Hawaii

States - Big Screen

Disability is a respected part of diversity in the Rainbow State of Hawaii, where employees with disabilities are saying "Aloha" to new job opportunities across the state. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Hawaii's VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.84%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,431,603
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-9.43%
Change from
2014 to 2015
63,826
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-16.78%
Change from
2014 to 2015
25,341
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-5.48%
Change from
2014 to 2015
40.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.59%
Change from
2014 to 2015
77.82%

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 1,404,054 1,419,561 1,431,603
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 64,795 69,846 63,826
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 25,344 29,593 25,341
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 573,321 586,811 597,207
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.11% 42.37% 40.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.66% 76.58% 77.82%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.80% 4.40% 3.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.40% 16.50% 15.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.30% 10.90% 10.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 74,367 78,803 71,818
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 76,732 80,672 76,260
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 38,799 39,902 38,396
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,302 2,474 1,718
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 10,993 13,037 12,292
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 295
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 66,896 66,959 62,269
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 14,251 16,414 14,071
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 28,232 32,387 30,302
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 1,130 1,215 1,027

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 782 764 782
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.00% 3.90% 4.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 23,328 23,174 22,800

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 396 482 188
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,562 2,573 1,573
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 4,421 8,654 1,771
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 9.00% 5.60% 10.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.80% 1.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.20% 5.90% 2.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 74 83 146
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 769 613 202
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,007 1,836 1,587
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 5 6 5
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 3 4 4
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 60.00% 67.00% 80.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.22 0.28 0.28

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
878
595
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 41 60 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 96 58 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 143 94 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 291 162 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 245 181 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 62 40 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 17.20% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,337 1,188 1,134
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 39,192 38,693 38,249
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 34 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2011 2012 2013
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,252,000 $584,000 $258,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $16,096,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $16,585,000 $21,996,000 $52,428,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 1.00% 2.00% 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,199 1,224 1,956
Number of people served in facility based work. 49 49 22
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A 0 1,216
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.80 2.70 3.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 36.00% 36.71% 36.90%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.00% 19.35% 20.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.58% 1.04% 1.08%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 84.00% 89.30% 84.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.59% 33.67% 31.45%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 76.75% 74.90% 68.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 84.86% 85.46% 73.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 40.16% 41.23% 36.70%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 448,452
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 607
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 268
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 268
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,228,248

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 4 7 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4 7 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 65 97 51
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 65 97 51

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~• Align policies and funding streams across education, workforce, and economic development systems and all levels of government to focus public resources on the training that moves workers into industries with high-quality jobs that lead to better financial outcomes and longer job tenures for workers.
• Take an active role in the development of the “common pathways” for both individuals who desire to pursue secondary education AND for individuals who do not desire to pursue secondary education but desire to learn employment skills through work experience and/or on-the-job training.
• Coordinate a “common” work assessment process between core partners.
• Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff.
• Continue with the current iCAN bridging program at the Community Schools for Adults as a stepping stone to proceed into a career pathway leading to a work-readiness certificate and/or degree and economic success. Work closely with UH/CC to create possible dual enrollment and pre-apprenticeship classes for adult learners. (Page 99)
In preparation for WIOA implementation, State-level Partners met regularly for about a year to learn about services provided by each Core Partner (and other Partners), convened joint meetings among Partner stakeholders, and determined how participant data would be shared and tracked through Core Programs. As much as possible during this preparation period, Core Partners were added as key agencies in programs such as DLIR’s Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI), DVR’s Student Transition Employment Program, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) led by DVR, and the American Apprenticeship Initiative Grant led by DLIR.
For example, the Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI) program recently awarded to DLIR includes as a goal increasing the number of Business Leadership Networks, which are business-driven groups of employers committed toward promoting the hiring of persons with disabilities. A major partner in DEI is DVR and their providers, and WIOA One-Stop Center staff members are the primary recipients of capacity building to serve persons with significant disabilities. Another DEI goal is developing an interagency group of providers with the One-Stop Centers for a more coordinated referral system among providers and for more integration of business engagement activities among providers. Adult Education will be part of this group with other partners. Approaching employers and Business Leadership Networks (BLN) in a coordinated manner that represents all agencies is more professional, useful, and productive than each agency operating in its own silo with employers. A coordinated approach also enables providers to offer a fuller array of services as different options to meet different situations. (Page 111)
Contributing to a more integrated service strategy is the partnership building created by the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a technical assistance grant provided by DOL Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) to increase employment of persons with disabilities. EFSLMP is truly a partnership effort currently led by Vocational Rehabilitation, with Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Council, DLIR Workforce Development Division, Department of Human Services MedQuest Division, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and Department of Education. A Cooperative Agreement is being developed among partners to formalize cooperative working arrangements and a series of technical assistance and training have been provided to the partners and AJCs by subject matter experts. (Page 118)
In addition, underserved populations such as persons with disabilities and offenders will be targeted to expand the job seeker pool. Capacity building obtained through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program and Disability Employment Initiative will enable more staff, in coordination with Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health, and other partners, to assist employers in employing persons with disabilities. These services include customizing employment for individuals with significant barriers to employment. This employment option, combined with federal and state tax credits, will increase the incentives for employers, including federal contractors, to hire persons with disabilities. To assist ex-offenders, the experience and skills obtained through staff’s provision of services to inmates and parolees through a contract with State Department of Public Safety and the partnerships built for this effort will facilitate services to this group. (Page 147-148)
• Upon exit from the DOE/Special Education Program, DVR’s clients attend DOE/Adult Education classes. DVR and Adult Education management staff have been meeting to significantly increase the number of DVR clients attending Adult Education classes in 2016.
• In partnership with DOH, DOE, DOL, DVR is the lead agency in the Office of Disability Employment Policy (OPED) Employment first State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) grant. The grant coordinates more in-depth training by their Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) on Customized, Supported and Self Employment “train the trainers” training. (Page 157)
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities.
DVR has engaged in the following activities in order to create sustainable employment service models over time. 
Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP): Currently meets on a monthly basis to analyze policies and procedures required to increase opportunities for competitive integrated employment opportunities for all persons with disabilities. ( Page 285)
The Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a grant through the US Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy that was first given to the Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) and turned over to the Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) for the final year will bring together various core partners. One of the two projects under EFSLMP is to develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, DDD, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group. (Page 288)
Results from the CSNA indicate a need for more CRP’s on neighboring islands which include Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and Kauai. Employment, transportation and housing were identified on the neighbor islands as needed. CRP’s and other entities need to collaborate and communicate with each other to establish a foundation that consumers can rely on. Additionally, CRP’s must embrace the "Employment first" philosophy and move from sheltered employment to competitive integrated employment. (Page 297)
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule):
1.   Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes.
2.   Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1.   Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2.   Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. ( Page 315)
• Invest in marketing materials aimed at re-branding the service provision of DVR to be an Employment First agency for people with disabilities
• Work cooperatively with Workforce Development Division to outreach to businesses as partners in training and placement. (Page 318)
Priority 1: Increase the number of clients receiving SE services. Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals that receive SE services. FY 2015: 57 individuals received SE services. FY 2014: 53 individuals received SE services. FY 2013: 98 individuals received SE services.
The factors that contributed to our ability to increase the number of individuals that received SE services was our participation in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, (EFSLMP). This program introduced our counseling and employment staff to the customized employment model which supports the long term supports of SE services.
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2013: 54 individuals eligible for SE services, received benefits counseling services. (Page 322)
 

Customized Employment

~~Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff.
• Continue with the current iCAN bridging program at the Community Schools for Adults as a stepping stone to proceed into a career pathway leading to a work-readiness certificate and/or degree and economic success. Work closely with UH/CC to create possible dual enrollment and pre-apprenticeship classes for adult learners. (Page 99)
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule):
1. Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes.
2. Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. ( Page 315)
 

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities. (Page 285)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Although DEI focuses on a specific group of individuals, the successes of the coordinated service strategies is a model for a broader population. (DEI, Round II, was conducted only on the Counties of Hawaii and Maui, and the successful collaboration with employers and providers was the stepping stone for DEI Round VI statewide.) Experience showed that building trust among agencies took time and a disciplined commitment to regular meetings. It also required the lead agency and its contractor, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, to develop meeting agenda, contact agencies for meetings, and include actions relevant to the providers. Similar factors were critical to sustain business interest in participating on the Business Leadership Networks.
Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of One-Stop staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 111)
The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), Round VI, also will help facilitate a coordinated approach with employers among agencies serving persons with disabilities. This approach was very successful on Hawaii County where DEI Round II was carried out. Lessons learned from that experience, including the time it took to build trust and break barriers, helps inform DEI Round VI, which will be implemented Statewide.
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
Kauai DVR started Hookipa Workforce Academy at Waimea High in August 2015. This is a great example of our collaborative effort between DOE and DVR where participants are not in Adult Education.
• DVR is currently working with the DOL/Workforce Development Division, DOE/ Adult Basic Education and the US Business Leadership Network (BLN) to learn, network and build local business relationships with key leaders of companies and employers in the private sector that have demonstrated leadership and commitment to disability inclusion. USBLN is a national non–profit, non–partisan business–to–business network promoting workplaces, supply chains and marketplaces where people with disabilities are included. We are working with the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant staff to promote development of BLN Affiliates on Oahu, Kauai and Maui. (Page 275)
 

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~• Piloting programs/services to serve the neighbor islands, or some of the rural areas of Oahu such as Hookipa. Hookipa provides small group work readiness and hospitality skills training with paid work experience in a competitive setting.
• Partner with Workforce Development Division (WDD) and Adult Education so that staff that can work with DVR and share information and resources, provide cross-training, and strategize ways to increase training and placement opportunities for individuals with disabilities statewide.
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Benefits

~~Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of One-Stop staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 111)
DOE is responsible for providing and paying for DOE services identified in the IEP, including transition services for eligible TAY under IDEA. DVR is responsible for providing and paying for vocational or employment related services identified in the IPE for TAY, in keeping with DVR requirement for comparable services and benefits, and personal resources. (Page 281) 
A semi-annual review is conducted to ensure training needs are met. Statewide training initiatives includes:
• Collaborative relationships with the local University to support the Master’s in Rehabilitation Counseling program.
• Formal contracts with San Diego State University to provide Statewide Training and technical assistance to VR Counselors and VR Management.
• Formal contracts to include training and technical assistance in the areas of Benefits Planning and Assistive Technology. (Page 292)
• A large majority of DVR consumers receive SSA benefits and fear of benefit loss significantly affects their return–to–work behavior; (Page 295)
• Benefits planning resources to be provided for all DVR consumers that are also SSA beneficiaries. DVR counselors and community partners will ensure that they are discussing the full range of options for work with their consumers, including striving towards self-sufficiency through work. (Page 317)
• Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues.
 Temporary Employment Opportunities
 Paid and Unpaid Work Experience
• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Do outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 319)
We achieved this goal because of a number of factors to include, but not limited to continuing to increased employer partnerships, continued benefits planning services for clients, available work experiences for clients and focusing on employment as the expectation of the program from the beginning. (Page 320)
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2013: 54 individuals eligible for SE services, received benefits counseling services. (Page 322)
 

School to Work Transition

~~• Promote strategies to prepare for, obtain and maintain competitive, integrated employment such as
1. iCAN: Preparatory classes for youth and students for college and careers and
2. Project Search: High School Transition Program is a unique, business led, one year, school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the work place.
• Promote strategies to participate in work experience and post-secondary educational experience. This year, students and youth are participating in the Summer Youth Employment Program. Partnering with the State Workforce Development Division and the Honolulu, Maui, Kauai and Hawaii Counties, the program would provide paid work-based learning experiences, internships, and employment.  (Page 317)
 

Data Collection

~~A statewide MIS workgroup, composed of representatives and managers from each local area is responsible for reporting issues or questions regarding the PMIS to DLIR, and for providing input on desired enhancements or changes to it. Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education will be added to the MIS workgroup. The MIS workgroup also communicates updates or changes to the system to other staff. The DLIR Administrative staff tracks each concern and inquiry, and ensures that all issues are addressed and resolved either by the vendor, DLIR, local area, Core Partner, or any combination of these entities. Recommendations for policies and procedures regarding data entry, data revision, reports, assistance to public users, or other facets of data collection and use of data are solicited from and provided by the MIS workgroup or other users and finalized by DLIR. Training for all staff users is provided by the vendor whenever a new version of the software is installed. ( Page 158)
(3)   Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
(A)  The most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates; Yes, VR’s Triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment for Program Years 2015 – 2017 identified needs for the following goals and priorities:
• Priority 1: To provide Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Priority 2: To provide Supported Employment (SE) Services for Youth
• Priority 3: To increase employment engagement (B) the State’s performance under the performance accountability measures of section 116 of WIOA; and
• Priority 4: Data Collection Goals.(Page 305)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

~~Hawaii Career Pathway System increases access to and opportunities for employment, education, training, and support services, particularly for individuals with the greatest barriers to employment. These individuals include displaced homemakers; low-income individuals; Native Hawaiians; individuals with disabilities, including youth who are disabled; adults; ex-offenders; homeless individuals, or homeless children and youth; youth who are in or have aged out of foster care; English language learners, individuals who have low levels of literacy, individuals facing substantial cultural barriers; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (TANF); single parents; veterans, and long-term unemployed individuals.(Page 100-101)
The development of a unified state approach to career pathways requires aligning core programs with other WIOA partners to improve the workforce system. This alignment requires the collaboration of stakeholders that facilitates the design and development of the Hawaii Unified Plan.
The Hawaii Career Pathway System is a reflection of the ongoing collaboration by core partners and stakeholders to develop a unified state approach to career pathways. This system bridges Core Programs, WIOA partners, and the private sector in the development, implementation, and sustenance of promising practices from the workforce and education arenas at the Federal, State and local levels. The use of career pathways provide individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development training, education, and support services to enter or retain employment. (Page 102)
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
Strategies to increase the median earning of program participants:
1. Assist in the development of Career Pathways based upon Hawaii’s labor market for individuals interested in postsecondary education or direct job placement or both. Identify Career Pathways and job opportunities that are specific to each county.
2. Identify strategies to increase the capacity of SSA beneficiaries to move toward self-sufficiency through, work include education of the person’s family and try and encourage high expectations for the person regarding work rather than striving to remain dependent on SSI. High expectations have been proven to have a positive effect on outcomes and earnings for beneficiaries.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes.
Strategies to cultivate VR’s effectiveness in serving employers: Developing successful partnerships with local and multi-state businesses in an effort to increase the employment of individuals with disabilities and self-employment. Services include, but not limited to:
1. Train employers on compliance the title I of the American with Disability Act (ADA) of 1990 and other employment-related laws.
2. Inform employers of the existence of the program and availability of services.
3. Educate and provide services to employers who have hired or are interested in hiring individuals with disabilities.
4. Provide training and technical assistance to employers regarding disability awareness.
5. Working with employers to provide opportunities for work-based learning experiences and opportunities for PETS services.
6. Train employees who are individuals with disabilities. (Page 315)
 

Employment Networks

~~In addition, DVR partners with Developmental Disabilities Division case managers and Ticket to Work Employment Networks to provide extended services to maintain employment. (Page 312)
1.   The methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.
• Increase support services in postsecondary settings thereby increasing graduation rate.
• Increase pre-employment transitions services to better prepare transitioning youth with disabilities into the workforce.
• Support the provision of summer youth employment for transitioning high school students as well as those in postsecondary training.
• Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues.
 Temporary Employment Opportunities
 Paid and Unpaid Work Experience
• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Do outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, and develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 319)
 

Displaying 1 - 10 of 39

1915(C) HCBS Medicaid Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities WAIVER STANDARDS MANUAL Version B - 10/01/2017

~~“Discovery and Career Planning (DCP)Discovery and Career Planning combines elements of traditional prevocational services with career planning in order to provide supports that  the participant may use to develop skills and interests toward becoming employed for the first time or at different stages of the participant’s work career to develop skills and interests for advancement or a change in the participant’s career plan” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Uniform Application FY 2018/2019 – State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Community Mental Health Services Block Grant - 08/29/2017

~~“The Clubhouse Model seeks to demonstrate that people with mental illness can successfully live productive lives and work in the community, regardless of the nature or severity of their mental illness. Clubhouse services include Transitional Employment (TE), Group Transitional Employment (GTE), Supported Employment (SE), Supported Education (SE), Advocacy and Case Management”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

The Going Home Plus Project - 07/09/2017

~~“The Going Home Plus (GHP) project helps residents who have been living in hospitals, nursing facilities, and ICF/ID facilities move back into the community. For those residents who choose to live in the community, the GHP project will assist in finding housing (if the resident does not have a home to return to) and services (for example, help with cooking and bathing).•Eligibility Requirements•Going Home Plus Services

Individuals from all islands are eligible to participate.

The Going Home Plus (GHP) project is funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration grant through June 30, 2020. The project is a partnership between the Hawaii Department of Human Services Med-Quest Division and the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

*UPDATED* Supported Employment Services for VR Consumers - 07/04/2017

~~This is a call for bids for a program that will “Provide supported employment (SE) services to individuals with disabilities, both physical and mental. Individualized services are to be provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with the consumer’s strengths, resources, priortiespriorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice.  The contract term will be from October 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019 with four (4) additional 12-month option periods.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Phase-In Timing for New Rates, by Services and ‘Cohort’ prepared for Developmental Disabilities Division” - 07/01/2017

~~“This document is a set of tables noting what services will be available for all of the participants in the program or different “cohorts” (Cohort 1 - Participants residing in certified or licensed settings; Cohort 2 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings AND receiving Adult Day Health; or Cohort 3 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings and NOT receiving Adult Day Health).”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for 1915(c) HCBS Waiver: HI.0013.R07.01 - Jun 01, 2017 - 07/01/2017

~~“The State of Hawaii requests approval for an amendment to the following Medicaid home and community-based services waiver…. Program Title: HCB Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD Waiver).  Amendment Number: HI.0013.R07.01Approved Effective Date of Waiver being Amended: 07/01/16This is a technical amendment to address several items that were not included in the waiver renewal approved effective July1, 2016. The new rate methodology and changes to services are designed to support implementation of the Home andCommunity Based Services Final Rule for Community Integration. This amendment also includes a multi-year phase-inusing the Supports Intensity Scale for Adults to assess participants’ support needs to inform the person-centered process.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HAWAII RESIDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CELEBRATE 30 YEARS OF SELF-DETERMINATION AT “DAY AT THE CAPITOL" - 03/16/2017

~~“Today, Hawaii is one of nine states that does  not have a waiting list for home and community based services. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes. Currently, 99 percent of people served by the Department of Health’s Developmental Disabilities Division live in residences serving one to six people, and 61 percent in settings with one to three people. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes.

By law, the Department of Health is mandated to develop, lead, administer, coordinate, monitor, evaluate, and set direction for a comprehensive system of supports and services for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Current services include: personal assistance/habilitation, emergency services, respite, employment supports, chore, training and consultation, specialized medical equipment, adult day health, skilled nursing, environmental accessibility and vehicular modifications, assistive technology, personal emergency response systems and non-medical transportation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Standards Manual Version A – Draft Pending DHS-MQD Approval - 03/09/2017

~~“The Waiver Standards Manual Version A includes current services that the participant may receive until their Individualized Service Plan (ISP) is held during fiscal year 2018 (July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018). Waiver Standards Manual Version B will include services available to participants as they transition to new services, fee schedules and billing codes based on their date of ISP and their cohort group.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REPORT ANNUALLY TO THE LEGISLATURE THE NUMBERS OF PERSONS WAITING FOR DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY OR INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES SERVICES AND SUPPORTS, - 12/01/2016

~~“For fiscal year (FY) 2016, the Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) had no waitlists of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) for the following programs:1. Medicaid Home and Community-Based Service (HCBS) I/DD Waiver under the authority of section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act;2. Long Term Adult Supports and Resources (LASR);3. Family Support Services Program (FSSP); and4. Crisis Network Services.The total number of individuals with I/DD served by DDD was 3,246. Of this number 2,789 were served under I/DD Waiver,” 83 individuals were served under the LASR program, 33 individuals received services through FSSP, 178 individuals were served through Crisis Network Services, and the remaining 163 received only case management services.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

RealChoices Hawaii - Guide to Employment for Job Seekers - 01/22/2016

This guide to employment for people with disabilities provides information and additional links on job centers, employment for seniors and employment for youth.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Hawaii HB 119 - 07/01/2015

"It is the intent and purpose of the legislature to establish a qualified tax exempt savings program to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities pursuant to section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or successor legislation, and any regulations promulgated thereunder.  It is the further intent of the legislature that the program established by this Act be and remain in conformance with the Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act [ABLE] of 2014, Division B of Public Law No. 113-295"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

House Bill 860: Related to Persons with Disabilities - 01/28/2015

 “Establishes an employment first policy for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Requires the DOH to establish an employment first committee.” (Introduced in the Hawaii state legislature 1/28/15; sent to committees and status is pending.)

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Hawaii Uniform Application FY 2018/2019 – State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Community Mental Health Services Block Grant - 08/29/2017

~~“The Clubhouse Model seeks to demonstrate that people with mental illness can successfully live productive lives and work in the community, regardless of the nature or severity of their mental illness. Clubhouse services include Transitional Employment (TE), Group Transitional Employment (GTE), Supported Employment (SE), Supported Education (SE), Advocacy and Case Management”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

HAWAII RESIDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CELEBRATE 30 YEARS OF SELF-DETERMINATION AT “DAY AT THE CAPITOL" - 03/16/2017

~~“Today, Hawaii is one of nine states that does  not have a waiting list for home and community based services. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes. Currently, 99 percent of people served by the Department of Health’s Developmental Disabilities Division live in residences serving one to six people, and 61 percent in settings with one to three people. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes.

By law, the Department of Health is mandated to develop, lead, administer, coordinate, monitor, evaluate, and set direction for a comprehensive system of supports and services for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Current services include: personal assistance/habilitation, emergency services, respite, employment supports, chore, training and consultation, specialized medical equipment, adult day health, skilled nursing, environmental accessibility and vehicular modifications, assistive technology, personal emergency response systems and non-medical transportation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REPORT ANNUALLY TO THE LEGISLATURE THE NUMBERS OF PERSONS WAITING FOR DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY OR INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES SERVICES AND SUPPORTS, - 12/01/2016

~~“For fiscal year (FY) 2016, the Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) had no waitlists of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) for the following programs:1. Medicaid Home and Community-Based Service (HCBS) I/DD Waiver under the authority of section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act;2. Long Term Adult Supports and Resources (LASR);3. Family Support Services Program (FSSP); and4. Crisis Network Services.The total number of individuals with I/DD served by DDD was 3,246. Of this number 2,789 were served under I/DD Waiver,” 83 individuals were served under the LASR program, 33 individuals received services through FSSP, 178 individuals were served through Crisis Network Services, and the remaining 163 received only case management services.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations “Labor Law Requirements for New Employers” - 03/14/2013

Employers are required to provide reasonable accommodations for a qualified employee with a disability which allows that person to perform their essential job functions. An accommodation is reasonable if it does not impose an undue hardship on the employer’s business.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii Department of Education “IEP Overview”

Each Individualized Education Program includes: -a statement of the child's present levels of educational performance; -a statement of annual goals, including short-term instructional objectives; -a statement of the specific special education and related services to be provided; -the extent that the child will be able to participate in regular educational programs; -the projected dates for initiation of services and the anticipated duration of the services; and -appropriate objective criteria and evaluation procedures and schedules for determining, on at least an annual basis, whether the objectives are being achieved. The IEP for each student, beginning no later than age 16, must include a statement of needed transition services.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hawaii Department of Human Services Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) provides services to Hawai’i community members who experience barriers to employment due to a physical or cognitive disability. DVR is designed to assist job seekers with disabilities prepare, secure, and retain competitive employment in an integrated work setting. DVR furnishes the finest resources and opportunities for training, support, and career placement. Productive partnerships with other state agencies, private non-profits, and employers pave the way for our consumers to find successful employment with the reality of competitive wages. The underlying philosophy and goal of the DVR is thorough employment, individuals with disabilities are empowered toward economic self-sufficiency, independence, inclusion, and integration into society.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Hawaii Department of Human Services Division of Vocational Rehabilitation "Our Vision"

Our vision at the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is “Move Forward to Work.” We would like to think of ourselves as the agency of choice for persons with disabilities who are looking to enter or retain integrated, competitive employment. As Hawai‘i’s primary agency directly responsible for the employment needs of our citizens with disabilities, we are committed in Hawai‘i’s efforts in establishing a 21st century workforce. With service offices on Hawai‘i Island, Maui, Moloka‘i, O‘ahu and Kaua‘i the Division is entrenched within our communities to meet the needs of those seeking our services. With the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) in July of 2014, the Hawai‘i VR program has been actively working with core partners from the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, Department of Education, Department of Health, University of Hawai‘i and the Community Colleges as well as divisions within the Department of Human Services in developing the kinds of services all of Hawai‘i can be proud of.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Hawai'i State Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The Hawai'i State Council on Developmental Disabilities is mandated by federal (P.L. 106-402) and state (Chapter 333E, Hawaii Revised Statutes) laws to: plan, coordinate, evaluate, monitor, and advocate on behalf of individuals with developmental disabilities; and assure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families participate in the design of and have access to culturally competent services, supports, and other assistance and opportunities that promote independence, productivity, and integration, and inclusion into the community.

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii Employment First Inititive

“To advance Employment First, ODEP created the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). This program helps states align policies, regulations and funding priorities to encourage integrated employment as the primary outcome for individuals with significant disabilities.”   “In November 2014, Hawaii was one of 15 states selected to receive technical assistance from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy to build capacity and develop inter-agency policy for employment for individuals with disabilities..”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

*UPDATED* Supported Employment Services for VR Consumers - 07/04/2017

~~This is a call for bids for a program that will “Provide supported employment (SE) services to individuals with disabilities, both physical and mental. Individualized services are to be provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with the consumer’s strengths, resources, priortiespriorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice.  The contract term will be from October 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019 with four (4) additional 12-month option periods.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division - Strategic Plan 2015-2017 Progress Report - 09/23/2015

“The Strategic Plan was adopted on December 2014. In the ensuing months Team Leaders have been convening meetings with advocates, providers, partners, and Division staff to plan specific activities for attaining goals and objectives of the Strategic Plan. Teams have also developed performance measures to track progress and measure results.” Goal number 3 outlines that “DDD will ensure individuals with I/DD have opportunities to seek employment and achieve personal outcomes to work in competitive integrated settings.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Full Life Sponsors Disability Legislative Forum

EHDDC to host the 2016 East Hawaii Disability Legislative Forum “You cannot have Inclusion without Us” Full Life is sponsoring both East and West Hawai’i Island Disability Legislative Forums! The public, especially family members and persons with disabilities, are invited to come and meet Hawaii Island’s State legislators and County officials. These free events will feature a forum where policymakers will answer questions about disability-related issues such as employment, housing, transportation, and health. Special activities include the opportunities to express your opinion on topics important to you and to meet and talk story with State legislators and County officials. Provider agencies have prepared booths with information about many available services and supports.

Systems
  • Other

West Hawaii Business Leadership Network

“The West Hawaii Business Leadership Network meets quarterly at the Workforce Development Division’s Kona Office to share best practices on hiring, promoting and accommodating individuals with disabilities.   The West Hawaii BLN organizes the annual Mea Like Ole Awards Ceremony, recognizing the most outstanding employers in West Hawaii. BLN members also collaborate with other organizations from across the country to present workshops on job accommodations, customized employment, and other topics.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

East Hawaii Business Leadership Network

“The East Hawaii Business Leadership Network meets monthly at the Workforce Development Division’s Hilo Office to share best practices on hiring, promoting and accommodating individuals with disabilities.   The East Hawaii BLN organizes the annual Hoomohala Awards Ceremony, recognizing the most outstanding employers in East Hawaii. BLN members also collaborate with other organizations from across the country to present workshops on job accommodations, customized employment, and other topics.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities

~~“The Council is responsible to engage in advocacy , capacity-building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the policy in the federal law; and contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered and consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system that includes needed community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that promote self-determination for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

The Council carries out its responsibilities through policy development, implementation and analysis; researching and promoting new approaches and best practices to services and supports; educating and informing policymakers and the public about developmental disabilities; developing and supporting coalitions; fostering interagency collaboration and coordination; providing training in leadership development and legislative advocacy; and eliminating barriers and enhancing design and redesign of systems.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hire Abilities Hawai'i

“Hire Abilities Hawaii represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`’ College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council.“

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Hawaii Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“To advance Employment First, ODEP created the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). This program helps states align policies, regulations and funding priorities to encourage integrated employment as the primary outcome for individuals with significant disabilities.”   “In November 2014, Hawaii was one of 15 states selected to receive technical assistance from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy to build capacity and develop inter-agency policy for employment for individuals with disabilities..”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii DEI - Round 6 Grant Abstracts

The U.S. Department of Labor awarded Hawaii a Round 6 DEI grant to improve employment opportunities for youth and/or adults with disabilities. “HIDEI [Hawaii DEI] will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and build upon the promising practices of the HIDEI 2 [Round 2] project to incorporate career pathways into its service to individuals with significant disabilities to better prepare participants to obtain meaningful employment and achieve self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii DEI - Round 2 Grants

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2010, Hawaii was awarded a Round 1 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The Round 1 grant ended in 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Hawaii Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“In 2006, Hawaii received a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, known as Hire Abilities Hawaii, ran from 2006 to 2009. It was authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. MIG provided funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that built supports for people with disabilities seeking employment. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. The Hire Abilities website grew out of these goals and objectives.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

RealChoices Hawaii - Guide to Employment for Job Seekers - 01/22/2016

This guide to employment for people with disabilities provides information and additional links on job centers, employment for seniors and employment for youth.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Hawaii’s Disability Employment Initiative

~~“Hawaii’s DEI will focus its effort on the following strategies:•Increase American Job Center (AJC) staff competencies through training on Disability 101, Customized Employment, Career Pathway Systems, Job Accommodation, Asset Development, Individualized Learning Plans, and Disability Benefits Planning.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maui Youth and Family Services, Inc

~~“MYFS was established in 1978 by Maui County as the Maunaolu Youth Residential Shelter to provide a safe place for Maui’s homeless, abused and runaway children. Incorporated as a private non-profit agency in 1982, MYFS has expanded to include a range of behavioral and mental health programs to support young people and their families’ personal growth and emotional stability.Maui Youth and Family Services is accredited by CARF, the Commission on the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.”

Systems
  • Other

Hawaii Employers Council In-house Training

As a service exclusively for members, any or all of the Fundamentals of Supervision workshops can be brought to your company’s site or held at the HEC training room. The content of these workshops can be designed to fit your company’s unique culture and tailored to highlight issues that are important to your workplace. The workshops combine lectures, videos and case studies, with longer sessions including role-play exercises. We will use your company's forms, policies and procedures to the extent possible. In addition what is presented in the Fundamentals of Supervision Workshops, the following topics are also available for in-house programs: -ABCs of Collective Bargaining -Americans with Disabilities Act -Effective Employee Relations: Remaining Union Free -Family and Medical Leave Act (for members with 50 or more employees) -Preparing for Unemployment Appeals Hearings -Preventive Discipline for Unionized Work Groups

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - Customized Employment Videos

“These Customized Employment (CE) videos, each specifically focused on Employers, Youth, or a General audience, highlight the benefits of CE, an employment strategy which matches the skills and preferences of the individual with the specific business needs of the employer. This process results in expanded employment opportunities for those who utilize and engage in this innovative, evidenced-based approach to employment. The General audience video has been created in both English and Spanish.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

HireAbilities Hawai'i

This website is intended to provide resources to support employment for individuals with disabilities. It is intended to be used by job seekers with disabilities, service providers, agencies and businesses. This site was revamped December 2013 and now has many new features and content. Some major additions to the website include: -The Benefits Finder can search for eligibility and work incentive information for Hawaii’s state and federal disability programs. -Use our Resource Finder to search a database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. -Learn more about how Hawaii’s proposed Medicaid Buy-In Program could help workers with a disability who require Medicaid . Hire Abilities Hawaii is a comprehensive database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. It represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`i College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council. Originally started through a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - "What is Customized Employment?"

This brief article defines customized employment and outlines the case for using it with job seekers with disabilities. It outlines the different forms customized employment can take, including "task reassignment," "job carving," and "job negotiation."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

1915(C) HCBS Medicaid Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities WAIVER STANDARDS MANUAL Version B - 10/01/2017

~~“Discovery and Career Planning (DCP)Discovery and Career Planning combines elements of traditional prevocational services with career planning in order to provide supports that  the participant may use to develop skills and interests toward becoming employed for the first time or at different stages of the participant’s work career to develop skills and interests for advancement or a change in the participant’s career plan” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Going Home Plus Project - 07/09/2017

~~“The Going Home Plus (GHP) project helps residents who have been living in hospitals, nursing facilities, and ICF/ID facilities move back into the community. For those residents who choose to live in the community, the GHP project will assist in finding housing (if the resident does not have a home to return to) and services (for example, help with cooking and bathing).•Eligibility Requirements•Going Home Plus Services

Individuals from all islands are eligible to participate.

The Going Home Plus (GHP) project is funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration grant through June 30, 2020. The project is a partnership between the Hawaii Department of Human Services Med-Quest Division and the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Phase-In Timing for New Rates, by Services and ‘Cohort’ prepared for Developmental Disabilities Division” - 07/01/2017

~~“This document is a set of tables noting what services will be available for all of the participants in the program or different “cohorts” (Cohort 1 - Participants residing in certified or licensed settings; Cohort 2 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings AND receiving Adult Day Health; or Cohort 3 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings and NOT receiving Adult Day Health).”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for 1915(c) HCBS Waiver: HI.0013.R07.01 - Jun 01, 2017 - 07/01/2017

~~“The State of Hawaii requests approval for an amendment to the following Medicaid home and community-based services waiver…. Program Title: HCB Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD Waiver).  Amendment Number: HI.0013.R07.01Approved Effective Date of Waiver being Amended: 07/01/16This is a technical amendment to address several items that were not included in the waiver renewal approved effective July1, 2016. The new rate methodology and changes to services are designed to support implementation of the Home andCommunity Based Services Final Rule for Community Integration. This amendment also includes a multi-year phase-inusing the Supports Intensity Scale for Adults to assess participants’ support needs to inform the person-centered process.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Standards Manual Version A – Draft Pending DHS-MQD Approval - 03/09/2017

~~“The Waiver Standards Manual Version A includes current services that the participant may receive until their Individualized Service Plan (ISP) is held during fiscal year 2018 (July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018). Waiver Standards Manual Version B will include services available to participants as they transition to new services, fee schedules and billing codes based on their date of ISP and their cohort group.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Statewide HCBS Transition Plan - 03/09/2015

“The State of Hawaii has prepared this statewide transition plan in accordance with the new Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) regulations in 42 CFR Section 441.301(c)(4)(5) and Section 441.710(a)(1)(2). This plan addresses settings where home and community based services are provided through the Med-QUEST Division’s QUEST Integration program and the 1915(c) waiver for persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities. Hawaii’s plan outlines the activities to be undertaken by the State in partnership with the individuals who receive home and community based services, their families, friends, advocates, providers, and other stakeholders. The State of Hawaii will implement this plan in a manner that assures the health and safety of the individuals receiving HCBS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii HCBS Waiver for People w/DD (0013.R06.00) (1915c) - 07/01/2011

This waiver "provides adult day health, individual employment supports, prevocational services, residential hab, respite, assistive technology, chore, environmental accessibility adaptations, group employment supports, non-medical transportation, personal assistance/hab, PERS, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, training and consultation, vehicular mods, waiver emergency services for individual w/ID/DD."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

 “In 2006, Hawaii received a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, known as Hire Abilities Hawaii, ran from 2006 to 2009. It was authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. MIG provided funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that built supports for people with disabilities seeking employment. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. The Hire Abilities website grew out of these goals and objectives.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii Application for a §1915 (c) HCBS Waiver

The Hawaii renewal application for the HCBS waiver includes plans to enhance vocational planning services. “Discovery and Career Planning (DCP) combines an existing service in the current waiver (Prevocational) with a new service (Career Planning) and changes the title. These revisions were the result of numerous public comments and brainstorming sessions with stakeholders to improve access to the services needed to help participants explore their interests and skills, enter the workforce and maintain employment. Many of the activities were in the previous service definition of Prevocational but needed to be expanded and clarified so participants, families, guardians and providers understand what is included for job discovery, career planning, job development and financial literacy/ benefits planning and counseling.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Medicaid State Plan

The Hawaii Medicaid state plan details the agreement between the state and the Federal government. It describes how Hawaii administers its Medicaid program and explains how the state will abide by Federal rules.  It also explains how Hawaii may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Disability is a respected part of diversity in the Rainbow State of Hawaii, where employees with disabilities are saying "Aloha" to new job opportunities across the state. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Hawaii's VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.84%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,431,603
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-9.43%
Change from
2014 to 2015
63,826
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-16.78%
Change from
2014 to 2015
25,341
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-5.48%
Change from
2014 to 2015
40.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.59%
Change from
2014 to 2015
77.82%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 1,404,054 1,419,561 1,431,603
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 64,795 69,846 63,826
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 25,344 29,593 25,341
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 573,321 586,811 597,207
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.11% 42.37% 40.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.66% 76.58% 77.82%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.80% 4.40% 3.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.40% 16.50% 15.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.30% 10.90% 10.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 74,367 78,803 71,818
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 76,732 80,672 76,260
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 38,799 39,902 38,396
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,302 2,474 1,718
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 10,993 13,037 12,292
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 295
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 66,896 66,959 62,269
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 14,251 16,414 14,071
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 28,232 32,387 30,302
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 1,130 1,215 1,027

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 782 764 782
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.00% 3.90% 4.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 23,328 23,174 22,800

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 396 482 188
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,562 2,573 1,573
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 4,421 8,654 1,771
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 9.00% 5.60% 10.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.80% 1.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.20% 5.90% 2.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 74 83 146
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 769 613 202
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,007 1,836 1,587
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 5 6 5
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 3 4 4
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 60.00% 67.00% 80.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.22 0.28 0.28

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
878
595
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 41 60 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 96 58 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 143 94 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 291 162 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 245 181 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 62 40 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 17.20% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,337 1,188 1,134
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 39,192 38,693 38,249
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 34 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2011 2012 2013
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,252,000 $584,000 $258,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $16,096,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $16,585,000 $21,996,000 $52,428,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 1.00% 2.00% 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,199 1,224 1,956
Number of people served in facility based work. 49 49 22
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A 0 1,216
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.80 2.70 3.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 36.00% 36.71% 36.90%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.00% 19.35% 20.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.58% 1.04% 1.08%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 84.00% 89.30% 84.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.59% 33.67% 31.45%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 76.75% 74.90% 68.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 84.86% 85.46% 73.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 40.16% 41.23% 36.70%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 448,452
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 607
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 268
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 268
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,228,248

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 4 7 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4 7 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 65 97 51
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 65 97 51

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~• Align policies and funding streams across education, workforce, and economic development systems and all levels of government to focus public resources on the training that moves workers into industries with high-quality jobs that lead to better financial outcomes and longer job tenures for workers.
• Take an active role in the development of the “common pathways” for both individuals who desire to pursue secondary education AND for individuals who do not desire to pursue secondary education but desire to learn employment skills through work experience and/or on-the-job training.
• Coordinate a “common” work assessment process between core partners.
• Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff.
• Continue with the current iCAN bridging program at the Community Schools for Adults as a stepping stone to proceed into a career pathway leading to a work-readiness certificate and/or degree and economic success. Work closely with UH/CC to create possible dual enrollment and pre-apprenticeship classes for adult learners. (Page 99)
In preparation for WIOA implementation, State-level Partners met regularly for about a year to learn about services provided by each Core Partner (and other Partners), convened joint meetings among Partner stakeholders, and determined how participant data would be shared and tracked through Core Programs. As much as possible during this preparation period, Core Partners were added as key agencies in programs such as DLIR’s Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI), DVR’s Student Transition Employment Program, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) led by DVR, and the American Apprenticeship Initiative Grant led by DLIR.
For example, the Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI) program recently awarded to DLIR includes as a goal increasing the number of Business Leadership Networks, which are business-driven groups of employers committed toward promoting the hiring of persons with disabilities. A major partner in DEI is DVR and their providers, and WIOA One-Stop Center staff members are the primary recipients of capacity building to serve persons with significant disabilities. Another DEI goal is developing an interagency group of providers with the One-Stop Centers for a more coordinated referral system among providers and for more integration of business engagement activities among providers. Adult Education will be part of this group with other partners. Approaching employers and Business Leadership Networks (BLN) in a coordinated manner that represents all agencies is more professional, useful, and productive than each agency operating in its own silo with employers. A coordinated approach also enables providers to offer a fuller array of services as different options to meet different situations. (Page 111)
Contributing to a more integrated service strategy is the partnership building created by the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a technical assistance grant provided by DOL Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) to increase employment of persons with disabilities. EFSLMP is truly a partnership effort currently led by Vocational Rehabilitation, with Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Council, DLIR Workforce Development Division, Department of Human Services MedQuest Division, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and Department of Education. A Cooperative Agreement is being developed among partners to formalize cooperative working arrangements and a series of technical assistance and training have been provided to the partners and AJCs by subject matter experts. (Page 118)
In addition, underserved populations such as persons with disabilities and offenders will be targeted to expand the job seeker pool. Capacity building obtained through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program and Disability Employment Initiative will enable more staff, in coordination with Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health, and other partners, to assist employers in employing persons with disabilities. These services include customizing employment for individuals with significant barriers to employment. This employment option, combined with federal and state tax credits, will increase the incentives for employers, including federal contractors, to hire persons with disabilities. To assist ex-offenders, the experience and skills obtained through staff’s provision of services to inmates and parolees through a contract with State Department of Public Safety and the partnerships built for this effort will facilitate services to this group. (Page 147-148)
• Upon exit from the DOE/Special Education Program, DVR’s clients attend DOE/Adult Education classes. DVR and Adult Education management staff have been meeting to significantly increase the number of DVR clients attending Adult Education classes in 2016.
• In partnership with DOH, DOE, DOL, DVR is the lead agency in the Office of Disability Employment Policy (OPED) Employment first State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) grant. The grant coordinates more in-depth training by their Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) on Customized, Supported and Self Employment “train the trainers” training. (Page 157)
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities.
DVR has engaged in the following activities in order to create sustainable employment service models over time. 
Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP): Currently meets on a monthly basis to analyze policies and procedures required to increase opportunities for competitive integrated employment opportunities for all persons with disabilities. ( Page 285)
The Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a grant through the US Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy that was first given to the Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) and turned over to the Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) for the final year will bring together various core partners. One of the two projects under EFSLMP is to develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, DDD, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group. (Page 288)
Results from the CSNA indicate a need for more CRP’s on neighboring islands which include Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and Kauai. Employment, transportation and housing were identified on the neighbor islands as needed. CRP’s and other entities need to collaborate and communicate with each other to establish a foundation that consumers can rely on. Additionally, CRP’s must embrace the "Employment first" philosophy and move from sheltered employment to competitive integrated employment. (Page 297)
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule):
1.   Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes.
2.   Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1.   Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2.   Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. ( Page 315)
• Invest in marketing materials aimed at re-branding the service provision of DVR to be an Employment First agency for people with disabilities
• Work cooperatively with Workforce Development Division to outreach to businesses as partners in training and placement. (Page 318)
Priority 1: Increase the number of clients receiving SE services. Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals that receive SE services. FY 2015: 57 individuals received SE services. FY 2014: 53 individuals received SE services. FY 2013: 98 individuals received SE services.
The factors that contributed to our ability to increase the number of individuals that received SE services was our participation in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, (EFSLMP). This program introduced our counseling and employment staff to the customized employment model which supports the long term supports of SE services.
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2013: 54 individuals eligible for SE services, received benefits counseling services. (Page 322)
 

Customized Employment

~~Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff.
• Continue with the current iCAN bridging program at the Community Schools for Adults as a stepping stone to proceed into a career pathway leading to a work-readiness certificate and/or degree and economic success. Work closely with UH/CC to create possible dual enrollment and pre-apprenticeship classes for adult learners. (Page 99)
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule):
1. Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes.
2. Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. ( Page 315)
 

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities. (Page 285)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Although DEI focuses on a specific group of individuals, the successes of the coordinated service strategies is a model for a broader population. (DEI, Round II, was conducted only on the Counties of Hawaii and Maui, and the successful collaboration with employers and providers was the stepping stone for DEI Round VI statewide.) Experience showed that building trust among agencies took time and a disciplined commitment to regular meetings. It also required the lead agency and its contractor, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, to develop meeting agenda, contact agencies for meetings, and include actions relevant to the providers. Similar factors were critical to sustain business interest in participating on the Business Leadership Networks.
Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of One-Stop staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 111)
The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), Round VI, also will help facilitate a coordinated approach with employers among agencies serving persons with disabilities. This approach was very successful on Hawaii County where DEI Round II was carried out. Lessons learned from that experience, including the time it took to build trust and break barriers, helps inform DEI Round VI, which will be implemented Statewide.
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
Kauai DVR started Hookipa Workforce Academy at Waimea High in August 2015. This is a great example of our collaborative effort between DOE and DVR where participants are not in Adult Education.
• DVR is currently working with the DOL/Workforce Development Division, DOE/ Adult Basic Education and the US Business Leadership Network (BLN) to learn, network and build local business relationships with key leaders of companies and employers in the private sector that have demonstrated leadership and commitment to disability inclusion. USBLN is a national non–profit, non–partisan business–to–business network promoting workplaces, supply chains and marketplaces where people with disabilities are included. We are working with the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant staff to promote development of BLN Affiliates on Oahu, Kauai and Maui. (Page 275)
 

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~• Piloting programs/services to serve the neighbor islands, or some of the rural areas of Oahu such as Hookipa. Hookipa provides small group work readiness and hospitality skills training with paid work experience in a competitive setting.
• Partner with Workforce Development Division (WDD) and Adult Education so that staff that can work with DVR and share information and resources, provide cross-training, and strategize ways to increase training and placement opportunities for individuals with disabilities statewide.
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Benefits

~~Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of One-Stop staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 111)
DOE is responsible for providing and paying for DOE services identified in the IEP, including transition services for eligible TAY under IDEA. DVR is responsible for providing and paying for vocational or employment related services identified in the IPE for TAY, in keeping with DVR requirement for comparable services and benefits, and personal resources. (Page 281) 
A semi-annual review is conducted to ensure training needs are met. Statewide training initiatives includes:
• Collaborative relationships with the local University to support the Master’s in Rehabilitation Counseling program.
• Formal contracts with San Diego State University to provide Statewide Training and technical assistance to VR Counselors and VR Management.
• Formal contracts to include training and technical assistance in the areas of Benefits Planning and Assistive Technology. (Page 292)
• A large majority of DVR consumers receive SSA benefits and fear of benefit loss significantly affects their return–to–work behavior; (Page 295)
• Benefits planning resources to be provided for all DVR consumers that are also SSA beneficiaries. DVR counselors and community partners will ensure that they are discussing the full range of options for work with their consumers, including striving towards self-sufficiency through work. (Page 317)
• Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues.
 Temporary Employment Opportunities
 Paid and Unpaid Work Experience
• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Do outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 319)
We achieved this goal because of a number of factors to include, but not limited to continuing to increased employer partnerships, continued benefits planning services for clients, available work experiences for clients and focusing on employment as the expectation of the program from the beginning. (Page 320)
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2013: 54 individuals eligible for SE services, received benefits counseling services. (Page 322)
 

School to Work Transition

~~• Promote strategies to prepare for, obtain and maintain competitive, integrated employment such as
1. iCAN: Preparatory classes for youth and students for college and careers and
2. Project Search: High School Transition Program is a unique, business led, one year, school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the work place.
• Promote strategies to participate in work experience and post-secondary educational experience. This year, students and youth are participating in the Summer Youth Employment Program. Partnering with the State Workforce Development Division and the Honolulu, Maui, Kauai and Hawaii Counties, the program would provide paid work-based learning experiences, internships, and employment.  (Page 317)
 

Data Collection

~~A statewide MIS workgroup, composed of representatives and managers from each local area is responsible for reporting issues or questions regarding the PMIS to DLIR, and for providing input on desired enhancements or changes to it. Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education will be added to the MIS workgroup. The MIS workgroup also communicates updates or changes to the system to other staff. The DLIR Administrative staff tracks each concern and inquiry, and ensures that all issues are addressed and resolved either by the vendor, DLIR, local area, Core Partner, or any combination of these entities. Recommendations for policies and procedures regarding data entry, data revision, reports, assistance to public users, or other facets of data collection and use of data are solicited from and provided by the MIS workgroup or other users and finalized by DLIR. Training for all staff users is provided by the vendor whenever a new version of the software is installed. ( Page 158)
(3)   Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
(A)  The most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates; Yes, VR’s Triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment for Program Years 2015 – 2017 identified needs for the following goals and priorities:
• Priority 1: To provide Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Priority 2: To provide Supported Employment (SE) Services for Youth
• Priority 3: To increase employment engagement (B) the State’s performance under the performance accountability measures of section 116 of WIOA; and
• Priority 4: Data Collection Goals.(Page 305)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

~~Hawaii Career Pathway System increases access to and opportunities for employment, education, training, and support services, particularly for individuals with the greatest barriers to employment. These individuals include displaced homemakers; low-income individuals; Native Hawaiians; individuals with disabilities, including youth who are disabled; adults; ex-offenders; homeless individuals, or homeless children and youth; youth who are in or have aged out of foster care; English language learners, individuals who have low levels of literacy, individuals facing substantial cultural barriers; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (TANF); single parents; veterans, and long-term unemployed individuals.(Page 100-101)
The development of a unified state approach to career pathways requires aligning core programs with other WIOA partners to improve the workforce system. This alignment requires the collaboration of stakeholders that facilitates the design and development of the Hawaii Unified Plan.
The Hawaii Career Pathway System is a reflection of the ongoing collaboration by core partners and stakeholders to develop a unified state approach to career pathways. This system bridges Core Programs, WIOA partners, and the private sector in the development, implementation, and sustenance of promising practices from the workforce and education arenas at the Federal, State and local levels. The use of career pathways provide individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development training, education, and support services to enter or retain employment. (Page 102)
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
Strategies to increase the median earning of program participants:
1. Assist in the development of Career Pathways based upon Hawaii’s labor market for individuals interested in postsecondary education or direct job placement or both. Identify Career Pathways and job opportunities that are specific to each county.
2. Identify strategies to increase the capacity of SSA beneficiaries to move toward self-sufficiency through, work include education of the person’s family and try and encourage high expectations for the person regarding work rather than striving to remain dependent on SSI. High expectations have been proven to have a positive effect on outcomes and earnings for beneficiaries.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes.
Strategies to cultivate VR’s effectiveness in serving employers: Developing successful partnerships with local and multi-state businesses in an effort to increase the employment of individuals with disabilities and self-employment. Services include, but not limited to:
1. Train employers on compliance the title I of the American with Disability Act (ADA) of 1990 and other employment-related laws.
2. Inform employers of the existence of the program and availability of services.
3. Educate and provide services to employers who have hired or are interested in hiring individuals with disabilities.
4. Provide training and technical assistance to employers regarding disability awareness.
5. Working with employers to provide opportunities for work-based learning experiences and opportunities for PETS services.
6. Train employees who are individuals with disabilities. (Page 315)
 

Employment Networks

~~In addition, DVR partners with Developmental Disabilities Division case managers and Ticket to Work Employment Networks to provide extended services to maintain employment. (Page 312)
1.   The methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.
• Increase support services in postsecondary settings thereby increasing graduation rate.
• Increase pre-employment transitions services to better prepare transitioning youth with disabilities into the workforce.
• Support the provision of summer youth employment for transitioning high school students as well as those in postsecondary training.
• Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues.
 Temporary Employment Opportunities
 Paid and Unpaid Work Experience
• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Do outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, and develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 319)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 39

1915(C) HCBS Medicaid Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities WAIVER STANDARDS MANUAL Version B - 10/01/2017

~~“Discovery and Career Planning (DCP)Discovery and Career Planning combines elements of traditional prevocational services with career planning in order to provide supports that  the participant may use to develop skills and interests toward becoming employed for the first time or at different stages of the participant’s work career to develop skills and interests for advancement or a change in the participant’s career plan” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Uniform Application FY 2018/2019 – State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Community Mental Health Services Block Grant - 08/29/2017

~~“The Clubhouse Model seeks to demonstrate that people with mental illness can successfully live productive lives and work in the community, regardless of the nature or severity of their mental illness. Clubhouse services include Transitional Employment (TE), Group Transitional Employment (GTE), Supported Employment (SE), Supported Education (SE), Advocacy and Case Management”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

The Going Home Plus Project - 07/09/2017

~~“The Going Home Plus (GHP) project helps residents who have been living in hospitals, nursing facilities, and ICF/ID facilities move back into the community. For those residents who choose to live in the community, the GHP project will assist in finding housing (if the resident does not have a home to return to) and services (for example, help with cooking and bathing).•Eligibility Requirements•Going Home Plus Services

Individuals from all islands are eligible to participate.

The Going Home Plus (GHP) project is funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration grant through June 30, 2020. The project is a partnership between the Hawaii Department of Human Services Med-Quest Division and the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

*UPDATED* Supported Employment Services for VR Consumers - 07/04/2017

~~This is a call for bids for a program that will “Provide supported employment (SE) services to individuals with disabilities, both physical and mental. Individualized services are to be provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with the consumer’s strengths, resources, priortiespriorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice.  The contract term will be from October 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019 with four (4) additional 12-month option periods.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Phase-In Timing for New Rates, by Services and ‘Cohort’ prepared for Developmental Disabilities Division” - 07/01/2017

~~“This document is a set of tables noting what services will be available for all of the participants in the program or different “cohorts” (Cohort 1 - Participants residing in certified or licensed settings; Cohort 2 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings AND receiving Adult Day Health; or Cohort 3 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings and NOT receiving Adult Day Health).”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for 1915(c) HCBS Waiver: HI.0013.R07.01 - Jun 01, 2017 - 07/01/2017

~~“The State of Hawaii requests approval for an amendment to the following Medicaid home and community-based services waiver…. Program Title: HCB Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD Waiver).  Amendment Number: HI.0013.R07.01Approved Effective Date of Waiver being Amended: 07/01/16This is a technical amendment to address several items that were not included in the waiver renewal approved effective July1, 2016. The new rate methodology and changes to services are designed to support implementation of the Home andCommunity Based Services Final Rule for Community Integration. This amendment also includes a multi-year phase-inusing the Supports Intensity Scale for Adults to assess participants’ support needs to inform the person-centered process.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HAWAII RESIDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CELEBRATE 30 YEARS OF SELF-DETERMINATION AT “DAY AT THE CAPITOL" - 03/16/2017

~~“Today, Hawaii is one of nine states that does  not have a waiting list for home and community based services. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes. Currently, 99 percent of people served by the Department of Health’s Developmental Disabilities Division live in residences serving one to six people, and 61 percent in settings with one to three people. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes.

By law, the Department of Health is mandated to develop, lead, administer, coordinate, monitor, evaluate, and set direction for a comprehensive system of supports and services for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Current services include: personal assistance/habilitation, emergency services, respite, employment supports, chore, training and consultation, specialized medical equipment, adult day health, skilled nursing, environmental accessibility and vehicular modifications, assistive technology, personal emergency response systems and non-medical transportation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Standards Manual Version A – Draft Pending DHS-MQD Approval - 03/09/2017

~~“The Waiver Standards Manual Version A includes current services that the participant may receive until their Individualized Service Plan (ISP) is held during fiscal year 2018 (July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018). Waiver Standards Manual Version B will include services available to participants as they transition to new services, fee schedules and billing codes based on their date of ISP and their cohort group.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REPORT ANNUALLY TO THE LEGISLATURE THE NUMBERS OF PERSONS WAITING FOR DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY OR INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES SERVICES AND SUPPORTS, - 12/01/2016

~~“For fiscal year (FY) 2016, the Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) had no waitlists of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) for the following programs:1. Medicaid Home and Community-Based Service (HCBS) I/DD Waiver under the authority of section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act;2. Long Term Adult Supports and Resources (LASR);3. Family Support Services Program (FSSP); and4. Crisis Network Services.The total number of individuals with I/DD served by DDD was 3,246. Of this number 2,789 were served under I/DD Waiver,” 83 individuals were served under the LASR program, 33 individuals received services through FSSP, 178 individuals were served through Crisis Network Services, and the remaining 163 received only case management services.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

RealChoices Hawaii - Guide to Employment for Job Seekers - 01/22/2016

This guide to employment for people with disabilities provides information and additional links on job centers, employment for seniors and employment for youth.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Hawaii HB 119 - 07/01/2015

"It is the intent and purpose of the legislature to establish a qualified tax exempt savings program to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities pursuant to section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or successor legislation, and any regulations promulgated thereunder.  It is the further intent of the legislature that the program established by this Act be and remain in conformance with the Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act [ABLE] of 2014, Division B of Public Law No. 113-295"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

House Bill 860: Related to Persons with Disabilities - 01/28/2015

 “Establishes an employment first policy for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Requires the DOH to establish an employment first committee.” (Introduced in the Hawaii state legislature 1/28/15; sent to committees and status is pending.)

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Hawaii Uniform Application FY 2018/2019 – State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Community Mental Health Services Block Grant - 08/29/2017

~~“The Clubhouse Model seeks to demonstrate that people with mental illness can successfully live productive lives and work in the community, regardless of the nature or severity of their mental illness. Clubhouse services include Transitional Employment (TE), Group Transitional Employment (GTE), Supported Employment (SE), Supported Education (SE), Advocacy and Case Management”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

HAWAII RESIDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CELEBRATE 30 YEARS OF SELF-DETERMINATION AT “DAY AT THE CAPITOL" - 03/16/2017

~~“Today, Hawaii is one of nine states that does  not have a waiting list for home and community based services. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes. Currently, 99 percent of people served by the Department of Health’s Developmental Disabilities Division live in residences serving one to six people, and 61 percent in settings with one to three people. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes.

By law, the Department of Health is mandated to develop, lead, administer, coordinate, monitor, evaluate, and set direction for a comprehensive system of supports and services for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Current services include: personal assistance/habilitation, emergency services, respite, employment supports, chore, training and consultation, specialized medical equipment, adult day health, skilled nursing, environmental accessibility and vehicular modifications, assistive technology, personal emergency response systems and non-medical transportation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REPORT ANNUALLY TO THE LEGISLATURE THE NUMBERS OF PERSONS WAITING FOR DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY OR INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES SERVICES AND SUPPORTS, - 12/01/2016

~~“For fiscal year (FY) 2016, the Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) had no waitlists of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) for the following programs:1. Medicaid Home and Community-Based Service (HCBS) I/DD Waiver under the authority of section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act;2. Long Term Adult Supports and Resources (LASR);3. Family Support Services Program (FSSP); and4. Crisis Network Services.The total number of individuals with I/DD served by DDD was 3,246. Of this number 2,789 were served under I/DD Waiver,” 83 individuals were served under the LASR program, 33 individuals received services through FSSP, 178 individuals were served through Crisis Network Services, and the remaining 163 received only case management services.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations “Labor Law Requirements for New Employers” - 03/14/2013

Employers are required to provide reasonable accommodations for a qualified employee with a disability which allows that person to perform their essential job functions. An accommodation is reasonable if it does not impose an undue hardship on the employer’s business.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii Department of Education “IEP Overview”

Each Individualized Education Program includes: -a statement of the child's present levels of educational performance; -a statement of annual goals, including short-term instructional objectives; -a statement of the specific special education and related services to be provided; -the extent that the child will be able to participate in regular educational programs; -the projected dates for initiation of services and the anticipated duration of the services; and -appropriate objective criteria and evaluation procedures and schedules for determining, on at least an annual basis, whether the objectives are being achieved. The IEP for each student, beginning no later than age 16, must include a statement of needed transition services.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hawaii Department of Human Services Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) provides services to Hawai’i community members who experience barriers to employment due to a physical or cognitive disability. DVR is designed to assist job seekers with disabilities prepare, secure, and retain competitive employment in an integrated work setting. DVR furnishes the finest resources and opportunities for training, support, and career placement. Productive partnerships with other state agencies, private non-profits, and employers pave the way for our consumers to find successful employment with the reality of competitive wages. The underlying philosophy and goal of the DVR is thorough employment, individuals with disabilities are empowered toward economic self-sufficiency, independence, inclusion, and integration into society.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Hawaii Department of Human Services Division of Vocational Rehabilitation "Our Vision"

Our vision at the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is “Move Forward to Work.” We would like to think of ourselves as the agency of choice for persons with disabilities who are looking to enter or retain integrated, competitive employment. As Hawai‘i’s primary agency directly responsible for the employment needs of our citizens with disabilities, we are committed in Hawai‘i’s efforts in establishing a 21st century workforce. With service offices on Hawai‘i Island, Maui, Moloka‘i, O‘ahu and Kaua‘i the Division is entrenched within our communities to meet the needs of those seeking our services. With the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) in July of 2014, the Hawai‘i VR program has been actively working with core partners from the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, Department of Education, Department of Health, University of Hawai‘i and the Community Colleges as well as divisions within the Department of Human Services in developing the kinds of services all of Hawai‘i can be proud of.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Hawai'i State Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The Hawai'i State Council on Developmental Disabilities is mandated by federal (P.L. 106-402) and state (Chapter 333E, Hawaii Revised Statutes) laws to: plan, coordinate, evaluate, monitor, and advocate on behalf of individuals with developmental disabilities; and assure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families participate in the design of and have access to culturally competent services, supports, and other assistance and opportunities that promote independence, productivity, and integration, and inclusion into the community.

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii Employment First Inititive

“To advance Employment First, ODEP created the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). This program helps states align policies, regulations and funding priorities to encourage integrated employment as the primary outcome for individuals with significant disabilities.”   “In November 2014, Hawaii was one of 15 states selected to receive technical assistance from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy to build capacity and develop inter-agency policy for employment for individuals with disabilities..”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

*UPDATED* Supported Employment Services for VR Consumers - 07/04/2017

~~This is a call for bids for a program that will “Provide supported employment (SE) services to individuals with disabilities, both physical and mental. Individualized services are to be provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with the consumer’s strengths, resources, priortiespriorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice.  The contract term will be from October 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019 with four (4) additional 12-month option periods.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division - Strategic Plan 2015-2017 Progress Report - 09/23/2015

“The Strategic Plan was adopted on December 2014. In the ensuing months Team Leaders have been convening meetings with advocates, providers, partners, and Division staff to plan specific activities for attaining goals and objectives of the Strategic Plan. Teams have also developed performance measures to track progress and measure results.” Goal number 3 outlines that “DDD will ensure individuals with I/DD have opportunities to seek employment and achieve personal outcomes to work in competitive integrated settings.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Full Life Sponsors Disability Legislative Forum

EHDDC to host the 2016 East Hawaii Disability Legislative Forum “You cannot have Inclusion without Us” Full Life is sponsoring both East and West Hawai’i Island Disability Legislative Forums! The public, especially family members and persons with disabilities, are invited to come and meet Hawaii Island’s State legislators and County officials. These free events will feature a forum where policymakers will answer questions about disability-related issues such as employment, housing, transportation, and health. Special activities include the opportunities to express your opinion on topics important to you and to meet and talk story with State legislators and County officials. Provider agencies have prepared booths with information about many available services and supports.

Systems
  • Other

West Hawaii Business Leadership Network

“The West Hawaii Business Leadership Network meets quarterly at the Workforce Development Division’s Kona Office to share best practices on hiring, promoting and accommodating individuals with disabilities.   The West Hawaii BLN organizes the annual Mea Like Ole Awards Ceremony, recognizing the most outstanding employers in West Hawaii. BLN members also collaborate with other organizations from across the country to present workshops on job accommodations, customized employment, and other topics.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

East Hawaii Business Leadership Network

“The East Hawaii Business Leadership Network meets monthly at the Workforce Development Division’s Hilo Office to share best practices on hiring, promoting and accommodating individuals with disabilities.   The East Hawaii BLN organizes the annual Hoomohala Awards Ceremony, recognizing the most outstanding employers in East Hawaii. BLN members also collaborate with other organizations from across the country to present workshops on job accommodations, customized employment, and other topics.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities

~~“The Council is responsible to engage in advocacy , capacity-building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the policy in the federal law; and contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered and consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system that includes needed community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that promote self-determination for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

The Council carries out its responsibilities through policy development, implementation and analysis; researching and promoting new approaches and best practices to services and supports; educating and informing policymakers and the public about developmental disabilities; developing and supporting coalitions; fostering interagency collaboration and coordination; providing training in leadership development and legislative advocacy; and eliminating barriers and enhancing design and redesign of systems.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hire Abilities Hawai'i

“Hire Abilities Hawaii represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`’ College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council.“

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Hawaii Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“To advance Employment First, ODEP created the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). This program helps states align policies, regulations and funding priorities to encourage integrated employment as the primary outcome for individuals with significant disabilities.”   “In November 2014, Hawaii was one of 15 states selected to receive technical assistance from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy to build capacity and develop inter-agency policy for employment for individuals with disabilities..”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii DEI - Round 6 Grant Abstracts

The U.S. Department of Labor awarded Hawaii a Round 6 DEI grant to improve employment opportunities for youth and/or adults with disabilities. “HIDEI [Hawaii DEI] will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and build upon the promising practices of the HIDEI 2 [Round 2] project to incorporate career pathways into its service to individuals with significant disabilities to better prepare participants to obtain meaningful employment and achieve self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii DEI - Round 2 Grants

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2010, Hawaii was awarded a Round 1 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The Round 1 grant ended in 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Hawaii Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“In 2006, Hawaii received a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, known as Hire Abilities Hawaii, ran from 2006 to 2009. It was authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. MIG provided funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that built supports for people with disabilities seeking employment. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. The Hire Abilities website grew out of these goals and objectives.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

RealChoices Hawaii - Guide to Employment for Job Seekers - 01/22/2016

This guide to employment for people with disabilities provides information and additional links on job centers, employment for seniors and employment for youth.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Hawaii’s Disability Employment Initiative

~~“Hawaii’s DEI will focus its effort on the following strategies:•Increase American Job Center (AJC) staff competencies through training on Disability 101, Customized Employment, Career Pathway Systems, Job Accommodation, Asset Development, Individualized Learning Plans, and Disability Benefits Planning.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maui Youth and Family Services, Inc

~~“MYFS was established in 1978 by Maui County as the Maunaolu Youth Residential Shelter to provide a safe place for Maui’s homeless, abused and runaway children. Incorporated as a private non-profit agency in 1982, MYFS has expanded to include a range of behavioral and mental health programs to support young people and their families’ personal growth and emotional stability.Maui Youth and Family Services is accredited by CARF, the Commission on the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.”

Systems
  • Other

Hawaii Employers Council In-house Training

As a service exclusively for members, any or all of the Fundamentals of Supervision workshops can be brought to your company’s site or held at the HEC training room. The content of these workshops can be designed to fit your company’s unique culture and tailored to highlight issues that are important to your workplace. The workshops combine lectures, videos and case studies, with longer sessions including role-play exercises. We will use your company's forms, policies and procedures to the extent possible. In addition what is presented in the Fundamentals of Supervision Workshops, the following topics are also available for in-house programs: -ABCs of Collective Bargaining -Americans with Disabilities Act -Effective Employee Relations: Remaining Union Free -Family and Medical Leave Act (for members with 50 or more employees) -Preparing for Unemployment Appeals Hearings -Preventive Discipline for Unionized Work Groups

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - Customized Employment Videos

“These Customized Employment (CE) videos, each specifically focused on Employers, Youth, or a General audience, highlight the benefits of CE, an employment strategy which matches the skills and preferences of the individual with the specific business needs of the employer. This process results in expanded employment opportunities for those who utilize and engage in this innovative, evidenced-based approach to employment. The General audience video has been created in both English and Spanish.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

HireAbilities Hawai'i

This website is intended to provide resources to support employment for individuals with disabilities. It is intended to be used by job seekers with disabilities, service providers, agencies and businesses. This site was revamped December 2013 and now has many new features and content. Some major additions to the website include: -The Benefits Finder can search for eligibility and work incentive information for Hawaii’s state and federal disability programs. -Use our Resource Finder to search a database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. -Learn more about how Hawaii’s proposed Medicaid Buy-In Program could help workers with a disability who require Medicaid . Hire Abilities Hawaii is a comprehensive database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. It represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`i College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council. Originally started through a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - "What is Customized Employment?"

This brief article defines customized employment and outlines the case for using it with job seekers with disabilities. It outlines the different forms customized employment can take, including "task reassignment," "job carving," and "job negotiation."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

1915(C) HCBS Medicaid Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities WAIVER STANDARDS MANUAL Version B - 10/01/2017

~~“Discovery and Career Planning (DCP)Discovery and Career Planning combines elements of traditional prevocational services with career planning in order to provide supports that  the participant may use to develop skills and interests toward becoming employed for the first time or at different stages of the participant’s work career to develop skills and interests for advancement or a change in the participant’s career plan” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Going Home Plus Project - 07/09/2017

~~“The Going Home Plus (GHP) project helps residents who have been living in hospitals, nursing facilities, and ICF/ID facilities move back into the community. For those residents who choose to live in the community, the GHP project will assist in finding housing (if the resident does not have a home to return to) and services (for example, help with cooking and bathing).•Eligibility Requirements•Going Home Plus Services

Individuals from all islands are eligible to participate.

The Going Home Plus (GHP) project is funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration grant through June 30, 2020. The project is a partnership between the Hawaii Department of Human Services Med-Quest Division and the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Phase-In Timing for New Rates, by Services and ‘Cohort’ prepared for Developmental Disabilities Division” - 07/01/2017

~~“This document is a set of tables noting what services will be available for all of the participants in the program or different “cohorts” (Cohort 1 - Participants residing in certified or licensed settings; Cohort 2 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings AND receiving Adult Day Health; or Cohort 3 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings and NOT receiving Adult Day Health).”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for 1915(c) HCBS Waiver: HI.0013.R07.01 - Jun 01, 2017 - 07/01/2017

~~“The State of Hawaii requests approval for an amendment to the following Medicaid home and community-based services waiver…. Program Title: HCB Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD Waiver).  Amendment Number: HI.0013.R07.01Approved Effective Date of Waiver being Amended: 07/01/16This is a technical amendment to address several items that were not included in the waiver renewal approved effective July1, 2016. The new rate methodology and changes to services are designed to support implementation of the Home andCommunity Based Services Final Rule for Community Integration. This amendment also includes a multi-year phase-inusing the Supports Intensity Scale for Adults to assess participants’ support needs to inform the person-centered process.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Standards Manual Version A – Draft Pending DHS-MQD Approval - 03/09/2017

~~“The Waiver Standards Manual Version A includes current services that the participant may receive until their Individualized Service Plan (ISP) is held during fiscal year 2018 (July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018). Waiver Standards Manual Version B will include services available to participants as they transition to new services, fee schedules and billing codes based on their date of ISP and their cohort group.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Statewide HCBS Transition Plan - 03/09/2015

“The State of Hawaii has prepared this statewide transition plan in accordance with the new Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) regulations in 42 CFR Section 441.301(c)(4)(5) and Section 441.710(a)(1)(2). This plan addresses settings where home and community based services are provided through the Med-QUEST Division’s QUEST Integration program and the 1915(c) waiver for persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities. Hawaii’s plan outlines the activities to be undertaken by the State in partnership with the individuals who receive home and community based services, their families, friends, advocates, providers, and other stakeholders. The State of Hawaii will implement this plan in a manner that assures the health and safety of the individuals receiving HCBS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii HCBS Waiver for People w/DD (0013.R06.00) (1915c) - 07/01/2011

This waiver "provides adult day health, individual employment supports, prevocational services, residential hab, respite, assistive technology, chore, environmental accessibility adaptations, group employment supports, non-medical transportation, personal assistance/hab, PERS, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, training and consultation, vehicular mods, waiver emergency services for individual w/ID/DD."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

 “In 2006, Hawaii received a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, known as Hire Abilities Hawaii, ran from 2006 to 2009. It was authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. MIG provided funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that built supports for people with disabilities seeking employment. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. The Hire Abilities website grew out of these goals and objectives.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii Application for a §1915 (c) HCBS Waiver

The Hawaii renewal application for the HCBS waiver includes plans to enhance vocational planning services. “Discovery and Career Planning (DCP) combines an existing service in the current waiver (Prevocational) with a new service (Career Planning) and changes the title. These revisions were the result of numerous public comments and brainstorming sessions with stakeholders to improve access to the services needed to help participants explore their interests and skills, enter the workforce and maintain employment. Many of the activities were in the previous service definition of Prevocational but needed to be expanded and clarified so participants, families, guardians and providers understand what is included for job discovery, career planning, job development and financial literacy/ benefits planning and counseling.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Medicaid State Plan

The Hawaii Medicaid state plan details the agreement between the state and the Federal government. It describes how Hawaii administers its Medicaid program and explains how the state will abide by Federal rules.  It also explains how Hawaii may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Disability is a respected part of diversity in the Rainbow State of Hawaii, where employees with disabilities are saying "Aloha" to new job opportunities across the state. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Hawaii's VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.84%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,431,603
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-9.43%
Change from
2014 to 2015
63,826
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-16.78%
Change from
2014 to 2015
25,341
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-5.48%
Change from
2014 to 2015
40.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.59%
Change from
2014 to 2015
77.82%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 1,404,054 1,419,561 1,431,603
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 64,795 69,846 63,826
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 25,344 29,593 25,341
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 573,321 586,811 597,207
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.11% 42.37% 40.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.66% 76.58% 77.82%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.80% 4.40% 3.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.40% 16.50% 15.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.30% 10.90% 10.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 74,367 78,803 71,818
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 76,732 80,672 76,260
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 38,799 39,902 38,396
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,302 2,474 1,718
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 10,993 13,037 12,292
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A 295
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 66,896 66,959 62,269
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 14,251 16,414 14,071
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 28,232 32,387 30,302
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 1,130 1,215 1,027

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 782 764 782
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.00% 3.90% 4.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 23,328 23,174 22,800

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 396 482 188
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,562 2,573 1,573
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 4,421 8,654 1,771
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 9.00% 5.60% 10.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 0.80% 1.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.20% 5.90% 2.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 74 83 146
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 769 613 202
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 2,007 1,836 1,587
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 5 6 5
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 3 4 4
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 60.00% 67.00% 80.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.22 0.28 0.28

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
878
595
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 41 60 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 96 58 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 143 94 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 291 162 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 245 181 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 62 40 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 17.20% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,337 1,188 1,134
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 39,192 38,693 38,249
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 34 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2011 2012 2013
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,252,000 $584,000 $258,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $16,096,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $16,585,000 $21,996,000 $52,428,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 1.00% 2.00% 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,199 1,224 1,956
Number of people served in facility based work. 49 49 22
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A 0 1,216
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.80 2.70 3.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 36.00% 36.71% 36.90%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.00% 19.35% 20.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.58% 1.04% 1.08%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 84.00% 89.30% 84.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 36.59% 33.67% 31.45%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 76.75% 74.90% 68.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 84.86% 85.46% 73.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 40.16% 41.23% 36.70%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 448,452
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 607
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 268
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 268
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,228,248

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 4 7 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4 7 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 65 97 51
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 65 97 51

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~• Align policies and funding streams across education, workforce, and economic development systems and all levels of government to focus public resources on the training that moves workers into industries with high-quality jobs that lead to better financial outcomes and longer job tenures for workers.
• Take an active role in the development of the “common pathways” for both individuals who desire to pursue secondary education AND for individuals who do not desire to pursue secondary education but desire to learn employment skills through work experience and/or on-the-job training.
• Coordinate a “common” work assessment process between core partners.
• Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff.
• Continue with the current iCAN bridging program at the Community Schools for Adults as a stepping stone to proceed into a career pathway leading to a work-readiness certificate and/or degree and economic success. Work closely with UH/CC to create possible dual enrollment and pre-apprenticeship classes for adult learners. (Page 99)
In preparation for WIOA implementation, State-level Partners met regularly for about a year to learn about services provided by each Core Partner (and other Partners), convened joint meetings among Partner stakeholders, and determined how participant data would be shared and tracked through Core Programs. As much as possible during this preparation period, Core Partners were added as key agencies in programs such as DLIR’s Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI), DVR’s Student Transition Employment Program, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) led by DVR, and the American Apprenticeship Initiative Grant led by DLIR.
For example, the Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI) program recently awarded to DLIR includes as a goal increasing the number of Business Leadership Networks, which are business-driven groups of employers committed toward promoting the hiring of persons with disabilities. A major partner in DEI is DVR and their providers, and WIOA One-Stop Center staff members are the primary recipients of capacity building to serve persons with significant disabilities. Another DEI goal is developing an interagency group of providers with the One-Stop Centers for a more coordinated referral system among providers and for more integration of business engagement activities among providers. Adult Education will be part of this group with other partners. Approaching employers and Business Leadership Networks (BLN) in a coordinated manner that represents all agencies is more professional, useful, and productive than each agency operating in its own silo with employers. A coordinated approach also enables providers to offer a fuller array of services as different options to meet different situations. (Page 111)
Contributing to a more integrated service strategy is the partnership building created by the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a technical assistance grant provided by DOL Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) to increase employment of persons with disabilities. EFSLMP is truly a partnership effort currently led by Vocational Rehabilitation, with Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Council, DLIR Workforce Development Division, Department of Human Services MedQuest Division, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and Department of Education. A Cooperative Agreement is being developed among partners to formalize cooperative working arrangements and a series of technical assistance and training have been provided to the partners and AJCs by subject matter experts. (Page 118)
In addition, underserved populations such as persons with disabilities and offenders will be targeted to expand the job seeker pool. Capacity building obtained through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program and Disability Employment Initiative will enable more staff, in coordination with Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health, and other partners, to assist employers in employing persons with disabilities. These services include customizing employment for individuals with significant barriers to employment. This employment option, combined with federal and state tax credits, will increase the incentives for employers, including federal contractors, to hire persons with disabilities. To assist ex-offenders, the experience and skills obtained through staff’s provision of services to inmates and parolees through a contract with State Department of Public Safety and the partnerships built for this effort will facilitate services to this group. (Page 147-148)
• Upon exit from the DOE/Special Education Program, DVR’s clients attend DOE/Adult Education classes. DVR and Adult Education management staff have been meeting to significantly increase the number of DVR clients attending Adult Education classes in 2016.
• In partnership with DOH, DOE, DOL, DVR is the lead agency in the Office of Disability Employment Policy (OPED) Employment first State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) grant. The grant coordinates more in-depth training by their Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) on Customized, Supported and Self Employment “train the trainers” training. (Page 157)
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities.
DVR has engaged in the following activities in order to create sustainable employment service models over time. 
Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP): Currently meets on a monthly basis to analyze policies and procedures required to increase opportunities for competitive integrated employment opportunities for all persons with disabilities. ( Page 285)
The Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a grant through the US Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy that was first given to the Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) and turned over to the Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) for the final year will bring together various core partners. One of the two projects under EFSLMP is to develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, DDD, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group. (Page 288)
Results from the CSNA indicate a need for more CRP’s on neighboring islands which include Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and Kauai. Employment, transportation and housing were identified on the neighbor islands as needed. CRP’s and other entities need to collaborate and communicate with each other to establish a foundation that consumers can rely on. Additionally, CRP’s must embrace the "Employment first" philosophy and move from sheltered employment to competitive integrated employment. (Page 297)
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule):
1.   Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes.
2.   Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1.   Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2.   Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. ( Page 315)
• Invest in marketing materials aimed at re-branding the service provision of DVR to be an Employment First agency for people with disabilities
• Work cooperatively with Workforce Development Division to outreach to businesses as partners in training and placement. (Page 318)
Priority 1: Increase the number of clients receiving SE services. Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals that receive SE services. FY 2015: 57 individuals received SE services. FY 2014: 53 individuals received SE services. FY 2013: 98 individuals received SE services.
The factors that contributed to our ability to increase the number of individuals that received SE services was our participation in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, (EFSLMP). This program introduced our counseling and employment staff to the customized employment model which supports the long term supports of SE services.
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2013: 54 individuals eligible for SE services, received benefits counseling services. (Page 322)
 

Customized Employment

~~Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff.
• Continue with the current iCAN bridging program at the Community Schools for Adults as a stepping stone to proceed into a career pathway leading to a work-readiness certificate and/or degree and economic success. Work closely with UH/CC to create possible dual enrollment and pre-apprenticeship classes for adult learners. (Page 99)
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule):
1. Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes.
2. Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. ( Page 315)
 

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities. (Page 285)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Although DEI focuses on a specific group of individuals, the successes of the coordinated service strategies is a model for a broader population. (DEI, Round II, was conducted only on the Counties of Hawaii and Maui, and the successful collaboration with employers and providers was the stepping stone for DEI Round VI statewide.) Experience showed that building trust among agencies took time and a disciplined commitment to regular meetings. It also required the lead agency and its contractor, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, to develop meeting agenda, contact agencies for meetings, and include actions relevant to the providers. Similar factors were critical to sustain business interest in participating on the Business Leadership Networks.
Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of One-Stop staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 111)
The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), Round VI, also will help facilitate a coordinated approach with employers among agencies serving persons with disabilities. This approach was very successful on Hawaii County where DEI Round II was carried out. Lessons learned from that experience, including the time it took to build trust and break barriers, helps inform DEI Round VI, which will be implemented Statewide.
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
Kauai DVR started Hookipa Workforce Academy at Waimea High in August 2015. This is a great example of our collaborative effort between DOE and DVR where participants are not in Adult Education.
• DVR is currently working with the DOL/Workforce Development Division, DOE/ Adult Basic Education and the US Business Leadership Network (BLN) to learn, network and build local business relationships with key leaders of companies and employers in the private sector that have demonstrated leadership and commitment to disability inclusion. USBLN is a national non–profit, non–partisan business–to–business network promoting workplaces, supply chains and marketplaces where people with disabilities are included. We are working with the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant staff to promote development of BLN Affiliates on Oahu, Kauai and Maui. (Page 275)
 

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~• Piloting programs/services to serve the neighbor islands, or some of the rural areas of Oahu such as Hookipa. Hookipa provides small group work readiness and hospitality skills training with paid work experience in a competitive setting.
• Partner with Workforce Development Division (WDD) and Adult Education so that staff that can work with DVR and share information and resources, provide cross-training, and strategize ways to increase training and placement opportunities for individuals with disabilities statewide.
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Benefits

~~Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of One-Stop staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 111)
DOE is responsible for providing and paying for DOE services identified in the IEP, including transition services for eligible TAY under IDEA. DVR is responsible for providing and paying for vocational or employment related services identified in the IPE for TAY, in keeping with DVR requirement for comparable services and benefits, and personal resources. (Page 281) 
A semi-annual review is conducted to ensure training needs are met. Statewide training initiatives includes:
• Collaborative relationships with the local University to support the Master’s in Rehabilitation Counseling program.
• Formal contracts with San Diego State University to provide Statewide Training and technical assistance to VR Counselors and VR Management.
• Formal contracts to include training and technical assistance in the areas of Benefits Planning and Assistive Technology. (Page 292)
• A large majority of DVR consumers receive SSA benefits and fear of benefit loss significantly affects their return–to–work behavior; (Page 295)
• Benefits planning resources to be provided for all DVR consumers that are also SSA beneficiaries. DVR counselors and community partners will ensure that they are discussing the full range of options for work with their consumers, including striving towards self-sufficiency through work. (Page 317)
• Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues.
 Temporary Employment Opportunities
 Paid and Unpaid Work Experience
• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Do outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 319)
We achieved this goal because of a number of factors to include, but not limited to continuing to increased employer partnerships, continued benefits planning services for clients, available work experiences for clients and focusing on employment as the expectation of the program from the beginning. (Page 320)
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2013: 54 individuals eligible for SE services, received benefits counseling services. (Page 322)
 

School to Work Transition

~~• Promote strategies to prepare for, obtain and maintain competitive, integrated employment such as
1. iCAN: Preparatory classes for youth and students for college and careers and
2. Project Search: High School Transition Program is a unique, business led, one year, school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the work place.
• Promote strategies to participate in work experience and post-secondary educational experience. This year, students and youth are participating in the Summer Youth Employment Program. Partnering with the State Workforce Development Division and the Honolulu, Maui, Kauai and Hawaii Counties, the program would provide paid work-based learning experiences, internships, and employment.  (Page 317)
 

Data Collection

~~A statewide MIS workgroup, composed of representatives and managers from each local area is responsible for reporting issues or questions regarding the PMIS to DLIR, and for providing input on desired enhancements or changes to it. Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education will be added to the MIS workgroup. The MIS workgroup also communicates updates or changes to the system to other staff. The DLIR Administrative staff tracks each concern and inquiry, and ensures that all issues are addressed and resolved either by the vendor, DLIR, local area, Core Partner, or any combination of these entities. Recommendations for policies and procedures regarding data entry, data revision, reports, assistance to public users, or other facets of data collection and use of data are solicited from and provided by the MIS workgroup or other users and finalized by DLIR. Training for all staff users is provided by the vendor whenever a new version of the software is installed. ( Page 158)
(3)   Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
(A)  The most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates; Yes, VR’s Triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment for Program Years 2015 – 2017 identified needs for the following goals and priorities:
• Priority 1: To provide Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Priority 2: To provide Supported Employment (SE) Services for Youth
• Priority 3: To increase employment engagement (B) the State’s performance under the performance accountability measures of section 116 of WIOA; and
• Priority 4: Data Collection Goals.(Page 305)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

~~Hawaii Career Pathway System increases access to and opportunities for employment, education, training, and support services, particularly for individuals with the greatest barriers to employment. These individuals include displaced homemakers; low-income individuals; Native Hawaiians; individuals with disabilities, including youth who are disabled; adults; ex-offenders; homeless individuals, or homeless children and youth; youth who are in or have aged out of foster care; English language learners, individuals who have low levels of literacy, individuals facing substantial cultural barriers; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (TANF); single parents; veterans, and long-term unemployed individuals.(Page 100-101)
The development of a unified state approach to career pathways requires aligning core programs with other WIOA partners to improve the workforce system. This alignment requires the collaboration of stakeholders that facilitates the design and development of the Hawaii Unified Plan.
The Hawaii Career Pathway System is a reflection of the ongoing collaboration by core partners and stakeholders to develop a unified state approach to career pathways. This system bridges Core Programs, WIOA partners, and the private sector in the development, implementation, and sustenance of promising practices from the workforce and education arenas at the Federal, State and local levels. The use of career pathways provide individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development training, education, and support services to enter or retain employment. (Page 102)
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
Strategies to increase the median earning of program participants:
1. Assist in the development of Career Pathways based upon Hawaii’s labor market for individuals interested in postsecondary education or direct job placement or both. Identify Career Pathways and job opportunities that are specific to each county.
2. Identify strategies to increase the capacity of SSA beneficiaries to move toward self-sufficiency through, work include education of the person’s family and try and encourage high expectations for the person regarding work rather than striving to remain dependent on SSI. High expectations have been proven to have a positive effect on outcomes and earnings for beneficiaries.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes.
Strategies to cultivate VR’s effectiveness in serving employers: Developing successful partnerships with local and multi-state businesses in an effort to increase the employment of individuals with disabilities and self-employment. Services include, but not limited to:
1. Train employers on compliance the title I of the American with Disability Act (ADA) of 1990 and other employment-related laws.
2. Inform employers of the existence of the program and availability of services.
3. Educate and provide services to employers who have hired or are interested in hiring individuals with disabilities.
4. Provide training and technical assistance to employers regarding disability awareness.
5. Working with employers to provide opportunities for work-based learning experiences and opportunities for PETS services.
6. Train employees who are individuals with disabilities. (Page 315)
 

Employment Networks

~~In addition, DVR partners with Developmental Disabilities Division case managers and Ticket to Work Employment Networks to provide extended services to maintain employment. (Page 312)
1.   The methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.
• Increase support services in postsecondary settings thereby increasing graduation rate.
• Increase pre-employment transitions services to better prepare transitioning youth with disabilities into the workforce.
• Support the provision of summer youth employment for transitioning high school students as well as those in postsecondary training.
• Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues.
 Temporary Employment Opportunities
 Paid and Unpaid Work Experience
• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Do outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, and develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 319)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 39

1915(C) HCBS Medicaid Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities WAIVER STANDARDS MANUAL Version B - 10/01/2017

~~“Discovery and Career Planning (DCP)Discovery and Career Planning combines elements of traditional prevocational services with career planning in order to provide supports that  the participant may use to develop skills and interests toward becoming employed for the first time or at different stages of the participant’s work career to develop skills and interests for advancement or a change in the participant’s career plan” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Uniform Application FY 2018/2019 – State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Community Mental Health Services Block Grant - 08/29/2017

~~“The Clubhouse Model seeks to demonstrate that people with mental illness can successfully live productive lives and work in the community, regardless of the nature or severity of their mental illness. Clubhouse services include Transitional Employment (TE), Group Transitional Employment (GTE), Supported Employment (SE), Supported Education (SE), Advocacy and Case Management”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

The Going Home Plus Project - 07/09/2017

~~“The Going Home Plus (GHP) project helps residents who have been living in hospitals, nursing facilities, and ICF/ID facilities move back into the community. For those residents who choose to live in the community, the GHP project will assist in finding housing (if the resident does not have a home to return to) and services (for example, help with cooking and bathing).•Eligibility Requirements•Going Home Plus Services

Individuals from all islands are eligible to participate.

The Going Home Plus (GHP) project is funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration grant through June 30, 2020. The project is a partnership between the Hawaii Department of Human Services Med-Quest Division and the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

*UPDATED* Supported Employment Services for VR Consumers - 07/04/2017

~~This is a call for bids for a program that will “Provide supported employment (SE) services to individuals with disabilities, both physical and mental. Individualized services are to be provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with the consumer’s strengths, resources, priortiespriorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice.  The contract term will be from October 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019 with four (4) additional 12-month option periods.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Phase-In Timing for New Rates, by Services and ‘Cohort’ prepared for Developmental Disabilities Division” - 07/01/2017

~~“This document is a set of tables noting what services will be available for all of the participants in the program or different “cohorts” (Cohort 1 - Participants residing in certified or licensed settings; Cohort 2 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings AND receiving Adult Day Health; or Cohort 3 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings and NOT receiving Adult Day Health).”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for 1915(c) HCBS Waiver: HI.0013.R07.01 - Jun 01, 2017 - 07/01/2017

~~“The State of Hawaii requests approval for an amendment to the following Medicaid home and community-based services waiver…. Program Title: HCB Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD Waiver).  Amendment Number: HI.0013.R07.01Approved Effective Date of Waiver being Amended: 07/01/16This is a technical amendment to address several items that were not included in the waiver renewal approved effective July1, 2016. The new rate methodology and changes to services are designed to support implementation of the Home andCommunity Based Services Final Rule for Community Integration. This amendment also includes a multi-year phase-inusing the Supports Intensity Scale for Adults to assess participants’ support needs to inform the person-centered process.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HAWAII RESIDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CELEBRATE 30 YEARS OF SELF-DETERMINATION AT “DAY AT THE CAPITOL" - 03/16/2017

~~“Today, Hawaii is one of nine states that does  not have a waiting list for home and community based services. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes. Currently, 99 percent of people served by the Department of Health’s Developmental Disabilities Division live in residences serving one to six people, and 61 percent in settings with one to three people. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes.

By law, the Department of Health is mandated to develop, lead, administer, coordinate, monitor, evaluate, and set direction for a comprehensive system of supports and services for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Current services include: personal assistance/habilitation, emergency services, respite, employment supports, chore, training and consultation, specialized medical equipment, adult day health, skilled nursing, environmental accessibility and vehicular modifications, assistive technology, personal emergency response systems and non-medical transportation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Standards Manual Version A – Draft Pending DHS-MQD Approval - 03/09/2017

~~“The Waiver Standards Manual Version A includes current services that the participant may receive until their Individualized Service Plan (ISP) is held during fiscal year 2018 (July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018). Waiver Standards Manual Version B will include services available to participants as they transition to new services, fee schedules and billing codes based on their date of ISP and their cohort group.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REPORT ANNUALLY TO THE LEGISLATURE THE NUMBERS OF PERSONS WAITING FOR DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY OR INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES SERVICES AND SUPPORTS, - 12/01/2016

~~“For fiscal year (FY) 2016, the Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) had no waitlists of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) for the following programs:1. Medicaid Home and Community-Based Service (HCBS) I/DD Waiver under the authority of section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act;2. Long Term Adult Supports and Resources (LASR);3. Family Support Services Program (FSSP); and4. Crisis Network Services.The total number of individuals with I/DD served by DDD was 3,246. Of this number 2,789 were served under I/DD Waiver,” 83 individuals were served under the LASR program, 33 individuals received services through FSSP, 178 individuals were served through Crisis Network Services, and the remaining 163 received only case management services.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

RealChoices Hawaii - Guide to Employment for Job Seekers - 01/22/2016

This guide to employment for people with disabilities provides information and additional links on job centers, employment for seniors and employment for youth.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Hawaii HB 119 - 07/01/2015

"It is the intent and purpose of the legislature to establish a qualified tax exempt savings program to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities pursuant to section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or successor legislation, and any regulations promulgated thereunder.  It is the further intent of the legislature that the program established by this Act be and remain in conformance with the Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act [ABLE] of 2014, Division B of Public Law No. 113-295"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

House Bill 860: Related to Persons with Disabilities - 01/28/2015

 “Establishes an employment first policy for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Requires the DOH to establish an employment first committee.” (Introduced in the Hawaii state legislature 1/28/15; sent to committees and status is pending.)

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Hawaii Uniform Application FY 2018/2019 – State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Community Mental Health Services Block Grant - 08/29/2017

~~“The Clubhouse Model seeks to demonstrate that people with mental illness can successfully live productive lives and work in the community, regardless of the nature or severity of their mental illness. Clubhouse services include Transitional Employment (TE), Group Transitional Employment (GTE), Supported Employment (SE), Supported Education (SE), Advocacy and Case Management”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

HAWAII RESIDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CELEBRATE 30 YEARS OF SELF-DETERMINATION AT “DAY AT THE CAPITOL" - 03/16/2017

~~“Today, Hawaii is one of nine states that does  not have a waiting list for home and community based services. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes. Currently, 99 percent of people served by the Department of Health’s Developmental Disabilities Division live in residences serving one to six people, and 61 percent in settings with one to three people. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes.

By law, the Department of Health is mandated to develop, lead, administer, coordinate, monitor, evaluate, and set direction for a comprehensive system of supports and services for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Current services include: personal assistance/habilitation, emergency services, respite, employment supports, chore, training and consultation, specialized medical equipment, adult day health, skilled nursing, environmental accessibility and vehicular modifications, assistive technology, personal emergency response systems and non-medical transportation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REPORT ANNUALLY TO THE LEGISLATURE THE NUMBERS OF PERSONS WAITING FOR DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY OR INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES SERVICES AND SUPPORTS, - 12/01/2016

~~“For fiscal year (FY) 2016, the Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) had no waitlists of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) for the following programs:1. Medicaid Home and Community-Based Service (HCBS) I/DD Waiver under the authority of section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act;2. Long Term Adult Supports and Resources (LASR);3. Family Support Services Program (FSSP); and4. Crisis Network Services.The total number of individuals with I/DD served by DDD was 3,246. Of this number 2,789 were served under I/DD Waiver,” 83 individuals were served under the LASR program, 33 individuals received services through FSSP, 178 individuals were served through Crisis Network Services, and the remaining 163 received only case management services.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations “Labor Law Requirements for New Employers” - 03/14/2013

Employers are required to provide reasonable accommodations for a qualified employee with a disability which allows that person to perform their essential job functions. An accommodation is reasonable if it does not impose an undue hardship on the employer’s business.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii Department of Education “IEP Overview”

Each Individualized Education Program includes: -a statement of the child's present levels of educational performance; -a statement of annual goals, including short-term instructional objectives; -a statement of the specific special education and related services to be provided; -the extent that the child will be able to participate in regular educational programs; -the projected dates for initiation of services and the anticipated duration of the services; and -appropriate objective criteria and evaluation procedures and schedules for determining, on at least an annual basis, whether the objectives are being achieved. The IEP for each student, beginning no later than age 16, must include a statement of needed transition services.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hawaii Department of Human Services Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) provides services to Hawai’i community members who experience barriers to employment due to a physical or cognitive disability. DVR is designed to assist job seekers with disabilities prepare, secure, and retain competitive employment in an integrated work setting. DVR furnishes the finest resources and opportunities for training, support, and career placement. Productive partnerships with other state agencies, private non-profits, and employers pave the way for our consumers to find successful employment with the reality of competitive wages. The underlying philosophy and goal of the DVR is thorough employment, individuals with disabilities are empowered toward economic self-sufficiency, independence, inclusion, and integration into society.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Hawaii Department of Human Services Division of Vocational Rehabilitation "Our Vision"

Our vision at the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is “Move Forward to Work.” We would like to think of ourselves as the agency of choice for persons with disabilities who are looking to enter or retain integrated, competitive employment. As Hawai‘i’s primary agency directly responsible for the employment needs of our citizens with disabilities, we are committed in Hawai‘i’s efforts in establishing a 21st century workforce. With service offices on Hawai‘i Island, Maui, Moloka‘i, O‘ahu and Kaua‘i the Division is entrenched within our communities to meet the needs of those seeking our services. With the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) in July of 2014, the Hawai‘i VR program has been actively working with core partners from the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, Department of Education, Department of Health, University of Hawai‘i and the Community Colleges as well as divisions within the Department of Human Services in developing the kinds of services all of Hawai‘i can be proud of.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Hawai'i State Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The Hawai'i State Council on Developmental Disabilities is mandated by federal (P.L. 106-402) and state (Chapter 333E, Hawaii Revised Statutes) laws to: plan, coordinate, evaluate, monitor, and advocate on behalf of individuals with developmental disabilities; and assure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families participate in the design of and have access to culturally competent services, supports, and other assistance and opportunities that promote independence, productivity, and integration, and inclusion into the community.

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii Employment First Inititive

“To advance Employment First, ODEP created the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). This program helps states align policies, regulations and funding priorities to encourage integrated employment as the primary outcome for individuals with significant disabilities.”   “In November 2014, Hawaii was one of 15 states selected to receive technical assistance from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy to build capacity and develop inter-agency policy for employment for individuals with disabilities..”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

*UPDATED* Supported Employment Services for VR Consumers - 07/04/2017

~~This is a call for bids for a program that will “Provide supported employment (SE) services to individuals with disabilities, both physical and mental. Individualized services are to be provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with the consumer’s strengths, resources, priortiespriorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice.  The contract term will be from October 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019 with four (4) additional 12-month option periods.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division - Strategic Plan 2015-2017 Progress Report - 09/23/2015

“The Strategic Plan was adopted on December 2014. In the ensuing months Team Leaders have been convening meetings with advocates, providers, partners, and Division staff to plan specific activities for attaining goals and objectives of the Strategic Plan. Teams have also developed performance measures to track progress and measure results.” Goal number 3 outlines that “DDD will ensure individuals with I/DD have opportunities to seek employment and achieve personal outcomes to work in competitive integrated settings.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Full Life Sponsors Disability Legislative Forum

EHDDC to host the 2016 East Hawaii Disability Legislative Forum “You cannot have Inclusion without Us” Full Life is sponsoring both East and West Hawai’i Island Disability Legislative Forums! The public, especially family members and persons with disabilities, are invited to come and meet Hawaii Island’s State legislators and County officials. These free events will feature a forum where policymakers will answer questions about disability-related issues such as employment, housing, transportation, and health. Special activities include the opportunities to express your opinion on topics important to you and to meet and talk story with State legislators and County officials. Provider agencies have prepared booths with information about many available services and supports.

Systems
  • Other

West Hawaii Business Leadership Network

“The West Hawaii Business Leadership Network meets quarterly at the Workforce Development Division’s Kona Office to share best practices on hiring, promoting and accommodating individuals with disabilities.   The West Hawaii BLN organizes the annual Mea Like Ole Awards Ceremony, recognizing the most outstanding employers in West Hawaii. BLN members also collaborate with other organizations from across the country to present workshops on job accommodations, customized employment, and other topics.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

East Hawaii Business Leadership Network

“The East Hawaii Business Leadership Network meets monthly at the Workforce Development Division’s Hilo Office to share best practices on hiring, promoting and accommodating individuals with disabilities.   The East Hawaii BLN organizes the annual Hoomohala Awards Ceremony, recognizing the most outstanding employers in East Hawaii. BLN members also collaborate with other organizations from across the country to present workshops on job accommodations, customized employment, and other topics.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities

~~“The Council is responsible to engage in advocacy , capacity-building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the policy in the federal law; and contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered and consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system that includes needed community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that promote self-determination for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

The Council carries out its responsibilities through policy development, implementation and analysis; researching and promoting new approaches and best practices to services and supports; educating and informing policymakers and the public about developmental disabilities; developing and supporting coalitions; fostering interagency collaboration and coordination; providing training in leadership development and legislative advocacy; and eliminating barriers and enhancing design and redesign of systems.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hire Abilities Hawai'i

“Hire Abilities Hawaii represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`’ College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council.“

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Hawaii Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“To advance Employment First, ODEP created the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). This program helps states align policies, regulations and funding priorities to encourage integrated employment as the primary outcome for individuals with significant disabilities.”   “In November 2014, Hawaii was one of 15 states selected to receive technical assistance from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy to build capacity and develop inter-agency policy for employment for individuals with disabilities..”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii DEI - Round 6 Grant Abstracts

The U.S. Department of Labor awarded Hawaii a Round 6 DEI grant to improve employment opportunities for youth and/or adults with disabilities. “HIDEI [Hawaii DEI] will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and build upon the promising practices of the HIDEI 2 [Round 2] project to incorporate career pathways into its service to individuals with significant disabilities to better prepare participants to obtain meaningful employment and achieve self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii DEI - Round 2 Grants

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2010, Hawaii was awarded a Round 1 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The Round 1 grant ended in 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Hawaii Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“In 2006, Hawaii received a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, known as Hire Abilities Hawaii, ran from 2006 to 2009. It was authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. MIG provided funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that built supports for people with disabilities seeking employment. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. The Hire Abilities website grew out of these goals and objectives.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

RealChoices Hawaii - Guide to Employment for Job Seekers - 01/22/2016

This guide to employment for people with disabilities provides information and additional links on job centers, employment for seniors and employment for youth.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Hawaii’s Disability Employment Initiative

~~“Hawaii’s DEI will focus its effort on the following strategies:•Increase American Job Center (AJC) staff competencies through training on Disability 101, Customized Employment, Career Pathway Systems, Job Accommodation, Asset Development, Individualized Learning Plans, and Disability Benefits Planning.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maui Youth and Family Services, Inc

~~“MYFS was established in 1978 by Maui County as the Maunaolu Youth Residential Shelter to provide a safe place for Maui’s homeless, abused and runaway children. Incorporated as a private non-profit agency in 1982, MYFS has expanded to include a range of behavioral and mental health programs to support young people and their families’ personal growth and emotional stability.Maui Youth and Family Services is accredited by CARF, the Commission on the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.”

Systems
  • Other

Hawaii Employers Council In-house Training

As a service exclusively for members, any or all of the Fundamentals of Supervision workshops can be brought to your company’s site or held at the HEC training room. The content of these workshops can be designed to fit your company’s unique culture and tailored to highlight issues that are important to your workplace. The workshops combine lectures, videos and case studies, with longer sessions including role-play exercises. We will use your company's forms, policies and procedures to the extent possible. In addition what is presented in the Fundamentals of Supervision Workshops, the following topics are also available for in-house programs: -ABCs of Collective Bargaining -Americans with Disabilities Act -Effective Employee Relations: Remaining Union Free -Family and Medical Leave Act (for members with 50 or more employees) -Preparing for Unemployment Appeals Hearings -Preventive Discipline for Unionized Work Groups

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - Customized Employment Videos

“These Customized Employment (CE) videos, each specifically focused on Employers, Youth, or a General audience, highlight the benefits of CE, an employment strategy which matches the skills and preferences of the individual with the specific business needs of the employer. This process results in expanded employment opportunities for those who utilize and engage in this innovative, evidenced-based approach to employment. The General audience video has been created in both English and Spanish.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

HireAbilities Hawai'i

This website is intended to provide resources to support employment for individuals with disabilities. It is intended to be used by job seekers with disabilities, service providers, agencies and businesses. This site was revamped December 2013 and now has many new features and content. Some major additions to the website include: -The Benefits Finder can search for eligibility and work incentive information for Hawaii’s state and federal disability programs. -Use our Resource Finder to search a database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. -Learn more about how Hawaii’s proposed Medicaid Buy-In Program could help workers with a disability who require Medicaid . Hire Abilities Hawaii is a comprehensive database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. It represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`i College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council. Originally started through a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - "What is Customized Employment?"

This brief article defines customized employment and outlines the case for using it with job seekers with disabilities. It outlines the different forms customized employment can take, including "task reassignment," "job carving," and "job negotiation."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

1915(C) HCBS Medicaid Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities WAIVER STANDARDS MANUAL Version B - 10/01/2017

~~“Discovery and Career Planning (DCP)Discovery and Career Planning combines elements of traditional prevocational services with career planning in order to provide supports that  the participant may use to develop skills and interests toward becoming employed for the first time or at different stages of the participant’s work career to develop skills and interests for advancement or a change in the participant’s career plan” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Going Home Plus Project - 07/09/2017

~~“The Going Home Plus (GHP) project helps residents who have been living in hospitals, nursing facilities, and ICF/ID facilities move back into the community. For those residents who choose to live in the community, the GHP project will assist in finding housing (if the resident does not have a home to return to) and services (for example, help with cooking and bathing).•Eligibility Requirements•Going Home Plus Services

Individuals from all islands are eligible to participate.

The Going Home Plus (GHP) project is funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration grant through June 30, 2020. The project is a partnership between the Hawaii Department of Human Services Med-Quest Division and the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Phase-In Timing for New Rates, by Services and ‘Cohort’ prepared for Developmental Disabilities Division” - 07/01/2017

~~“This document is a set of tables noting what services will be available for all of the participants in the program or different “cohorts” (Cohort 1 - Participants residing in certified or licensed settings; Cohort 2 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings AND receiving Adult Day Health; or Cohort 3 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings and NOT receiving Adult Day Health).”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for 1915(c) HCBS Waiver: HI.0013.R07.01 - Jun 01, 2017 - 07/01/2017

~~“The State of Hawaii requests approval for an amendment to the following Medicaid home and community-based services waiver…. Program Title: HCB Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD Waiver).  Amendment Number: HI.0013.R07.01Approved Effective Date of Waiver being Amended: 07/01/16This is a technical amendment to address several items that were not included in the waiver renewal approved effective July1, 2016. The new rate methodology and changes to services are designed to support implementation of the Home andCommunity Based Services Final Rule for Community Integration. This amendment also includes a multi-year phase-inusing the Supports Intensity Scale for Adults to assess participants’ support needs to inform the person-centered process.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Standards Manual Version A – Draft Pending DHS-MQD Approval - 03/09/2017

~~“The Waiver Standards Manual Version A includes current services that the participant may receive until their Individualized Service Plan (ISP) is held during fiscal year 2018 (July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018). Waiver Standards Manual Version B will include services available to participants as they transition to new services, fee schedules and billing codes based on their date of ISP and their cohort group.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Statewide HCBS Transition Plan - 03/09/2015

“The State of Hawaii has prepared this statewide transition plan in accordance with the new Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) regulations in 42 CFR Section 441.301(c)(4)(5) and Section 441.710(a)(1)(2). This plan addresses settings where home and community based services are provided through the Med-QUEST Division’s QUEST Integration program and the 1915(c) waiver for persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities. Hawaii’s plan outlines the activities to be undertaken by the State in partnership with the individuals who receive home and community based services, their families, friends, advocates, providers, and other stakeholders. The State of Hawaii will implement this plan in a manner that assures the health and safety of the individuals receiving HCBS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii HCBS Waiver for People w/DD (0013.R06.00) (1915c) - 07/01/2011

This waiver "provides adult day health, individual employment supports, prevocational services, residential hab, respite, assistive technology, chore, environmental accessibility adaptations, group employment supports, non-medical transportation, personal assistance/hab, PERS, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, training and consultation, vehicular mods, waiver emergency services for individual w/ID/DD."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

 “In 2006, Hawaii received a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, known as Hire Abilities Hawaii, ran from 2006 to 2009. It was authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. MIG provided funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that built supports for people with disabilities seeking employment. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. The Hire Abilities website grew out of these goals and objectives.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii Application for a §1915 (c) HCBS Waiver

The Hawaii renewal application for the HCBS waiver includes plans to enhance vocational planning services. “Discovery and Career Planning (DCP) combines an existing service in the current waiver (Prevocational) with a new service (Career Planning) and changes the title. These revisions were the result of numerous public comments and brainstorming sessions with stakeholders to improve access to the services needed to help participants explore their interests and skills, enter the workforce and maintain employment. Many of the activities were in the previous service definition of Prevocational but needed to be expanded and clarified so participants, families, guardians and providers understand what is included for job discovery, career planning, job development and financial literacy/ benefits planning and counseling.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Medicaid State Plan

The Hawaii Medicaid state plan details the agreement between the state and the Federal government. It describes how Hawaii administers its Medicaid program and explains how the state will abide by Federal rules.  It also explains how Hawaii may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

States - Phablet

Snapshot

Disability is a respected part of diversity in the Rainbow State of Hawaii, where employees with disabilities are saying "Aloha" to new job opportunities across the state. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Hawaii's VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.84%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,431,603
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-9.43%
Change from
2014 to 2015
63,826
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-16.78%
Change from
2014 to 2015
25,341
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-5.48%
Change from
2014 to 2015
40.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.59%
Change from
2014 to 2015
77.82%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 1,431,603
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 63,826
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 25,341
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 597,207
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.82%
Overall unemployment rate. 3.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 15.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 71,818
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 76,260
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 38,396
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,718
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 12,292
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 295
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 62,269
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 14,071
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 30,302
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 1,027

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 782
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 22,800

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 188
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,573
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 1,771
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 10.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 146
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 202
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,587
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 5
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 4
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 80.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.28

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,134
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 38,249
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $258,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $16,096,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $52,428,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,956
Number of people served in facility based work. 22
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,216
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 3.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 36.90%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 20.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.08%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 84.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 31.45%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 68.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 36.70%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 448,452
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 607
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 268
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 268
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,228,248

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 51
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 51

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~• Align policies and funding streams across education, workforce, and economic development systems and all levels of government to focus public resources on the training that moves workers into industries with high-quality jobs that lead to better financial outcomes and longer job tenures for workers.
• Take an active role in the development of the “common pathways” for both individuals who desire to pursue secondary education AND for individuals who do not desire to pursue secondary education but desire to learn employment skills through work experience and/or on-the-job training.
• Coordinate a “common” work assessment process between core partners.
• Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff.
• Continue with the current iCAN bridging program at the Community Schools for Adults as a stepping stone to proceed into a career pathway leading to a work-readiness certificate and/or degree and economic success. Work closely with UH/CC to create possible dual enrollment and pre-apprenticeship classes for adult learners. (Page 99)
In preparation for WIOA implementation, State-level Partners met regularly for about a year to learn about services provided by each Core Partner (and other Partners), convened joint meetings among Partner stakeholders, and determined how participant data would be shared and tracked through Core Programs. As much as possible during this preparation period, Core Partners were added as key agencies in programs such as DLIR’s Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI), DVR’s Student Transition Employment Program, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) led by DVR, and the American Apprenticeship Initiative Grant led by DLIR.
For example, the Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI) program recently awarded to DLIR includes as a goal increasing the number of Business Leadership Networks, which are business-driven groups of employers committed toward promoting the hiring of persons with disabilities. A major partner in DEI is DVR and their providers, and WIOA One-Stop Center staff members are the primary recipients of capacity building to serve persons with significant disabilities. Another DEI goal is developing an interagency group of providers with the One-Stop Centers for a more coordinated referral system among providers and for more integration of business engagement activities among providers. Adult Education will be part of this group with other partners. Approaching employers and Business Leadership Networks (BLN) in a coordinated manner that represents all agencies is more professional, useful, and productive than each agency operating in its own silo with employers. A coordinated approach also enables providers to offer a fuller array of services as different options to meet different situations. (Page 111)
Contributing to a more integrated service strategy is the partnership building created by the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a technical assistance grant provided by DOL Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) to increase employment of persons with disabilities. EFSLMP is truly a partnership effort currently led by Vocational Rehabilitation, with Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Council, DLIR Workforce Development Division, Department of Human Services MedQuest Division, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and Department of Education. A Cooperative Agreement is being developed among partners to formalize cooperative working arrangements and a series of technical assistance and training have been provided to the partners and AJCs by subject matter experts. (Page 118)
In addition, underserved populations such as persons with disabilities and offenders will be targeted to expand the job seeker pool. Capacity building obtained through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program and Disability Employment Initiative will enable more staff, in coordination with Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health, and other partners, to assist employers in employing persons with disabilities. These services include customizing employment for individuals with significant barriers to employment. This employment option, combined with federal and state tax credits, will increase the incentives for employers, including federal contractors, to hire persons with disabilities. To assist ex-offenders, the experience and skills obtained through staff’s provision of services to inmates and parolees through a contract with State Department of Public Safety and the partnerships built for this effort will facilitate services to this group. (Page 147-148)
• Upon exit from the DOE/Special Education Program, DVR’s clients attend DOE/Adult Education classes. DVR and Adult Education management staff have been meeting to significantly increase the number of DVR clients attending Adult Education classes in 2016.
• In partnership with DOH, DOE, DOL, DVR is the lead agency in the Office of Disability Employment Policy (OPED) Employment first State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) grant. The grant coordinates more in-depth training by their Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) on Customized, Supported and Self Employment “train the trainers” training. (Page 157)
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities.
DVR has engaged in the following activities in order to create sustainable employment service models over time. 
Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP): Currently meets on a monthly basis to analyze policies and procedures required to increase opportunities for competitive integrated employment opportunities for all persons with disabilities. ( Page 285)
The Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a grant through the US Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy that was first given to the Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) and turned over to the Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) for the final year will bring together various core partners. One of the two projects under EFSLMP is to develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, DDD, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group. (Page 288)
Results from the CSNA indicate a need for more CRP’s on neighboring islands which include Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and Kauai. Employment, transportation and housing were identified on the neighbor islands as needed. CRP’s and other entities need to collaborate and communicate with each other to establish a foundation that consumers can rely on. Additionally, CRP’s must embrace the "Employment first" philosophy and move from sheltered employment to competitive integrated employment. (Page 297)
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule):
1.   Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes.
2.   Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1.   Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2.   Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. ( Page 315)
• Invest in marketing materials aimed at re-branding the service provision of DVR to be an Employment First agency for people with disabilities
• Work cooperatively with Workforce Development Division to outreach to businesses as partners in training and placement. (Page 318)
Priority 1: Increase the number of clients receiving SE services. Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals that receive SE services. FY 2015: 57 individuals received SE services. FY 2014: 53 individuals received SE services. FY 2013: 98 individuals received SE services.
The factors that contributed to our ability to increase the number of individuals that received SE services was our participation in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, (EFSLMP). This program introduced our counseling and employment staff to the customized employment model which supports the long term supports of SE services.
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2013: 54 individuals eligible for SE services, received benefits counseling services. (Page 322)
 

Customized Employment

~~Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff.
• Continue with the current iCAN bridging program at the Community Schools for Adults as a stepping stone to proceed into a career pathway leading to a work-readiness certificate and/or degree and economic success. Work closely with UH/CC to create possible dual enrollment and pre-apprenticeship classes for adult learners. (Page 99)
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule):
1. Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes.
2. Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. ( Page 315)
 

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities. (Page 285)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Although DEI focuses on a specific group of individuals, the successes of the coordinated service strategies is a model for a broader population. (DEI, Round II, was conducted only on the Counties of Hawaii and Maui, and the successful collaboration with employers and providers was the stepping stone for DEI Round VI statewide.) Experience showed that building trust among agencies took time and a disciplined commitment to regular meetings. It also required the lead agency and its contractor, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, to develop meeting agenda, contact agencies for meetings, and include actions relevant to the providers. Similar factors were critical to sustain business interest in participating on the Business Leadership Networks.
Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of One-Stop staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 111)
The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), Round VI, also will help facilitate a coordinated approach with employers among agencies serving persons with disabilities. This approach was very successful on Hawaii County where DEI Round II was carried out. Lessons learned from that experience, including the time it took to build trust and break barriers, helps inform DEI Round VI, which will be implemented Statewide.
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
Kauai DVR started Hookipa Workforce Academy at Waimea High in August 2015. This is a great example of our collaborative effort between DOE and DVR where participants are not in Adult Education.
• DVR is currently working with the DOL/Workforce Development Division, DOE/ Adult Basic Education and the US Business Leadership Network (BLN) to learn, network and build local business relationships with key leaders of companies and employers in the private sector that have demonstrated leadership and commitment to disability inclusion. USBLN is a national non–profit, non–partisan business–to–business network promoting workplaces, supply chains and marketplaces where people with disabilities are included. We are working with the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant staff to promote development of BLN Affiliates on Oahu, Kauai and Maui. (Page 275)
 

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~• Piloting programs/services to serve the neighbor islands, or some of the rural areas of Oahu such as Hookipa. Hookipa provides small group work readiness and hospitality skills training with paid work experience in a competitive setting.
• Partner with Workforce Development Division (WDD) and Adult Education so that staff that can work with DVR and share information and resources, provide cross-training, and strategize ways to increase training and placement opportunities for individuals with disabilities statewide.
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Benefits

~~Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of One-Stop staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 111)
DOE is responsible for providing and paying for DOE services identified in the IEP, including transition services for eligible TAY under IDEA. DVR is responsible for providing and paying for vocational or employment related services identified in the IPE for TAY, in keeping with DVR requirement for comparable services and benefits, and personal resources. (Page 281) 
A semi-annual review is conducted to ensure training needs are met. Statewide training initiatives includes:
• Collaborative relationships with the local University to support the Master’s in Rehabilitation Counseling program.
• Formal contracts with San Diego State University to provide Statewide Training and technical assistance to VR Counselors and VR Management.
• Formal contracts to include training and technical assistance in the areas of Benefits Planning and Assistive Technology. (Page 292)
• A large majority of DVR consumers receive SSA benefits and fear of benefit loss significantly affects their return–to–work behavior; (Page 295)
• Benefits planning resources to be provided for all DVR consumers that are also SSA beneficiaries. DVR counselors and community partners will ensure that they are discussing the full range of options for work with their consumers, including striving towards self-sufficiency through work. (Page 317)
• Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues.
 Temporary Employment Opportunities
 Paid and Unpaid Work Experience
• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Do outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 319)
We achieved this goal because of a number of factors to include, but not limited to continuing to increased employer partnerships, continued benefits planning services for clients, available work experiences for clients and focusing on employment as the expectation of the program from the beginning. (Page 320)
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2013: 54 individuals eligible for SE services, received benefits counseling services. (Page 322)
 

School to Work Transition

~~• Promote strategies to prepare for, obtain and maintain competitive, integrated employment such as
1. iCAN: Preparatory classes for youth and students for college and careers and
2. Project Search: High School Transition Program is a unique, business led, one year, school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the work place.
• Promote strategies to participate in work experience and post-secondary educational experience. This year, students and youth are participating in the Summer Youth Employment Program. Partnering with the State Workforce Development Division and the Honolulu, Maui, Kauai and Hawaii Counties, the program would provide paid work-based learning experiences, internships, and employment.  (Page 317)
 

Data Collection

~~A statewide MIS workgroup, composed of representatives and managers from each local area is responsible for reporting issues or questions regarding the PMIS to DLIR, and for providing input on desired enhancements or changes to it. Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education will be added to the MIS workgroup. The MIS workgroup also communicates updates or changes to the system to other staff. The DLIR Administrative staff tracks each concern and inquiry, and ensures that all issues are addressed and resolved either by the vendor, DLIR, local area, Core Partner, or any combination of these entities. Recommendations for policies and procedures regarding data entry, data revision, reports, assistance to public users, or other facets of data collection and use of data are solicited from and provided by the MIS workgroup or other users and finalized by DLIR. Training for all staff users is provided by the vendor whenever a new version of the software is installed. ( Page 158)
(3)   Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
(A)  The most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates; Yes, VR’s Triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment for Program Years 2015 – 2017 identified needs for the following goals and priorities:
• Priority 1: To provide Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Priority 2: To provide Supported Employment (SE) Services for Youth
• Priority 3: To increase employment engagement (B) the State’s performance under the performance accountability measures of section 116 of WIOA; and
• Priority 4: Data Collection Goals.(Page 305)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

~~Hawaii Career Pathway System increases access to and opportunities for employment, education, training, and support services, particularly for individuals with the greatest barriers to employment. These individuals include displaced homemakers; low-income individuals; Native Hawaiians; individuals with disabilities, including youth who are disabled; adults; ex-offenders; homeless individuals, or homeless children and youth; youth who are in or have aged out of foster care; English language learners, individuals who have low levels of literacy, individuals facing substantial cultural barriers; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (TANF); single parents; veterans, and long-term unemployed individuals.(Page 100-101)
The development of a unified state approach to career pathways requires aligning core programs with other WIOA partners to improve the workforce system. This alignment requires the collaboration of stakeholders that facilitates the design and development of the Hawaii Unified Plan.
The Hawaii Career Pathway System is a reflection of the ongoing collaboration by core partners and stakeholders to develop a unified state approach to career pathways. This system bridges Core Programs, WIOA partners, and the private sector in the development, implementation, and sustenance of promising practices from the workforce and education arenas at the Federal, State and local levels. The use of career pathways provide individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development training, education, and support services to enter or retain employment. (Page 102)
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
Strategies to increase the median earning of program participants:
1. Assist in the development of Career Pathways based upon Hawaii’s labor market for individuals interested in postsecondary education or direct job placement or both. Identify Career Pathways and job opportunities that are specific to each county.
2. Identify strategies to increase the capacity of SSA beneficiaries to move toward self-sufficiency through, work include education of the person’s family and try and encourage high expectations for the person regarding work rather than striving to remain dependent on SSI. High expectations have been proven to have a positive effect on outcomes and earnings for beneficiaries.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes.
Strategies to cultivate VR’s effectiveness in serving employers: Developing successful partnerships with local and multi-state businesses in an effort to increase the employment of individuals with disabilities and self-employment. Services include, but not limited to:
1. Train employers on compliance the title I of the American with Disability Act (ADA) of 1990 and other employment-related laws.
2. Inform employers of the existence of the program and availability of services.
3. Educate and provide services to employers who have hired or are interested in hiring individuals with disabilities.
4. Provide training and technical assistance to employers regarding disability awareness.
5. Working with employers to provide opportunities for work-based learning experiences and opportunities for PETS services.
6. Train employees who are individuals with disabilities. (Page 315)
 

Employment Networks

~~In addition, DVR partners with Developmental Disabilities Division case managers and Ticket to Work Employment Networks to provide extended services to maintain employment. (Page 312)
1.   The methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.
• Increase support services in postsecondary settings thereby increasing graduation rate.
• Increase pre-employment transitions services to better prepare transitioning youth with disabilities into the workforce.
• Support the provision of summer youth employment for transitioning high school students as well as those in postsecondary training.
• Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues.
 Temporary Employment Opportunities
 Paid and Unpaid Work Experience
• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Do outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, and develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 319)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 39

1915(C) HCBS Medicaid Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities WAIVER STANDARDS MANUAL Version B - 10/01/2017

~~“Discovery and Career Planning (DCP)Discovery and Career Planning combines elements of traditional prevocational services with career planning in order to provide supports that  the participant may use to develop skills and interests toward becoming employed for the first time or at different stages of the participant’s work career to develop skills and interests for advancement or a change in the participant’s career plan” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Uniform Application FY 2018/2019 – State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Community Mental Health Services Block Grant - 08/29/2017

~~“The Clubhouse Model seeks to demonstrate that people with mental illness can successfully live productive lives and work in the community, regardless of the nature or severity of their mental illness. Clubhouse services include Transitional Employment (TE), Group Transitional Employment (GTE), Supported Employment (SE), Supported Education (SE), Advocacy and Case Management”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

The Going Home Plus Project - 07/09/2017

~~“The Going Home Plus (GHP) project helps residents who have been living in hospitals, nursing facilities, and ICF/ID facilities move back into the community. For those residents who choose to live in the community, the GHP project will assist in finding housing (if the resident does not have a home to return to) and services (for example, help with cooking and bathing).•Eligibility Requirements•Going Home Plus Services

Individuals from all islands are eligible to participate.

The Going Home Plus (GHP) project is funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration grant through June 30, 2020. The project is a partnership between the Hawaii Department of Human Services Med-Quest Division and the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

*UPDATED* Supported Employment Services for VR Consumers - 07/04/2017

~~This is a call for bids for a program that will “Provide supported employment (SE) services to individuals with disabilities, both physical and mental. Individualized services are to be provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with the consumer’s strengths, resources, priortiespriorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice.  The contract term will be from October 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019 with four (4) additional 12-month option periods.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Phase-In Timing for New Rates, by Services and ‘Cohort’ prepared for Developmental Disabilities Division” - 07/01/2017

~~“This document is a set of tables noting what services will be available for all of the participants in the program or different “cohorts” (Cohort 1 - Participants residing in certified or licensed settings; Cohort 2 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings AND receiving Adult Day Health; or Cohort 3 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings and NOT receiving Adult Day Health).”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for 1915(c) HCBS Waiver: HI.0013.R07.01 - Jun 01, 2017 - 07/01/2017

~~“The State of Hawaii requests approval for an amendment to the following Medicaid home and community-based services waiver…. Program Title: HCB Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD Waiver).  Amendment Number: HI.0013.R07.01Approved Effective Date of Waiver being Amended: 07/01/16This is a technical amendment to address several items that were not included in the waiver renewal approved effective July1, 2016. The new rate methodology and changes to services are designed to support implementation of the Home andCommunity Based Services Final Rule for Community Integration. This amendment also includes a multi-year phase-inusing the Supports Intensity Scale for Adults to assess participants’ support needs to inform the person-centered process.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HAWAII RESIDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CELEBRATE 30 YEARS OF SELF-DETERMINATION AT “DAY AT THE CAPITOL" - 03/16/2017

~~“Today, Hawaii is one of nine states that does  not have a waiting list for home and community based services. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes. Currently, 99 percent of people served by the Department of Health’s Developmental Disabilities Division live in residences serving one to six people, and 61 percent in settings with one to three people. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes.

By law, the Department of Health is mandated to develop, lead, administer, coordinate, monitor, evaluate, and set direction for a comprehensive system of supports and services for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Current services include: personal assistance/habilitation, emergency services, respite, employment supports, chore, training and consultation, specialized medical equipment, adult day health, skilled nursing, environmental accessibility and vehicular modifications, assistive technology, personal emergency response systems and non-medical transportation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Standards Manual Version A – Draft Pending DHS-MQD Approval - 03/09/2017

~~“The Waiver Standards Manual Version A includes current services that the participant may receive until their Individualized Service Plan (ISP) is held during fiscal year 2018 (July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018). Waiver Standards Manual Version B will include services available to participants as they transition to new services, fee schedules and billing codes based on their date of ISP and their cohort group.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REPORT ANNUALLY TO THE LEGISLATURE THE NUMBERS OF PERSONS WAITING FOR DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY OR INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES SERVICES AND SUPPORTS, - 12/01/2016

~~“For fiscal year (FY) 2016, the Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) had no waitlists of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) for the following programs:1. Medicaid Home and Community-Based Service (HCBS) I/DD Waiver under the authority of section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act;2. Long Term Adult Supports and Resources (LASR);3. Family Support Services Program (FSSP); and4. Crisis Network Services.The total number of individuals with I/DD served by DDD was 3,246. Of this number 2,789 were served under I/DD Waiver,” 83 individuals were served under the LASR program, 33 individuals received services through FSSP, 178 individuals were served through Crisis Network Services, and the remaining 163 received only case management services.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

RealChoices Hawaii - Guide to Employment for Job Seekers - 01/22/2016

This guide to employment for people with disabilities provides information and additional links on job centers, employment for seniors and employment for youth.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Hawaii HB 119 - 07/01/2015

"It is the intent and purpose of the legislature to establish a qualified tax exempt savings program to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities pursuant to section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or successor legislation, and any regulations promulgated thereunder.  It is the further intent of the legislature that the program established by this Act be and remain in conformance with the Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act [ABLE] of 2014, Division B of Public Law No. 113-295"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

House Bill 860: Related to Persons with Disabilities - 01/28/2015

 “Establishes an employment first policy for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Requires the DOH to establish an employment first committee.” (Introduced in the Hawaii state legislature 1/28/15; sent to committees and status is pending.)

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Hawaii Uniform Application FY 2018/2019 – State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Community Mental Health Services Block Grant - 08/29/2017

~~“The Clubhouse Model seeks to demonstrate that people with mental illness can successfully live productive lives and work in the community, regardless of the nature or severity of their mental illness. Clubhouse services include Transitional Employment (TE), Group Transitional Employment (GTE), Supported Employment (SE), Supported Education (SE), Advocacy and Case Management”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

HAWAII RESIDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CELEBRATE 30 YEARS OF SELF-DETERMINATION AT “DAY AT THE CAPITOL" - 03/16/2017

~~“Today, Hawaii is one of nine states that does  not have a waiting list for home and community based services. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes. Currently, 99 percent of people served by the Department of Health’s Developmental Disabilities Division live in residences serving one to six people, and 61 percent in settings with one to three people. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes.

By law, the Department of Health is mandated to develop, lead, administer, coordinate, monitor, evaluate, and set direction for a comprehensive system of supports and services for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Current services include: personal assistance/habilitation, emergency services, respite, employment supports, chore, training and consultation, specialized medical equipment, adult day health, skilled nursing, environmental accessibility and vehicular modifications, assistive technology, personal emergency response systems and non-medical transportation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REPORT ANNUALLY TO THE LEGISLATURE THE NUMBERS OF PERSONS WAITING FOR DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY OR INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES SERVICES AND SUPPORTS, - 12/01/2016

~~“For fiscal year (FY) 2016, the Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) had no waitlists of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) for the following programs:1. Medicaid Home and Community-Based Service (HCBS) I/DD Waiver under the authority of section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act;2. Long Term Adult Supports and Resources (LASR);3. Family Support Services Program (FSSP); and4. Crisis Network Services.The total number of individuals with I/DD served by DDD was 3,246. Of this number 2,789 were served under I/DD Waiver,” 83 individuals were served under the LASR program, 33 individuals received services through FSSP, 178 individuals were served through Crisis Network Services, and the remaining 163 received only case management services.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations “Labor Law Requirements for New Employers” - 03/14/2013

Employers are required to provide reasonable accommodations for a qualified employee with a disability which allows that person to perform their essential job functions. An accommodation is reasonable if it does not impose an undue hardship on the employer’s business.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii Department of Education “IEP Overview”

Each Individualized Education Program includes: -a statement of the child's present levels of educational performance; -a statement of annual goals, including short-term instructional objectives; -a statement of the specific special education and related services to be provided; -the extent that the child will be able to participate in regular educational programs; -the projected dates for initiation of services and the anticipated duration of the services; and -appropriate objective criteria and evaluation procedures and schedules for determining, on at least an annual basis, whether the objectives are being achieved. The IEP for each student, beginning no later than age 16, must include a statement of needed transition services.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hawaii Department of Human Services Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) provides services to Hawai’i community members who experience barriers to employment due to a physical or cognitive disability. DVR is designed to assist job seekers with disabilities prepare, secure, and retain competitive employment in an integrated work setting. DVR furnishes the finest resources and opportunities for training, support, and career placement. Productive partnerships with other state agencies, private non-profits, and employers pave the way for our consumers to find successful employment with the reality of competitive wages. The underlying philosophy and goal of the DVR is thorough employment, individuals with disabilities are empowered toward economic self-sufficiency, independence, inclusion, and integration into society.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Hawaii Department of Human Services Division of Vocational Rehabilitation "Our Vision"

Our vision at the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is “Move Forward to Work.” We would like to think of ourselves as the agency of choice for persons with disabilities who are looking to enter or retain integrated, competitive employment. As Hawai‘i’s primary agency directly responsible for the employment needs of our citizens with disabilities, we are committed in Hawai‘i’s efforts in establishing a 21st century workforce. With service offices on Hawai‘i Island, Maui, Moloka‘i, O‘ahu and Kaua‘i the Division is entrenched within our communities to meet the needs of those seeking our services. With the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) in July of 2014, the Hawai‘i VR program has been actively working with core partners from the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, Department of Education, Department of Health, University of Hawai‘i and the Community Colleges as well as divisions within the Department of Human Services in developing the kinds of services all of Hawai‘i can be proud of.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Hawai'i State Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The Hawai'i State Council on Developmental Disabilities is mandated by federal (P.L. 106-402) and state (Chapter 333E, Hawaii Revised Statutes) laws to: plan, coordinate, evaluate, monitor, and advocate on behalf of individuals with developmental disabilities; and assure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families participate in the design of and have access to culturally competent services, supports, and other assistance and opportunities that promote independence, productivity, and integration, and inclusion into the community.

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii Employment First Inititive

“To advance Employment First, ODEP created the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). This program helps states align policies, regulations and funding priorities to encourage integrated employment as the primary outcome for individuals with significant disabilities.”   “In November 2014, Hawaii was one of 15 states selected to receive technical assistance from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy to build capacity and develop inter-agency policy for employment for individuals with disabilities..”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

*UPDATED* Supported Employment Services for VR Consumers - 07/04/2017

~~This is a call for bids for a program that will “Provide supported employment (SE) services to individuals with disabilities, both physical and mental. Individualized services are to be provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with the consumer’s strengths, resources, priortiespriorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice.  The contract term will be from October 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019 with four (4) additional 12-month option periods.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division - Strategic Plan 2015-2017 Progress Report - 09/23/2015

“The Strategic Plan was adopted on December 2014. In the ensuing months Team Leaders have been convening meetings with advocates, providers, partners, and Division staff to plan specific activities for attaining goals and objectives of the Strategic Plan. Teams have also developed performance measures to track progress and measure results.” Goal number 3 outlines that “DDD will ensure individuals with I/DD have opportunities to seek employment and achieve personal outcomes to work in competitive integrated settings.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Full Life Sponsors Disability Legislative Forum

EHDDC to host the 2016 East Hawaii Disability Legislative Forum “You cannot have Inclusion without Us” Full Life is sponsoring both East and West Hawai’i Island Disability Legislative Forums! The public, especially family members and persons with disabilities, are invited to come and meet Hawaii Island’s State legislators and County officials. These free events will feature a forum where policymakers will answer questions about disability-related issues such as employment, housing, transportation, and health. Special activities include the opportunities to express your opinion on topics important to you and to meet and talk story with State legislators and County officials. Provider agencies have prepared booths with information about many available services and supports.

Systems
  • Other

West Hawaii Business Leadership Network

“The West Hawaii Business Leadership Network meets quarterly at the Workforce Development Division’s Kona Office to share best practices on hiring, promoting and accommodating individuals with disabilities.   The West Hawaii BLN organizes the annual Mea Like Ole Awards Ceremony, recognizing the most outstanding employers in West Hawaii. BLN members also collaborate with other organizations from across the country to present workshops on job accommodations, customized employment, and other topics.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

East Hawaii Business Leadership Network

“The East Hawaii Business Leadership Network meets monthly at the Workforce Development Division’s Hilo Office to share best practices on hiring, promoting and accommodating individuals with disabilities.   The East Hawaii BLN organizes the annual Hoomohala Awards Ceremony, recognizing the most outstanding employers in East Hawaii. BLN members also collaborate with other organizations from across the country to present workshops on job accommodations, customized employment, and other topics.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities

~~“The Council is responsible to engage in advocacy , capacity-building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the policy in the federal law; and contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered and consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system that includes needed community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that promote self-determination for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

The Council carries out its responsibilities through policy development, implementation and analysis; researching and promoting new approaches and best practices to services and supports; educating and informing policymakers and the public about developmental disabilities; developing and supporting coalitions; fostering interagency collaboration and coordination; providing training in leadership development and legislative advocacy; and eliminating barriers and enhancing design and redesign of systems.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hire Abilities Hawai'i

“Hire Abilities Hawaii represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`’ College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council.“

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Hawaii Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“To advance Employment First, ODEP created the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). This program helps states align policies, regulations and funding priorities to encourage integrated employment as the primary outcome for individuals with significant disabilities.”   “In November 2014, Hawaii was one of 15 states selected to receive technical assistance from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy to build capacity and develop inter-agency policy for employment for individuals with disabilities..”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii DEI - Round 6 Grant Abstracts

The U.S. Department of Labor awarded Hawaii a Round 6 DEI grant to improve employment opportunities for youth and/or adults with disabilities. “HIDEI [Hawaii DEI] will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and build upon the promising practices of the HIDEI 2 [Round 2] project to incorporate career pathways into its service to individuals with significant disabilities to better prepare participants to obtain meaningful employment and achieve self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii DEI - Round 2 Grants

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2010, Hawaii was awarded a Round 1 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The Round 1 grant ended in 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Hawaii Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“In 2006, Hawaii received a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, known as Hire Abilities Hawaii, ran from 2006 to 2009. It was authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. MIG provided funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that built supports for people with disabilities seeking employment. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. The Hire Abilities website grew out of these goals and objectives.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

RealChoices Hawaii - Guide to Employment for Job Seekers - 01/22/2016

This guide to employment for people with disabilities provides information and additional links on job centers, employment for seniors and employment for youth.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Hawaii’s Disability Employment Initiative

~~“Hawaii’s DEI will focus its effort on the following strategies:•Increase American Job Center (AJC) staff competencies through training on Disability 101, Customized Employment, Career Pathway Systems, Job Accommodation, Asset Development, Individualized Learning Plans, and Disability Benefits Planning.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maui Youth and Family Services, Inc

~~“MYFS was established in 1978 by Maui County as the Maunaolu Youth Residential Shelter to provide a safe place for Maui’s homeless, abused and runaway children. Incorporated as a private non-profit agency in 1982, MYFS has expanded to include a range of behavioral and mental health programs to support young people and their families’ personal growth and emotional stability.Maui Youth and Family Services is accredited by CARF, the Commission on the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.”

Systems
  • Other

Hawaii Employers Council In-house Training

As a service exclusively for members, any or all of the Fundamentals of Supervision workshops can be brought to your company’s site or held at the HEC training room. The content of these workshops can be designed to fit your company’s unique culture and tailored to highlight issues that are important to your workplace. The workshops combine lectures, videos and case studies, with longer sessions including role-play exercises. We will use your company's forms, policies and procedures to the extent possible. In addition what is presented in the Fundamentals of Supervision Workshops, the following topics are also available for in-house programs: -ABCs of Collective Bargaining -Americans with Disabilities Act -Effective Employee Relations: Remaining Union Free -Family and Medical Leave Act (for members with 50 or more employees) -Preparing for Unemployment Appeals Hearings -Preventive Discipline for Unionized Work Groups

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - Customized Employment Videos

“These Customized Employment (CE) videos, each specifically focused on Employers, Youth, or a General audience, highlight the benefits of CE, an employment strategy which matches the skills and preferences of the individual with the specific business needs of the employer. This process results in expanded employment opportunities for those who utilize and engage in this innovative, evidenced-based approach to employment. The General audience video has been created in both English and Spanish.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

HireAbilities Hawai'i

This website is intended to provide resources to support employment for individuals with disabilities. It is intended to be used by job seekers with disabilities, service providers, agencies and businesses. This site was revamped December 2013 and now has many new features and content. Some major additions to the website include: -The Benefits Finder can search for eligibility and work incentive information for Hawaii’s state and federal disability programs. -Use our Resource Finder to search a database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. -Learn more about how Hawaii’s proposed Medicaid Buy-In Program could help workers with a disability who require Medicaid . Hire Abilities Hawaii is a comprehensive database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. It represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`i College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council. Originally started through a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - "What is Customized Employment?"

This brief article defines customized employment and outlines the case for using it with job seekers with disabilities. It outlines the different forms customized employment can take, including "task reassignment," "job carving," and "job negotiation."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

1915(C) HCBS Medicaid Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities WAIVER STANDARDS MANUAL Version B - 10/01/2017

~~“Discovery and Career Planning (DCP)Discovery and Career Planning combines elements of traditional prevocational services with career planning in order to provide supports that  the participant may use to develop skills and interests toward becoming employed for the first time or at different stages of the participant’s work career to develop skills and interests for advancement or a change in the participant’s career plan” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Going Home Plus Project - 07/09/2017

~~“The Going Home Plus (GHP) project helps residents who have been living in hospitals, nursing facilities, and ICF/ID facilities move back into the community. For those residents who choose to live in the community, the GHP project will assist in finding housing (if the resident does not have a home to return to) and services (for example, help with cooking and bathing).•Eligibility Requirements•Going Home Plus Services

Individuals from all islands are eligible to participate.

The Going Home Plus (GHP) project is funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration grant through June 30, 2020. The project is a partnership between the Hawaii Department of Human Services Med-Quest Division and the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Phase-In Timing for New Rates, by Services and ‘Cohort’ prepared for Developmental Disabilities Division” - 07/01/2017

~~“This document is a set of tables noting what services will be available for all of the participants in the program or different “cohorts” (Cohort 1 - Participants residing in certified or licensed settings; Cohort 2 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings AND receiving Adult Day Health; or Cohort 3 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings and NOT receiving Adult Day Health).”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for 1915(c) HCBS Waiver: HI.0013.R07.01 - Jun 01, 2017 - 07/01/2017

~~“The State of Hawaii requests approval for an amendment to the following Medicaid home and community-based services waiver…. Program Title: HCB Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD Waiver).  Amendment Number: HI.0013.R07.01Approved Effective Date of Waiver being Amended: 07/01/16This is a technical amendment to address several items that were not included in the waiver renewal approved effective July1, 2016. The new rate methodology and changes to services are designed to support implementation of the Home andCommunity Based Services Final Rule for Community Integration. This amendment also includes a multi-year phase-inusing the Supports Intensity Scale for Adults to assess participants’ support needs to inform the person-centered process.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Standards Manual Version A – Draft Pending DHS-MQD Approval - 03/09/2017

~~“The Waiver Standards Manual Version A includes current services that the participant may receive until their Individualized Service Plan (ISP) is held during fiscal year 2018 (July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018). Waiver Standards Manual Version B will include services available to participants as they transition to new services, fee schedules and billing codes based on their date of ISP and their cohort group.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Statewide HCBS Transition Plan - 03/09/2015

“The State of Hawaii has prepared this statewide transition plan in accordance with the new Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) regulations in 42 CFR Section 441.301(c)(4)(5) and Section 441.710(a)(1)(2). This plan addresses settings where home and community based services are provided through the Med-QUEST Division’s QUEST Integration program and the 1915(c) waiver for persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities. Hawaii’s plan outlines the activities to be undertaken by the State in partnership with the individuals who receive home and community based services, their families, friends, advocates, providers, and other stakeholders. The State of Hawaii will implement this plan in a manner that assures the health and safety of the individuals receiving HCBS.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii HCBS Waiver for People w/DD (0013.R06.00) (1915c) - 07/01/2011

This waiver "provides adult day health, individual employment supports, prevocational services, residential hab, respite, assistive technology, chore, environmental accessibility adaptations, group employment supports, non-medical transportation, personal assistance/hab, PERS, skilled nursing, specialized medical equipment and supplies, training and consultation, vehicular mods, waiver emergency services for individual w/ID/DD."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

 “In 2006, Hawaii received a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, known as Hire Abilities Hawaii, ran from 2006 to 2009. It was authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. MIG provided funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that built supports for people with disabilities seeking employment. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. The Hire Abilities website grew out of these goals and objectives.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii Application for a §1915 (c) HCBS Waiver

The Hawaii renewal application for the HCBS waiver includes plans to enhance vocational planning services. “Discovery and Career Planning (DCP) combines an existing service in the current waiver (Prevocational) with a new service (Career Planning) and changes the title. These revisions were the result of numerous public comments and brainstorming sessions with stakeholders to improve access to the services needed to help participants explore their interests and skills, enter the workforce and maintain employment. Many of the activities were in the previous service definition of Prevocational but needed to be expanded and clarified so participants, families, guardians and providers understand what is included for job discovery, career planning, job development and financial literacy/ benefits planning and counseling.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Medicaid State Plan

The Hawaii Medicaid state plan details the agreement between the state and the Federal government. It describes how Hawaii administers its Medicaid program and explains how the state will abide by Federal rules.  It also explains how Hawaii may claim Federal matching funds for its program activities. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

States - Phone

Snapshot

Disability is a respected part of diversity in the Rainbow State of Hawaii, where employees with disabilities are saying "Aloha" to new job opportunities across the state. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Hawaii's VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.84%
Change from
2014 to 2015
1,431,603
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-9.43%
Change from
2014 to 2015
63,826
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-16.78%
Change from
2014 to 2015
25,341
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-5.48%
Change from
2014 to 2015
40.17%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.59%
Change from
2014 to 2015
77.82%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 1,431,603
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 63,826
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 25,341
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 597,207
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.17%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.82%
Overall unemployment rate. 3.60%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 15.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.30%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 71,818
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 76,260
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 38,396
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 1,718
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 12,292
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 295
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 62,269
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 14,071
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 30,302
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 1,027

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 782
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.00%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 22,800

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 188
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 1,573
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 1,771
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 10.60%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.40%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 146
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 202
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 1,587
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 5
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 4
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 80.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.28

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,134
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 38,249
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $258,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $16,096,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $52,428,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,956
Number of people served in facility based work. 22
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,216
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 3.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 36.90%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 20.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.08%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 84.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 31.45%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 68.15%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.19%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 36.70%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 448,452
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 607
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 225,722
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 268
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 268
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $3,228,248

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 6
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 6
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 51
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 51

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

~~• Align policies and funding streams across education, workforce, and economic development systems and all levels of government to focus public resources on the training that moves workers into industries with high-quality jobs that lead to better financial outcomes and longer job tenures for workers.
• Take an active role in the development of the “common pathways” for both individuals who desire to pursue secondary education AND for individuals who do not desire to pursue secondary education but desire to learn employment skills through work experience and/or on-the-job training.
• Coordinate a “common” work assessment process between core partners.
• Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff.
• Continue with the current iCAN bridging program at the Community Schools for Adults as a stepping stone to proceed into a career pathway leading to a work-readiness certificate and/or degree and economic success. Work closely with UH/CC to create possible dual enrollment and pre-apprenticeship classes for adult learners. (Page 99)
In preparation for WIOA implementation, State-level Partners met regularly for about a year to learn about services provided by each Core Partner (and other Partners), convened joint meetings among Partner stakeholders, and determined how participant data would be shared and tracked through Core Programs. As much as possible during this preparation period, Core Partners were added as key agencies in programs such as DLIR’s Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI), DVR’s Student Transition Employment Program, ODEP’s Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (Round II) led by DVR, and the American Apprenticeship Initiative Grant led by DLIR.
For example, the Disability Employment Initiative (Round VI) program recently awarded to DLIR includes as a goal increasing the number of Business Leadership Networks, which are business-driven groups of employers committed toward promoting the hiring of persons with disabilities. A major partner in DEI is DVR and their providers, and WIOA One-Stop Center staff members are the primary recipients of capacity building to serve persons with significant disabilities. Another DEI goal is developing an interagency group of providers with the One-Stop Centers for a more coordinated referral system among providers and for more integration of business engagement activities among providers. Adult Education will be part of this group with other partners. Approaching employers and Business Leadership Networks (BLN) in a coordinated manner that represents all agencies is more professional, useful, and productive than each agency operating in its own silo with employers. A coordinated approach also enables providers to offer a fuller array of services as different options to meet different situations. (Page 111)
Contributing to a more integrated service strategy is the partnership building created by the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a technical assistance grant provided by DOL Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) to increase employment of persons with disabilities. EFSLMP is truly a partnership effort currently led by Vocational Rehabilitation, with Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Council, DLIR Workforce Development Division, Department of Human Services MedQuest Division, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and Department of Education. A Cooperative Agreement is being developed among partners to formalize cooperative working arrangements and a series of technical assistance and training have been provided to the partners and AJCs by subject matter experts. (Page 118)
In addition, underserved populations such as persons with disabilities and offenders will be targeted to expand the job seeker pool. Capacity building obtained through the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program and Disability Employment Initiative will enable more staff, in coordination with Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Health, and other partners, to assist employers in employing persons with disabilities. These services include customizing employment for individuals with significant barriers to employment. This employment option, combined with federal and state tax credits, will increase the incentives for employers, including federal contractors, to hire persons with disabilities. To assist ex-offenders, the experience and skills obtained through staff’s provision of services to inmates and parolees through a contract with State Department of Public Safety and the partnerships built for this effort will facilitate services to this group. (Page 147-148)
• Upon exit from the DOE/Special Education Program, DVR’s clients attend DOE/Adult Education classes. DVR and Adult Education management staff have been meeting to significantly increase the number of DVR clients attending Adult Education classes in 2016.
• In partnership with DOH, DOE, DOL, DVR is the lead agency in the Office of Disability Employment Policy (OPED) Employment first State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) grant. The grant coordinates more in-depth training by their Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) on Customized, Supported and Self Employment “train the trainers” training. (Page 157)
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities.
DVR has engaged in the following activities in order to create sustainable employment service models over time. 
Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP): Currently meets on a monthly basis to analyze policies and procedures required to increase opportunities for competitive integrated employment opportunities for all persons with disabilities. ( Page 285)
The Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a grant through the US Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy that was first given to the Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) and turned over to the Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) for the final year will bring together various core partners. One of the two projects under EFSLMP is to develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, DDD, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group. (Page 288)
Results from the CSNA indicate a need for more CRP’s on neighboring islands which include Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and Kauai. Employment, transportation and housing were identified on the neighbor islands as needed. CRP’s and other entities need to collaborate and communicate with each other to establish a foundation that consumers can rely on. Additionally, CRP’s must embrace the "Employment first" philosophy and move from sheltered employment to competitive integrated employment. (Page 297)
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule):
1.   Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes.
2.   Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1.   Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2.   Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. ( Page 315)
• Invest in marketing materials aimed at re-branding the service provision of DVR to be an Employment First agency for people with disabilities
• Work cooperatively with Workforce Development Division to outreach to businesses as partners in training and placement. (Page 318)
Priority 1: Increase the number of clients receiving SE services. Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals that receive SE services. FY 2015: 57 individuals received SE services. FY 2014: 53 individuals received SE services. FY 2013: 98 individuals received SE services.
The factors that contributed to our ability to increase the number of individuals that received SE services was our participation in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program, (EFSLMP). This program introduced our counseling and employment staff to the customized employment model which supports the long term supports of SE services.
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2013: 54 individuals eligible for SE services, received benefits counseling services. (Page 322)
 

Customized Employment

~~Continue with implementation of the Employment First State Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) to train a cadre of trainers on Customized Employment, who in turn will train other staff.
• Continue with the current iCAN bridging program at the Community Schools for Adults as a stepping stone to proceed into a career pathway leading to a work-readiness certificate and/or degree and economic success. Work closely with UH/CC to create possible dual enrollment and pre-apprenticeship classes for adult learners. (Page 99)
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who obtain a postsecondary credential or high school or diploma (subject to the special rule):
1. Strengthening vocational assessment practices as the foundation for more comprehensive services which meet customer needs, identify and address barriers to employment, and maximize outcomes.
2. Identify a network of consumers that have been closed successfully rehabilitated as mentors. These mentors can provide inspiration and advice to people on how to be successful in postsecondary education and work and can provide them with high expectations.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes. ( Page 315)
 

Braiding/Blending Resources

~~To achieve competitive, integrated employment outcomes for prospective workers and job seekers with disabilities, Hawaii DVR has applied effective practices and partnerships to leverage resources with providers of disability services and supports. Currently, DVR is establishing a Cooperative Agreement (CA) through the Employment First Initiative with partner agencies to offer blending and braiding of resources to achieve competitive integrated employment for persons with disabilities. (Page 285)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Although DEI focuses on a specific group of individuals, the successes of the coordinated service strategies is a model for a broader population. (DEI, Round II, was conducted only on the Counties of Hawaii and Maui, and the successful collaboration with employers and providers was the stepping stone for DEI Round VI statewide.) Experience showed that building trust among agencies took time and a disciplined commitment to regular meetings. It also required the lead agency and its contractor, University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, to develop meeting agenda, contact agencies for meetings, and include actions relevant to the providers. Similar factors were critical to sustain business interest in participating on the Business Leadership Networks.
Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of One-Stop staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 111)
The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI), Round VI, also will help facilitate a coordinated approach with employers among agencies serving persons with disabilities. This approach was very successful on Hawaii County where DEI Round II was carried out. Lessons learned from that experience, including the time it took to build trust and break barriers, helps inform DEI Round VI, which will be implemented Statewide.
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
Kauai DVR started Hookipa Workforce Academy at Waimea High in August 2015. This is a great example of our collaborative effort between DOE and DVR where participants are not in Adult Education.
• DVR is currently working with the DOL/Workforce Development Division, DOE/ Adult Basic Education and the US Business Leadership Network (BLN) to learn, network and build local business relationships with key leaders of companies and employers in the private sector that have demonstrated leadership and commitment to disability inclusion. USBLN is a national non–profit, non–partisan business–to–business network promoting workplaces, supply chains and marketplaces where people with disabilities are included. We are working with the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant staff to promote development of BLN Affiliates on Oahu, Kauai and Maui. (Page 275)
 

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

~~• Piloting programs/services to serve the neighbor islands, or some of the rural areas of Oahu such as Hookipa. Hookipa provides small group work readiness and hospitality skills training with paid work experience in a competitive setting.
• Partner with Workforce Development Division (WDD) and Adult Education so that staff that can work with DVR and share information and resources, provide cross-training, and strategize ways to increase training and placement opportunities for individuals with disabilities statewide.
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Benefits

~~Another DEI example is the goal of increasing participation in Ticket to Work, a federal program that provides cash incentives to providers who assist in placing SSI or SSDI beneficiaries in employment. DEI Training of One-Stop staff and its partners, Benefits Planning through University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies, and close linkages with DVR and other partners, including Adult Education, will give staff the ability to provide the services needed for successful placement and retention of persons with disabilities. (Page 111)
DOE is responsible for providing and paying for DOE services identified in the IEP, including transition services for eligible TAY under IDEA. DVR is responsible for providing and paying for vocational or employment related services identified in the IPE for TAY, in keeping with DVR requirement for comparable services and benefits, and personal resources. (Page 281) 
A semi-annual review is conducted to ensure training needs are met. Statewide training initiatives includes:
• Collaborative relationships with the local University to support the Master’s in Rehabilitation Counseling program.
• Formal contracts with San Diego State University to provide Statewide Training and technical assistance to VR Counselors and VR Management.
• Formal contracts to include training and technical assistance in the areas of Benefits Planning and Assistive Technology. (Page 292)
• A large majority of DVR consumers receive SSA benefits and fear of benefit loss significantly affects their return–to–work behavior; (Page 295)
• Benefits planning resources to be provided for all DVR consumers that are also SSA beneficiaries. DVR counselors and community partners will ensure that they are discussing the full range of options for work with their consumers, including striving towards self-sufficiency through work. (Page 317)
• Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues.
 Temporary Employment Opportunities
 Paid and Unpaid Work Experience
• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Do outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 319)
We achieved this goal because of a number of factors to include, but not limited to continuing to increased employer partnerships, continued benefits planning services for clients, available work experiences for clients and focusing on employment as the expectation of the program from the beginning. (Page 320)
Priority 2: Increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services.
Goal: Annually increase the number of individuals eligible for SE services that receive benefits planning services. FY 2015: 255 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2014: 201 individuals eligible for SE services received benefits counseling services. FY 2013: 54 individuals eligible for SE services, received benefits counseling services. (Page 322)
 

School to Work Transition

~~• Promote strategies to prepare for, obtain and maintain competitive, integrated employment such as
1. iCAN: Preparatory classes for youth and students for college and careers and
2. Project Search: High School Transition Program is a unique, business led, one year, school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the work place.
• Promote strategies to participate in work experience and post-secondary educational experience. This year, students and youth are participating in the Summer Youth Employment Program. Partnering with the State Workforce Development Division and the Honolulu, Maui, Kauai and Hawaii Counties, the program would provide paid work-based learning experiences, internships, and employment.  (Page 317)
 

Data Collection

~~A statewide MIS workgroup, composed of representatives and managers from each local area is responsible for reporting issues or questions regarding the PMIS to DLIR, and for providing input on desired enhancements or changes to it. Vocational Rehabilitation and Adult Education will be added to the MIS workgroup. The MIS workgroup also communicates updates or changes to the system to other staff. The DLIR Administrative staff tracks each concern and inquiry, and ensures that all issues are addressed and resolved either by the vendor, DLIR, local area, Core Partner, or any combination of these entities. Recommendations for policies and procedures regarding data entry, data revision, reports, assistance to public users, or other facets of data collection and use of data are solicited from and provided by the MIS workgroup or other users and finalized by DLIR. Training for all staff users is provided by the vendor whenever a new version of the software is installed. ( Page 158)
(3)   Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
(A)  The most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates; Yes, VR’s Triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment for Program Years 2015 – 2017 identified needs for the following goals and priorities:
• Priority 1: To provide Pre-Employment Transition Services
• Priority 2: To provide Supported Employment (SE) Services for Youth
• Priority 3: To increase employment engagement (B) the State’s performance under the performance accountability measures of section 116 of WIOA; and
• Priority 4: Data Collection Goals.(Page 305)
 

Small business/Entrepreneurship

~~No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

~~Hawaii Career Pathway System increases access to and opportunities for employment, education, training, and support services, particularly for individuals with the greatest barriers to employment. These individuals include displaced homemakers; low-income individuals; Native Hawaiians; individuals with disabilities, including youth who are disabled; adults; ex-offenders; homeless individuals, or homeless children and youth; youth who are in or have aged out of foster care; English language learners, individuals who have low levels of literacy, individuals facing substantial cultural barriers; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (TANF); single parents; veterans, and long-term unemployed individuals.(Page 100-101)
The development of a unified state approach to career pathways requires aligning core programs with other WIOA partners to improve the workforce system. This alignment requires the collaboration of stakeholders that facilitates the design and development of the Hawaii Unified Plan.
The Hawaii Career Pathway System is a reflection of the ongoing collaboration by core partners and stakeholders to develop a unified state approach to career pathways. This system bridges Core Programs, WIOA partners, and the private sector in the development, implementation, and sustenance of promising practices from the workforce and education arenas at the Federal, State and local levels. The use of career pathways provide individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development training, education, and support services to enter or retain employment. (Page 102)
As a Core Partner, there are more opportunities to leverage resources for common goals among agencies. The Employment First Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP) is an example of inter-agency cooperation among Core Programs and other agencies by its provision of technical assistance and training to staff of AJCs and other agencies serving persons with disabilities. This also dovetails with training to be provided to AJCs and its partners to increase the numbers of persons with significant disabilities being served in the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grant. In addition, the DEI plans to build more business-led Business Leadership Networks to promote and champion the hiring of persons with disabilities. With the increased emphasis on Career Pathways, more AJC staff will be participating in on-going forums to help define or refine existing pathways and learn more about the pathways developed. The training and partnership building provided through these grants build capacity for all AJC staff, including those funded by Wagner-Peyser, and the skills acquired are transferable to other populations served. (Page 216)
Strategies to increase the median earning of program participants:
1. Assist in the development of Career Pathways based upon Hawaii’s labor market for individuals interested in postsecondary education or direct job placement or both. Identify Career Pathways and job opportunities that are specific to each county.
2. Identify strategies to increase the capacity of SSA beneficiaries to move toward self-sufficiency through, work include education of the person’s family and try and encourage high expectations for the person regarding work rather than striving to remain dependent on SSI. High expectations have been proven to have a positive effect on outcomes and earnings for beneficiaries.
Strategies to increase the percentage of participants who during a program year achieve a measurable skill gain:
1. Use the customized employment model identified in the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program.
2. Create career pathways; channels of opportunities from pre-employment training to competitive employment outcomes.
Strategies to cultivate VR’s effectiveness in serving employers: Developing successful partnerships with local and multi-state businesses in an effort to increase the employment of individuals with disabilities and self-employment. Services include, but not limited to:
1. Train employers on compliance the title I of the American with Disability Act (ADA) of 1990 and other employment-related laws.
2. Inform employers of the existence of the program and availability of services.
3. Educate and provide services to employers who have hired or are interested in hiring individuals with disabilities.
4. Provide training and technical assistance to employers regarding disability awareness.
5. Working with employers to provide opportunities for work-based learning experiences and opportunities for PETS services.
6. Train employees who are individuals with disabilities. (Page 315)
 

Employment Networks

~~In addition, DVR partners with Developmental Disabilities Division case managers and Ticket to Work Employment Networks to provide extended services to maintain employment. (Page 312)
1.   The methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.
• Increase support services in postsecondary settings thereby increasing graduation rate.
• Increase pre-employment transitions services to better prepare transitioning youth with disabilities into the workforce.
• Support the provision of summer youth employment for transitioning high school students as well as those in postsecondary training.
• Redevelop the relationship with the State agency providing services to those individuals with mental health issues.
 Temporary Employment Opportunities
 Paid and Unpaid Work Experience
• Develop a cooperative agreement involving DVR, Developmental Disability Division, Workforce Development Division, Med-QUEST Division, Adult Mental Health Division (AMHD), Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) and the University of Hawaii. Through this larger cooperative agreement, it is anticipated that small agreements and MOA’s will be developed between smaller agencies from the larger core group.
• Do outreach to individuals with disabilities from rural areas, Native Hawaiians, Micronesians and Deaf-Blind individuals to provide VR services.
• Implement “Customized Employment” strategies, continue Benefits Planning services to Ticket Holders, and develop MOAs with Employment Networks to increase our focus on the provision of Supported Employment services. (Page 319)
 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 39

1915(C) HCBS Medicaid Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities WAIVER STANDARDS MANUAL Version B - 10/01/2017

~~“Discovery and Career Planning (DCP)Discovery and Career Planning combines elements of traditional prevocational services with career planning in order to provide supports that  the participant may use to develop skills and interests toward becoming employed for the first time or at different stages of the participant’s work career to develop skills and interests for advancement or a change in the participant’s career plan” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Hawaii Uniform Application FY 2018/2019 – State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Community Mental Health Services Block Grant - 08/29/2017

~~“The Clubhouse Model seeks to demonstrate that people with mental illness can successfully live productive lives and work in the community, regardless of the nature or severity of their mental illness. Clubhouse services include Transitional Employment (TE), Group Transitional Employment (GTE), Supported Employment (SE), Supported Education (SE), Advocacy and Case Management”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

The Going Home Plus Project - 07/09/2017

~~“The Going Home Plus (GHP) project helps residents who have been living in hospitals, nursing facilities, and ICF/ID facilities move back into the community. For those residents who choose to live in the community, the GHP project will assist in finding housing (if the resident does not have a home to return to) and services (for example, help with cooking and bathing).•Eligibility Requirements•Going Home Plus Services

Individuals from all islands are eligible to participate.

The Going Home Plus (GHP) project is funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration grant through June 30, 2020. The project is a partnership between the Hawaii Department of Human Services Med-Quest Division and the University of Hawaii Center on Disability Studies.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

*UPDATED* Supported Employment Services for VR Consumers - 07/04/2017

~~This is a call for bids for a program that will “Provide supported employment (SE) services to individuals with disabilities, both physical and mental. Individualized services are to be provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with the consumer’s strengths, resources, priortiespriorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice.  The contract term will be from October 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019 with four (4) additional 12-month option periods.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

“Phase-In Timing for New Rates, by Services and ‘Cohort’ prepared for Developmental Disabilities Division” - 07/01/2017

~~“This document is a set of tables noting what services will be available for all of the participants in the program or different “cohorts” (Cohort 1 - Participants residing in certified or licensed settings; Cohort 2 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings AND receiving Adult Day Health; or Cohort 3 - Participants living independently, in family homes, or unlicensed settings and NOT receiving Adult Day Health).”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Application for 1915(c) HCBS Waiver: HI.0013.R07.01 - Jun 01, 2017 - 07/01/2017

~~“The State of Hawaii requests approval for an amendment to the following Medicaid home and community-based services waiver…. Program Title: HCB Services for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD Waiver).  Amendment Number: HI.0013.R07.01Approved Effective Date of Waiver being Amended: 07/01/16This is a technical amendment to address several items that were not included in the waiver renewal approved effective July1, 2016. The new rate methodology and changes to services are designed to support implementation of the Home andCommunity Based Services Final Rule for Community Integration. This amendment also includes a multi-year phase-inusing the Supports Intensity Scale for Adults to assess participants’ support needs to inform the person-centered process.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

HAWAII RESIDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CELEBRATE 30 YEARS OF SELF-DETERMINATION AT “DAY AT THE CAPITOL" - 03/16/2017

~~“Today, Hawaii is one of nine states that does  not have a waiting list for home and community based services. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes. Currently, 99 percent of people served by the Department of Health’s Developmental Disabilities Division live in residences serving one to six people, and 61 percent in settings with one to three people. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes.

By law, the Department of Health is mandated to develop, lead, administer, coordinate, monitor, evaluate, and set direction for a comprehensive system of supports and services for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Current services include: personal assistance/habilitation, emergency services, respite, employment supports, chore, training and consultation, specialized medical equipment, adult day health, skilled nursing, environmental accessibility and vehicular modifications, assistive technology, personal emergency response systems and non-medical transportation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Waiver Standards Manual Version A – Draft Pending DHS-MQD Approval - 03/09/2017

~~“The Waiver Standards Manual Version A includes current services that the participant may receive until their Individualized Service Plan (ISP) is held during fiscal year 2018 (July 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018). Waiver Standards Manual Version B will include services available to participants as they transition to new services, fee schedules and billing codes based on their date of ISP and their cohort group.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REPORT ANNUALLY TO THE LEGISLATURE THE NUMBERS OF PERSONS WAITING FOR DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY OR INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES SERVICES AND SUPPORTS, - 12/01/2016

~~“For fiscal year (FY) 2016, the Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) had no waitlists of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) for the following programs:1. Medicaid Home and Community-Based Service (HCBS) I/DD Waiver under the authority of section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act;2. Long Term Adult Supports and Resources (LASR);3. Family Support Services Program (FSSP); and4. Crisis Network Services.The total number of individuals with I/DD served by DDD was 3,246. Of this number 2,789 were served under I/DD Waiver,” 83 individuals were served under the LASR program, 33 individuals received services through FSSP, 178 individuals were served through Crisis Network Services, and the remaining 163 received only case management services.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

RealChoices Hawaii - Guide to Employment for Job Seekers - 01/22/2016

This guide to employment for people with disabilities provides information and additional links on job centers, employment for seniors and employment for youth.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Hawaii HB 119 - 07/01/2015

"It is the intent and purpose of the legislature to establish a qualified tax exempt savings program to encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities pursuant to section 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or successor legislation, and any regulations promulgated thereunder.  It is the further intent of the legislature that the program established by this Act be and remain in conformance with the Stephen Beck, Jr., Achieving a Better Life Experience Act [ABLE] of 2014, Division B of Public Law No. 113-295"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

House Bill 860: Related to Persons with Disabilities - 01/28/2015

 “Establishes an employment first policy for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Requires the DOH to establish an employment first committee.” (Introduced in the Hawaii state legislature 1/28/15; sent to committees and status is pending.)

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Hawaii Uniform Application FY 2018/2019 – State Behavioral Health Assessment and Plan Community Mental Health Services Block Grant - 08/29/2017

~~“The Clubhouse Model seeks to demonstrate that people with mental illness can successfully live productive lives and work in the community, regardless of the nature or severity of their mental illness. Clubhouse services include Transitional Employment (TE), Group Transitional Employment (GTE), Supported Employment (SE), Supported Education (SE), Advocacy and Case Management”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

HAWAII RESIDENTS WITH INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES CELEBRATE 30 YEARS OF SELF-DETERMINATION AT “DAY AT THE CAPITOL" - 03/16/2017

~~“Today, Hawaii is one of nine states that does  not have a waiting list for home and community based services. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes. Currently, 99 percent of people served by the Department of Health’s Developmental Disabilities Division live in residences serving one to six people, and 61 percent in settings with one to three people. Hawaii ranks in the top quartile of states in supporting individuals in family homes.

By law, the Department of Health is mandated to develop, lead, administer, coordinate, monitor, evaluate, and set direction for a comprehensive system of supports and services for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities in Hawaii. Current services include: personal assistance/habilitation, emergency services, respite, employment supports, chore, training and consultation, specialized medical equipment, adult day health, skilled nursing, environmental accessibility and vehicular modifications, assistive technology, personal emergency response systems and non-medical transportation.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

REPORT ANNUALLY TO THE LEGISLATURE THE NUMBERS OF PERSONS WAITING FOR DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY OR INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES SERVICES AND SUPPORTS, - 12/01/2016

~~“For fiscal year (FY) 2016, the Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD) had no waitlists of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) for the following programs:1. Medicaid Home and Community-Based Service (HCBS) I/DD Waiver under the authority of section 1915(c) of the Social Security Act;2. Long Term Adult Supports and Resources (LASR);3. Family Support Services Program (FSSP); and4. Crisis Network Services.The total number of individuals with I/DD served by DDD was 3,246. Of this number 2,789 were served under I/DD Waiver,” 83 individuals were served under the LASR program, 33 individuals received services through FSSP, 178 individuals were served through Crisis Network Services, and the remaining 163 received only case management services.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations “Labor Law Requirements for New Employers” - 03/14/2013

Employers are required to provide reasonable accommodations for a qualified employee with a disability which allows that person to perform their essential job functions. An accommodation is reasonable if it does not impose an undue hardship on the employer’s business.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii Department of Education “IEP Overview”

Each Individualized Education Program includes: -a statement of the child's present levels of educational performance; -a statement of annual goals, including short-term instructional objectives; -a statement of the specific special education and related services to be provided; -the extent that the child will be able to participate in regular educational programs; -the projected dates for initiation of services and the anticipated duration of the services; and -appropriate objective criteria and evaluation procedures and schedules for determining, on at least an annual basis, whether the objectives are being achieved. The IEP for each student, beginning no later than age 16, must include a statement of needed transition services.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Hawaii Department of Human Services Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) provides services to Hawai’i community members who experience barriers to employment due to a physical or cognitive disability. DVR is designed to assist job seekers with disabilities prepare, secure, and retain competitive employment in an integrated work setting. DVR furnishes the finest resources and opportunities for training, support, and career placement. Productive partnerships with other state agencies, private non-profits, and employers pave the way for our consumers to find successful employment with the reality of competitive wages. The underlying philosophy and goal of the DVR is thorough employment, individuals with disabilities are empowered toward economic self-sufficiency, independence, inclusion, and integration into society.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Hawaii Department of Human Services Division of Vocational Rehabilitation "Our Vision"

Our vision at the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is “Move Forward to Work.” We would like to think of ourselves as the agency of choice for persons with disabilities who are looking to enter or retain integrated, competitive employment. As Hawai‘i’s primary agency directly responsible for the employment needs of our citizens with disabilities, we are committed in Hawai‘i’s efforts in establishing a 21st century workforce. With service offices on Hawai‘i Island, Maui, Moloka‘i, O‘ahu and Kaua‘i the Division is entrenched within our communities to meet the needs of those seeking our services. With the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) in July of 2014, the Hawai‘i VR program has been actively working with core partners from the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, Department of Education, Department of Health, University of Hawai‘i and the Community Colleges as well as divisions within the Department of Human Services in developing the kinds of services all of Hawai‘i can be proud of.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other

Hawai'i State Council on Developmental Disabilities

“The Hawai'i State Council on Developmental Disabilities is mandated by federal (P.L. 106-402) and state (Chapter 333E, Hawaii Revised Statutes) laws to: plan, coordinate, evaluate, monitor, and advocate on behalf of individuals with developmental disabilities; and assure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families participate in the design of and have access to culturally competent services, supports, and other assistance and opportunities that promote independence, productivity, and integration, and inclusion into the community.

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii Employment First Inititive

“To advance Employment First, ODEP created the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). This program helps states align policies, regulations and funding priorities to encourage integrated employment as the primary outcome for individuals with significant disabilities.”   “In November 2014, Hawaii was one of 15 states selected to receive technical assistance from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy to build capacity and develop inter-agency policy for employment for individuals with disabilities..”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

*UPDATED* Supported Employment Services for VR Consumers - 07/04/2017

~~This is a call for bids for a program that will “Provide supported employment (SE) services to individuals with disabilities, both physical and mental. Individualized services are to be provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with the consumer’s strengths, resources, priortiespriorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice.  The contract term will be from October 1, 2017 through June 30, 2019 with four (4) additional 12-month option periods.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services

Hawaii Developmental Disabilities Division - Strategic Plan 2015-2017 Progress Report - 09/23/2015

“The Strategic Plan was adopted on December 2014. In the ensuing months Team Leaders have been convening meetings with advocates, providers, partners, and Division staff to plan specific activities for attaining goals and objectives of the Strategic Plan. Teams have also developed performance measures to track progress and measure results.” Goal number 3 outlines that “DDD will ensure individuals with I/DD have opportunities to seek employment and achieve personal outcomes to work in competitive integrated settings.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Full Life Sponsors Disability Legislative Forum

EHDDC to host the 2016 East Hawaii Disability Legislative Forum “You cannot have Inclusion without Us” Full Life is sponsoring both East and West Hawai’i Island Disability Legislative Forums! The public, especially family members and persons with disabilities, are invited to come and meet Hawaii Island’s State legislators and County officials. These free events will feature a forum where policymakers will answer questions about disability-related issues such as employment, housing, transportation, and health. Special activities include the opportunities to express your opinion on topics important to you and to meet and talk story with State legislators and County officials. Provider agencies have prepared booths with information about many available services and supports.

Systems
  • Other

West Hawaii Business Leadership Network

“The West Hawaii Business Leadership Network meets quarterly at the Workforce Development Division’s Kona Office to share best practices on hiring, promoting and accommodating individuals with disabilities.   The West Hawaii BLN organizes the annual Mea Like Ole Awards Ceremony, recognizing the most outstanding employers in West Hawaii. BLN members also collaborate with other organizations from across the country to present workshops on job accommodations, customized employment, and other topics.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

East Hawaii Business Leadership Network

“The East Hawaii Business Leadership Network meets monthly at the Workforce Development Division’s Hilo Office to share best practices on hiring, promoting and accommodating individuals with disabilities.   The East Hawaii BLN organizes the annual Hoomohala Awards Ceremony, recognizing the most outstanding employers in East Hawaii. BLN members also collaborate with other organizations from across the country to present workshops on job accommodations, customized employment, and other topics.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii State Council on Developmental Disabilities

~~“The Council is responsible to engage in advocacy , capacity-building, and systemic change activities that are consistent with the policy in the federal law; and contribute to a coordinated, consumer and family-centered and consumer and family-directed, comprehensive system that includes needed community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that promote self-determination for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families.

The Council carries out its responsibilities through policy development, implementation and analysis; researching and promoting new approaches and best practices to services and supports; educating and informing policymakers and the public about developmental disabilities; developing and supporting coalitions; fostering interagency collaboration and coordination; providing training in leadership development and legislative advocacy; and eliminating barriers and enhancing design and redesign of systems.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hire Abilities Hawai'i

“Hire Abilities Hawaii represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`’ College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council.“

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Hawaii Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“To advance Employment First, ODEP created the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP). This program helps states align policies, regulations and funding priorities to encourage integrated employment as the primary outcome for individuals with significant disabilities.”   “In November 2014, Hawaii was one of 15 states selected to receive technical assistance from the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy to build capacity and develop inter-agency policy for employment for individuals with disabilities..”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Hawaii DEI - Round 6 Grant Abstracts

The U.S. Department of Labor awarded Hawaii a Round 6 DEI grant to improve employment opportunities for youth and/or adults with disabilities. “HIDEI [Hawaii DEI] will hire four Disability Resource Coordinators and build upon the promising practices of the HIDEI 2 [Round 2] project to incorporate career pathways into its service to individuals with significant disabilities to better prepare participants to obtain meaningful employment and achieve self-sufficiency.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Hawaii DEI - Round 2 Grants

The Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) is a three-year federal grant-funded program that improves education, training, employment opportunities, and employment outcomes for people who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. In 2010, Hawaii was awarded a Round 1 DEI grant from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. The Round 1 grant ended in 2013.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Hawaii Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“In 2006, Hawaii received a grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid to improve employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program, known as Hire Abilities Hawaii, ran from 2006 to 2009. It was authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. MIG provided funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that built supports for people with disabilities seeking employment. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities. The Hire Abilities website grew out of these goals and objectives.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

RealChoices Hawaii - Guide to Employment for Job Seekers - 01/22/2016

This guide to employment for people with disabilities provides information and additional links on job centers, employment for seniors and employment for youth.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

Hawaii’s Disability Employment Initiative

~~“Hawaii’s DEI will focus its effort on the following strategies:•Increase American Job Center (AJC) staff competencies through training on Disability 101, Customized Employment, Career Pathway Systems, Job Accommodation, Asset Development, Individualized Learning Plans, and Disability Benefits Planning.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maui Youth and Family Services, Inc

~~“MYFS was established in 1978 by Maui County as the Maunaolu Youth Residential Shelter to provide a safe place for Maui’s homeless, abused and runaway children. Incorporated as a private non-profit agency in 1982, MYFS has expanded to include a range of behavioral and mental health programs to support young people and their families’ personal growth and emotional stability.Maui Youth and Family Services is accredited by CARF, the Commission on the Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.”

Systems
  • Other

Hawaii Employers Council In-house Training

As a service exclusively for members, any or all of the Fundamentals of Supervision workshops can be brought to your company’s site or held at the HEC training room. The content of these workshops can be designed to fit your company’s unique culture and tailored to highlight issues that are important to your workplace. The workshops combine lectures, videos and case studies, with longer sessions including role-play exercises. We will use your company's forms, policies and procedures to the extent possible. In addition what is presented in the Fundamentals of Supervision Workshops, the following topics are also available for in-house programs: -ABCs of Collective Bargaining -Americans with Disabilities Act -Effective Employee Relations: Remaining Union Free -Family and Medical Leave Act (for members with 50 or more employees) -Preparing for Unemployment Appeals Hearings -Preventive Discipline for Unionized Work Groups

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - Customized Employment Videos

“These Customized Employment (CE) videos, each specifically focused on Employers, Youth, or a General audience, highlight the benefits of CE, an employment strategy which matches the skills and preferences of the individual with the specific business needs of the employer. This process results in expanded employment opportunities for those who utilize and engage in this innovative, evidenced-based approach to employment. The General audience video has been created in both English and Spanish.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

HireAbilities Hawai'i

This website is intended to provide resources to support employment for individuals with disabilities. It is intended to be used by job seekers with disabilities, service providers, agencies and businesses. This site was revamped December 2013 and now has many new features and content. Some major additions to the website include: -The Benefits Finder can search for eligibility and work incentive information for Hawaii’s state and federal disability programs. -Use our Resource Finder to search a database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. -Learn more about how Hawaii’s proposed Medicaid Buy-In Program could help workers with a disability who require Medicaid . Hire Abilities Hawaii is a comprehensive database of articles, web sites and provider agencies for employment resources. It represents an innovative collaboration among the Department of Human Services (DHS), University of Hawai`i College of Education Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Health (DOH), the Department of Labor (DOL) and its statewide Workforce Development Council. Originally started through a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Hire Abilities Hawai'i - "What is Customized Employment?"

This brief article defines customized employment and outlines the case for using it with job seekers with disabilities. It outlines the different forms customized employment can take, including "task reassignment," "job carving," and "job negotiation."

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

1915(C) HCBS Medicaid Waiver for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities WAIVER STANDARDS MANUAL Version B - 10/01/2017

~~“Discovery and Career Planning (DCP)Discovery and Career Planning combines elements of traditional prevocational services with career planning in order to provide supports that  the participant may use to develop skills and interests toward becoming employed for the first time or at different stages of the participant’s work career to develop skills and interests for advancement or a change in the participant’s career plan” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
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