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 356 228 242
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,023 739 742
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 2,703 1,584 1,508
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 13.20% 14.40% 16.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.10% 0.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 10.20% 6.40% 5.70%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A 0.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 52 8 9
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 782 483 435
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A 32
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,007 1,836 1,587
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6 5 10
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 4 4 4
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 67.00% 80.00% 40.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.28 0.28 0.28

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
845
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 77 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 81 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 102 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 317 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 203 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 61 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 28.00% 25.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,134 1,507 1,257
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 38,249 37,035 36,162
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 20 11 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 55 19 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $341,000 $148,000 $453,960
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $18,700,000 $24,072,000 $19,586,588
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $29,175,000 $28,982,000 $15,477,471
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 1.00% 1.00% 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 806 855 1,443
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,276 1,229 1,432
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.20 1.00 2.74

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 36.83% 37.33% 40.63%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 20.24% 20.40% 18.94%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.17% 1.15% 1.11%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 70.32% 74.14% 64.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 35.87% 36.34% 35.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 83.37% 85.04% 85.69%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 89.79% 93.11% 93.05%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 47.50% 48.70% 50.52%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 448,452
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 607
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 268
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 268
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,228,248

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 6 7 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6 7 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 51 63 67
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 51 63 67

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~o Align policies and funding streams across education, workforce, and economic development systems and all levels of government to focus public resources on the training that moves workers into industries with high-quality jobs that lead to better financial outcomes and longer job tenures for workers.
o Take an active role in the development of the “common pathways” for both individuals who desire to pursue secondary education AND for individuals who do not desire to pursue secondary education but desire to learn employment skills through work experience and/or on-the-job training.
o Coordinate a “common” work assessment process between core partners.
o Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff. (Page 110) Title 1

In preparation for WIOA implementation, State-level Partners met regularly for about a year to learn about services provided by each Core Partner (and other Partners), convened joint meetings among Partner stakeholders, and determined how participant data would be shared and tracked through Core Programs. As much as possible during this preparation period, Core Partners were added as key agencies in programs such as DLIR’s Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI), DVR’s Student Transition Employment Program, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) led by DVR, and the American Apprenticeship Initiative Grant led by DLIR. Since then, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) was led by the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and the collaboration continues among agencies serving persons with disabilities. (Page 121) Title 1

Contributing to a more integrated service strategy is the partnership building created by the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a technical assistance grant provided by DOL Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) to increase employment of persons with disabilities. EFSLMP is truly a partnership effort currently led by the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, with Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Council, DLIR Workforce Development Division, Department of Human Services MedQuest Division, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and Department of Education. A Cooperative Agreement is being developed among partners to
formalize cooperative working arrangements and a series of technical assistance and training have been provided to the partners and AJCs by subject matter experts. (Page 130-131) Title I

In addition, underserved populations such as persons with disabilities and offenders will be targeted to expand the job seeker pool. Capacity building obtained through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program and Disability Employment Initiative will enable more staff, in coordination with Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health, and other partners, to assist employers in employing persons with disabilities. These services include customizing employment for individuals with significant barriers to employment. This employment option, combined with federal and state tax credits, will increase the incentives for employers, including federal contractors, to hire persons with disabilities. To assist ex-offenders, the experience and skills obtained through staff’s provision of services to inmates and parolees through a contract with State Department of Public Safety and the partnerships built for this effort will facilitate services to this group. (Page 157) Title I

Wagner-Peyser and leveraged funds will be used for staff training that will increase their capability to deliver high-quality services to both employers and job seekers. For example, Career and Technical Education resources were recently accessed to train AJC staff on all counties in the areas of business services and conflict resolution; and Work Keys assessment tools and training were purchased from different funding sources to increase assessment and training capabilities with corresponding staff training.
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 225-226) Title IV

DVR has implemented evidence-based practices and innovative strategies for addressing key challenges to strengthen employer engagement, including: streamlined employer outreach activities; customization of employer engagement; job development and job negotiation tailored to the unique business needs of each individual employer; and dissemination of technological tools for improving the direct relationship between the employee and the employer.
To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of non-duplicative resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities.
DVR has engaged in the following activities in order to create sustainable employment service models over time. (Page 287) Title IV

The Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a grant through the US Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy that was first given to the Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) and turned over to the Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) for the final year will bring together various core partners. One of the two projects under EFSLMP is to develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, DDD, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from this larger core group. (Page 288) Title IV

Results from the CSNA indicate a need for more CRP’s on neighboring islands which include Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and Kauai. Employment, transportation and housing were identified on the neighbor islands as needed. CRP’s and other entities need to collaborate and communicate with each other to establish a foundation that consumers can rely on. Additionally, CRP’s must embrace the "Employment first" philosophy and move from sheltered employment to competitive integrated employment. (Page 297) Title IV

Goal 2.1 Annually increase the percentage of individuals with most significant disabilities who during a program year participate in work-based learning experiences and internships (by a minimum rate of 1%);
Goal 2.2 Annually increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities in competitive integrated employment during the fourth quarter after exit (by a minimum rate of 1%)
Goal 2.3 Annually increase the percentage of employers providing customized employment to individuals with most significant disabilities. Customized employment means, in general, competitive integrated employment designed to meet both the specific abilities of the individual with a most significant disability and the business needs of an employer (by a minimum rate of 1%). (Page 304) Title IV

Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule): 1. Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes. 2. Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain: 1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. 2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. (Page 318) Title IV

The factors that contributed to our ability to increase the number of individuals that received SE services was our participation in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, (EFSLMP). This program introduced our counseling and employment staff to the customized employment model which supports the long term supports of SE services.
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2017: 108 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services; FY 2016: 70 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. (Page 325) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~3. To develop sector strategies and a career pathways system that will integrate education and training, and move skilled jobseekers into growth industries.
o Use economic data, industry clusters and industry resources to determine growth industries and the skill needs of industries and employers.
o Establish and maintain sector initiatives that facilitate ongoing dialogue between government, employers and other key stakeholders to increase understanding of growth industry needs, foster learning between related businesses and coordinate use of information and resources to formulate and implement effective workforce solutions that meet the skill, recruitment, and retention needs of employers and the training, employment, and career advancement needs of workers.
o Align policies and funding streams across education, workforce, and economic development systems and all levels of government to focus public resources on the training that moves workers into industries with high-quality jobs that lead to better financial outcomes and longer job tenures for workers.
o Take an active role in the development of the “common pathways” for both individuals who desire to pursue secondary education AND for individuals who do not desire to pursue secondary education but desire to learn employment skills through work experience and/or on-the-job training.
o Coordinate a “common” work assessment process between core partners.
o Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff. (Page 110) Title 1

Goal 2.2 Annually increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities in competitive integrated employment during the fourth quarter after exit (by a minimum rate of 1%)
Goal 2.3 Annually increase the percentage of employers providing customized employment to individuals with most significant disabilities. Customized employment means, in general, competitive integrated employment designed to meet both the specific abilities of the individual with a most significant disability and the business needs of an employer (by a minimum rate of 1%). (Page 304) Title IV

Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain: 1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. 2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes.
Strategies to cultivate VR’s effectiveness in serving employers: Developing successful partnerships with local and multi-state businesses in an effort to increase the employment of individuals with disabilities and self-employment. Services include, but not limited to: 1. Train employers on compliance the title I of the American with Disability Act (ADA) of 1990 and other employment-related laws. 2. Inform employers of the existence of the program and availability of services. 3. Educate and provide services to employers who have hired or are interested in hiring individuals with disabilities. 4. Provide training and technical assistance to employers regarding disability awareness. 5. Working with employers to provide opportunities for work-based learning experiences and opportunities. for PRE-ETS services. 6. Train employees who are individuals with disabilities. (Page 318) Title IV

• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Conduct outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, and develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 322) Title IV

Priority 1: Increase the number of clients receiving SE services. Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals that receive SE services. FY 2017: 325 FY: 304 FY 2015: 57 individuals received SE services. FY 2014: 53 individuals received SE services. FY 2013: 98 individuals received SE services.
The factors that contributed to our ability to increase the number of individuals that received SE services was our participation in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, (EFSLMP). This program introduced our counseling and employment staff to the customized employment model which supports the long term supports of SE services.
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. (Page 325) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~PRE-ETS Goals: DVR/WDD/DOE strategies for leveraging resources and funding include; DVR working/contracting with the Core Partners to leverage resources and funding for the provision of job exploration counseling and placement and case management services. Specifically, WDD has agreed to leverage resources and funding from other programs (e.g. a Disability Employment Initiative grant) to the maximum extent possible, to provide individualized services such as job coaching, uniforms, transportation to and from work-based learning sites, safety equipment or assistive technology to participating Pre-ETS students. WDD will partner with Adult Education to provide the workplace readiness training to DVR’s Pre-ETS students in preparation for successful attainment of the work-based learning skills.

DVR is participating and in support of the American Job Center’s One-Stop Single Sign-On registration system to increase access to the services of DOE’s Adult Education, the Workforce Development Division, and other partners for DVR clients on the deferred list to meet their training and job placement needs. (Page 303) Title VI
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~For example, the Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI) program awarded to DLIR in 2015 includes as a goal increasing the number of Business Leadership Networks, which are business-driven groups of employers committed toward promoting the hiring of persons with disabilities. A major partner in DEI is DVR and their providers, and WIOA AJC staff members are the primary recipients of capacity building to serve persons with significant disabilities. Another DEI goal is developing an interagency group of providers with the AJCs for a more coordinated referral system among providers and for more integration of business engagement activities among providers. Adult Education will be part of this group with other partners. Approaching employers and Business Leadership Networks (BLN) in a coordinated manner that represents all agencies is more professional, useful, and productive than each agency operating in its own silo with employers. A coordinated approach also enables providers to offer a fuller array of services as different options to meet different situations. (Page 121) Title I

Although DEI focuses on a specific group of individuals, the successes of the coordinated service strategies is a model for a broader population. (DEI, Round II, was conducted only on the Counties of Hawaii and Maui, and the successful collaboration with employers and providers was the stepping stone for DEI Round VI statewide.) Experience showed that building trust among agencies took time and a disciplined commitment to regular meetings. It also required the lead agency and its contractor, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, to develop meeting agenda, contact agencies for meetings, and include actions relevant to the providers. Similar factors were critical to sustain business interest in participating on the Business Leadership Networks.
Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of AJC staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 122) Title I

The Employer Engagement Committee of the Council is developing a business services framework plan that will coordinate business services of the AJC partner network and will improve the quality of services provided by the system to employers; meet the needs of employers; and meet the effectiveness in serving employers goals of the State.
The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), Round VI, also will help facilitate a coordinated approach with employers among agencies serving persons with disabilities. This approach was very successful on Hawaii County where DEI Round II was carried out. Lessons learned from that experience, including the time it took to build trust and break barriers, helps inform DEI Round VI, which will be implemented Statewide.  (Page 130) Title I

Each self-service resource room located in the AJCs features a minimum of one accessible computer terminal equipped with assistive technology software designed to increase accessibility to all AJC customers, including individuals with multiple challenges and individuals with disabilities. Where needed in the AJCs, assistive technology has been or will be purchased under the Disability Employment Initiative Grants.
The technical assistance provided to Core Partners and AJCs from Employment First State Leadership Mentoring (EFSLMP) projects enabled the creation of interagency teams called Workforce Solutions to collaboratively plan and implement statewide efforts to serve persons with disabilities more effectively. The interagency teams include DVR, Department of Health, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, WDD, and AJCs. A series of training sessions for partner agencies were arranged under EFSLMP to build their capacity for serving persons with disabilities. The training continues under DEI Round VI for Hawaii and Maui; and they will be provided under DEI Round VIII statewide. (Page 175) Title I

As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by itsprovision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 225-226) Title V

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~It is clear from the interviews and the survey results that students and youth with disabilities in Hawaii have a need to receive pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) as identified in the Reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act in WIOA. These services include:
1. Job exploration counseling;
2. Work-based learning experiences;
3. Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs at institutions of higher education;
4. Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living (often referred to as soft skills); and
5. Instruction in self-advocacy, which may include peer mentoring
Each of these Pre-ETS services was noted as a need on a recurring basis when discussing the needs of students and youth in Hawaii.
The Rehabilitation Act as reauthorized in WIOA also indicates that the following authorized services can be provided if funds remain after the provision of the five required services noted above:
1. Implementing effective strategies to increase the likelihood of independent living and inclusion in communities and competitive integrated workplaces;
2. Developing and improving strategies for individuals with intellectual disabilities and individuals with significant disabilities to live independently, participate in postsecondary education experiences, and obtain and retain competitive integrated employment;
3. Providing instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students and youth with disabilities;
4. Disseminating information about innovative, effective, and efficient approaches to achieve the goals of this section;
5. Coordinating activities with transition services provided by local educational agencies under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.);
6. Applying evidence-based findings to improve policy, procedure, practice, and the preparation of personnel, in order to better achieve the goals of this section;
7. Developing model transition demonstration projects;
8. Establishing or supporting multistate or regional partnerships involving States, local educational agencies, designated State units, developmental disability agencies, private businesses, or other participants to achieve the goals of this section; and
9. Disseminating information and strategies to improve the transition to postsecondary activities of individuals who are members of traditionally unserved populations. (Page 77) Title I

DVR can assist a VR eligible individual with only those activities that are included in their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). All activities that are required for a VR eligible individual to prepare, obtain, maintain/regain employment (of their informed choice) will be listed on their IPE. If an activity that is required, is identified after the IPE is completed, then the VR eligible individual and the VR counselor, in agreement, can amend the IPE to include the activity and make any other changes as determined to be necessary to obtain employment. DVR and the Core partners are working on MOA’s which details the responsibilities of each partner which will help in the management and avoid duplication among these activities. In so far as duplication of activities by other optional AJC partners, VR would have minimal involvement as those services would not be listed on the IPE since those services would not be necessary for the VR eligible individual to obtain employment. (Page 123-124) Title I

The DLIR Director, along with the Superintendent of Education and the University of Hawaii President, is a voting member of the P-20 Statewide Longitudinal Data System (aka Data Exchange Partnership or DXP) Executive Committee. The Workforce Development Council Executive Director is an attending member of the Executive Committee. WDC staff are members of the DXP’s Data Governance and Access Committee (formerly known as the Steering Committee) and the Research and Data Request Sub-Committee.
In support of the WIOA state plan, the state CTE office is supporting two new positions to be hired in the spring of 2018. One is a CTE and Workforce Data Analyst and the other is a Workforce Alignment and Learning Opportunities Specialist. They will be housed in the P20 office and will address data and work-based learning across all WIOA stakeholders.
DVR already has a Special Education/Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR) program. The primary purpose of the program is for students ages 14 - 21 who have been found eligible for VR services to participate gain work experience in an integrated setting, while still enrolled in school.
DVR is also working with Adult Literacy and Community Colleges to develop career pathways which include Pre-ETS with work-based learning experiences for VR students between 14-21 years of age. We are working with Adult Education to provide career pathways for VR clients which includes remedial reading and math classes; PETS and work experience for those clients who desire to enter directly into the labor force. We are working with the Community Colleges to provide career pathways for VR clients ages 14 and above who desire to enter secondary education prior to entering the workforce. (Page 132) Title I

In support of the WIOA state plan, the state CTE office is supporting two new positions to be hired in the spring of 2018. One is a CTE and Workforce Data Analyst and the other is a Workforce Alignment and Learning Opportunities Specialist. They will be housed in the P20 office and will address data and work-based learning across all WIOA stakeholders. (Page 133) Title I
The Sector Strategies and Career Pathways committee will convene sub-committees based on key industry sectors identified in the Unified Plan. These sub-committees will provide employer and industry perspective. The objectives of the sub-committees are:
• Assess training needs and skills gaps, inventory current resources and services, identify high priority gaps;
• Build stronger networks between firms and among education and training partners to identify high-priority skill gaps and in-demand sectors;
• Review and provide feedback on HIDOE and UHCC’s standards and assessments, academic and career technical content and work skills;
• Increase high quality, work-based learning opportunities for secondary and postsecondary students that lead to industry recognized credentials;
• Identify new industry-recognized credentials or work-based programs that give companies confidence in skills of new hires and provide workers with more mobility;
• Develop opportunities for professional development training for teachers, school/job counselors, training providers, etc.;
• Identify policies and/or strategies to sustain the model. (Page 153) Title I

• State and federal funds from DHS—for job development. job readiness, and placement of TANF recipients and SNAP recipients into jobs.
• State and federal funds from State DHS, DVR to WDD to implement a 2016 Summer Youth Employment program for youth with a disability on Counties of Oahu, Hawaii, and Maui; also supports a year-round WDD staff on Big Island for business outreach and employment assistance for DVR clients. With DVR, WDD is developing a plan for year-round work-based learning services to youth with disabilities using DVR Pre-Employment Transition Services fund for Oahu; and a plan for DVR youth referrals for a Summer Youth Employment Program on Hawaii and Maui Counties. (Page 162) Title I

In the case of a State that, under section 101(a)(2)(A)(i)of the Rehabilitation Act designates a State agency to administer the part of the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services portion of the Unified or Combined State Plan under which VR services are provided for individuals who are blind, describe the process and the factors used by the State to determine the distribution of funds among the two VR agencies in the State.
o Vocational Rehabilitation Basic Support Grant. The purpose of this grant is to assist Hawaii in operating statewide comprehensive, coordinated, effective, efficient, and accountable programs of vocational rehabilitation, which is an integral part of a statewide workforce investment system designed to assess, plan, develop, and provide vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities to prepare for and engage in gainful employment.
o Hawaii DVR is a combined agency which means that we receive one Basic Support Grant which funds the General and Blind agency.
o DVR supports the WDD staff and the American Job Center staff on all islands for business outreach and employment assistance for DVR clients. Along with DVR staff, employers will be provided training and technical assistance to include, but not limited to (1) disability awareness; (2) compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); (3) VR services; (4) recruitment and hiring of persons with disabilities and (5) support for current employees with disabilities.
o DVR has a current State Educational Agency (SEA) Agreement with the DOE and is currently developing an updated SEA agreement to include the WIOA regulations.
o Upon exit from the DOE/Special Education Program, DVR’s clients attend DOE/Adult Education classes. DVR and Adult Education management staff have been meeting to significantly increase the number of DVR clients attending Adult Education classes in 2018. (Page 167) Title I

Following receipt of student referrals, VR counselors complete applications with students and their families, and determine eligibility. When a student is found eligible for VR Services, the VR counselor will attend the IEP meeting at the request of the DOE, when possible. At the request of the IEP team, the VR counselor will review and allow for amendments to the student’s IPE. Pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) include: job exploration counseling, counseling related to transition or post-secondary training/education, instruction in self-advocacy, workplace readiness training and work-based learning experiences. VR counselors provide counseling in job exploration and transition or post-secondary training/education. Service providers (e.g. community rehabilitation programs, partnering public sector agencies) are contracted for workplace readiness training and work-based learning experiences, and instruction in self-advocacy. (Pages 281-282) Title IV

VR counselors receive direct referrals of students with disabilities from the school, at any time during the school year. They provide consultation and technical assistance to schools during their visits, and during IEP meetings for students who were found eligible. When a student is found eligible for VR services the VR counselor will attend IEP meetings, at the request of the DOE when possible and agreed to with stakeholders. If unable to attend, VR information is provided. The VR counselor will review the student’s IPE and allow for amendments at the request of an IEP team.
Transition counselors provide introduction and guidance to post-school alternatives, and planning and coordination for work experiences in a work based setting to improve employment outcomes.
VR counselors receive direct referrals of students with disabilities from the school, at any time during the school year. They provide consultation and technical assistance to school staff during their school visits, and during IEP meetings for students and their families who were found eligible. When a student is found eligible for VR Services the VR counselor will attend IEP meetings, at the request of the DOE when possible. If unable to attend, VR information is provided. The VR counselor will review the student’s IPE and allow for amendments at the request of an IEP team. (Page 282) Title IV

DVR and DOE are agreed to work collaboratively to assist transition aged youth (TAY) in development and completion of their individualized education program (IEP). Transition planning includes, but is not limited to: DVR Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist (VRS) invitation to participate in DOE’s IEP meeting for shared TAYs, DVR VRS collaboration with and assistance to DOE teachers in transition planning for TAY, introduction and guidance of TAY to post-school alternatives by DOE transition coordinator and DVR VRS. Planning also includes coordination of experiences for TAY in work—based settings to improve employment outcomes.
DVR will provide transition planning which facilitates the development and completion of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and development of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) within 90 days from the date of eligibility, and prior to exit from high school for students served by the VR program (34 CFR §361.22(a)).
DOE facilitates annual IEP meetings for every student receiving Special Education services. Should the IEP team agree to submit a referral to DVR; the DOE Transition teacher will be responsible for submitting a referral for VR Services at the conclusion of the IEP meeting.
IEP meetings are facilitated by DOE. At IEP meetings, the VR Counselor provides an overview of the agency’s goal/mission, eligibility criteria, scope of services, rights/remedies, and other information specific to the student’s IPE. Once a student is found eligible for VR Services, the VR Counselor will attend the annual IEP meetings at the request of the DOE, when possible. If the VR Counselor is unable to attend this meeting, information will be provided to the family. The VR Counselor reviews the student’s IPE and allows for amendments at the request of the IEP team. DVR is represented on a variety of committees (Special Education Advisory Council, Developmental Disabilities Council) which enable parents and members of the community to gather information and provide input to DVR. (Page 283-284) Title IV

DVR works with employers to provide VR services through disability and diversity etiquette training, ADA advising, workshops on Emotional Intelligence and Job Readiness Training “Ho’ala” contracted through City and County, Department of Community Service Work Hawaii. Pre-employment transition services are offered through contracts with the Department of Education through Special Education Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR). SEVR provides unique work experience opportunities with employers in the community. Our network of over 600 employers are informed of various DVR programs that allow them to utilize internships, OJTs, apprenticeships in collaboration with the local Community Colleges, and Adult Education programs to access work-based learning experiences. Ongoing workshops and forums with employers are conducted on a quarterly basis with Work Hawaii from Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) to inform employers of changes in legislation and workforce diversification. (Page 288) Title II

Hawaii DVR will coordinate CSPD activities with those provided under the IDEA through the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). A representative of the State Educational Agency responsible for the public education of students with disabilities who are eligible to receive services under this title and part B of the IDEA is appointed by the Governor to be a member of the SRC. Program and financial information are disseminated at SRC meetings and orientation and trainings with VR and DOE, Special Education staff are coordinated at SRC meetings. Joint trainings for DOE /DVR staff are scheduled when necessary (e.g. training for revised procedures for current services or new services.). The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, WIOA, regulations are shared with the DOE staff during the joint quarterly meetings and other meetings needed to address concerns/clarifications as they arise. The transition counselor’s role is to have a presence at their designated schools. The counselors provide consultation and technical assistance to the Department of Education (DOE) staff, students and their families with information regarding DVR’s goal/mission, eligibility criteria, scope of services, rights/remedies and the Special Education-Vocational Rehabilitation (SE-VR) program during their regularly scheduled visits and during IEP meetings. (Page 294) Title IV

DVR investigated the needs of youth and students with disabilities in their 2015 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA). It is clear from the interviews and the survey results that students in Hawaii have a need to receive pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS). Each of the Pre-ETS categories of activities were noted as a need on a recurring basis when discussing the needs of students.
B. Required Activities
• Job exploration counseling;
• Work-based learning experiences, which may include in-school or afterschool opportunities, or experience outside the traditional school setting (including internships), provided in an integrated environment to the maximum extent possible;
• Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs at institutions of higher education;
• Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living skills; and
• Instruction in self-advocacy, which may include peer mentoring.
C. Target Populations: Students receiving transition services pursuant to IDEA or a student who is an individual with a disability under Section 504 aged 14 - 21. (Page 302) Title IV
PRE-ETS Goals: DVR/WDD/DOE strategies for leveraging resources and funding include; DVR working/contracting with the Core Partners to leverage resources and funding for the provision of job exploration counseling and placement and case management services. Specifically, WDD has agreed to leverage resources and funding from other programs (e.g. a Disability Employment Initiative grant) to the maximum extent possible, to provide individualized services such as job coaching, uniforms, transportation to and from work-based learning sites, safety equipment or assistive technology to participating Pre-ETS students. WDD will partner with Adult Education to provide the workplace readiness training to DVR’s Pre-ETS students in preparation for successful attainment of the work-based learning skills. (Page 303) title IV

VR counselors receive direct referrals of students with disabilities from the school, at any time during the school year. They provide consultation and technical assistance to schools during their visits, and during IEP meetings for students who were found eligible. When a student is found eligible for VR services, the VR counselor will attend IEP meetings, at the request of the DOE when possible. If VR counselor is unable to attend the IEP meeting, the transition counselor provides VR information to the student. The VR counselor will review the student’s IPE and allow for amendments at the request of an IEP team. Transition counselors provide introduction and guidance to post school alternatives, and planning and coordination for work experiences in a work-based setting to improve employment outcomes. VR counselors provide counseling in job exploration and transition or post-secondary training/education. Service providers (e.g. community rehabilitation programs, public sector agencies) are contracted for workplace readiness training, work-based learning experiences, and instruction in self-advocacy. DVR continues a long-standing collaboration with the Department of Education to deliver the Special Education — Vocational Rehabilitation (SE-VR) Work Study Program. SE-VR is a work-based learning experience designed to deliver three inter-related components: classroom experience, in-school work experiences and community work experience. The DOE classroom experience is designed with a workplace readiness component. DOE in-school experience is designed to continue work place readiness training with hands-on experience at the DOE school. Finally, community work experience is designed to provide work-based learning experiences in the community. DVR has implemented a Summer Youth Program to provide work-based learning experiences in State, City and County, Federal and private sector work places. (Page 317) Title IV

Improve Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Disabilities by:
1.Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes. • Incentivize timely service delivery by implementing new performance measures for VR counselors which ensure that 90% of eligibility determinations will be completed within 90 days of customers’ application dates and that 90% of Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs) are developed within 60 days of customers’ eligibility determination dates. • Provide high-quality training and support, ensuring staff have the knowledge and skills needed to deliver high-quality vocational rehabilitation services. • Through statewide case file reviews, build an organizational culture of quality to strengthen substantial counseling and guidance.
2.Conduct outreach to key populations, including students with disabilities, to ensure thatall with persons with disabilities have access to services and supports needed to prepare forand obtain employment. (Page 318) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~DVR already has a Special Education/Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR) program. The primary purpose of the program is for students ages 14 - 21 who have been found eligible for VR services to participate gain work experience in an integrated setting, while still enrolled in school.
DVR is also working with Adult Literacy and Community Colleges to develop career pathways which include Pre-ETS with work-based learning experiences for VR students between 14-21 years of age. We are working with Adult Education to provide career pathways for VR clients which includes remedial reading and math classes; PETS and work experience for those clients who desire to enter directly into the labor force. We are working with the Community Colleges to provide career pathways for VR clients ages 14 and above who desire to enter secondary education prior to entering the workforce. (Page 132) Title I

• Data in Hawaii’s ETPL including those providing non-traditional training services and ETPs of registered apprenticeship programs;
• Information identifying eligible providers of on-the-job training (OJT), customized training, incumbent worker training, internships, paid or unpaid work experience opportunities and transitional jobs. WIOA sec. 122(h) exempts providers of on-the-job training and other employer-based training from the requirements at WIOA sec. 122(a)-(f). However, the identity of employers that access WIOA funds for employer-based training, as well as any performance information required by the State under WIOA sec. 122(h)(2) is disclosable;
• Information on effective outreach and partnerships with business;
• Information on effective service delivery strategies and promising practices to serve workers and job seekers;
• Performance information and information on the cost of attendance, including tuition and fees;
• A list of eligible providers of youth activities;
• Information on physical and programmatic accessibility for individuals with disabilities; and
• Access to providers’ past performance information to maximize consumer choice. (Page 189) Title I

DVR works with employers to provide VR services through disability and diversity etiquette training, ADA advising, workshops on Emotional Intelligence and Job Readiness Training “Ho’ala” contracted through City and County, Department of Community Service Work Hawaii. Pre-employment transition services are offered through contracts with the Department of Education through Special Education Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR). SEVR provides unique work experience opportunities with employers in the community. Our network of over 600 employers are informed of various DVR programs that allow them to utilize internships, OJTs, apprenticeships in collaboration with the local Community Colleges, and Adult Education programs to access work-based learning experiences. Ongoing workshops and forums with employers are conducted on a quarterly basis with Work Hawaii from Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) to inform employers of changes in legislation and workforce diversification. (Page 288) Title I

Apprenticeship

In preparation for WIOA implementation, State-level Partners met regularly for about a year to learn about services provided by each Core Partner (and other Partners), convened joint meetings among Partner stakeholders, and determined how participant data would be shared and tracked through Core Programs. As much as possible during this preparation period, Core Partners were added as key agencies in programs such as DLIR’s Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI), DVR’s Student Transition Employment Program, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) led by DVR, and the American Apprenticeship Initiative Grant led by DLIR. Since then, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) was led by the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and the collaboration continues among agencies serving persons with disabilities. (Page 121) Title II

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Although DEI focuses on a specific group of individuals, the successes of the coordinated service strategies is a model for a broader population. (DEI, Round II, was conducted only on the Counties of Hawaii and Maui, and the successful collaboration with employers and providers was the stepping stone for DEI Round VI statewide.) Experience showed that building trust among agencies took time and a disciplined commitment to regular meetings. It also required the lead agency and its contractor, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, to develop meeting agenda, contact agencies for meetings, and include actions relevant to the providers. Similar factors were critical to sustain business interest in participating on the Business Leadership Networks.
Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of AJC staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 122) Title I

USDOL Foreign Labor Certifications—assists employers with housing inspections, job order recruitments, and labor certification applications to hire foreign workers for temporary agriculture labor (H-2A); and assists employers with job order recruitments and labor certification applications to hire foreign workers to perform temporary non-agriculture labor (H-2B).
USDOL ODEP funds for Disability Employment Initiative, Round VI—provides AJC and partner staff training from University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies to increase capability to serve persons with significant disabilities; help establish and maintain Business Leadership Networks and interagency provider collaborations; and increase number of SSI and SSDI beneficiaries getting employment and remaining employed. Round VIII targets youth with disabilities. (Page 161) Title I

4. The VR Classroom Experience - SE Clients will have access to Job Empowerment Training (JET), a classroom-based job readiness course. JET is designed to address the various barriers to employment and to teach the basic skills to find, gain, and maintain employment.
5. VR Placement - Assist clients in gaining competitive employment in the community.
6. SE Retention and Ongoing Supports - Assist in retaining competitive employment in the community via job coaching and regular follow-up. Though purely based on need, most SE clients will receive 100% Job Coaching at first, then will taper off to less than 50% with the goal of final independence. In addition, DVR partners with Developmental Disabilities Division case managers and Ticket to Work Employment Networks to provide extended services to sustain employment. (Page 315) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Dislocated Worker Eligible Training Provider
WDC staff along with LWDB staff are working to increase the number of Eligible Training Providers approved in the State. Each LWDB will work with their local UH System Community College(s) to add programs of study, credit and non-credit courses that meet WIOA requirements. In addition, out-ot-state providers of on-line courses have been added to the eligible education and training providers that can be funded, at least in part, through WIOA. These providers work in cooperation with the American Job Centers located through the state of Hawaii and offer both specialized training as well as credit and non-credit pathways to higher-level employment opportunities. (Page 101) Title I

As required by WIOA, registered apprenticeship program sponsors are informed of their automatic qualification to the Eligible Training Provider List.
DVR can assist a VR eligible individual with only those activities that are included in their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). All activities that are required for a VR eligible individual to prepare, obtain, maintain/regain employment (of their informed choice) will be listed on their IPE. If an activity that is required, is identified after the IPE is completed, then the VR eligible individual and the VR counselor, in agreement, can amend the IPE to include the activity and make any other changes as determined to be necessary to obtain employment. DVR and the Core partners are working on MOA’s which details the responsibilities of each partner which will help in the management and avoid duplication among these activities. In so far as duplication of activities by other optional AJC partners, VR would have minimal involvement as those services would not be listed on the IPE since those services would not be necessary for the VR eligible individual to obtain employment. (Page 123-124) Title I

Core Partner staff also will have access to employer and job order information in the PMIS so they can analyze business services being performed by their providers and offices and improve coordination and management of employer engagement activities.
DVR is currently in the process of getting internal approvals for contracting with the current PMIS vendor and targets having an executed contract in place by July 1, 2016. Adult Education similarly plans to finalize their plans and have any necessary contract in place with Geographic Solutions by July 1, 2016 or shortly thereafter. These contracts will enable the importation of data from DVR and Adult Education file extracts and the development and maintenance of separate portals for DVR and Adult Education participants into HireNet Hawaii. For WIOA, Wagner-Peyser, Veteran, and Trade Adjustment Act reports, Geographic Solutions has been preparing updates to HireNet Hawaii specifications based on federal draft reporting instructions. The vendor will update the specifications based on changes made in the final instructions on a timely basis. (Page 170) Title I

Employer Engagement Goals: DVR's Statewide Employment Staff Specialist has been invited and will participate in the sector strategies by the Chamber of Commerce of Hawaii and will participate in WDC's Employment Committee. DVR's Employment Specialist will continue to be a resource to employers to provide training and education to employers on the skills and abilities of persons with disabilities, reasonable accommodations, tax incentives, etc.
Goal 3.1 Annually increase the number of employers who provide opportunities for individuals with disabilities to participate in work-based employment experiences and internships (by 1%). (Page 304) Title IV

Data Collection

For Section (l) State Goals and Priorities: Priority 1: Pre-Employment Transition Services we want to know how to leverage the funding in pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) with other Core Partners. What specific actions will be taken by the DVR to ensure a stronger relationship between the Core Partners in support of DVR Pre-ETS recipients? We recommend amending priorities to list specifically how the DVR will work with the Core Partners to try to mitigate the Order of Selection, and how the DVR can work with the Core Partners to address Priority Category 2 and 3 clients. Tapping into the Core Partners resources is a recommended focus as well. Priority 3: (Employer Engagement) SRC recommends including specific examples of work that have been done to ensure employer engagement. For Priority 4: (Common Data Collection for Unified State Plan), it is recommended DVR include the WDC Data Integration and Single Sign-On project among the priorities. (Page 278) Title IV

4. Coordination with Employers: DVR’s ongoing coordination efforts will include participation in sector strategies and training employers and state agencies on reasonable accommodations as supports that will be provided to improve partnerships with employers. We will continue to partner with DOE and DLIR’s WDD to leverage resources and funding to provide employers with qualified employees. 5. The Annual Estimates section will be updated as recommended. 6. State Goals and Priorities - Pre-Employment Transition Services; Employer Engagement and Common Data Collection for Unified State Plan: More details will be included in description (l) on how DVR will accomplish the goals. 7. Order of Selection section has been updated. 8. Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title IV funds section will be reviewed and aligned with the goals and priorities as listed in description (l). DVR is very appreciative of the continuing working partnership with SRC to develop strategic elements of planning and achieving financial stability to ensure that we are focusing on the right targets and are proactive instead of reactive to ensure effectiveness. (Page 279 278 ) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

As a condition to the award of financial assistance from the Department of Labor under Title I of WIOA, the grant applicant assures that it has the ability to comply with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of the following laws and will remain in compliance for the duration of the award of federal financial assistance: • Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status and gender identity), national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship status or participation in any WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity; • Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the bases of race, color and national origin; • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, which prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities; • The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age; and • Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs. (Page 145) Title I

AJC partners will collaborate to develop policies, procedures, proven and promising practices, and templates to aid local boards in the AJC Certification process. Additional criteria will be developed by the core partners, customer representatives, additional partners and other key stakeholders, including job-seekers. Multiple avenues will be utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of AJC services including: • Development of a shared AJC Operations Manual • Monitoring checklist • Development of self-evaluation training, toolkit and ongoing guidance • A system for obtaining client feedback which is user-friendly, streamlined and accessible • Surveys will be accessible in multiple formats, provided in a variety of ways, and can be submitted anonymously - at no cost or inconvenience to the client. • Office Peer Review tool • Timely survey evaluation and dissemination to local programs • Dedicated Technical Assistance (TA) personnel available for on-site and remote TA. (Page 155) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) defines a person with a disability as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activity. Nearly 1 in 5 people have a disability in the U.S. About 56.7 million people — 19 percent of the population —with more than half of them reporting the disability was severe, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, 2010. (Page 174) Title II

Vets

Hawaii’s veterans will compete with non-veterans for the same jobs especially those that pay well, are full-time, and have good benefits. Veterans will leverage their military service, service-connected disability, VA educational benefits, and federal government regulations and statutes to gain hiring preference over non-veterans for jobs with the federal, state, local governments and with federal contractors. Any shortfalls in relevant credentials, transferrable skills, and work experience can be mitigated, in part, with veterans leveraging their Post 9-11 GI Bill Educational benefits. In Hawaii, eligible veterans can receive over $100,000 in Post 9-11 GI Bill financial aid to pursue a college degree or a vocational training credential. Hawaii employment opportunities will grow by 43,930 to 740,540 jobs from 2014 to 2024, averaging a modest growth of 0.6 percent annually. Service-providing industries (trade, transportation, and utilities; information; financial activities; professional and business services; education and health services; leisure and hospitality; other services; and government) will represent over 83 percent of the total workforce throughout the projection period, and will generate slightly more than four-fifths of the total job gains. The top four largest industries within this sector (education and health services; trade, transportation, and utilities; professional and business services; and leisure and hospitality) will provide 75 percent of the total statewide job gains. Government is the only industry projected to decline. (Page 60) Title I

…access to an array of formidable tools in the veterans’ transition tool kit. Military transitional services, employment, training and priority of services delivered by the American Job Centers, and U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs education programs will be integral components of a veteran’s tool kit. Veterans will leverage federal regulations that require American Job Centers and employment programs, funded in part by U.S. DOL, to serve veterans ahead of non-veterans; this rule is known as priority of service. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Labor funds the Hawaii Department of Labor’s Workforce Development Division, in part, with the Jobs for Veterans State Grant, to hire specialized and trained staffs, Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists and Local Veterans Employment Representatives, to serve veterans with significant barriers to employment and to reach out to employers to promote the hiring of veterans. (Page 61) Title I

• USDOL, Veterans Employment Training Services -- supports WDD Disabled Veterans Outreach Program counselors for employment planning, job counseling, and case management to address employment issues of veterans with service-connected disabilities or other significant barriers to employment; and WDD Local Veteran Employment Representatives to conduct continual outreach to businesses to promote hiring of veterans, and with human resource professionals, conduct job search workshops for veterans. • USDOL, Senior Community Services Employment Program—supports providers serving low-income residents 55 years and older with employment planning and assessments, part-time community service jobs, and job placement assistance; providers include Hawaii County Office on Aging, Honolulu Community Action Program, DHS, Maui Economic Opportunity, and Kauai Branch of WDD. • USDOL, Work Opportunity Tax Credit—supports processing employer requests for certifications of the Work Opportunity Tax Credit for certain eligible new hires (also funded by Wagner-Peyser) (Page 161) Title I

Participant performance in all Core Programs (WIOA Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth Programs; Wagner-Peyser programs, Adult Education, Vocational Rehabilitation), Disabled Veterans Outreach Program, Local Veterans Employment Representative, and Trade Adjustment Act will be measured through data stored in the PMIS. All staff users and their providers are responsible to accurately enter data into the PMIS in a timely manner. All quarterly and annual reports required by the federal government are generated from HireNet Hawaii data and electronically transmitted to the USDOL. DLIR extracts information on employment status and average earnings for all exiters from UI wage records. Local area staff and Core Partner staff also may enter supplementary information on jobs obtained by participants. At the end of each quarter and year, DLIR will transmit to each county and Core Partner their performance reports in the same format as the federal statewide report. Counties, Local Boards, and Core Partners will review their performance at least on a quarterly basis and take any necessary corrective actions to resolve deficiencies. Staff users can produce PMIS reports to assess and correct performance on an on-going basis. These reports, filtered by different criteria, dates, and target groups, enable staff to review different aspects of performance prior to or after outcomes are reported with the goal of continually improving performance. (Page 170) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist. The State shall ensure priority of service to veterans and eligible spouses in its program delivery and services that are directly funded in whole or part, by the Department of Labor, in accordance with all federal guidance letters and notices, including 20 CRF Part 1010, Employment and Training Administration’s Training and Employment Guidance Letter No. 10-09, and Training and Employment Notice 15-10. This applies to all services in the AJCs. Procedures are in place in each AJC office for staff to identify veterans and eligible spouses at every point of entry in the service delivery system. Staff at all levels of WDD operations and in AJCs have been trained in priority of service requirements. (Page 173) Title I

Staff shall refer individuals identified as VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE SPOUSES WITH SIGNIFICANT BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist for intensive service. If a DVOP specialist is not available, the client shall be referred to the AJC staff assigned to provide intensive service. In circumstances when it is not practical to refer a client to a DVOP for intensive service and to a Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER) for job development service, the local office/AJC manager shall designate appropriate staff to assist the client. Services received by the client shall be the same service he or she would receive if a DVOP and LVER were available. AJC Managers and WDD Managers shall periodically review the State policies and guidance for identifying and serving veterans with significant barriers to employment to ensure that staff continues to be aware of and continues implementing correct procedures for serving veterans with significant disabilities. State policies include Job Service Bulletin No. 01-15, Change 1, and its updates. (Page 173) Title I

Mental Health

~~Other Rapid Response topics, such as the following, will be included for group sessions, as appropriate:
• COBRA;
• Credit counseling and loan assistance;
• Grief/trauma counseling, or other mental health services;
• Housing assistance, and/or
• Social services provided by Community-Based Organizations.
Because of the breadth of topics covered during Rapid Response sessions, only those staff members who are experienced and knowledgeable will participate as presenters. Services for individuals, such as filing for UI (after layoff), registration in the PMIS, and applying for financial assistance may be provided immediately following group sessions, if workers need assistance for these services. Job fairs also will be scheduled, as appropriate, specifically for the laid-off workers in conjunction with, or shortly after Rapid Response sessions. In addition, job search workshops and literacy or skills training may be provided for the workers to prepare them for the job market prior to or shortly after layoff.
In addition to reacting to layoff notices, Rapid Response will include business service teams to expand the rapid response infrastructure in each local area so that Rapid Response becomes pro-active and on-going to serve businesses and their workers more effectively. (Page 198) Title IV

Outreach at the State Level: In collaborative partnership with other agencies, DVR administrative level staff serves on boards and councils to address joint responsibilities for provision of vocational services to eligible TAY. These partnerships include, but are not limited to: Special Education Advisory Council (SEAC), State Council on Developmental Disabilities, State Council on Mental Health, State Workforce Development Board, Services for the Blind Branch Advisory Council, and Deaf & Hard of Hearing Advisory Board. Outreach at the Local Level: As designated, DVR branch managers, section supervisors and VRS assist with identification of TAY who may be eligible for services. Between DVR and DOE, referrals for DVR services can occur at any time during the school year. DVR will maintain a presence and receive referrals of potential applicants at: transition fairs, job and career fairs, parent support groups, and forums hosted by high schools, organizations serving youth with disabilities and independent living skills training programs. DVR continues to identify opportunities to conduct outreach to potentially eligible and eligible students in need of pre-employment transition services and transition services. (Page 284) Title IV

The Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a grant through the US Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy that was first given to the Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) and turned over to the Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) for the final year will bring together various core partners. One of the two projects under EFSLMP is to develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, DDD, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from this larger core group. (Page 288) Title IV

Earlier in 2016, working arrangements between DVR and Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD) once again started. This specifically addresses clients involved in the clubhouse programs through AMHD and development of transitional employment opportunities for persons with significant mental health barriers. This was a program that had moderate success in the past and is hoped to achieve in greater success as the two agencies reignite the relationship. (Page 289) Title IV

Strategies for increasing percentage of program participants employed during the send and fourth quarter after exit: 1. Increase support services in postsecondary settings thereby increasing graduation rate. 2. Increase pre-employment transitions services to better prepare transitioning students with disabilities into the workforce. 3. Support the provision of summer youth employment for transitioning high school students as well as those in postsecondary training. 4. Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues. Temporary Employment Opportunities Paid and Unpaid Work Experience
Strategies to increase the median earning of program participants: 1. Assist in the development of Career Pathways based upon Hawaii’s labor market for individuals interested in postsecondary education or direct job placement or both. Identify Career Pathways and job opportunities that are specific to each county. (Page 317) Title IV

Complete agreement between DVR and Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD) for clients involved in the clubhouse programs through AMHD and development of transitional employment opportunities for persons with significant mental health barriers. This was a program that had moderate success in the past and is hoped to achieve in greater success as the two agencies reignite the relationship.
• Initiated in 2015 is an agreement between the DVR and the DOE to provide pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities. These are programs which counsels students in exploring vocational options, training in soft-skills and provides paid and unpaid work experience both on and off campus. One project in particular utilizes the general learning objectives developed by the DOE in providing the instructional material allowing students with disabilities to explore work within the visitor industry. After which students are placed into paid work experiences in a hotel. DVR and the DOE are looking to expand this project in the upcoming school year. (Page 320-321) Title IV

Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues.
o Temporary Employment Opportunities
o Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences
• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group. (Page 322) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

DVR does not use the Supported Employment model frequently for clients, and when it is used, the length of time the case is open after employment with Supported Employment services provided rarely has exceeded 90 days, even though Supported Employment services may be made available for a period of time not to exceed 24 months , unless under special circumstances the eligible individual and the rehabilitation counselor jointly agree to extend the time to achieve the employment outcome identified in the IPE.; • A large majority of DVR consumers receive SSA benefits and fear of benefit loss significantly affects their return-to-work choices and behaviors; • DVR’s relationship with the Developmental Disabilities Division is critical to the success and expansion of the SE program. The relationship has been improving in the last 18 months, which is viewed as a positive sign for the sustainability of high-quality Supported Employment services. (Page 295) Title IV Wagner-Peyser staff members, including LOMAs, are provide an array of Wagner-Peyser services, and either directly provide WIOA services, or at a minimum, provide information about WIOA services. They are also aware of the Job Service Complaint system and familiar with AJC services, including but not limited to, training programs and their referral procedures; Career Services such as labor market information, vocational counseling, and assessments; supportive services; and referrals to jobs. Because WDD staff works with other agencies, the staff members regularly make referrals to other resources such UI, TANF, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, temporary shelters, and services for the homeless population. As WDD is part of the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, which also contains the Disability Compensation (workers’ compensation) Division, and Wage Standards Division (wage standard enforcers), WDD staff will be able to refer farmworkers to these agencies as applicable. The LOMAs and AJC staff periodically meet with MEO, and know how they may refer MSFWs to MEO for more services. (Page 235-236) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 59

Proclamation: Apprenticeship week 2019 - 11/01/2019

“WHEREAS, apprenticeships are unique, long-term training programs that allow job seekers to learn specialized skills for various trades, combining classroom instruction with on-the-job training; and

WHEREAS, apprenticeship programs tap into a wider pool of talent, including people with disabilities, veterans, women and minorities…

THEREFORE I, DAVID Y. IGE, Governor, and I, JOSHUA B. GREEN, Lieutenant Governor of the State of Hawai'i, do hereby proclaim November 11-17, 2019 as "APPRENTICESHIP WEEK."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Apprenticeship
  • Veterans

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid Society Hawaii was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving consumers in the vulnerable and “left behind” populations, as well as those with limited English proficiency; consumers from the Compact of Free Association Countries; low income consumers; and geographically and culturally isolated consumers.   There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with the Compact of Free Association Countries (COFA), Consulate offices, local community groups such as: Churches, Health centers, Social service agencies, Women’s and homeless shelters, and Community center9/3/2019s. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Sergio Alcubilla Phone: (808) 527-8063Email: Sergio.alcubilla@legalaidhawaii.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

S.B. 1240 A BILL FOR AN ACT RELATING TO MEDICAID WAIVER - 06/29/2019

~~“Removes the sunset date of Act 21, Special Session Laws of Hawaii 2009, which requires the Department of Health to license home care agencies.  Adds exception for Medicaid waiver provider agencies providing services to Medicaid waiver participants”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Four-Year Area Plan on Aging - 06/04/2019

~~“Current statewide initiatives spearheaded by the Governor’s office include the expansion of the ADRC system to increase active collaboration with state agencies such as the Department of Human Services MedQUEST and Vocational Rehabilitation Divisions; the Department of Health Executive Office on Aging, Adult Mental Health Division, Developmental Disabilities Division, Disability and Communication Access Board, Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Language Access Advisory Council; the Hawaii Department of Defense Office of Veterans Services; and with community organizations and councils such as Centers for Independent Living. The goal of this collaborative effort is to build upon the ADRC Systems Change to create a No Wrong Door (NWD) System in the state. The NWD Initiative will enhance existing ADRC processes to expand assistance to all populations and payers in accessing long term services and supports, thereby making it easier for people of all ages, disabilities, and income levels to learn about and obtain the help they need. A reasonable expected outcome of the NWD Initiative also includes the removal of silos and the increase of integrated efforts among various State and local agencies that serve these populations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Individualized Education Program - 04/10/2019

~~ “An IEP is a written statement about the educational program for a child with a disability. It serves as a management tool used to ensure that the child receives the needed special education and related services. It also serves as an evaluation device when used to determine the extent of the child's progress toward accomplishing projected goals. The contents of an IEP are listed and available by accessing the web-link.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hawaii’s IDEA Part B Profile - 04/10/2019

~~“The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) has created an IDEA Part B Profile for Hawaii that provides a resource for IDEA-related, State-specific information. Hawai‘i's state profile includes:• the most recent State Performance Plan/Annual Performance Report (SPP/APR) and OSEP’s response;• the State’s determination letter;• the State’s Results Driven Accountability Matrix;• and the approved submission for the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP).OSEP will be adding additional information about the State in the future. Hawaii’s profile can be accessed here: https://osep.grads360.org/#report/apr/2016B/publicView?state=HI&ispublic=true ” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

REPORT IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 348-8(c), HAWAII REVISED STATUTE - 01/04/2019

~~“1. In June 2018, a reverse job fair was held at America’s Job Center at Dillingham on Oahu.  As a result of this successful event, employers requested another be held.2.In response to #1, in October 2018 the Employment First Hawaii sponsored an Empowering All Abilities Reverse Job Fair held at the State Capitol.  There were 54 students from various high schools prepared with resumes and display boards showing their abilities, interests and skills.  Employers met with those students who met their current hiring and future hiring need.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Report to the Governor in Accordance with the Provisions of Section 348-8(c), 'Special Education Agreement" - 01/04/2019

~~” DVR - Special Education Agreement and Transitional student services have been reviewed with updates to MOA between DVR and DOE in final review to support ongoing partnership for students to explore careers and work-based learning experiences.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Report to the Governor in Accordance with the Provisions of Section 348-8(c), "Pre-ETS Program" - 01/04/2019

~~“Through DVR’s Pre-ETS program, work experience is subsidized in the Summer Youth Employment Programs.  Leveraging funding among Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) formal/informal partners continues to be explored to enhance work-based learning experiences statewide.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

State of Hawaii Office of Veterans' Services - 01/01/2019

~~“List of Services for Veterans, Active Military, Spouses & Dependents

    Assist in preparation of VA claims;    Assist with burials of indigent veterans;    Employment and Re-employment;…;    Help individuals file VA Appeals;….”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Hawaii HB 119 - 07/01/2015

"It is the intent and purpose of the legislature to establish a qualified tax exempt savings program to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities pursuant to section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or successor legislation, and any regulations promulgated thereunder.  It is the further intent of the legislature that the program established by this Act be and remain in conformance with the Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act [ABLE] of 2014, Division B of Public Law No. 113-295"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

House Bill 860: Related to Persons with Disabilities - 01/28/2015

 “Establishes an employment first policy for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Requires the DOH to establish an employment first committee.” (Introduced in the Hawaii state legislature 1/28/15; sent to committees and status is pending.)

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Proclamation: Apprenticeship week 2019 - 11/01/2019

“WHEREAS, apprenticeships are unique, long-term training programs that allow job seekers to learn specialized skills for various trades, combining classroom instruction with on-the-job training; and

WHEREAS, apprenticeship programs tap into a wider pool of talent, including people with disabilities, veterans, women and minorities…

THEREFORE I, DAVID Y. IGE, Governor, and I, JOSHUA B. GREEN, Lieutenant Governor of the State of Hawai'i, do hereby proclaim November 11-17, 2019 as "APPRENTICESHIP WEEK."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Apprenticeship
  • Veterans

Day at the Capitol event highlights Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month in March - 03/08/2018

~~“A proclamation signing by Governor David Ige at 9 a.m. in the governor’s ceremonial room. Gov. Ige will proclaim March as Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month in Hawaii, urging all citizens to recognize the abilities and contributions of people with developmental disabilities and engage and encourage them in their endeavors. Participants from Maui, Molokai, Lanai, Kauai, and Kona will attend the proclamation signing.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Individualized Education Program - 04/10/2019

~~ “An IEP is a written statement about the educational program for a child with a disability. It serves as a management tool used to ensure that the child receives the needed special education and related services. It also serves as an evaluation device when used to determine the extent of the child's progress toward accomplishing projected goals. The contents of an IEP are listed and available by accessing the web-link.” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hawaii’s IDEA Part B Profile - 04/10/2019

~~“The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) has created an IDEA Part B Profile for Hawaii that provides a resource for IDEA-related, State-specific information. Hawai‘i's state profile includes:• the most recent State Performance Plan/Annual Performance Report (SPP/APR) and OSEP’s response;• the State’s determination letter;• the State’s Results Driven Accountability Matrix;• and the approved submission for the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP).OSEP will be adding additional information about the State in the future. Hawaii’s profile can be accessed here: https://osep.grads360.org/#report/apr/2016B/publicView?state=HI&ispublic=true ” 

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

State of Hawaii Office of Veterans' Services - 01/01/2019

~~“List of Services for Veterans, Active Military, Spouses & Dependents

    Assist in preparation of VA claims;    Assist with burials of indigent veterans;    Employment and Re-employment;…;    Help individuals file VA Appeals;….”

Systems
  • Other

Employment First - 07/20/2018

~~The Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities believes that all people, regardless of disability, should have the opportunity to work and recognizes that individuals with I/DD achieve successful employment outcomes when:•They are empowered to drive their job search process;•They have access to services and supports; and•They are given the opportunity to engage in a Customized Employment

In 2017 Governor David Y. Ige signed a Proclamation identifying October as Disability Employment Awareness month, and endorsed Hawai’i’s designation as an Employment First state.  In this proclamation, Governor Ige encouraged all citizens of the Aloha State to fully participate in the workforce and bring their individual strengths and talents to augment Hawai’i’s business and industry.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
Citations

Medicaid I/DD Waiver - 07/20/2018

~~“Medicaid is a jointly funded, Federal-State health insurance program for people with limited income and resources who meet eligibility requirements.  The Medicaid 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) is authorized under Section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act.  These services are designed to implement creative person-centered alternatives to long-term institutionalized care.

Quest Hawaii: More Choices for Your Healthcare

Hawaii’s state Medicaid program is called Med-QUEST. It is administered by the Department of Human Services, Med-QUEST Division (MQD), and is financed through the State of Hawai‘i and the Federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). MQD works in partnership with DDD and stakeholders to design a waiver that meets the needs of Hawai‘i residents with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (I/DD). MQD and DDD ensure the waiver is implemented in compliance with all waiver requirements, federal and state laws, and waiver standards.

Individuals who are eligible for DDD services, are Medicaid eligible, and meet the level of care criteria can apply for the Medicaid I/DD Waiver.  Services and supports are identified through a person-centered planning process with case managers who coordinate and assist individuals in accessing waiver services from qualified providers or through the Consumer-Directed (CD) Option.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Employment Services and Supports - 07/20/2018

~~This page has information on the following services and supports:Discovery and Career PlanningBenefits CounselingHawaii Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (WIPA)Individual Employment Supports•Job Development•Job Coaching 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WorkHawaii Ticket to Work - 04/06/2018

~~“American Job Center Hawaii is an employment network that provides assistance to persons with disabilities who are receiving Social Security benefits with the intent to obtain employment through our supportive services, which includes career and benefits planning; job development through work readiness and skills workshops; resume building and cover letter writing; and job search assistance to return to work.  Phone: (808)768-5720”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Report to the Twenty-Ninth Legislature State of Hawaii 2018 on Long Term Adult Supports and Resources - 12/30/2017

~~“Long Term Adult Supports and Resources (LASR)This program provides supports for individuals who are eligible for DDD but not eligible for Medicaid services under the I/DD Waiver, or do not choose to receive Waiver services.  The LASR Program assists individuals with I/DD and families to increase independence and interdependence in daily life activities.  The LASR program services include but are not limited to: discovery and career planning, volunteer work, senior activities (if applicable), competitive, integrated employment opportunities, activities to increase skills necessary to perform typical daily activities, activities to increase and strengthen social roles, building communications skills with members of the community, developing friendships and relationships with community members, and practicing skills in activities of daily living.

There was no waitlist for the LASR program during FY 2017. There were 83 individuals served by the LASR program with an expenditure of $720,231 from state general funds.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Hawaii Uniform Application FY 2018/2019 – State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Community Mental Health Services Block Grant - 08/29/2017

~~“The Clubhouse Model seeks to demonstrate that people with mental illness can successfully live productive lives and work in the community, regardless of the nature or severity of their mental illness. Clubhouse services include Transitional Employment (TE), Group Transitional Employment (GTE), Supported Employment (SE), Supported Education (SE), Advocacy and Case Management”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

HAWAII RESIDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CELEBRATE 30 YEARS OF SELF-DETERMINATION AT “DAY AT THE CAPITOL" - 03/16/2017

~~“Today, Hawaii is one of nine states that does  not have a waiting list for home and community based services. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes. Currently, 99 percent of people served by the Department of Health’s Developmental Disabilities Division live in residences serving one to six people, and 61 percent in settings with one to three people. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes.

By law, the Department of Health is mandated to develop, lead, administer, coordinate, monitor, evaluate, and set direction for a comprehensive system of supports and services for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Current services include: personal assistance/habilitation, emergency services, respite, employment supports, chore, training and consultation, specialized medical equipment, adult day health, skilled nursing, environmental accessibility and vehicular modifications, assistive technology, personal emergency response systems and non-medical transportation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Four-Year Area Plan on Aging - 06/04/2019

~~“Current statewide initiatives spearheaded by the Governor’s office include the expansion of the ADRC system to increase active collaboration with state agencies such as the Department of Human Services MedQUEST and Vocational Rehabilitation Divisions; the Department of Health Executive Office on Aging, Adult Mental Health Division, Developmental Disabilities Division, Disability and Communication Access Board, Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities, and the Language Access Advisory Council; the Hawaii Department of Defense Office of Veterans Services; and with community organizations and councils such as Centers for Independent Living. The goal of this collaborative effort is to build upon the ADRC Systems Change to create a No Wrong Door (NWD) System in the state. The NWD Initiative will enhance existing ADRC processes to expand assistance to all populations and payers in accessing long term services and supports, thereby making it easier for people of all ages, disabilities, and income levels to learn about and obtain the help they need. A reasonable expected outcome of the NWD Initiative also includes the removal of silos and the increase of integrated efforts among various State and local agencies that serve these populations.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Report to the Governor in Accordance with the Provisions of Section 348-8(c), 'Special Education Agreement" - 01/04/2019

~~” DVR - Special Education Agreement and Transitional student services have been reviewed with updates to MOA between DVR and DOE in final review to support ongoing partnership for students to explore careers and work-based learning experiences.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Report to the Governor in Accordance with the Provisions of Section 348-8(c), "Pre-ETS Program" - 01/04/2019

~~“Through DVR’s Pre-ETS program, work experience is subsidized in the Summer Youth Employment Programs.  Leveraging funding among Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) formal/informal partners continues to be explored to enhance work-based learning experiences statewide.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Hawaii Disability Rights Center “Employment” - 11/30/2018

~~The rights of persons with disabilities were reaffirmed as follows: “People with disabilities have the right to freedom from discrimination in:

Being employed, provided reasonable accommodation in training for a job or in the workplace, the opportunity for career advancement, termination of supported or sheltered employment for placement in competitive, integrated employment at fair wages.

People with disabilities have the right to assistance to resolve problems or issues arising from programs or services funded under the Rehabilitation Act.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

*UPDATED* Supported Employment Services for VR Consumers - 07/04/2017

~~This is a call for bids for a program that will “Provide supported employment (SE) services to individuals with disabilities, both physical and mental. Individualized services are to be provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with the consumer’s strengths, resources, priortiespriorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice.  The contract term will be from October 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019 with four (4) additional 12-month option periods.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division - Strategic Plan 2015-2017 Progress Report - 09/23/2015

“The Strategic Plan was adopted on December 2014. In the ensuing months Team Leaders have been convening meetings with advocates, providers, partners, and Division staff to plan specific activities for attaining goals and objectives of the Strategic Plan. Teams have also developed performance measures to track progress and measure results.” Goal number 3 outlines that “DDD will ensure individuals with I/DD have opportunities to seek employment and achieve personal outcomes to work in competitive integrated settings.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Full Life Sponsors Disability Legislative Forum

EHDDC to host the 2016 East Hawaii Disability Legislative Forum “You cannot have Inclusion without Us” Full Life is sponsoring both East and West Hawai’i Island Disability Legislative Forums! The public, especially family members and persons with disabilities, are invited to come and meet Hawaii Island’s State legislators and County officials. These free events will feature a forum where policymakers will answer questions about disability-related issues such as employment, housing, transportation, and health. Special activities include the opportunities to express your opinion on topics important to you and to meet and talk story with State legislators and County officials. Provider agencies have prepared booths with information about many available services and supports.

Systems
  • Other

Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities

~~“The Council is responsible to engage in advocacy , capacity-building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the policy in the federal law; and contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered and consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system that includes needed community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that promote self-determination for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

The Council carries out its responsibilities through policy development, implementation and analysis; researching and promoting new approaches and best practices to services and supports; educating and informing policymakers and the public about developmental disabilities; developing and supporting coalitions; fostering interagency collaboration and coordination; providing training in leadership development and legislative advocacy; and eliminating barriers and enhancing design and redesign of systems.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hire Abilities Hawai'i

“Hire Abilities Hawaii represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`’ College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council.“

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

DLIR NEWS RELEASE: State awarded $2.25 million for youth disability workforce development - 10/16/2017

~~"Hawaii Youth At Work! Program Expands to Year AroundThe Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) was awarded $2.25 million in federal funds to help prepare youth with disabilities to enter the workforce or post-secondary education. The funding enables Hawaii Youth At Work! summer participants to obtain paid work experience during the year, coupled with employment preparation activities….

The program is a collaboration between the Department of Human Services (DHS) and DLIR. DHS’s Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), Benefit, Employment and Support Services Division, and Social Services Division counselors and staff work with DLIR workforce staff to place participants in temporary jobs with the State and Counties…..

In 2016, the Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP) provided 153 youth with disabilities paid work experience in State and County offices on the islands of Oahu, Maui, Molokai, Lanai and Hawaii. Youth were paid $10.00 an hour and worked up to twenty hours per week during the summer months. SYEP 2017 expanded referrals to include youth participants from the DHS’s Benefit, Employment and Support Services Division and Social Services Division in addition to VR. 125 participants were placed in State and City offices on the islands of Oahu, Maui, Molokai, Lanai and Hawaii.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii DEI - Round 6 Grant Abstracts - 11/01/2015

The U.S. Department of Labor awarded Hawaii a Round 6 DEI grant to improve employment opportunities for youth and/or adults with disabilities. “HIDEI [Hawaii DEI] will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and build upon the promising practices of the HIDEI 2 [Round 2] project to incorporate career pathways into its service to individuals with significant disabilities to better prepare participants to obtain meaningful employment and achieve self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii DEI - Round 2 Grants - 11/01/2015

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2010, Hawaii was awarded a Round 1 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The Round 1 grant ended in 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Hawaii Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“In 2006, Hawaii received a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, known as Hire Abilities Hawaii, ran from 2006 to 2009. It was authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. MIG provided funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that built supports for people with disabilities seeking employment. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. The Hire Abilities website grew out of these goals and objectives.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid Society Hawaii was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving consumers in the vulnerable and “left behind” populations, as well as those with limited English proficiency; consumers from the Compact of Free Association Countries; low income consumers; and geographically and culturally isolated consumers.   There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations.  They will partner with the Compact of Free Association Countries (COFA), Consulate offices, local community groups such as: Churches, Health centers, Social service agencies, Women’s and homeless shelters, and Community center9/3/2019s. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Sergio Alcubilla Phone: (808) 527-8063Email: Sergio.alcubilla@legalaidhawaii.org” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

REPORT IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 348-8(c), HAWAII REVISED STATUTE - 01/04/2019

~~“1. In June 2018, a reverse job fair was held at America’s Job Center at Dillingham on Oahu.  As a result of this successful event, employers requested another be held.2.In response to #1, in October 2018 the Employment First Hawaii sponsored an Empowering All Abilities Reverse Job Fair held at the State Capitol.  There were 54 students from various high schools prepared with resumes and display boards showing their abilities, interests and skills.  Employers met with those students who met their current hiring and future hiring need.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

RealChoices Hawaii - Guide to Employment for Job Seekers - 01/22/2016

This guide to employment for people with disabilities provides information and additional links on job centers, employment for seniors and employment for youth.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Hawaii’s Disability Employment Initiative

~~“Hawaii’s DEI will focus its effort on the following strategies:•Increase American Job Center (AJC) staff competencies through training on Disability 101, Customized Employment, Career Pathway Systems, Job Accommodation, Asset Development, Individualized Learning Plans, and Disability Benefits Planning.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maui Youth and Family Services, Inc

~~“MYFS was established in 1978 by Maui County as the Maunaolu Youth Residential Shelter to provide a safe place for Maui’s homeless, abused and runaway children. Incorporated as a private non-profit agency in 1982, MYFS has expanded to include a range of behavioral and mental health programs to support young people and their families’ personal growth and emotional stability.Maui Youth and Family Services is accredited by CARF, the Commission on the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.”

Systems
  • Other

Hawaii Employers Council In-house Training

As a service exclusively for members, any or all of the Fundamentals of Supervision workshops can be brought to your company’s site or held at the HEC training room. The content of these workshops can be designed to fit your company’s unique culture and tailored to highlight issues that are important to your workplace. The workshops combine lectures, videos and case studies, with longer sessions including role-play exercises. We will use your company's forms, policies and procedures to the extent possible. In addition what is presented in the Fundamentals of Supervision Workshops, the following topics are also available for in-house programs: -ABCs of Collective Bargaining -Americans with Disabilities Act -Effective Employee Relations: Remaining Union Free -Family and Medical Leave Act (for members with 50 or more employees) -Preparing for Unemployment Appeals Hearings -Preventive Discipline for Unionized Work Groups

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - Customized Employment Videos

“These Customized Employment (CE) videos, each specifically focused on Employers, Youth, or a General audience, highlight the benefits of CE, an employment strategy which matches the skills and preferences of the individual with the specific business needs of the employer. This process results in expanded employment opportunities for those who utilize and engage in this innovative, evidenced-based approach to employment. The General audience video has been created in both English and Spanish.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

HireAbilities Hawai'i

This website is intended to provide resources to support employment for individuals with disabilities. It is intended to be used by job seekers with disabilities, service providers, agencies and businesses. This site was revamped December 2013 and now has many new features and content. Some major additions to the website include: -The Benefits Finder can search for eligibility and work incentive information for Hawaii’s state and federal disability programs. -Use our Resource Finder to search a database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. -Learn more about how Hawaii’s proposed Medicaid Buy-In Program could help workers with a disability who require Medicaid . Hire Abilities Hawaii is a comprehensive database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. It represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`i College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council. Originally started through a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - "What is Customized Employment?"

This brief article defines customized employment and outlines the case for using it with job seekers with disabilities. It outlines the different forms customized employment can take, including "task reassignment," "job carving," and "job negotiation."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 17

S.B. 1240 A BILL FOR AN ACT RELATING TO MEDICAID WAIVER - 06/29/2019

~~“Removes the sunset date of Act 21, Special Session Laws of Hawaii 2009, which requires the Department of Health to license home care agencies.  Adds exception for Medicaid waiver provider agencies providing services to Medicaid waiver participants”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

WAIVER PROVIDER STANDARDS MANUAL Version B-3 - 11/02/2018

~~“Remediation for HCBS Final Rule (79 FR 2947) on Community Integration Through its process of validation and monitoring of Providers, DOH-DDD will ensure that settings meet HCBS final rule requirements by maximizing opportunities for participants to have access to the benefits of community living and opportunities to receive services in the most integrated setting.a. Setting requirements include but are not limited to the following: 1)The setting is integrated in and supports access to the greater community;2)The setting provides opportunities to seek employment and work in competitive integrated settings if Discovery and Career Planning and Individual Employment Supports services are part of the Provider’s service array; 3)The setting provides opportunities to engage in community life, and control personal resources; and4)The setting ensures the participant receives services in the community to the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid I/DD Waiver.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Updated Medicaid Waiver Provider Standards For Individuals With Intellectual And Developmental Disabilities - 10/19/2018

~~“The Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Division, has issued the updated Medicaid Waiver Provider Standards for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (Medicaid I/DD Waiver), Version B-3. The Standards reflect changes based on the CMS-Approved I/DD Waiver Amendment #2 and are effective in November 2018.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

QUEST Integration §1115 Waiver Renewal Application - 07/27/2018

~~Pursuant to Section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act, the State of Hawai‘i, Department of Human Services (the State) is seeking a five-year renewal of the QUEST Integration Section 1115 demonstration project from CMS. Absent a renewal, the demonstration will expire on December 31, 2018.For nearly two decades, the demonstration has efficiently and effectively delivered comprehensive benefits to a large number of beneficiaries, including expansion populations, through a competitive managed care delivery system. Under the renewal, “QUEST Integration” (QI) will continue to build on this success by delivering services through managed care, while integrating the demonstration’s programs and benefits to have a more patient-centered care delivery.All eligible beneficiaries will continue to be enrolled under QUEST Integration, and access to services will be determined by clinical criteria and medical necessity. The renewal will continue to incorporate the simplified Medicaid eligibility structure under the ACA into the demonstration. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid I/DD Waiver Providers - 07/19/2018

~~Services are provided through the Medicaid 1915(c) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Waiver, for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (Medicaid I/DD Waiver). The purpose of the Medicaid I/DD Waiver is to support people to have a full life in the community.

Life Course Tools Diagram

Services and supports are identified through a person-centered planning process with case managers to develop the Individualized Service Plan (ISP) with the individual’s desired outcomes and goals. The case manager assists the individual and family in accessing these services from qualified Medicaid I/DD Waiver providers chosen by the individual.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR SECTION 1115(a) RENEWAL OF HAWAII’S SECTION 1115 DEMONSTRATION (11-W-00001/9) - 03/02/2018

~~“The State of Hawaii, Department of Human Services (the State), hereby notifies the public that it intends to seek a five-year renewal of its Section 1115 Demonstration from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).  This renewal, which will be effective January 1, 2019, will be entitled “QUEST Integration.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Standards Manual Version B – Draft Pending DHS-MQD Approval - 03/01/2018

~"The Waiver Standards Manual Version B includes services that the participant may receive after their Individualized Service Plan (ISP) meeting is held during Year 1 of the phase-in (July 1,2017 through June 30, 2018). Waiver Standards Manual Version B is the manual that includes services available to participants as they transition to new services, fee schedules and billing codes based on their date of ISP and their cohort group. By the end of fiscal year 2018, Standards A will be sunset and Standards B will be in use for the Medicaid I/DD Waiver."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawai’i Behavioral Health Employment Services - 02/21/2018

~~“Under the guidance of the My Choice My Way plan, Hawaii Behavioral Health works with The Department of Health, and other stakeholders, on providing employment services to qualified participants. Our goal is to help participants attain competitive, integrated employment. We believe that all individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities have the capacity to find their life’s work.

Discovery and Career Planning (DCP)During the Discovery and Career Planning Program (DCP), Hawaii Behavioral Health works with participants to explore their strengths, abilities, and interests. Our DCP services are designed to help participants explore future careers, build their skills, and realize their talents. Once participants are ready to enter the employment market, HBH transitions them into Individual Employment Supports.

Individual Employment Supports (IES)Hawaii Behavioral Health’s Individual Employment Supports Program (IES) works with all stakeholders, while helping participants access and maintain employment in the community. HBH consults with employers, discovering their business needs, and finding mutually-beneficial employment opportunities for our participants. HBH also continues to develop our participants, providing person-centered employment planning, job coaching, and problem solving.Available on Oahu, and the Big Island”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Resource Leveraging

Hawai'i Medicaid State Plan and Demonstration - 02/15/2018

~~“The Hawaiʻi Medicaid State Plan is an agreement between Hawaii and the Federal government describing how that Hawaiʻi administers its Medicaid programs.  Department of Human Services is the single State agency designated to administer the Medicaid program under Title XIX of the Social Security Act.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for a 1915(c) HCBS Waiver: - 12/21/2017

~~“The State of Hawaii requests approval of an amendment to the following Medicaid home and community based services waiver approved under authority of  1915© of the Social Security Act.Program Title: HCB Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD WaiverWaiver Name: HI.0013Amendment Number:Proposed Effective Date 06/01/18Approved Effective Date of Waiver being amended: 07/01/16Purpose(s) of the Amendment:This is a technical amendment to address items that were enot included in the waiver renewal approved effective July 1, 2016 and the amendment approved effective June 1, 2017. The amendment will add services mixes   and supports budgets to enable participants to have choice, flexibility and control over their services. The amendment also adds a new service, phases-out one service and clarifies language in several services.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

Disability is a respected part of diversity in the Rainbow State of Hawaii, where employees with disabilities are saying "Aloha" to new job opportunities across the state. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Hawaii's VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
-0.5%
Change from
2017 to 2018
1,420,491
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
10.38%
Change from
2017 to 2018
66,355
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
10.37%
Change from
2017 to 2018
28,503
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
0%
Change from
2017 to 2018
42.96%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.65%
Change from
2017 to 2018
80.12%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 1,420,491
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 66,355
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 28,503
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 594,407
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 42.96%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.12%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 13.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.40%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 80,714
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 77,647
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 43,150
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 2,464
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 10,888
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 927
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 61,806
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 18,520
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 30,487
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 1,007

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 823
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 21,165

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 242
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 742
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 1,508
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 16.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.70%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 9
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 435
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 32
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,587
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 10
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 4
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 40.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.28

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,257
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 36,162
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $453,960
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $19,586,588
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $15,477,471
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,443
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,432
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 2.74

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 40.63%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 18.94%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.11%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 64.62%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 35.17%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 85.69%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 93.05%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 50.52%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 448,452
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 607
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 268
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 268
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,228,248

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 67
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 67

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~o Align policies and funding streams across education, workforce, and economic development systems and all levels of government to focus public resources on the training that moves workers into industries with high-quality jobs that lead to better financial outcomes and longer job tenures for workers.
o Take an active role in the development of the “common pathways” for both individuals who desire to pursue secondary education AND for individuals who do not desire to pursue secondary education but desire to learn employment skills through work experience and/or on-the-job training.
o Coordinate a “common” work assessment process between core partners.
o Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff. (Page 110) Title 1

In preparation for WIOA implementation, State-level Partners met regularly for about a year to learn about services provided by each Core Partner (and other Partners), convened joint meetings among Partner stakeholders, and determined how participant data would be shared and tracked through Core Programs. As much as possible during this preparation period, Core Partners were added as key agencies in programs such as DLIR’s Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI), DVR’s Student Transition Employment Program, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) led by DVR, and the American Apprenticeship Initiative Grant led by DLIR. Since then, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) was led by the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and the collaboration continues among agencies serving persons with disabilities. (Page 121) Title 1

Contributing to a more integrated service strategy is the partnership building created by the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a technical assistance grant provided by DOL Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) to increase employment of persons with disabilities. EFSLMP is truly a partnership effort currently led by the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, with Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Council, DLIR Workforce Development Division, Department of Human Services MedQuest Division, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and Department of Education. A Cooperative Agreement is being developed among partners to
formalize cooperative working arrangements and a series of technical assistance and training have been provided to the partners and AJCs by subject matter experts. (Page 130-131) Title I

In addition, underserved populations such as persons with disabilities and offenders will be targeted to expand the job seeker pool. Capacity building obtained through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program and Disability Employment Initiative will enable more staff, in coordination with Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health, and other partners, to assist employers in employing persons with disabilities. These services include customizing employment for individuals with significant barriers to employment. This employment option, combined with federal and state tax credits, will increase the incentives for employers, including federal contractors, to hire persons with disabilities. To assist ex-offenders, the experience and skills obtained through staff’s provision of services to inmates and parolees through a contract with State Department of Public Safety and the partnerships built for this effort will facilitate services to this group. (Page 157) Title I

Wagner-Peyser and leveraged funds will be used for staff training that will increase their capability to deliver high-quality services to both employers and job seekers. For example, Career and Technical Education resources were recently accessed to train AJC staff on all counties in the areas of business services and conflict resolution; and Work Keys assessment tools and training were purchased from different funding sources to increase assessment and training capabilities with corresponding staff training.
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 225-226) Title IV

DVR has implemented evidence-based practices and innovative strategies for addressing key challenges to strengthen employer engagement, including: streamlined employer outreach activities; customization of employer engagement; job development and job negotiation tailored to the unique business needs of each individual employer; and dissemination of technological tools for improving the direct relationship between the employee and the employer.
To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of non-duplicative resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities.
DVR has engaged in the following activities in order to create sustainable employment service models over time. (Page 287) Title IV

The Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a grant through the US Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy that was first given to the Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) and turned over to the Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) for the final year will bring together various core partners. One of the two projects under EFSLMP is to develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, DDD, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from this larger core group. (Page 288) Title IV

Results from the CSNA indicate a need for more CRP’s on neighboring islands which include Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and Kauai. Employment, transportation and housing were identified on the neighbor islands as needed. CRP’s and other entities need to collaborate and communicate with each other to establish a foundation that consumers can rely on. Additionally, CRP’s must embrace the "Employment first" philosophy and move from sheltered employment to competitive integrated employment. (Page 297) Title IV

Goal 2.1 Annually increase the percentage of individuals with most significant disabilities who during a program year participate in work-based learning experiences and internships (by a minimum rate of 1%);
Goal 2.2 Annually increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities in competitive integrated employment during the fourth quarter after exit (by a minimum rate of 1%)
Goal 2.3 Annually increase the percentage of employers providing customized employment to individuals with most significant disabilities. Customized employment means, in general, competitive integrated employment designed to meet both the specific abilities of the individual with a most significant disability and the business needs of an employer (by a minimum rate of 1%). (Page 304) Title IV

Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule): 1. Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes. 2. Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain: 1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. 2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. (Page 318) Title IV

The factors that contributed to our ability to increase the number of individuals that received SE services was our participation in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, (EFSLMP). This program introduced our counseling and employment staff to the customized employment model which supports the long term supports of SE services.
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2017: 108 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services; FY 2016: 70 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. (Page 325) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~3. To develop sector strategies and a career pathways system that will integrate education and training, and move skilled jobseekers into growth industries.
o Use economic data, industry clusters and industry resources to determine growth industries and the skill needs of industries and employers.
o Establish and maintain sector initiatives that facilitate ongoing dialogue between government, employers and other key stakeholders to increase understanding of growth industry needs, foster learning between related businesses and coordinate use of information and resources to formulate and implement effective workforce solutions that meet the skill, recruitment, and retention needs of employers and the training, employment, and career advancement needs of workers.
o Align policies and funding streams across education, workforce, and economic development systems and all levels of government to focus public resources on the training that moves workers into industries with high-quality jobs that lead to better financial outcomes and longer job tenures for workers.
o Take an active role in the development of the “common pathways” for both individuals who desire to pursue secondary education AND for individuals who do not desire to pursue secondary education but desire to learn employment skills through work experience and/or on-the-job training.
o Coordinate a “common” work assessment process between core partners.
o Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff. (Page 110) Title 1

Goal 2.2 Annually increase the number of individuals with most significant disabilities in competitive integrated employment during the fourth quarter after exit (by a minimum rate of 1%)
Goal 2.3 Annually increase the percentage of employers providing customized employment to individuals with most significant disabilities. Customized employment means, in general, competitive integrated employment designed to meet both the specific abilities of the individual with a most significant disability and the business needs of an employer (by a minimum rate of 1%). (Page 304) Title IV

Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain: 1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program. 2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes.
Strategies to cultivate VR’s effectiveness in serving employers: Developing successful partnerships with local and multi-state businesses in an effort to increase the employment of individuals with disabilities and self-employment. Services include, but not limited to: 1. Train employers on compliance the title I of the American with Disability Act (ADA) of 1990 and other employment-related laws. 2. Inform employers of the existence of the program and availability of services. 3. Educate and provide services to employers who have hired or are interested in hiring individuals with disabilities. 4. Provide training and technical assistance to employers regarding disability awareness. 5. Working with employers to provide opportunities for work-based learning experiences and opportunities. for PRE-ETS services. 6. Train employees who are individuals with disabilities. (Page 318) Title IV

• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Conduct outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, and develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 322) Title IV

Priority 1: Increase the number of clients receiving SE services. Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals that receive SE services. FY 2017: 325 FY: 304 FY 2015: 57 individuals received SE services. FY 2014: 53 individuals received SE services. FY 2013: 98 individuals received SE services.
The factors that contributed to our ability to increase the number of individuals that received SE services was our participation in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, (EFSLMP). This program introduced our counseling and employment staff to the customized employment model which supports the long term supports of SE services.
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. (Page 325) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~PRE-ETS Goals: DVR/WDD/DOE strategies for leveraging resources and funding include; DVR working/contracting with the Core Partners to leverage resources and funding for the provision of job exploration counseling and placement and case management services. Specifically, WDD has agreed to leverage resources and funding from other programs (e.g. a Disability Employment Initiative grant) to the maximum extent possible, to provide individualized services such as job coaching, uniforms, transportation to and from work-based learning sites, safety equipment or assistive technology to participating Pre-ETS students. WDD will partner with Adult Education to provide the workplace readiness training to DVR’s Pre-ETS students in preparation for successful attainment of the work-based learning skills.

DVR is participating and in support of the American Job Center’s One-Stop Single Sign-On registration system to increase access to the services of DOE’s Adult Education, the Workforce Development Division, and other partners for DVR clients on the deferred list to meet their training and job placement needs. (Page 303) Title VI
 

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~For example, the Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI) program awarded to DLIR in 2015 includes as a goal increasing the number of Business Leadership Networks, which are business-driven groups of employers committed toward promoting the hiring of persons with disabilities. A major partner in DEI is DVR and their providers, and WIOA AJC staff members are the primary recipients of capacity building to serve persons with significant disabilities. Another DEI goal is developing an interagency group of providers with the AJCs for a more coordinated referral system among providers and for more integration of business engagement activities among providers. Adult Education will be part of this group with other partners. Approaching employers and Business Leadership Networks (BLN) in a coordinated manner that represents all agencies is more professional, useful, and productive than each agency operating in its own silo with employers. A coordinated approach also enables providers to offer a fuller array of services as different options to meet different situations. (Page 121) Title I

Although DEI focuses on a specific group of individuals, the successes of the coordinated service strategies is a model for a broader population. (DEI, Round II, was conducted only on the Counties of Hawaii and Maui, and the successful collaboration with employers and providers was the stepping stone for DEI Round VI statewide.) Experience showed that building trust among agencies took time and a disciplined commitment to regular meetings. It also required the lead agency and its contractor, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, to develop meeting agenda, contact agencies for meetings, and include actions relevant to the providers. Similar factors were critical to sustain business interest in participating on the Business Leadership Networks.
Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of AJC staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 122) Title I

The Employer Engagement Committee of the Council is developing a business services framework plan that will coordinate business services of the AJC partner network and will improve the quality of services provided by the system to employers; meet the needs of employers; and meet the effectiveness in serving employers goals of the State.
The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), Round VI, also will help facilitate a coordinated approach with employers among agencies serving persons with disabilities. This approach was very successful on Hawaii County where DEI Round II was carried out. Lessons learned from that experience, including the time it took to build trust and break barriers, helps inform DEI Round VI, which will be implemented Statewide.  (Page 130) Title I

Each self-service resource room located in the AJCs features a minimum of one accessible computer terminal equipped with assistive technology software designed to increase accessibility to all AJC customers, including individuals with multiple challenges and individuals with disabilities. Where needed in the AJCs, assistive technology has been or will be purchased under the Disability Employment Initiative Grants.
The technical assistance provided to Core Partners and AJCs from Employment First State Leadership Mentoring (EFSLMP) projects enabled the creation of interagency teams called Workforce Solutions to collaboratively plan and implement statewide efforts to serve persons with disabilities more effectively. The interagency teams include DVR, Department of Health, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, WDD, and AJCs. A series of training sessions for partner agencies were arranged under EFSLMP to build their capacity for serving persons with disabilities. The training continues under DEI Round VI for Hawaii and Maui; and they will be provided under DEI Round VIII statewide. (Page 175) Title I

As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by itsprovision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 225-226) Title V

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~It is clear from the interviews and the survey results that students and youth with disabilities in Hawaii have a need to receive pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) as identified in the Reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act in WIOA. These services include:
1. Job exploration counseling;
2. Work-based learning experiences;
3. Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs at institutions of higher education;
4. Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living (often referred to as soft skills); and
5. Instruction in self-advocacy, which may include peer mentoring
Each of these Pre-ETS services was noted as a need on a recurring basis when discussing the needs of students and youth in Hawaii.
The Rehabilitation Act as reauthorized in WIOA also indicates that the following authorized services can be provided if funds remain after the provision of the five required services noted above:
1. Implementing effective strategies to increase the likelihood of independent living and inclusion in communities and competitive integrated workplaces;
2. Developing and improving strategies for individuals with intellectual disabilities and individuals with significant disabilities to live independently, participate in postsecondary education experiences, and obtain and retain competitive integrated employment;
3. Providing instruction to vocational rehabilitation counselors, school transition personnel, and other persons supporting students and youth with disabilities;
4. Disseminating information about innovative, effective, and efficient approaches to achieve the goals of this section;
5. Coordinating activities with transition services provided by local educational agencies under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.);
6. Applying evidence-based findings to improve policy, procedure, practice, and the preparation of personnel, in order to better achieve the goals of this section;
7. Developing model transition demonstration projects;
8. Establishing or supporting multistate or regional partnerships involving States, local educational agencies, designated State units, developmental disability agencies, private businesses, or other participants to achieve the goals of this section; and
9. Disseminating information and strategies to improve the transition to postsecondary activities of individuals who are members of traditionally unserved populations. (Page 77) Title I

DVR can assist a VR eligible individual with only those activities that are included in their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). All activities that are required for a VR eligible individual to prepare, obtain, maintain/regain employment (of their informed choice) will be listed on their IPE. If an activity that is required, is identified after the IPE is completed, then the VR eligible individual and the VR counselor, in agreement, can amend the IPE to include the activity and make any other changes as determined to be necessary to obtain employment. DVR and the Core partners are working on MOA’s which details the responsibilities of each partner which will help in the management and avoid duplication among these activities. In so far as duplication of activities by other optional AJC partners, VR would have minimal involvement as those services would not be listed on the IPE since those services would not be necessary for the VR eligible individual to obtain employment. (Page 123-124) Title I

The DLIR Director, along with the Superintendent of Education and the University of Hawaii President, is a voting member of the P-20 Statewide Longitudinal Data System (aka Data Exchange Partnership or DXP) Executive Committee. The Workforce Development Council Executive Director is an attending member of the Executive Committee. WDC staff are members of the DXP’s Data Governance and Access Committee (formerly known as the Steering Committee) and the Research and Data Request Sub-Committee.
In support of the WIOA state plan, the state CTE office is supporting two new positions to be hired in the spring of 2018. One is a CTE and Workforce Data Analyst and the other is a Workforce Alignment and Learning Opportunities Specialist. They will be housed in the P20 office and will address data and work-based learning across all WIOA stakeholders.
DVR already has a Special Education/Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR) program. The primary purpose of the program is for students ages 14 - 21 who have been found eligible for VR services to participate gain work experience in an integrated setting, while still enrolled in school.
DVR is also working with Adult Literacy and Community Colleges to develop career pathways which include Pre-ETS with work-based learning experiences for VR students between 14-21 years of age. We are working with Adult Education to provide career pathways for VR clients which includes remedial reading and math classes; PETS and work experience for those clients who desire to enter directly into the labor force. We are working with the Community Colleges to provide career pathways for VR clients ages 14 and above who desire to enter secondary education prior to entering the workforce. (Page 132) Title I

In support of the WIOA state plan, the state CTE office is supporting two new positions to be hired in the spring of 2018. One is a CTE and Workforce Data Analyst and the other is a Workforce Alignment and Learning Opportunities Specialist. They will be housed in the P20 office and will address data and work-based learning across all WIOA stakeholders. (Page 133) Title I
The Sector Strategies and Career Pathways committee will convene sub-committees based on key industry sectors identified in the Unified Plan. These sub-committees will provide employer and industry perspective. The objectives of the sub-committees are:
• Assess training needs and skills gaps, inventory current resources and services, identify high priority gaps;
• Build stronger networks between firms and among education and training partners to identify high-priority skill gaps and in-demand sectors;
• Review and provide feedback on HIDOE and UHCC’s standards and assessments, academic and career technical content and work skills;
• Increase high quality, work-based learning opportunities for secondary and postsecondary students that lead to industry recognized credentials;
• Identify new industry-recognized credentials or work-based programs that give companies confidence in skills of new hires and provide workers with more mobility;
• Develop opportunities for professional development training for teachers, school/job counselors, training providers, etc.;
• Identify policies and/or strategies to sustain the model. (Page 153) Title I

• State and federal funds from DHS—for job development. job readiness, and placement of TANF recipients and SNAP recipients into jobs.
• State and federal funds from State DHS, DVR to WDD to implement a 2016 Summer Youth Employment program for youth with a disability on Counties of Oahu, Hawaii, and Maui; also supports a year-round WDD staff on Big Island for business outreach and employment assistance for DVR clients. With DVR, WDD is developing a plan for year-round work-based learning services to youth with disabilities using DVR Pre-Employment Transition Services fund for Oahu; and a plan for DVR youth referrals for a Summer Youth Employment Program on Hawaii and Maui Counties. (Page 162) Title I

In the case of a State that, under section 101(a)(2)(A)(i)of the Rehabilitation Act designates a State agency to administer the part of the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services portion of the Unified or Combined State Plan under which VR services are provided for individuals who are blind, describe the process and the factors used by the State to determine the distribution of funds among the two VR agencies in the State.
o Vocational Rehabilitation Basic Support Grant. The purpose of this grant is to assist Hawaii in operating statewide comprehensive, coordinated, effective, efficient, and accountable programs of vocational rehabilitation, which is an integral part of a statewide workforce investment system designed to assess, plan, develop, and provide vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities to prepare for and engage in gainful employment.
o Hawaii DVR is a combined agency which means that we receive one Basic Support Grant which funds the General and Blind agency.
o DVR supports the WDD staff and the American Job Center staff on all islands for business outreach and employment assistance for DVR clients. Along with DVR staff, employers will be provided training and technical assistance to include, but not limited to (1) disability awareness; (2) compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); (3) VR services; (4) recruitment and hiring of persons with disabilities and (5) support for current employees with disabilities.
o DVR has a current State Educational Agency (SEA) Agreement with the DOE and is currently developing an updated SEA agreement to include the WIOA regulations.
o Upon exit from the DOE/Special Education Program, DVR’s clients attend DOE/Adult Education classes. DVR and Adult Education management staff have been meeting to significantly increase the number of DVR clients attending Adult Education classes in 2018. (Page 167) Title I

Following receipt of student referrals, VR counselors complete applications with students and their families, and determine eligibility. When a student is found eligible for VR Services, the VR counselor will attend the IEP meeting at the request of the DOE, when possible. At the request of the IEP team, the VR counselor will review and allow for amendments to the student’s IPE. Pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) include: job exploration counseling, counseling related to transition or post-secondary training/education, instruction in self-advocacy, workplace readiness training and work-based learning experiences. VR counselors provide counseling in job exploration and transition or post-secondary training/education. Service providers (e.g. community rehabilitation programs, partnering public sector agencies) are contracted for workplace readiness training and work-based learning experiences, and instruction in self-advocacy. (Pages 281-282) Title IV

VR counselors receive direct referrals of students with disabilities from the school, at any time during the school year. They provide consultation and technical assistance to schools during their visits, and during IEP meetings for students who were found eligible. When a student is found eligible for VR services the VR counselor will attend IEP meetings, at the request of the DOE when possible and agreed to with stakeholders. If unable to attend, VR information is provided. The VR counselor will review the student’s IPE and allow for amendments at the request of an IEP team.
Transition counselors provide introduction and guidance to post-school alternatives, and planning and coordination for work experiences in a work based setting to improve employment outcomes.
VR counselors receive direct referrals of students with disabilities from the school, at any time during the school year. They provide consultation and technical assistance to school staff during their school visits, and during IEP meetings for students and their families who were found eligible. When a student is found eligible for VR Services the VR counselor will attend IEP meetings, at the request of the DOE when possible. If unable to attend, VR information is provided. The VR counselor will review the student’s IPE and allow for amendments at the request of an IEP team. (Page 282) Title IV

DVR and DOE are agreed to work collaboratively to assist transition aged youth (TAY) in development and completion of their individualized education program (IEP). Transition planning includes, but is not limited to: DVR Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist (VRS) invitation to participate in DOE’s IEP meeting for shared TAYs, DVR VRS collaboration with and assistance to DOE teachers in transition planning for TAY, introduction and guidance of TAY to post-school alternatives by DOE transition coordinator and DVR VRS. Planning also includes coordination of experiences for TAY in work—based settings to improve employment outcomes.
DVR will provide transition planning which facilitates the development and completion of an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and development of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) within 90 days from the date of eligibility, and prior to exit from high school for students served by the VR program (34 CFR §361.22(a)).
DOE facilitates annual IEP meetings for every student receiving Special Education services. Should the IEP team agree to submit a referral to DVR; the DOE Transition teacher will be responsible for submitting a referral for VR Services at the conclusion of the IEP meeting.
IEP meetings are facilitated by DOE. At IEP meetings, the VR Counselor provides an overview of the agency’s goal/mission, eligibility criteria, scope of services, rights/remedies, and other information specific to the student’s IPE. Once a student is found eligible for VR Services, the VR Counselor will attend the annual IEP meetings at the request of the DOE, when possible. If the VR Counselor is unable to attend this meeting, information will be provided to the family. The VR Counselor reviews the student’s IPE and allows for amendments at the request of the IEP team. DVR is represented on a variety of committees (Special Education Advisory Council, Developmental Disabilities Council) which enable parents and members of the community to gather information and provide input to DVR. (Page 283-284) Title IV

DVR works with employers to provide VR services through disability and diversity etiquette training, ADA advising, workshops on Emotional Intelligence and Job Readiness Training “Ho’ala” contracted through City and County, Department of Community Service Work Hawaii. Pre-employment transition services are offered through contracts with the Department of Education through Special Education Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR). SEVR provides unique work experience opportunities with employers in the community. Our network of over 600 employers are informed of various DVR programs that allow them to utilize internships, OJTs, apprenticeships in collaboration with the local Community Colleges, and Adult Education programs to access work-based learning experiences. Ongoing workshops and forums with employers are conducted on a quarterly basis with Work Hawaii from Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) to inform employers of changes in legislation and workforce diversification. (Page 288) Title II

Hawaii DVR will coordinate CSPD activities with those provided under the IDEA through the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). A representative of the State Educational Agency responsible for the public education of students with disabilities who are eligible to receive services under this title and part B of the IDEA is appointed by the Governor to be a member of the SRC. Program and financial information are disseminated at SRC meetings and orientation and trainings with VR and DOE, Special Education staff are coordinated at SRC meetings. Joint trainings for DOE /DVR staff are scheduled when necessary (e.g. training for revised procedures for current services or new services.). The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, WIOA, regulations are shared with the DOE staff during the joint quarterly meetings and other meetings needed to address concerns/clarifications as they arise. The transition counselor’s role is to have a presence at their designated schools. The counselors provide consultation and technical assistance to the Department of Education (DOE) staff, students and their families with information regarding DVR’s goal/mission, eligibility criteria, scope of services, rights/remedies and the Special Education-Vocational Rehabilitation (SE-VR) program during their regularly scheduled visits and during IEP meetings. (Page 294) Title IV

DVR investigated the needs of youth and students with disabilities in their 2015 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA). It is clear from the interviews and the survey results that students in Hawaii have a need to receive pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS). Each of the Pre-ETS categories of activities were noted as a need on a recurring basis when discussing the needs of students.
B. Required Activities
• Job exploration counseling;
• Work-based learning experiences, which may include in-school or afterschool opportunities, or experience outside the traditional school setting (including internships), provided in an integrated environment to the maximum extent possible;
• Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs at institutions of higher education;
• Workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living skills; and
• Instruction in self-advocacy, which may include peer mentoring.
C. Target Populations: Students receiving transition services pursuant to IDEA or a student who is an individual with a disability under Section 504 aged 14 - 21. (Page 302) Title IV
PRE-ETS Goals: DVR/WDD/DOE strategies for leveraging resources and funding include; DVR working/contracting with the Core Partners to leverage resources and funding for the provision of job exploration counseling and placement and case management services. Specifically, WDD has agreed to leverage resources and funding from other programs (e.g. a Disability Employment Initiative grant) to the maximum extent possible, to provide individualized services such as job coaching, uniforms, transportation to and from work-based learning sites, safety equipment or assistive technology to participating Pre-ETS students. WDD will partner with Adult Education to provide the workplace readiness training to DVR’s Pre-ETS students in preparation for successful attainment of the work-based learning skills. (Page 303) title IV

VR counselors receive direct referrals of students with disabilities from the school, at any time during the school year. They provide consultation and technical assistance to schools during their visits, and during IEP meetings for students who were found eligible. When a student is found eligible for VR services, the VR counselor will attend IEP meetings, at the request of the DOE when possible. If VR counselor is unable to attend the IEP meeting, the transition counselor provides VR information to the student. The VR counselor will review the student’s IPE and allow for amendments at the request of an IEP team. Transition counselors provide introduction and guidance to post school alternatives, and planning and coordination for work experiences in a work-based setting to improve employment outcomes. VR counselors provide counseling in job exploration and transition or post-secondary training/education. Service providers (e.g. community rehabilitation programs, public sector agencies) are contracted for workplace readiness training, work-based learning experiences, and instruction in self-advocacy. DVR continues a long-standing collaboration with the Department of Education to deliver the Special Education — Vocational Rehabilitation (SE-VR) Work Study Program. SE-VR is a work-based learning experience designed to deliver three inter-related components: classroom experience, in-school work experiences and community work experience. The DOE classroom experience is designed with a workplace readiness component. DOE in-school experience is designed to continue work place readiness training with hands-on experience at the DOE school. Finally, community work experience is designed to provide work-based learning experiences in the community. DVR has implemented a Summer Youth Program to provide work-based learning experiences in State, City and County, Federal and private sector work places. (Page 317) Title IV

Improve Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Disabilities by:
1.Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes. • Incentivize timely service delivery by implementing new performance measures for VR counselors which ensure that 90% of eligibility determinations will be completed within 90 days of customers’ application dates and that 90% of Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs) are developed within 60 days of customers’ eligibility determination dates. • Provide high-quality training and support, ensuring staff have the knowledge and skills needed to deliver high-quality vocational rehabilitation services. • Through statewide case file reviews, build an organizational culture of quality to strengthen substantial counseling and guidance.
2.Conduct outreach to key populations, including students with disabilities, to ensure thatall with persons with disabilities have access to services and supports needed to prepare forand obtain employment. (Page 318) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~DVR already has a Special Education/Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR) program. The primary purpose of the program is for students ages 14 - 21 who have been found eligible for VR services to participate gain work experience in an integrated setting, while still enrolled in school.
DVR is also working with Adult Literacy and Community Colleges to develop career pathways which include Pre-ETS with work-based learning experiences for VR students between 14-21 years of age. We are working with Adult Education to provide career pathways for VR clients which includes remedial reading and math classes; PETS and work experience for those clients who desire to enter directly into the labor force. We are working with the Community Colleges to provide career pathways for VR clients ages 14 and above who desire to enter secondary education prior to entering the workforce. (Page 132) Title I

• Data in Hawaii’s ETPL including those providing non-traditional training services and ETPs of registered apprenticeship programs;
• Information identifying eligible providers of on-the-job training (OJT), customized training, incumbent worker training, internships, paid or unpaid work experience opportunities and transitional jobs. WIOA sec. 122(h) exempts providers of on-the-job training and other employer-based training from the requirements at WIOA sec. 122(a)-(f). However, the identity of employers that access WIOA funds for employer-based training, as well as any performance information required by the State under WIOA sec. 122(h)(2) is disclosable;
• Information on effective outreach and partnerships with business;
• Information on effective service delivery strategies and promising practices to serve workers and job seekers;
• Performance information and information on the cost of attendance, including tuition and fees;
• A list of eligible providers of youth activities;
• Information on physical and programmatic accessibility for individuals with disabilities; and
• Access to providers’ past performance information to maximize consumer choice. (Page 189) Title I

DVR works with employers to provide VR services through disability and diversity etiquette training, ADA advising, workshops on Emotional Intelligence and Job Readiness Training “Ho’ala” contracted through City and County, Department of Community Service Work Hawaii. Pre-employment transition services are offered through contracts with the Department of Education through Special Education Vocational Rehabilitation (SEVR). SEVR provides unique work experience opportunities with employers in the community. Our network of over 600 employers are informed of various DVR programs that allow them to utilize internships, OJTs, apprenticeships in collaboration with the local Community Colleges, and Adult Education programs to access work-based learning experiences. Ongoing workshops and forums with employers are conducted on a quarterly basis with Work Hawaii from Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) to inform employers of changes in legislation and workforce diversification. (Page 288) Title I

Apprenticeship

In preparation for WIOA implementation, State-level Partners met regularly for about a year to learn about services provided by each Core Partner (and other Partners), convened joint meetings among Partner stakeholders, and determined how participant data would be shared and tracked through Core Programs. As much as possible during this preparation period, Core Partners were added as key agencies in programs such as DLIR’s Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI), DVR’s Student Transition Employment Program, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) led by DVR, and the American Apprenticeship Initiative Grant led by DLIR. Since then, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) was led by the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and the collaboration continues among agencies serving persons with disabilities. (Page 121) Title II

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Although DEI focuses on a specific group of individuals, the successes of the coordinated service strategies is a model for a broader population. (DEI, Round II, was conducted only on the Counties of Hawaii and Maui, and the successful collaboration with employers and providers was the stepping stone for DEI Round VI statewide.) Experience showed that building trust among agencies took time and a disciplined commitment to regular meetings. It also required the lead agency and its contractor, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, to develop meeting agenda, contact agencies for meetings, and include actions relevant to the providers. Similar factors were critical to sustain business interest in participating on the Business Leadership Networks.
Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of AJC staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 122) Title I

USDOL Foreign Labor Certifications—assists employers with housing inspections, job order recruitments, and labor certification applications to hire foreign workers for temporary agriculture labor (H-2A); and assists employers with job order recruitments and labor certification applications to hire foreign workers to perform temporary non-agriculture labor (H-2B).
USDOL ODEP funds for Disability Employment Initiative, Round VI—provides AJC and partner staff training from University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies to increase capability to serve persons with significant disabilities; help establish and maintain Business Leadership Networks and interagency provider collaborations; and increase number of SSI and SSDI beneficiaries getting employment and remaining employed. Round VIII targets youth with disabilities. (Page 161) Title I

4. The VR Classroom Experience - SE Clients will have access to Job Empowerment Training (JET), a classroom-based job readiness course. JET is designed to address the various barriers to employment and to teach the basic skills to find, gain, and maintain employment.
5. VR Placement - Assist clients in gaining competitive employment in the community.
6. SE Retention and Ongoing Supports - Assist in retaining competitive employment in the community via job coaching and regular follow-up. Though purely based on need, most SE clients will receive 100% Job Coaching at first, then will taper off to less than 50% with the goal of final independence. In addition, DVR partners with Developmental Disabilities Division case managers and Ticket to Work Employment Networks to provide extended services to sustain employment. (Page 315) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~Dislocated Worker Eligible Training Provider
WDC staff along with LWDB staff are working to increase the number of Eligible Training Providers approved in the State. Each LWDB will work with their local UH System Community College(s) to add programs of study, credit and non-credit courses that meet WIOA requirements. In addition, out-ot-state providers of on-line courses have been added to the eligible education and training providers that can be funded, at least in part, through WIOA. These providers work in cooperation with the American Job Centers located through the state of Hawaii and offer both specialized training as well as credit and non-credit pathways to higher-level employment opportunities. (Page 101) Title I

As required by WIOA, registered apprenticeship program sponsors are informed of their automatic qualification to the Eligible Training Provider List.
DVR can assist a VR eligible individual with only those activities that are included in their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). All activities that are required for a VR eligible individual to prepare, obtain, maintain/regain employment (of their informed choice) will be listed on their IPE. If an activity that is required, is identified after the IPE is completed, then the VR eligible individual and the VR counselor, in agreement, can amend the IPE to include the activity and make any other changes as determined to be necessary to obtain employment. DVR and the Core partners are working on MOA’s which details the responsibilities of each partner which will help in the management and avoid duplication among these activities. In so far as duplication of activities by other optional AJC partners, VR would have minimal involvement as those services would not be listed on the IPE since those services would not be necessary for the VR eligible individual to obtain employment. (Page 123-124) Title I

Core Partner staff also will have access to employer and job order information in the PMIS so they can analyze business services being performed by their providers and offices and improve coordination and management of employer engagement activities.
DVR is currently in the process of getting internal approvals for contracting with the current PMIS vendor and targets having an executed contract in place by July 1, 2016. Adult Education similarly plans to finalize their plans and have any necessary contract in place with Geographic Solutions by July 1, 2016 or shortly thereafter. These contracts will enable the importation of data from DVR and Adult Education file extracts and the development and maintenance of separate portals for DVR and Adult Education participants into HireNet Hawaii. For WIOA, Wagner-Peyser, Veteran, and Trade Adjustment Act reports, Geographic Solutions has been preparing updates to HireNet Hawaii specifications based on federal draft reporting instructions. The vendor will update the specifications based on changes made in the final instructions on a timely basis. (Page 170) Title I

Employer Engagement Goals: DVR's Statewide Employment Staff Specialist has been invited and will participate in the sector strategies by the Chamber of Commerce of Hawaii and will participate in WDC's Employment Committee. DVR's Employment Specialist will continue to be a resource to employers to provide training and education to employers on the skills and abilities of persons with disabilities, reasonable accommodations, tax incentives, etc.
Goal 3.1 Annually increase the number of employers who provide opportunities for individuals with disabilities to participate in work-based employment experiences and internships (by 1%). (Page 304) Title IV

Data Collection

For Section (l) State Goals and Priorities: Priority 1: Pre-Employment Transition Services we want to know how to leverage the funding in pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) with other Core Partners. What specific actions will be taken by the DVR to ensure a stronger relationship between the Core Partners in support of DVR Pre-ETS recipients? We recommend amending priorities to list specifically how the DVR will work with the Core Partners to try to mitigate the Order of Selection, and how the DVR can work with the Core Partners to address Priority Category 2 and 3 clients. Tapping into the Core Partners resources is a recommended focus as well. Priority 3: (Employer Engagement) SRC recommends including specific examples of work that have been done to ensure employer engagement. For Priority 4: (Common Data Collection for Unified State Plan), it is recommended DVR include the WDC Data Integration and Single Sign-On project among the priorities. (Page 278) Title IV

4. Coordination with Employers: DVR’s ongoing coordination efforts will include participation in sector strategies and training employers and state agencies on reasonable accommodations as supports that will be provided to improve partnerships with employers. We will continue to partner with DOE and DLIR’s WDD to leverage resources and funding to provide employers with qualified employees. 5. The Annual Estimates section will be updated as recommended. 6. State Goals and Priorities - Pre-Employment Transition Services; Employer Engagement and Common Data Collection for Unified State Plan: More details will be included in description (l) on how DVR will accomplish the goals. 7. Order of Selection section has been updated. 8. Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title IV funds section will be reviewed and aligned with the goals and priorities as listed in description (l). DVR is very appreciative of the continuing working partnership with SRC to develop strategic elements of planning and achieving financial stability to ensure that we are focusing on the right targets and are proactive instead of reactive to ensure effectiveness. (Page 279 278 ) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

As a condition to the award of financial assistance from the Department of Labor under Title I of WIOA, the grant applicant assures that it has the ability to comply with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of the following laws and will remain in compliance for the duration of the award of federal financial assistance: • Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status and gender identity), national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship status or participation in any WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity; • Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the bases of race, color and national origin; • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, which prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities; • The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age; and • Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs. (Page 145) Title I

AJC partners will collaborate to develop policies, procedures, proven and promising practices, and templates to aid local boards in the AJC Certification process. Additional criteria will be developed by the core partners, customer representatives, additional partners and other key stakeholders, including job-seekers. Multiple avenues will be utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of AJC services including: • Development of a shared AJC Operations Manual • Monitoring checklist • Development of self-evaluation training, toolkit and ongoing guidance • A system for obtaining client feedback which is user-friendly, streamlined and accessible • Surveys will be accessible in multiple formats, provided in a variety of ways, and can be submitted anonymously - at no cost or inconvenience to the client. • Office Peer Review tool • Timely survey evaluation and dissemination to local programs • Dedicated Technical Assistance (TA) personnel available for on-site and remote TA. (Page 155) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) defines a person with a disability as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activity. Nearly 1 in 5 people have a disability in the U.S. About 56.7 million people — 19 percent of the population —with more than half of them reporting the disability was severe, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, 2010. (Page 174) Title II

Vets

Hawaii’s veterans will compete with non-veterans for the same jobs especially those that pay well, are full-time, and have good benefits. Veterans will leverage their military service, service-connected disability, VA educational benefits, and federal government regulations and statutes to gain hiring preference over non-veterans for jobs with the federal, state, local governments and with federal contractors. Any shortfalls in relevant credentials, transferrable skills, and work experience can be mitigated, in part, with veterans leveraging their Post 9-11 GI Bill Educational benefits. In Hawaii, eligible veterans can receive over $100,000 in Post 9-11 GI Bill financial aid to pursue a college degree or a vocational training credential. Hawaii employment opportunities will grow by 43,930 to 740,540 jobs from 2014 to 2024, averaging a modest growth of 0.6 percent annually. Service-providing industries (trade, transportation, and utilities; information; financial activities; professional and business services; education and health services; leisure and hospitality; other services; and government) will represent over 83 percent of the total workforce throughout the projection period, and will generate slightly more than four-fifths of the total job gains. The top four largest industries within this sector (education and health services; trade, transportation, and utilities; professional and business services; and leisure and hospitality) will provide 75 percent of the total statewide job gains. Government is the only industry projected to decline. (Page 60) Title I

…access to an array of formidable tools in the veterans’ transition tool kit. Military transitional services, employment, training and priority of services delivered by the American Job Centers, and U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs education programs will be integral components of a veteran’s tool kit. Veterans will leverage federal regulations that require American Job Centers and employment programs, funded in part by U.S. DOL, to serve veterans ahead of non-veterans; this rule is known as priority of service. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Labor funds the Hawaii Department of Labor’s Workforce Development Division, in part, with the Jobs for Veterans State Grant, to hire specialized and trained staffs, Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists and Local Veterans Employment Representatives, to serve veterans with significant barriers to employment and to reach out to employers to promote the hiring of veterans. (Page 61) Title I

• USDOL, Veterans Employment Training Services -- supports WDD Disabled Veterans Outreach Program counselors for employment planning, job counseling, and case management to address employment issues of veterans with service-connected disabilities or other significant barriers to employment; and WDD Local Veteran Employment Representatives to conduct continual outreach to businesses to promote hiring of veterans, and with human resource professionals, conduct job search workshops for veterans. • USDOL, Senior Community Services Employment Program—supports providers serving low-income residents 55 years and older with employment planning and assessments, part-time community service jobs, and job placement assistance; providers include Hawaii County Office on Aging, Honolulu Community Action Program, DHS, Maui Economic Opportunity, and Kauai Branch of WDD. • USDOL, Work Opportunity Tax Credit—supports processing employer requests for certifications of the Work Opportunity Tax Credit for certain eligible new hires (also funded by Wagner-Peyser) (Page 161) Title I

Participant performance in all Core Programs (WIOA Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth Programs; Wagner-Peyser programs, Adult Education, Vocational Rehabilitation), Disabled Veterans Outreach Program, Local Veterans Employment Representative, and Trade Adjustment Act will be measured through data stored in the PMIS. All staff users and their providers are responsible to accurately enter data into the PMIS in a timely manner. All quarterly and annual reports required by the federal government are generated from HireNet Hawaii data and electronically transmitted to the USDOL. DLIR extracts information on employment status and average earnings for all exiters from UI wage records. Local area staff and Core Partner staff also may enter supplementary information on jobs obtained by participants. At the end of each quarter and year, DLIR will transmit to each county and Core Partner their performance reports in the same format as the federal statewide report. Counties, Local Boards, and Core Partners will review their performance at least on a quarterly basis and take any necessary corrective actions to resolve deficiencies. Staff users can produce PMIS reports to assess and correct performance on an on-going basis. These reports, filtered by different criteria, dates, and target groups, enable staff to review different aspects of performance prior to or after outcomes are reported with the goal of continually improving performance. (Page 170) Title I

Describe how the State will implement and monitor the priority of service provisions for veterans in accordance with the requirements of the Jobs for Veterans Act, codified at section 4215 of 38 U.S.C., which applies to all employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the Department of Labor. States should also describe the referral process for veterans determined to have a significant barrier to employment to receive services from the Jobs for Veterans State Grants (JVSG) program’s Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist. The State shall ensure priority of service to veterans and eligible spouses in its program delivery and services that are directly funded in whole or part, by the Department of Labor, in accordance with all federal guidance letters and notices, including 20 CRF Part 1010, Employment and Training Administration’s Training and Employment Guidance Letter No. 10-09, and Training and Employment Notice 15-10. This applies to all services in the AJCs. Procedures are in place in each AJC office for staff to identify veterans and eligible spouses at every point of entry in the service delivery system. Staff at all levels of WDD operations and in AJCs have been trained in priority of service requirements. (Page 173) Title I

Staff shall refer individuals identified as VETERANS AND ELIGIBLE SPOUSES WITH SIGNIFICANT BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT to the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) specialist for intensive service. If a DVOP specialist is not available, the client shall be referred to the AJC staff assigned to provide intensive service. In circumstances when it is not practical to refer a client to a DVOP for intensive service and to a Local Veterans Employment Representative (LVER) for job development service, the local office/AJC manager shall designate appropriate staff to assist the client. Services received by the client shall be the same service he or she would receive if a DVOP and LVER were available. AJC Managers and WDD Managers shall periodically review the State policies and guidance for identifying and serving veterans with significant barriers to employment to ensure that staff continues to be aware of and continues implementing correct procedures for serving veterans with significant disabilities. State policies include Job Service Bulletin No. 01-15, Change 1, and its updates. (Page 173) Title I

Mental Health

~~Other Rapid Response topics, such as the following, will be included for group sessions, as appropriate:
• COBRA;
• Credit counseling and loan assistance;
• Grief/trauma counseling, or other mental health services;
• Housing assistance, and/or
• Social services provided by Community-Based Organizations.
Because of the breadth of topics covered during Rapid Response sessions, only those staff members who are experienced and knowledgeable will participate as presenters. Services for individuals, such as filing for UI (after layoff), registration in the PMIS, and applying for financial assistance may be provided immediately following group sessions, if workers need assistance for these services. Job fairs also will be scheduled, as appropriate, specifically for the laid-off workers in conjunction with, or shortly after Rapid Response sessions. In addition, job search workshops and literacy or skills training may be provided for the workers to prepare them for the job market prior to or shortly after layoff.
In addition to reacting to layoff notices, Rapid Response will include business service teams to expand the rapid response infrastructure in each local area so that Rapid Response becomes pro-active and on-going to serve businesses and their workers more effectively. (Page 198) Title IV

Outreach at the State Level: In collaborative partners