Maryland

States - Big Screen

The numerous efforts to support individuals with disabilities in securing and sustaining competitive, integrated employment in the Old Line State of Maryland are more than you can imagine. We're open for business, and welcome the skills and talents of workers with disabilities! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Maryland’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
-0.16%
Change from
2017 to 2018
6,042,718
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.67%
Change from
2017 to 2018
341,159
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.01%
Change from
2017 to 2018
149,359
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.4%
Change from
2017 to 2018
43.78%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.42%
Change from
2017 to 2018
80.77%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 6,016,447 6,052,177 6,042,718
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 334,505 335,461 341,159
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 137,517 141,870 149,359
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,716,777 2,733,682 2,711,665
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.11% 42.29% 43.78%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.21% 80.43% 80.77%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.30% 4.10% 3.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.70% 17.70% 16.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.70% 8.30% 8.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 303,117 304,396 322,325
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 353,003 355,747 353,747
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 405,250 384,006 392,131
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 200,243 212,801 215,937
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 34,281 38,339 43,047
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,983 3,041 3,061
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 22,124 25,795 27,051
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 14,959 18,249 21,063
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 10,239 16,000 16,522

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,308 6,375 6,090
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.90% 5.90% 5.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 130,269 129,481 126,920

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 12,955 13,764 16,358
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 31,395 32,876 41,349
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 59,031 58,225 71,761
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.90% 23.60% 22.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.20% 5.00% 3.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 18.10% 18.70% 15.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.30% 5.90% 3.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,268 2,675 3,047
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 11,435 10,146 13,981
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,362 3,186 3,418
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 10,425 9,388 8,821
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06 0.07 0.08

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 56 56 96
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 35 34 50
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00% 61.00% 52.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.59 0.57 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,222
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 209 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 253 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 531 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,359 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 764 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,103 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 35.20% 20.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,178 10,569 10,790
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 204,612 207,082 205,144
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 166 182 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 328 179 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $75,498,000 $59,262,000 $59,181,431
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $171,675,000 $180,016,327
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $10,955,000 $15,191,591
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 37.00% 33.00% 30.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A 676 976
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A 0 2,111
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A 9,131 8,942
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 81.80 11.20 65.28

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.95% 69.73% 70.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 12.95% 12.04% 12.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 6.93% 6.86% 6.77%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.49% 98.86% 97.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 23.45% 22.66% 26.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.63% 58.09% 65.07%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 61.47% 72.93% 79.63%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 31.18% 35.43% 38.61%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 4,727,875
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 5,994
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 267,634
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 2,927,591
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,195,225
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 162
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 2,256
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,418
AbilityOne wages (products). $2,320,330
AbilityOne wages (services). $37,326,061

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 2 2 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 22 21 13
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 25 24 13
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 172 140 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,056 2,124 1,159
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,229 2,265 1,159

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Every working age Marylander with a disability, including those with significant disabilities, must have access to opportunities that lead to employment in competitive, integrated settings. The opportunity to learn necessary skills and receive needed support through the State’s workforce system and its key partners enables individuals with disabilities to experience success in the full cross section of Maryland’s businesses and industries. Employment is critical to ensuring quality lives for Marylanders with disabilities while reducing reliance on public assistance and strengthening the economic fabric of the State.

Marylanders with disabilities possess the ability to contribute to the state’s economic growth and achieve financial self-sufficiency. Historically, however, this population has had a low level of workforce participation, particularly those with the most significant disabilities. In an effort to capitalize on the attributes of this untapped workforce, Maryland’s workforce system will play a key role in embracing nationally recognized best practices including Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals with significant disabilities can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate support. All aspects of the workforce system, including state partner agencies, local public and private partners, and businesses will coordinate to effectively strengthen employment outcomes for Marylanders with disabilities. (Page 46-47) Title I

1. The Council commends DORS for the progress made in developing a comprehensive QA case review process to be implemented no later than July 1, 2014. The Council looks forward to hearing results of the initial “beta” year of implementation. The Council recommends that the agency address the methodology of consumer satisfaction surveys and explore web-based survey; consider strategies to expand sample size; reach underrepresented groups; preserve anonymity; and explore web-based surveys, follow-up phone calls, and other response methods.
2. The Council recommends that DORS develop training for staff to expand knowledge and understanding of disabilities and functional capacities; means to mitigate limitations, such as Assistive Technology; and impact on employment as a basis for providing effective career counseling.
3. The Council recommends that DORS continue collaboration with local providers, the Maryland Department of Disabilities, and the Developmental Disabilities Administration, at the state and local levels, as related to the Employment First initiative. This should include an exploration of programmatic barriers to success and cross-agency training needs.
4. The Council recognizes the continuing barrier that lack of transportation causes for individuals with disabilities seeking employment statewide. The Council will work with DORS staff to determine the status of federal and state transportation efforts that may improve transportation resources for individuals with disabilities.
5. The Council recommends that DORS continue to explore, identify, and implement innovative practices in job development and placement, including evaluating the effectiveness of the new Business Services Branch. (Page 240) Title I

Behavioral Health Administration - This cooperative agreement, most recently updated effective December 2011, addresses referrals between agencies and specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, as well as cross-training for staff.
Developmental Disabilities Administration - MSDE, DORS, and the Maryland Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Administration updated and approved the Cooperative Agreement, Employment Services in October 2013. It focuses on implementation of Employment First in Maryland and addresses referral between agencies and specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment. It also describes cross-training activities. (Page 243-244) Title I

DORS is a partner with other state agencies (including WIOA partner, DLLR) and Community Rehabilitation Programs in implementing Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals, including those with significant disabilities, consider employment on a preferred basis in planning for their lives. Employment First is consistent with DORS’ belief that individuals with disabilities, even the most significant disabilities, can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate supports. Supported employment is appropriate for individuals in Employment First and is the means to assure the best chance for success in employment. Benefits planning is an important part of services for individuals served through Employment First. (Page 252) Title I

DORS has entered into a cooperative agreement with the Maryland Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA), to provide for increased interagency cooperation, to ensure the maximum utilization of appropriate programs and resources in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, to expand and improve services to individuals with significant disabilities, and to maximize the use of comparable benefits. The agreement sets forth terms and conditions under which DORS and DDA will cooperate in the provision of services. The formal interagency cooperative agreement identifies policies, practices, and procedures that are coordinated between DORS and DDA (particularly definitions, standards for eligibility, the joint sharing and use of evaluations and assessments, and procedures for making referrals). It also identifies available resources and defines the financial responsibility of each agency for paying for necessary services, consistent with state law and procedures for resolving disputes between agencies, and includes all additional components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation and coordination.
DORS and DDA updated and approved the Cooperative Agreement, Employment Services, in October 2013. The agreement focuses on the implementation of Employment First in Maryland. It addresses referral between agencies, specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, and describes cross-training activities. (Page 257) Title I

1. Evaluate agency resources which support BHA Evidence-Based Practice Supported Employment (EBPSE) and consumers who receive Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) services.
2. Collaborate with DDA and clarify procedures, including those related to Employment First, to ensure seamless delivery of services.
3. Continue strategic activities that will meet the unique needs of individuals with Autism spectrum disorders preparing for employment.
4. The DORS Multi-Cultural workgroup will continue to develop and publicize specialized resources for minority groups. (Page 321) Title IV

DORS is a partner with other state agencies, including WIOA partner DLLR, and Community Rehabilitation Programs in implementing Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals with signi4268ficant disabilities consider competitive, integrated employment on a preferred basis in planning for their lives. Employment First is consistent with DORS’ belief that individuals with disabilities, even the most significant disabilities, can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate supports. Supported employment is appropriate for individuals in Employment First and is the means to assure the best chance for success in employment. Benefits planning is an important part of services for individuals served through Employment First. (Page 372-373) Title IV

Currently, Maryland’s TCA workforce programs are built on connecting individuals to work participation activities that ultimately result in permanent employment. Local Departments of Social Services (LDSS) workforce programs are operated through pay-for-performance vendors, vendors, or the LDSS themselves. This allows the LDSS to achieve the federal TANF performance measure of 50 percent for WPR. DHS will continue to deploy an “employment first” model, but with TANF’s new mandated partnership in the WIOA system, DHS can leverage the myriad of opportunities that the WIOA Partners will offer to improve upon the employment and training trajectories of TCA recipients in Maryland.  (Page 383) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~To increase the workforce system’s capacity to effectively serve individuals with disabilities, Maryland’s DEI provides for an array of professional development opportunities. Throughout the DEI grant period, Local Workforce Development Area staff will receive professional development and technical assistance opportunities, including the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) Competency-based Certificate Training, which places an emphasis on Customized Employment.
Customized Employment allows for an individualized approach to supporting jobseekers and employers in meeting their goals and typically involves four components: (1) discovery and assessment; (2) job search planning; (3) job development and negotiation; and (4) post-employment support. Depending on the needs of the jobseeker, accommodations or recognition of jobseeker limitations may take place at any point in the training process. (Page 149) Title I

7. Improve information and referral services to AJCs and other workforce partners for individuals on the DORS waiting list, especially Social Security Ticket to Work holders who may benefit from Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA) programs and Employment Network services, while waiting for DORS services to be available.
8. Improve the variety of employment opportunities available to DORS consumers by increasing staff knowledge of current labor market trends; by collaborating with community colleges to develop pre-apprenticeships and RA programs for high growth industries in Maryland in collaboration with workforce and educational partners; by providing customized employment services; and by increasing opportunities for DORS consumers to participate in internships.
9. Create a catalogue of standard letters in the same foreign languages for which the DORS Application is already available to ensure individual understanding of services and their rights and responsibilities, during the rehabilitation process.
10. Increase technology training opportunities for DORS consumers to include advanced training on Apple software/devices and access technology used in competitive integrated employment.
11. Expand and increase, as appropriate, the programs and services designed specifically for individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing, including students in need of Pre-ETS, by evaluating the Rehabilitation Communication Services pilot to determine whether services and outcomes have improved, establishing an in-state Pre-ETS program to complement existing out-of-state programs, and providing consultation services for other WIOA workforce programs on using technology to communicate with deaf individuals. (Page 270) Title I

Information from both CRPs and DORS staff indicates: a desire for additional training and job placement programs for consumers available in all geographic areas, more training available for CPRs to increase skill level of job placement staff (especially related to customized employment and disability information as it pertains to an individual’s limitations on a job and in the selection of an appropriate placement), and higher level skills training in IT, administrative, and medical office work. Additionally, there were numerous comments from both CRPs and DORS staff that better collaboration is needed in the areas of communication, especially in returning phone calls and emails. (Page 312) Title IV

• Develop additional training for both CRPs and DORS staff in service areas, particularly for job development and services that are new to both entities such as customized employment.
• Continue to enhance collaboration between DORS and CRPs focusing on communication and working relationships.
• Determine if inactive CRPs will begin to provide services to DORS consumers and if not, remove from DORS CPR list.
• Develop resources, including CRPs, for DORS counselors to be able to access employment services for individuals requiring professional level job placement.
• Expand the number of CRPs to provide employment services for specialized populations including Deaf Blind, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Individuals with Blindness. (Page 313) Title IV

• The 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment will include an assessment and recommendations for expanding and improving services to students and adults with disabilities;
• In collaboration with the WIOA partners, DORS will establish linkages with businesses and employers to include training, customized employment, education and disability awareness, on-site worksite Assistive Technology services, and mentoring/internship activities;
• DORS will continue to enhance relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs to ensure availability of Community Rehabilitation Program services statewide;
• DORS will continue to expand services and outreach to individuals who are deaf-blind and provide technical assistance to staff and WIOA partners serving this population; and
• In collaboration with WIOA partners, DORS will develop relationships with employers and analyze labor trends, to increase opportunities for employment of populations that are unserved or underserved. (Page 330) Title IV

• DORS is collaborating with its WIOA partners, including those within the AJCs throughout the state, on office spaces. As leases expire, DORS will look for opportunities to expand the co-location of DORS and other WIOA partners, in an effort to assist in better serving individuals with disabilities;
• DORS will collaborate with WIOA partners to offer cross-training on disability awareness, customized employment, Assistive Technology, and other disability-specific topics;
• DORS Business Service members will collaborate with WIOA partner Business Service teams to leverage business contacts, share resources and expertise, and coordinate services that are beneficial to businesses and promote the employment of individuals with disabilities; and
• DORS will coordinate with WIOA partners, including WIOA Business Services Team and AJCs, in recruitment events and job fairs. (Page 333) Title IV

The AWARE case management system was updated four times during this FY in compliance with new federal requirements to submit case service data to RSA on a quarterly basis for open and closed cases. With each AWARE update, the Rehabilitation Service Manuals were updated with direction provided to staff.
• Training will be provided to DORS staff on changes resulting from the reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act (e.g. pre-employment transition services, customized employment, limitations on use of subminimum wage, “competitive integrated employment” criteria, and services to employers). (Page 350) Title IV

Supported employment services are defined in the regulations as ongoing support services and other appropriate services needed to support and maintain an individual with the most significant disability in supported employment, as well as services to establish and maintain a supported business enterprise or customized employment. The quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services are consistent with the definition of supported employment as it is contained in the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. Supported employment means competitive work in integrated work settings or employment in integrated work settings. Individuals with the most significant disabilities are working toward competitive work consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. These are persons including youth with the most significant disabilities:
• For whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a significant disability and
• Who, because of the nature and severity of a disability, need intensive supported employment services from the designated state unit, DORS, and extended services after transition in order to perform this work. (Page 367) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Also, in late 2016, USDOL awarded the DWDAL nearly $2.5 million to implement the state’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). Maryland’s DEI has a grant period spanning October 1,
2016 through April 1, 2020. Employing the career pathways model, Maryland’s DEI will meet the USDOL’s goals and aims to equip individuals with disabilities with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in-demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. When designing Maryland’s DEI, the State had the following goals in mind: (1) increase the number of individuals with disabilities entering competitive integrated employment via services within AJCs; (2) improve accessibility of the AJCs involved; increase the competency level and number of skilled staff in the AJCs to serve individuals with significant disabilities; (3) develop career pathways systems and programs to equip individuals with disabilities with skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them be competitive in the workforce; and, (4) create a more robust workforce system to serve individuals with disabilities within the state of Maryland, by addressing the needs of businesses. (Pages 148-149) Title I

Customized Employment allows for an individualized approach to supporting jobseekers and employers in meeting their goals and typically involves four components: (1) discovery and assessment; (2) job search planning; (3) job development and negotiation; and (4) post-employment support. Depending on the needs of the jobseeker, accommodations or recognition of jobseeker limitations may take place at any point in the training process.
In addition, to ensure the DEI’s success in Maryland, DLLR has: (1) hired a DEI program manager for the State; (2) established a statewide Cohesive Resource Committee; (3) encouraged Anne Arundel and Montgomery counties to establish local Cohesive Resource Committees; (4)
made resources available locally to hire Disability Resource Coordinators in Anne Arundel and
Montgomery counties; and, (5) encouraged the pilot counties to support individuals through an Integrated Resource Team approach. (Page 149) Title I.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Maryland recognizes that youth must truly be ready to enter into the workforce and academically prepared to enter into college. The State continues to invest in partnerships with Career Technology Education (CTE) programs for high school students. CTE programs include a work-based learning opportunity (e.g. internships, clinical experiences, or industry-mentored projects) tied to the student’s area of interest. (Page 43) Title I

3. Outline strategies to increase work-based learning experiences such as paid internships and RAs that provide jobseekers with the skills and credentials necessary to secure employment and advance in their jobs with family sustaining wages and benefits by building new sector partnerships and strengthening existing partnerships - EARN will serve as the starting point for this, as some SIPs are providing work-based learning experiences. We look forward to building on lessons learned. (Page 176) Title I

6. Incorporation of an increase in work-based learning opportunities in EARN and throughout the business-focused delivery system with the Job Driven National Emergency Grant Program - Under this system, dislocated worker services will focus on industry-driven partnerships with the business community. Utilizing this renewed focus, employer partnerships create job opportunities for dislocated workers through work based learning, on-the-job training, and customized and occupational skills training. Some EARN Maryland Partnerships are leveraging JDNEG funding, but the WIOA partners will explore ways to more effectively take advantage of this opportunity. Maryland will continue to utilize models like EARN Maryland and those established under the Job Driven National Emergency Grant program in advancing this business focused system. Under this system, dislocated worker services will focus on industry-driven partnerships with the business community. Utilizing this renewed focus, employer partnerships create job opportunities for dislocated workers through work based learning, on-the-job training, and customized and occupational skills training. (Page 177) Title I

• DORS will facilitate activities to bring state of the art transitioning services to Maryland’s students and families, including the following Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the WIOA: job exploration counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and instruction in self-advocacy.
• DORS will continue to explore, develop, and expand new initiatives and methodologies that promote the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services and successful post-school outcomes, including the following: work experience, employment, postsecondary education and training, community participation, independent living, and healthy lifestyles. These initiatives will be accomplished through a variety of cooperative agreements, cooperative funding agreements, special grants, or other innovative means. (Page 250) Title I

• Training and technical assistance to employers and WIOA partners to promote the awareness of the skills and benefits that people with disabilities can bring to their workforce. Types of training include: information on DORS services and training programs, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and federal contractor compliance with Section 503. Group training opportunities for businesses will be offered, as well as individual consultation and need-driven training for specific employers.
• Providing consultation on and support to remove disability-related obstacles to employment and the provision of reasonable accommodations for recruitment, work-based learning activities, onboarding, and retention of employees, including Assistive Technology and worksite assessments. Business Services Representatives will serve as points of contact for businesses needing guidance, and the Workforce and Technology Center Rehabilitation Technology Services unit will provide specific and applicable worksite services for consumers and employers. (Page 254) Title I

• Providing business and industry-specific career information and training sessions for consumers.
• Developing and monitoring of work-based learning and resume-building opportunities, such as internships, job shadowing, disability employment awareness month activities, volunteering, and on-the-job training, including expanding programs already in place, such as the Governor’s QUEST Internship Program and the federal agency VR internship programs.
• Promoting the federal Workforce Recruitment Program to businesses and consumers.
• Engaging businesses in Training Program Advisory Committees at DORS’ Workforce and Technology Center to ensure training programs meet business and industry needs and standards and to facilitate work-based learning and employment opportunities. (Page 255) Title I

In 2013, the CSNA reported that transitioning students need to have more opportunities for basic work experiences and exposure to role models to develop an understanding of employer expectations and to develop a strong work ethic, rather than be satisfied with remaining on government assistance. In 2016, this is still true and even more so because of the requirement to make pre-employment transition services available for students with disabilities. There are very few community rehabilitation programs that offer opportunities for youth who are deaf to participate in a work-based learning environment. Gallaudet University (GU) and National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID) continue to offer Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) summer camps and other summer learning programs on campus. DORS is committed to serving consumers that participate in these camps and summer learning programs, but the associated out-of-state costs are high. There is a need for these types of programs to be offered in-state to provide increased access for all deaf students. (Page 280) Title I

A policy and braided funding mechanism with BHA assures that the individuals BHA report as receiving SEP services are individuals referred to DORS for the provision of job coaching for job development and intensive job coaching at the onset of employment. To assess whether supported employment services for individuals with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness are being appropriately integrated between DORS and BHA statewide according to this braided-funding policy, the BHO Services Report data on the number of individuals served by County paid through June 2016 was compared to DORS data on the number of individuals with a priority population diagnosis served under an Individualized Plan for Employment through June 2016.
The results of this comparison are provided in the table below. For each County, the table displays the total number receiving any Behavioral Health Administration (BHA) services, the total receiving BHA supported employment funding, the total receiving services from DORS under an IPE, and the total number of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) approved both by DORS and BHA to provide services in the County. (Page 284) Title I

• A review of DORS information for individuals with a potential priority population diagnosis (e.g. Major Depression, Bi-Polar Disorder, or Schizophrenia) who were in an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in FY16 found that DORS is capturing a majority of the individuals reported to be receiving SEP through BHA.
• In Baltimore City it appears that DORS is working with about twice the number of individuals reported by BHA. This may be due to a number of factors: counselors, other than those with the behavioral health supported employment expertise, are working with those individuals and are not aware of supports available in the community, miscoding of primary diagnosis, or they may be carryover cases from previous years that have been closed/discharged from the BHA system.
• In Region 6, there appears to be a need for additional CRPs and additional counselors with a technical specialty to service this population. (Page 287) Title I

• DORS may wish to pilot various case management approaches which appear to hold promise. For instance, the agency may choose to assign counselors a specialty based upon their work strengths. For example, Counselor A may meet with a consumer to gather all pertinent intake information (e.g. demographics, documentation of disability, etc.), then Counselor B may provide all services related to implementation of the IPE, while Counselor C may manage all financial matters for an assigned number of consumers (e.g. issue and track purchase authorizations and Maintenance and Transportation logs), Counselor D may assist consumers to access services in the community to address barriers affecting their ability to become or maintain employment. (Page 291) Title I

1. Ensure that VR counselors and staff work with high school students with disabilities, families, school personnel, business partners, and community partners to help these students prepare for and achieve employment and self-sufficiency.
2. Emphasize and implement transition services, including work-based learning experiences such as Project Search, internships, and summer work-based learning experiences to promote long-term career success and leadership, including expanding transitioning services through federal initiatives, such as the Maryland Workplace Collaborative.
3. Provide Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including the following services: job exploration counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training, and instruction on Self-Advocacy for students with disabilities who are 14-21 years old.
4. Provide training and support to DORS transition counselors and pre-employment transition services counselors through the Transition Specialists Group and other meetings, the Transition Conference, and training programs. Training shall help counselors identify and develop tools and resources related to postsecondary education and best practices in working with families and transitioning students. (Pages 316- 317) Title IV

1. Continue to have the Business Services Representatives in each region assist with enhancing services to businesses to include recruitment assistance, technical assistance for tax incentives, development of work-based learning opportunities, OJT and customized training, education, and disability awareness training.
2. Engage with businesses through the CSAVR National Employment Team (NET) activities, including use of the national Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP).
3. Collaborate with WIOA partners and community rehabilitation programs to leverage business contacts, share resources and expertise, and coordinate services that are beneficial to businesses and promote the employment of individuals with disabilities. (Pages 320) Title IV

o The number of services to businesses will increase as compared to the previous year, and will be documented in the AWARE employer module, as well as through a pilot using the MWE to measure effectiveness in serving employers.
o The number of work-based learning opportunities, including but not limited to QUEST, Summer Youth Employment, and On-the-Job Training opportunities, will increase as compared to the previous year and be tracked through the AWARE case management system. (Pages 320) Title IV

Individuals shall be placed in priority categories at the time of eligibility determination. Depending upon DORS’ resources, the categories shall be closed for services in ascending order beginning with Category III and proceeding to Categories II and I. Services shall be provided only to those individuals in an open category. However, DORS shall continue to plan for and provide services to any individual determined eligible prior to the date on which the Order of Selection category to which the individual has been assigned has been closed, irrespective of the severity of the individual’s disability.
DORS staff will be advised via formal issuance when categories are closed or reopened. Consumers shall be taken off the waiting list when resources are available to provide services, based on their application date.
The Order of Selection categories are as follows:
• I. Individuals with Most Significant Disabilities.
• II. Individuals with Significant Disabilities.
• III. Individuals with Non-Severe Disabilities.
Under the order of selection, DORS will continue to emphasize and enhance services to students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. (Page 325) Title IV

DORS provides VR services and pre-employment transition services in partnership with local education agencies, workforce partners, and businesses that lead to successful outcomes in postsecondary education and employment for students with disabilities.
• DORS will ensure that VR counselors and staff work with high school students (including those in special education, with 504 plans, with severe medical conditions, and those who have a disability for purposes of section 504), families, school personnel, and community partners to help students prepare for and achieve employment and self-sufficiency;
• DORS will continue to emphasize and implement evidence-based transition practices, including work-based experiences such as Project Search, internships, and summer employment to promote long-term career success and leadership, including expanding transitioning services at the Workforce and Technology Center (especially for consumers not planning to attend college);
• DORS will implement the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, including the following services: Job Exploration Counseling, Work-based learning experiences, Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, Workplace readiness training, and Instruction on Self-Advocacy for high school students with disabilities who are 14-21 years old; and
• The Division will continue to provide training and support to transition counselors through the Transition Specialists Group and other meetings, the Transition Conference, and training programs. Training shall help counselors identify and develop tools and resources related to postsecondary education and best practices in working with families and transitioning students. The agency will also collaborate with Developmental Disabilities Administration and clarify procedures to ensure seamless transition for individuals receiving Developmental Disabilities Administration assistance. (Page 331-332) Title IV

1. Ensure that VR counselors and staff work with high school students with disabilities, families, school personnel, and community partners to help these students prepare for and achieve employment and self-sufficiency.
2. Emphasize and implement transition services, including work-based learning experiences such as Project Search, internships, and summer employment to promote long-term career success and leadership, including expanding transitioning services at the Workforce and Technology Center.
3. Provide Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) including the following services: job exploration counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training, and instruction on self-advocacy for students with disabilities who are 14-21 years old. (Page 335) Title IV

4. Provide training and support to DORS transition counselors through the Transition Specialists Group and other meetings, the Transition Conference and training programs. Training shall help counselors identify and develop tools and resources related to postsecondary education and best practices in working with families and transitioning students. (Page 335) Title IV

DORS saw a decrease in the number of students who achieved employment outcomes from 849 in FY 16 to 590 in FY 17. This decrease was partially due to the new emphasis on providing pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities and partially because DORS discontinued assisting individuals to obtain employment in jobs created for the purpose of employing individuals with disabilities because they do not fit the definition of “integrated” employment.
• Funding will be provided to support leadership programs for youth with disabilities.
During FY17, DORS contributed $17,130.00 to support the Maryland Youth Leadership Forum for youth with disabilities.
• The DORS Transition Specialists Group will meet at least semiannually and include staff training on pertinent topics (e.g. pre-employment transition services), and will identify, develop and disseminate tools and resources for transitioning students related to postsecondary education. (Page 336) Title IV

1. The Business Services Representatives in each region will assist with enhancing services to businesses to include recruitment assistance, technical assistance for tax incentives, development of work-based learning opportunities, OJT and customized training, education, and disability awareness training.
2. The Business Relations Branch will assist counselors and consumers to use Labor Market Information when identifying appropriate employment goals (Needs Assessment Rec. 8). (Page 341) Title IV

o The number of work-based learning opportunities, including QUEST and On-the-Job Training opportunities, will increase and be tracked through the AWARE case management system.
61 QUEST internship opportunities were made available, and 34 individuals completed QUEST internships. The number of opportunities decreased; however, nine intern host agencies offered three month extensions to their interns in lieu of advertising for a new intern. This allowed those individuals to gain additional skills and six months of experience, which is the minimum requirement for many entry level state positions. In addition, 33 work-based learning activities and 26 on-the-job training (OJT) activities were documented in AWARE. (Page 342) Title IV

1. Ensure that VR counselors and staff work with high school students with disabilities, families, school personnel, and community partners to help these students prepare for and achieve employment and self-sufficiency.
2. Emphasize and implement transition services, including work-based learning experiences such as Project Search, internships, and summer employment to promote long-term career success and leadership, including expanding transitioning services at the Workforce and Technology Center.
3. Provide Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) including the following services: job exploration counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training, and instruction on self-advocacy for students with disabilities who are 14-21 years old. (Page 352) Title IV

During FY 17, DORS served 5,568 individuals with supported employment identified as a service on their IPEs, which exceeded the goal to serve 4,000. During FY17, DORS and the Maryland Behavioral Health Administration (BHA) have been updating the MOU to meet the requirements under WIOA, specifically, the process for serving youth with serious and persistent mental illness. This agreement, which identifies the roles and responsibilities of both partners at the state and local level, will further strengthen the collaborative relationship between both agencies. Also, throughout FY17, DORS and DDA have been actively updating their cooperative agreement to reflect collaborative practices and changes related to WIOA. DORS anticipates finalizing both cooperative agreements in 2018. (Page 369) Title IV

The state of Maryland developed a comprehensive approach to the adolescent pregnancy problem including:
o Improvements in education, such as providing sexuality education, access to contraceptives and other health promotion services to reach out-of-school adolescents;
o Community based programs, such as local multimedia promotion of responsible decision-making on sexual matters;
o Enhanced social services, such as physical and sexual abuse prevention at primary, secondary, and tertiary levels;
o Employment development, such as school-to-work opportunities in partnership with private business and public agencies; and
o Health initiatives, such as improved access to birth control counseling and services for sexually active adolescents and parenting classes for every pregnant teenager and her partner. Programs and services for people in this age group will be improved or added, as needed. (Page 420) Title IV

Each SCSEP participant works with a SCSEP employment specialist and a AJC staff person to identify the services that would best assist with career goals and movement toward unsubsidized employment. The staff search for opportunities to utilize services provided under WIOA and other related programs available in the local job center. It is the goal of SCSEP to provide and utilize services and programs that are available in the AJCs to assist participants to attain individual and program goals. Participants are assessed and referred to additional services available in each AJC that will aid in reaching employment goals of their Individual Employment Plan (IEP).
MD SCSEP has integrated into DLLR’s AJCs. To strengthen these partnerships, MD SCSEP staff periodically schedule joint meetings with the LEAs at these AJCs to find ways to work together more efficiently. Joint meetings will also ensure that all participants receiving services within the local AJCs become informed of the wealth of supportive services. (Page 513) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~2016 through April 1, 2020. Employing the career pathways model, Maryland’s DEI will meet the USDOL’s goals and aims to equip individuals with disabilities with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in-demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. When designing Maryland’s DEI, the State had the following goals in mind: (1) increase the number of individuals with disabilities entering competitive integrated employment via services within AJCs; (2) improve accessibility of the AJCs involved; increase the competency level and number of skilled staff in the AJCs to serve individuals with significant disabilities; (3) develop career pathways systems and programs to equip individuals with disabilities with skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them be competitive in the workforce; and, (4) create a more robust workforce system to serve individuals with disabilities within the state of Maryland, by addressing the needs of businesses. (Page 148-149) Title IV

DORS maintains a Staff Specialist for Transition position to lead the following activities:
• Coordinate all VR and Pre-Employment Transition Service activities and projects with other WIOA partners to facilitate access to WIOA Programs, such as the Youth Program, the career pathways system, and apprenticeship programs. Also coordinate with other state agencies, community organizations, public and private facilities, local DORS field offices, and employers.
• Collaborate with the DORS Grants Administrator and WIOA partners in responding to federal and state transition requests for proposals and in implementing cooperative agreements.
• Develop, update, and monitor transition documents in collaboration with WIOA partners in responding to federal and state transition requests for proposals and in implementing cooperative agreements.
• Provide program information to state level transition personnel and to the local education agencies through in-service training and publications.
• Serve as consultative staff for the Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities.
• Facilitate an intra-agency transition group for counselors who provide transitioning services for the purpose of information sharing and ongoing training.
• Provide guidance to community rehabilitation programs and providers submitting proposals for the provision of pre-employment transition services. (Page 249) Title I

1. Continue to have the Business Services Representatives in each region assist with enhancing services to businesses to include recruitment assistance, technical assistance for tax incentives, development of work-based learning opportunities, OJT and customized training, education, and disability awareness training.
2. Engage with businesses through the CSAVR National Employment Team (NET) activities, including use of the national Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP).
3. Collaborate with WIOA partners and community rehabilitation programs to leverage business contacts, share resources and expertise, and coordinate services that are beneficial to businesses and promote the employment of individuals with disabilities. (Page 320) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Connecting Individuals with Disabilities to Apprenticeship Opportunities The State of Maryland is committed to providing opportunities for individuals with disabilities, and the RA program is no exception. RAs offer young adults, including those with disabilities, career pathways that provides employment as the individual learns on the job. Focused attention is directed towards developing relationships with RA Sponsors/employers to encourage increased participation of individuals with disabilities in RA programs. Outreach efforts to identify and educate individuals with disabilities on the value of and opportunities in RA programs include, but are not limited to: o Working with State VR agencies, the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS), convening a roundtable of employers who hire people with disabilities to introduce the concept of developing apprenticeable occupations; S o Showcasing a Registered Apprenticeship model among disability-friendly businesses; and o Establishing public-private partnerships to develop outreach strategies for those individuals with disabilities. (Page 182) Title I

RA programs combine work-based learning and classroom training to help successful program completers obtain secure, full-time journeyman positions. DLLR’s Apprenticeship and Training Program offers over 100 active apprenticeship programs. The state measure the outcomes of these services through their MWE in the form of reports that are developed to measure the specific services for both the DVOP and AJC delivery system. (Page 436) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~7. Improve information and referral services to AJCs and other workforce partners for individuals on the DORS waiting list, especially Social Security Ticket to Work holders who may benefit from Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA) programs and Employment Network services, while waiting for DORS services to be available.
8. Improve the variety of employment opportunities available to DORS consumers by increasing staff knowledge of current labor market trends; by collaborating with community colleges to develop pre-apprenticeships and RA programs for high growth industries in Maryland in collaboration with workforce and educational partners; by providing customized employment services; and by increasing opportunities for DORS consumers to participate in internships.
9. Create a catalogue of standard letters in the same foreign languages for which the DORS Application is already available to ensure individual understanding of services and their rights and responsibilities, during the rehabilitation process. (Page 270) Title I

Respondents identified the following needs/concerns:
• Length of waiting list to access services and lack of results;
• Insufficient number of rehabilitation counselors for the Deaf (RCDs);
• Communication (including interpreters) and lack of job coaches;
• Lack of awareness of accommodations needed for Deaf employees;
• Lack of accessibility to accommodations needed for Deaf employees;
• Discrimination;
• Lack of English skills;
• Lack of Driver’s License; and
• Issues with SSI/SSDI.
In addition, respondents spoke of perceived barriers to accessing DORS services, including unresponsiveness on the part of the counselors, and spoke of the need to reduce the waiting list, to have more counselors to respond to inquiries, to increase availability of job coaching services, to provide assistance with college and finding internships, and to provide more interpreting services. (Page 279) Title I

• Via the Ticket to Work Verification Portal, DORS Program Income staff determined that 44 percent of those currently waiting for services are Ticket holders, indicating that at least five percent of consumers on the waiting list became Social Security beneficiaries after entering the waiting list.
• Since counselors and consumers do not routinely communicate during this waiting period, counselors often miss potential opportunities to request new diagnostic information from the Disability Determination Services regarding their consumers—information which, if available, may provide sufficient support for increasing their consumer’s disability priority to Category I: Most Significantly Disabled.
• These individuals may be considered underserved because they are most likely not being advised by their DORS counselors of services available through Work Incentive Program and Assistance (WIPA) providers and/or Employment Networks. (Page 293) Title I

Develop a system for routinely comparing the DORS waiting list with the Disability Determination Services (DDS) list of open claims so that counselors may have the opportunity to secure the consumer’s permission to request any available documentation when it is most readily available.
• Implement a strategy for informing Social Security beneficiaries in general and Social Security Ticket to Work holders in particular about WIPA and EN services that may be available while they are waiting for agency services to be available. (Page 293) Title I

Strategies: DORS will
1. Cross-train staff regarding services available from WIOA partners at the state and local level.
2. Participate in meetings regarding WIOA policy development and partnerships.
3. Participate in local planning meetings regarding service provision and collaboration in AJCs.
4. Strengthen referral procedures to increase engagement of consumers, including Consumers on the DORS waiting list, with WIOA partners.
5. Develop and implement procedures for referring consumers whose cases were recently closed to Maryland Employment Networks.
Performance Measures by September 30, 2018:
• Disability awareness training for WIOA partners will be provided.
• A common referral form and release of confidentiality will be developed.
• A baseline number of individuals involved in services provided by WIOA partners will be determined, using AWARE documentation.
• Develop a method for tracking ticket hand-offs to Maryland Employment Networks. (Page 320-321) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~DLLR will make SCSEP participants a part of their pipeline of talent identified by business services staff. Business services staff will be trained to understand the program and participants as potential candidates for openings.
MD SCSEP will also continue to cultivate and grow relationships with host agency partners who have demonstrated their commitment to employing older workers by hiring SCSEP participants. Proper exit and follow-up procedures are critical to this area of employer engagement and will be measured as a job performance standard of MD SCSEP staff. The program aims to develop an internal network of training and job referral completely comprised of proven hiring and training partners. These partners will assist MD SCSEP in advocating for older workers as viable human capital for Maryland businesses and agencies, and the program will rely on them to increase host agency, training partner, and employer recruitment and retention.

Senior Service America, Inc. (SSAI) Long-Term Strategy for Engaging Employers
Senior Service America’s, Inc. (SSAI’s) sub grantees have well-established partnerships with local Chambers of Commerce. Sub grantees often attend meetings in order to network with local business representatives. Through training provided by SSAI, sub grantees regularly get on a Chamber’s agenda to engage employers by promoting both SCSEP and job ready participants. In PY2014, SSAI Field Support Program Officers introduced an Employer Outreach Kit to a pilot group of sub grantees. The kit includes both three-minute and ten-minute talking points, a PowerPoint presentation, general presentation tips, suggested wording for an elevator pitch, and advice on how to handle both cold and warm calls with employers. This kit has been proven to save a great deal of preparation time and has increased subgrantee staff confidence about engaging employers. Further improvements to the kit will be made as MD SCSEP expands its use in future PYs. (Page 526) Title IV

Data Collection

DORS also monitors performance on an ongoing basis. DORS staff have access to AWARE VR standardized performance reports on an ongoing basis - weekly, monthly, quarterly, and annual reports. Performance is monitored regularly to ensure progress toward the achievement of performance goals. Additionally, Alliance Enterprises has been working with DORS and other VR agencies to develop new data reporting elements in accordance with WIOA common performance measures. As Alliance Enterprises updates AWARE, DORS will ensure that staff are provided necessary training. Also, DORS staff will continue to work with its workforce partners toward implementing WIOA common performance measures. (Page 90) Title I

DORS and other VR agencies to develop new data reporting elements in accordance with WIOA common performance measures. As Alliance Enterprises updates AWARE, DORS will ensure that staff are provided necessary training. Also, DORS staff will continue to work with its workforce partners toward implementing WIOA common performance measures. (Page 138) Title I

Performance Measures by September 30, 2018: • Meet federal performance standards for timely determination of eligibility and development of the Individualized Plan for Employment. • Provide staff training related to the new federal common performance measures for WIOA programs. • OBVS will achieve 108 competitive integrated employment outcomes. • The Business Enterprise Program will recruit, train, and license six new managers and establish new vending sites where available. • OBVS will close 190 ILOB cases successful. • An increased number of consumers who are blind/vision impaired or Deaf-Blind will be referred to WTC compared to the previous year. • OBVS will achieve at least 85 percent consumer satisfaction based upon Consumer surveys. • OBVS will serve more Consumers who are Deaf-Blind as compared to the previous year. (Page 318) Title IV

Objective 4.1 - Implement strategies required by the WIOA, consistent with WIOA final regulation, including Title IV, Amendments to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and in consultation with the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the Maryland State Rehabilitation Council, other core programs identified within the Combined State Plan, and the Technical Assistance Centers. Strategies: 1. DORS will collaborate with workforce partners to update and implement the Combined State Plan. 2. Implement MOU/RSAs with workforce partners required for DORS to fulfill new federal reporting requirements. 3. Identify a technology training team to increase effective use of current technology for case management. 4. Develop strategy for use of Career Index Plus to enhance vocational guidance and counseling for development of the Individualized Plan for Employment. 5. Provide ongoing training to staff regarding the Rehabilitation Act and implications for DORS policy, procedures, and data collection. 6. Leverage electronic communication strategies to gather information from DORS consumers during service delivery as well as post-exit. Performance Measures by September 30, 2018: • DORS Rehabilitation Services Manuals, publications, and the AWARE case management system will be updated consistent with changes in the Rehabilitation Act. • Ongoing training will be provided to DORS staff regarding the Rehabilitation Act (e.g. pre-employment transition services, supported employment, limitations on use of subminimum wage, competitive integrated employment criteria, measurable skills gains, and services to employers). • The DORS section of the Combined State Plan will be updated. • DORS will request and receive UI wage data from DLLR four times per year, as required for federal reporting. • Electronic communication procedures for requesting and collecting information from DORS consumers will be implemented. (Page 323) Title IV

• DORS will continue to actively participate with the WIOA partners on the WIOA Workgroups. The collaboration will ensure effective and efficient implementation of new common performance accountability measures in Maryland, identification of best presentation of WIOA performance reports for the state and for Local Areas, development of recommendations for additional measures, and negotiation of levels of performance/adjustment factors; • DORS and the other WIOA Core Programs will establish base-line or benchmarking data in the first year of data collection for the new Common Performance measures; • In order to secure wage data for DORS consumers working in other states, DORS will explore strategies with DLLR to access Wage Record Interchange System wage reporting system; • DORS will review data sharing agreement with the WIOA partners as described within this plan for possible revisions to have better access to wage data; and • Federal employment data is available through FEDES, which is operated by the University of Baltimore, Jacob France Institute under contract with DLLR and the USDOL. DORS will work with WIOA partners to review existing agreement and take appropriate actions to ensure access to federal wage records. (Page 332) Title I

1. Provide high quality comprehensive services to eligible individuals with significant disabilities in keeping with the WIOA and Federal Regulations, the Code of Maryland regulation, and DORS Policy. 2. Collaborate with WTC in assuring consumers with all disabilities receive services offered at WTC in a seamless and timely manner. 3. Strengthen relationships with WIOA partners to improve employment outcomes and reporting on common performance measures for DORS consumers (Needs Assessment Rec. 1). 4. In conjunction with the Staff Specialist for Community Rehabilitation Programs, OFS management will continue to enhance relationships with community rehabilitation programs. (Page 353) Title IV

• Meet federal performance standards for timely determination of eligibility and development of the Individualized Plan for Employment. During FY 17, OFS achieved 98 percent eligibility determination timeliness compliance, compared to 93 percent in FY 16, and 91 percent Individualized Plan for Employment development timeliness compliance, compared to 81 percent in FY 16. • Provide staff training related to the new federal and state common measures for CORE WIOA Core Programs. DORS provided and/or supported two learning events pertaining to WIOA state and federal common performance measures. • OFS will achieve at least 85 percent consumer satisfaction. 93 percent overall customer satisfaction achieved. • OFS will achieve 1,910 employment outcomes. (Page 337) Title IV

511

~~The Need of Individuals with Most Significant Disabilities for Supported Employment Services in Maryland
An increased need for supported employment services, including extended services for youth with most significant disabilities for a period not to exceed four years, is anticipated for several reasons:
• Section 511 of WIOA states that the DSU must provide youth with disabilities documentation that the youth have completed certain activities, such as receipt of transition services and Pre-Employment Transition services, under the VR program prior to the youth engaging in subminimum wage employment.
• In Maryland Senate Bill 417/House Bill 420: Individuals with Disabilities: Minimum Wage and Community Integration (Ken Capone Equal Employment Act) was passed during the 2016 Maryland Legislative Session. The bill phases out the authority for the Commissioner of Labor and Industry to authorize a work activities center or other sheltered workshop to pay a subminimum wage to an employee with a disability. It also restricts the authority of a work activities center or other sheltered workshop to pay a subminimum wage and/or a sub-prevailing wage to an employee with a disability. Beginning October 1, 2020, the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) may not fund providers that pay individuals less than the minimum wage under a specified federal certificate. (Page 273) Title IV

Examine DORS policy regarding supported employment in light of WIOA requirements regarding Section 511 and provisions for customized employment and extended services.
• Develop a strategy for increasing the number of students with disabilities exiting high school to whom extended services can be made available.
• Update the DORS and DDA MOU, considering whether a braided funding mechanism similar to the DORS and BHA model can be utilized.
• Partner with DDA, BHA, and 14c certificate holders to plan for implementation of Section 511 requirements.
Individuals who are Blind/Visually Impaired and Deaf-Blind
As reported in the 2013 State Plan Needs Assessment, the Maryland DORS and the Office for Blindness and Vision Services (OBVS) are committed to providing quality and specialized services to Maryland citizens who are Blind, Visually Impaired, and Deaf-Blind. Together, the Office for Blindness and Vision Services and the State Rehabilitation Council, Blind Services Committee Provides oversight and leadership in guiding policies and enhancing services to Maryland citizens. The Office for Blindness and Vision Services (OBVS) operates the following programs and services for eligible participants:
i. VR Counselors are located throughout the state in DORS field offices and at the Workforce and Technology Center. The staff provides employment and independent living services for individuals who have a goal of employment.
ii. Rehabilitation Teachers for the Blind are also located throughout the state in DORS field offices and at the Workforce and Technology Center. The staff provides independent living assessments and services to individuals who have a goal of employment. Additionally, these Rehabilitation Teachers provide in-home teaching for the Independent Living Older Blind Grant (ILOB). They assess for areas such as: mobility training, household management skills, and communication device training. (Page 275) Title IV

WIOA Section 511 does not require a DSU to identify individuals who are currently earning sub-minimum wage. However, DORS has compelling reasons for developing a proactive approach for managing these referrals, including the sheer number of individuals in Maryland currently earning sub-minimum wage who could self-refer or be referred to the agency at any time to obtain the documentation required to continue earning sub-minimum wages, and the implications of Maryland SB 417/HB 420: Individuals With Disabilities: Minimum Wage and Community Integration (Ken Capone Equal Employment Act), signed into law on May 19, 2016. Because the majority of 14c certificate holders are also programs funded by the Developmental Disabilities Administration, it is understood that the majority of individuals working for subminimum wage are individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. As such, this section of the Needs Assessment will focus on the use of 14c certificates in Maryland and the impact for VR in providing the services required by WIOA for individuals employed in these settings.
Prevalence

Data available on the DLLR, Wage and Hour Division (WHD) was reviewed for Maryland. This data was current through March 2016. Information was compared to the DORS Fee Schedule to determine which geographic regions the providers primarily serve.
An analysis of the information available noted that 36 CRPs have 14c certificates permitting them to pay sub-minimum wages. All but two of the CRPs are currently providing services for Maryland VR. Of the 36 CRPs mentioned above, 3,469 Individuals are being paid through the use of sub minimum wage certificates. Five CRPs have more than 200 individuals involved in subminimum wage work. Of the top five, the highest is 387 and the lowest 214. (Page 282) Title IV

• Review literature from Office of Disability Employment Policy and Vermont Conversion Institute and, in collaboration with CRPs, evaluate how to implement 511 WIOA requirements within the agency and each region.
• Establish a process for obtaining consumer information from CRPs with 14c certificates for individuals working at subminimum wage.
• Provide training opportunities to DORS staff and CRPs in the implementation of Section 511 especially around competitive integrated employment. (Page 283) Title IV

• It is anticipated based on data collected that the number of students accessing DORS services will increase each year.
• It is anticipated based on data collected that the number of HS students with Autism will increase each year.
• It is anticipated that the number of students with IDD accessing DORS services will increase each year as a result of WIOA requirements related to Section 511.
• DORS Transitioning caseloads will continue to grow each year. (Page 310) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Maryland is dedicated to ensuring that communication regarding the state’s implementation efforts is not a singular event. Beginning in 2016, the WIOA partners leverage mass communication systems, such as GovDelivery/Granicus, to ensure that important messages regarding implementation are continually provided in a unified manner to frontline staff, local providers, and other stakeholders. Furthermore, Maryland is dedicated to utilizing WIOA implementation funding to ensure that local and state staff are provided professional development and other training opportunities. (Page 56) Title I

The third convening, in the winter of 2017, unpacked the WIOA Section 188 Nondiscrimination and subsequent guidance, overviewing topics such as the State Nondiscrimination Plan and Language Access Plan, compliance deadlines, Benchmarks, WIOA target populations and priority of service, and cultural competency. In-depth topics included language access training, Equal Opportunity Officer Training, disability accessibility, the discrimination complaint process, understanding immigration and eligibility documents, and more. (Page 56) Title I

Within DHS’ Family Investment Administration is the Maryland Office for Refugees and Asylees (MORA), which provides support and services to federally-recognized refugees and other humanitarian immigrants including asylees, certified Victims of Trafficking, Special Immigrant Visa holders from Iraq and Afghanistan, Cuban and Haitian entrants, and certain Amerasians. MORA has helped more than 40,000 refugees and eligible humanitarian immigrants make Maryland their home through a statewide network of public and private organizations. MORA provides transitional cash assistance, employment services, English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes, vocational training, health case management, and other supportive services. MORA partners assist individuals to become independent, contributing members to the national and local economy through a number of transitional services aimed at helping the clients achieve social and economic self-sufficiency. The Task Force has already provided key input into the workforce system. In 2017, the Task Force issued the first ever Maryland Workforce System Survey: Serving Limited English Proficiency (LEP) Individuals and Skilled Immigrants. The tool surveyed WIOA partners from DLLR, Local Areas, DORS, and local departments of social services regarding how the workforce system engages immigrants and those with limited English proficiency. There were 428 responses, 51% of which were from those in direct-service positions. Respondents indicated that staff is interested in learning how to enhance service to these populations through cross-training and professional development opportunities. The complete survey is available here: http://www.dllr.state.md.us/employment/wdskilledimmigrantsurvey.pdf. The Task Force was also key in establishing Maryland’s Third WIOA Convening in January 2018 that focused on training for Local Areas and state staff on the provisions of Section 188 of WIOA, the State’s Non-Discrimination Plan, and DWDAL’s proposed Language Access Plan. (Page 70) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. WIOA System Accessibility for All Marylanders Maryland’s WIOA oversight entities are committed to ensuring that individuals with disabilities have equal access to all WIOA covered programs and activities. The State of Maryland will ensure that sub-recipients establish and implement appropriate procedures and processes under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Rehabilitation Act -Title IV. The State of Maryland has taken necessary steps to identify compliance under Section 188 of WIOA, which contains provisions identical to those in Section 188 of WIA, as well as 29 CFR Part 38, which is similar to 29 CFR Part 37. Additionally, the state will ensure that all Local Areas comply with provisions that prohibit discrimination against individuals who apply to, participate in, work for, or come into contact with programs and activities that receive financial assistance from USDOL, United States Department of Education, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Section 188 of WIOA prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status, and gender identity), national origin (including LEP), age, disability, or political affiliation or belief, or against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship status or participation in any WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. Section 188 also requires that reasonable accommodations be provided to eligible individuals with disabilities. AJCs are expected to meet the needs of their customers by ensuring universal access to their programs and activities for all eligible individuals. Universal access includes performance of the following functions: o Understanding local needs; o Marketing and outreach; o Involving community groups and schools; o Affecting collaboration, including partnerships and linkages; o Staff training; o Intake, registration and orientation; o Assessments and screening; and o Service delivery. (Page 146-147) Title I

Maryland’s AJCs are required to provide reasonable accommodation for individuals with disabilities to ensure equal access and opportunity. The term “reasonable accommodation” is defined as “modifications or adjustments to an application/registration process that enables a qualified applicant/registrant with a disability to be considered for the aid, benefits, services, training or employment that the qualified applicant/registrant desires;” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to perform the essential functions of a job, or receive aid, benefits, services, or training equal to that provided to qualified individuals without disabilities,” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to enjoy the same benefits and privileges of the aid.” AJC will make visible to participants that: o Section 188 implements the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA, which are contained in Section 188 of the statute. o Section 188 prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status, and gender identity), national origin (including LEP), age, disability, or political affiliation or belief, or against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship status or participation in any WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. o Section 188 also requires that reasonable accommodations be provided to qualified individuals with disabilities in certain circumstances. (Page 147) Title I

The guidelines for the development and submission of each grant recipient’s Local WIOA Plan included the requirement that recipients describe the steps they would take to ensure that communications with individuals with disabilities, including individuals with visual or hearing impairments, are as effective as communications with others. Additionally, to ensure staff are properly trained on topics related to EO, Maryland held its 3rd WIOA Convening in the winter of 2017 to unpack the WIOA Section 188 Nondiscrimination and subsequent guidance, overviewing topics such as the State Nondiscrimination Plan and Language Access Plan, compliance deadlines, Benchmarks of Success, WIOA target populations and priority of service, and cultural competency. In-depth topics included language access training, Equal Opportunity Officer Training, disability accessibility, the discrimination complaint process, understanding immigration and eligibility documents, and more. (Page 148) Title I

Maryland’s Nondiscrimination Plan fulfills the requirements of WIOA Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 38. The plan states that it is the policy of the State of Maryland to not discriminate against any individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status, and gender identity), national origin (including LEP), age, disability, or political affiliation or belief, or against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship status or participation in any WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. (Page 152) Title I

A day-long convening in 2017 unpacked the WIOA Section 188 Nondiscrimination and subsequent guidance. Workshops focused on topics such as the State Nondiscrimination Plan and Language Access Plan, compliance deadlines, Benchmarks, WIOA target populations and priority of service, and cultural competency. Language access training, Equal Opportunity Officer Training, disability accessibility, the discrimination complaint process, understanding immigration and eligibility documents, and other similar key topics were covered. In addition to the State-wide convenings, the State is looking towards online resources, as well. DLLR is working to develop a presence on the “The Hub” for virtual training and workforce system resources. “The Hub” is a learning management system available to all Maryland State agencies that is maintained by Maryland’s Department of Budget and Management (DBM). In 2017, DLLR utilized WIOA implementation funds to purchase licenses for this state learning management software for the benefit of local partners. The WIOA partners will use the Hub as the platform on which state and local partners, including Wagner-Peyser staff, will be able to access a variety of training modules and resources. “The Hub” has the capacity to create two home pages: one for DLLR-DWDAL internal training content and a second for content added by external partners. The external home page presents an excellent opportunity to facilitate improved service integration across the system. For example, each partner can post a “101” module that provides other partners with the basics on that organization’s mission, target audiences, resources, key initiatives, etc. (Page 157) Title I

Vets

For WIOA programs under DLLR’s oversight, in order to confirm compliance under Section 188, DWDAL state Regional Program Monitors will conduct an onsite review. Prior to the commencement of the visit, the Monitor will confirm with the Program Manager or Director that notification of the visit was received, staff are aware, and requested information prior to the visit is unchanged. The Program Monitor will observe the site’s triage system, confirm that appropriate federal signs are visible to participants, and examine the kiosk to confirm that appropriate WIOA, Veteran, ITA, and OJT information is available. A site walk-through will determine whether: o EO Law Posters are in plain sight, centrally located, in needed languages and provide state and local EO Officer contact information; o WIOA, Veteran, ITA, and OJT Literature are present; o EO tagline is inserted and correct; o TTY/TDD or Relay Service number is provided where phone numbers are listed; o Site is accessible, i.e. ADA compliant; o Disability entrance signage is present; o Entrance and parking lot are accessible; and o There are both Accessible stations and Assistive Technology. (Pages 149-150) Title I

Men and women who have served in the U.S. armed forces or who have been the spouses of service members have made significant sacrifices on behalf of the United States. In recognition of their service, and in accordance with the WIOA, the Jobs for Veterans Act of 2002[i] and the Veterans’ Benefits, Healthcare, and Information Technology Act of 2006[ii], Maryland is committed to prioritizing services to Veterans and spouses who meet the criteria for “covered persons.” Maryland’s workforce system must ensure that members of this population have access to services that enable them to qualify for, find, and keep good civilian jobs in occupations with career pathways. (Page 142) Title I

Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVERs) conduct outreach to local employers to assist Veterans in gaining employment. Outreach activities conducted by LVERs include: conducting seminars for employers, job search workshops, and facilitating access to occupational training, and placement services. The DVOPS and LVER roles have defined, differentiated duties that are designed to function in a complementary fashion. Both staff positions are dedicated resources for the exclusive purpose of serving Veterans, other eligible covered persons, transitioning service members, their spouses, and, indirectly, employers. DVOP staff assist veterans and other eligible veterans and other eligible persons with: • Finding a job, • Enrolling in training or applying for educational assistance (credential attainment); • Connecting to resources/information related to meeting immediate needs such as housing/food/mental health services. (Page 429) Title IV

On-the-job training (OJT) is training conducted by an employer that occurs while a participant is engaged in productive work. OJT optimizes the resources available under workforce development initiatives to meet the needs of employers and job seekers. Employers generally pay a reduced OJT wage (generally 40-50 percent of wages) to employ participants, while they train for the job. RA programs combine work-based learning and classroom training to help successful program completers obtain secure, full-time journeyman positions. DLLR’s Apprenticeship and Training Program offers over 100 active apprenticeship programs. The state measure the outcomes of these services through their MWE in the form of reports that are developed to measure the specific services for both the DVOP and AJC delivery system. (Page 436) Title IV

Mental Health

~~Maryland Statewide Independent Living Council
• Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council
• Maryland Mental Health Advisory Board
• Department of Health, Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Committee
Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities Under Executive Order 01.01.2007.13 (Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Students with Disabilities)
• The Maryland Coordinating Committee for Human Services Transportation
• Department of Health/Developmental Disabilities Administration, Maryland Department of Disabilities Employment First, The Maryland Library for the Blind, and Physically Handicapped Advisory Board
• Local Coordinating Councils
• Maryland Special Education state Advisory Committee (Page 244-245) Title I

DORS has also entered into a cooperative agreement with the Department of Health, Behavioral Health Administration. The cooperative agreement, most recently updated effective December 2011, addresses referrals between agencies and specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, as well as cross-training for staff. (Page 257) Title I

Information from the 2013 Comprehensive Needs Assessment noted that the utilization of mental health supported employment services varies by county. Additionally, a documented need was to examine longitudinal data to inform program development and staff and provider training. (Page 283) Title I

Information from CRPs that attended the public meetings indicated a need for employment services for students with mental health needs and a need for funding to develop programs not just fee-for-service. Areas for expansion include CRPs for the Deaf Blind, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Individuals with Blindness. These are also addressed in other areas within the needs assessment. (Page 313) Title IV

DORS has a strong partnership with Maryland’s mental health system related to Evidence-Based Practice in Supported Employment. This is based on overwhelming evidence that supported employment is the most effective route to competitive employment for consumers with severe mental illness. The partnership is characterized by streamlined access to VR services through guest access of VR counselors into the Behavioral Health Administration’s Administrative Service Organization’s case management system; presumption of eligibility for VR services for individuals determined eligible for Supported Employment through the Behavioral Health Administration; and adherence to principles of Evidence-based Practice in Supported Employment.
These principles include:
• Competitive employment is the goal.
• Eligibility for Evidence-Based Practice is based on consumer choice. Consumers are considered work ready when they say they want to work.
• Job search starts soon after a consumer expresses interest in working.
• Supported employment is integrated with treatment. Employment specialists have frequent meetings with the treatment team to integrate supported employment with mental health treatment. (DORS staff participation is critical to success.)
• Follow-along supports are continuous. Employment supports are never terminated unless the consumer directly requests it.
• Consumer preferences are important. Consumer preference plays a key role in determining the type of job that is sought, the nature of supports provided, and the decision about disability disclosure.
• Employment specialists practice systematic job development, based on consumer work preferences and face-to-face meetings with consumers, and gather information about job opportunities and assess whether they may be a good job fit for an individual. Employment specialists continue to make periodic visits to promote networking and achievement of employment.
• Personalized benefits planning is provided.  (Page 372) Title IV

Family Preservation represents a variety of programs available to families to provide supportive services to promote safety and well-being of children and their families. This includes families with identified stresses around family life, including disruption, child abuse and neglect issues, domestic violence, homelessness, substance abuse, mental health, physical health, and educational concerns, who are within 200 percent of the poverty level. The principal purpose behind these programs is to enable children to continue to live and thrive in their home with their parents or relatives. Each program is child safety based, goal oriented, family focused, flexible, provided in the home or community, culturally relevant and sensitive, and designed to build on family strengths and unity. Manageable caseload sizes and a team approach of social worker and case associate are an integral part of all services. Each service has designated timeframes, with the possibility for limited extensions when service goals have not been realized. Employment and self-sufficiency are program goals and part of the mutually agreed upon family service agreement. This program provides non-assistance. (Pages 401-402) Title IV

Maryland provides an extensive array of services to families and children under its Social Services Block Grant, Community Action Block Grant, Title IV-B State Plan, the Child and Maternal Health Block Grant, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Block Grant plans that are reasonably calculated to accomplish the third and fourth purposes of TANF. To the extent that the state expends state or local funds on these services that exceed available block grant funds, the state reserves the option to use TANF funds or TANF-MOE as appropriate and reported in the state’s fiscal reports subject to federal limitations. The funds claimed for these will be for non-assistance. (Page 410) Title IV

There are a variety of programs available to families to provide supportive services to promote safety and well-being of children and their families, promote stability and permanency, preserve family unity, and build empowerment, self-sufficiency, and psychosocial well- being. This includes families with identified stresses around family life, including disruption, child abuse and neglect issues, domestic violence, homelessness, substance abuse, mental health, physical health, and educational concerns. These programs help families by providing: protective services or potential protective services to families, family support through projects such as parenting classes and after school programs, and family preservation, through grants for Interagency Family Preservation Services and through other means as appropriate, such as by counseling families in crisis, referring them to other existing services, and providing a wide range of service to the family to maximize the chances the children grow up in safe, stable, and loving homes. The programs include, but are not limited to, Families Now, Intensive Family Services, Continuing Protective Services, Services to Families with Children, Kinship Care, Parent Aide Services, and those provided through Inter-Agency Agreements such as the Family Recovery Program. These programs prevent or reduce out-of-wedlock pregnancies and encourage the formation and maintenance of two parent families, since the ultimate goal of all of them is to provide a safe home for children in a stable, two-parent environment. These programs provide non-assistance. (Page 415- 416) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Maryland is thereby implementing an integrative UI/Workforce IT tool utilizing Geographic Solution, Inc.’s Reemployment Exchange Module (REX) to facilitate claimant job searches and return to work efforts. The REX Module was secured as an effective system connectivity integration solution for Maryland DUI and DWDAL. DUI’s legacy system, the Maryland Automated Benefit System (MABS), runs on a separate and distinct mainframe platform that was built in the early 1980s. This outdated system requires convoluted custom programs to be written in order to make minor changes to the system or develop system-to-system data sharing methodologies. The REX Module is comprised of progressive functionality components which will help boost service delivery efforts and facilitate the ultimate sharing of real-time information between staff and systems. REX will immediately display suitable job openings to claimants that closely match their recent/past employment, educational background, desired occupation, and skill set; automatically create a reemployment roadmap designed to help the claimant obtain employment; display real time Labor Market Information to help claimants make intelligent sources and provide claimants real-time access to a comprehensive list of openings repeatedly upon entering the system; allow claimants to enter job search contact information within the system; send system-generated alert notifications to claimants when they are not meeting work search requirements/established thresholds; monitor and notify claimants as to whether they have active online resume and virtual recruiters; and allow staff to view claimants’ ongoing work search status. (Page 453) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 92

Medicaid Funded Long-Term Care Services - 03/29/2020

“This program area administers and operates Maryland's Long-Term Care Medicaid program, Coordination of Community Services, Community First Choice (CFC). CFC Supports Planners and Nurse Monitors provide a continuum of services designed to allow people of all ages and in need of long-term care to live in the community, rather than in institutions. Adult Evaluation and Review Services (AERS) provides mandatory medical evaluations for clients seeking these services and for those referred by Adult Protective Services. In addition, this program area provides service coordination to eligible young people funded under the Maryland Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Autism Waiver Program).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Special Needs Housing - 03/26/2020

“FUNCTION

 

The vision of the staff of Services to End and Prevent Homelessness (SEPH) is a community where all persons have access to safe, affordable housing, and the opportunity to achieve a higher quality of life. The mission of SEPH is to make homelessness a rare, brief, and non-recurring event by operating from a Housing First philosophy. Housing First recognizes that people are most successful when they have choice in housing and seeks to eliminate barriers such as sobriety requirements or treatment compliance. SEPH provides a full continuum of services including housing stabilization, homeless diversion, and permanent housing; and employs evidence-based and promising practices. The mission cannot be achieved without collaborating with public and private partners through the Interagency Commission on Homelessness. Special needs populations include veterans, both individuals and families, persons with behavioral health challenges, individuals with developmental disabilities, and transitioning youth, and seniors with disabilities experiencing or at risk of homelessness.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Transition Services - 03/25/2020

“The Maryland School for the Blind’s Transition program assists students and their families as they prepare to leave school and move to:

Post-secondary educationVocational trainingIntegrated employment (including supported employment)Continuing educationAdult servicesIndependent livingCommunity participation

As students complete their educational entitlement programs, they enter the adult service world of eligibility, where individuals may be deemed eligible for services based on agency guidelines and funding availability.  Establishing linkages with adult funding agencies such as the Developmental Disabilities Administrations (DDA) and the Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) is an integral part of transitioning and learning to navigate the adult service world.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs Annual Report - 01/17/2020

“According to the most recent USDVA data projections (FY2019), there were an estimated 371,000 veterans living in Maryland. To help address the challenges facing Maryland Veterans as they retire or return home from military service the Department continues to provide safety nets, wherever possible, to enhance services provided by the USDVA and the U.S. Department of Defense…

In Fiscal Year 2019, The Service Program submitted 4,917 disability compensation and pension claims for adjudication to the USDVA. Maryland veterans received almost $34 million dollars in new/increased and one-time monthly cash benefits with support from this program. Charlotte Hall Veterans Home continues to provide quality assisted living and skilled nursing services to our aging and disabled veterans, along with eligible spouses. Their most recent 2019 year to date census reached 88% capacity. This year the Maryland Veterans Trust Fund distributed over $126,000 in grants to Maryland veterans and eligible dependents.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

VA Maryland Health Care System - 01/14/2020

“The Perry Point VA Medical Center provides a broad range of inpatient, outpatient and primary care services. As the largest inpatient facility in the VA Maryland Health Care System, the medical center provides inpatient medical, intermediate and long-term care programs, including nursing home care, rehabilitation services, geriatric evaluation and management, respite care, chronic ventilator care and hospice care.

The Perry Point VA Medical Center is a leader in providing comprehensive mental health care to Maryland’s Veterans.  The medical center offers long and short-term inpatient and outpatient mental health care, including the following specialized treatment programs:

Mental Health Intensive Case Management Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center Health Improvement Program Family Intervention Team Outpatient Trauma & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Program Substance Abuse Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Domiciliary Residential Rehabilitation Treatment (for Homeless Veterans) Compensated Work Therapy – Transitional Residence”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

WIOA Annual Report 2018 - 12/02/2019

“This publication illustrates Maryland’s successful job placement and training activities for the period of  July 1, 2018, through June 30, 2019, as required by U.S. Department of  Labor’s Training and Employment Guidance Letter No. 5-18.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

Annual Maryland Transition Conference 2019 - 11/07/2019

~~“Help us celebrate the partnerships between public vocational rehabilitation, community organizations, and the Maryland workforce partners that create successful outcomes for Marylanders with disabilities who want to work.Mark your calendars for November 7 and 8, 2019.  This year's venue is the Sheraton Baltimore North, in Towson, Maryland.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Transition Resource Guide - 11/01/2019

“This guide provides tips and resources to help plan for adulthood and life after high school. Get ready to consider choices, explore options, and take action to prepare for your future.“ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Works Programs & Initiatives - 10/17/2019

"‘[Maryland Works is] a statewide membership association that expands employment and business ownership opportunities for people with disabilities and other barriers to employment.

Our Programs & Initiatives:

We are organized into three programs that provide services and support for organizations, career counseling professionals, and individuals with disabilities.The Provider Network is comprised of nonprofit community-based organizations that offer quality training, employment, and other services for people with disabilities.The Workforce Network is made up of a wide range of workforce development and other career counseling professionals.

The Employment Works Program creates quality employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities while providing the State of Maryland with high-quality services and commodities”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Code of Maryland Regulations Sec. 10.22.12.12. Admission to and Discharge from DDA Community-Funded Services - 07/03/2019

~~“(1) Only those individuals seeking DDA-funded services and who have been deemed eligible by the DDA in accordance with Regulations .05-.10 of this chapter may be served by community service providers in DDA-funded vacancies or with DDA-funded support services.

(2) Each provider shall report all DDA-funded vacancies to the appropriate regional office in accordance with a DDA-approved procedure, as soon as the potential vacancy is known to the provider.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Maryland Minimum Wage Act of 2014 (HB 0295/CH0262) - 07/01/2018

“Incrementally increasing the State minimum wage rate to $10.10 beginning July 1, 2018; authorizing specified employers to pay employees under the age of 20 years a specified wage under specified circumstances; requiring the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to increase reimbursement of community providers serving individuals with developmental disabilities; requiring the Governor, in specified fiscal years, to include in a specified budget proposal specified funding increases; etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

SB 0344/HB0448 “Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program - Account Clarifications” - 04/11/2017

~~“Clarifying that a specified amount may be contributed in each calendar year to an account for a disabled individual under the Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program; providing that contributions to an ABLE account may not exceed a specified maximum amount; and requiring the Maryland 529 Board to adopt specified procedures to ensure that specified contributions to ABLE accounts do not exceed a specified maximum limit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

HB 420/SB 417: Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA) - 05/19/2016

MDLC Board member Ken Capone, People on the Go, MDLC, and other advocates and coalition partners led this strong and successful effort to abolish the payment of subminimum wages to people with disabilities in Maryland. Like SB 765, the bill will become a national model when signed into law and make Maryland the second U.S. state to eliminate this discriminatory exception to Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. The EEA will phase out “sheltered workshops” that pay people as little as pennies per hour and require the Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration to implement a 4-year transition plan to move individuals from segregated day programs to competitive integrated employment. MDLC participates on the Employment First Steering Committee that is developing the policies and infrastructure to support transition to competitive integrated employment.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

HB 431/SB 355: ABLE Act - 04/12/2016

 Federal law enacted in December 2014 authorized states to establish tax-advantaged savings program to help people with disabilities save limited amounts for disability-related expenses (such as health care, assistive technology, education, employment supports and housing) without losing eligibility for certain public benefits. Maryland legislation enacted in 2015 established the ABLE Task Force to make recommendations for an ABLE Program, resulting in this year’s bill. College Savings Plans of Maryland and the Maryland Department of Disabilities and will co-manage the program. Governor Hogan committed $745,000 for program start-up costs and signed the legislation into law on April 12, 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maryland HB 473 - 05/12/2015

Altering the amount of a credit against specified State taxes for wages and child care or transportation expenses related to qualified employees with disabilities; and applying the Act to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2014.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

An Act Concerning Reasonable Accommodations For Disabilities Due to Pregnancy (HB804/SB784) - 04/08/2013

“[The Act] will require employers with more than 15 employees to provide reasonable accommodations to workers experiencing a disability caused or contributed by pregnancy. […] The Act prohibits an employer from refusing to make a reasonable accommodation for the known disability of a worker that is caused by pregnancy […]” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Hogan Administration Proclaims November Hire A Veteran Month - 11/01/2018

~~“Governor Larry Hogan has signed an official proclamation designating November as “Hire A Veteran” Month in Maryland. The month-long observance raises awareness of veteran employment opportunities, and familiarizes citizens, business, and others with the many workforce services available to veteran jobseekers and employers.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 01.01.2017.23 Maryland Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/10/2017

“Now, therefore, I, Lawrence J. Hogan, Jr., Governor of the State of Maryland, by virtue of the power invested in my by the constitution and the laws of Maryland, declare the following:

 

Each State department, board, agency, authority, board, or instrumentality controlled by the Governor (an “Executive unit”) shall annually observe October as Disability Employment Awareness Month to celebrate the many and varied contributions of people with disabilities.The Department of Disabilities […] shall: reinforce the value and talents people with disabilities add to Maryland’s workplaces and communitiesIncreasing public awarenessTo promote individuals with disabilities’ access to technology”

 

Rescinds Executive Order 01.01.2009.10

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order 01.01.2009.10 Maryland Disability History and Awareness Month - 07/26/2009

“Now, therefore, I, Martin O’Malley, Governor of the State of Maryland […] hereby proclaim the following executive order, effective immediately.

State of Maryland Executive Branch agencies shall annually observe October as Disability History and Awareness Month.

The Department of Disabilities shall take steps to increase public awareness of the history of disabilities and the disability rights movement […]

The Maryland State Department of Education shall encourage and assist local boards of education to provide instruction in the history of disabilities, people with disabilities, and the disability rights movement during the observance of Disability History Awareness Month.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Executive Order 01.01.2007.13 - 08/02/2007

"It is the policy of the State of Maryland to ensure a smooth and effective transition for all students with disabilities from secondary education to adult services such as postsecondary education and employment; and to provide transition planning for students and families that is student focused and family-centered, based on individual strengths and needs, utilizes best practices, and leads to outcomes in the most integrated setting appropriate; and It is deemed necessary to establish an Interagency Transition Council to recommend policies and identify the funding requirements to ensure effective, efficient, and comprehensive delivery of services that will most effectively meet the transition needs of Maryland students with disabilities."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 10 of 26

Special Needs Housing - 03/26/2020

“FUNCTION

 

The vision of the staff of Services to End and Prevent Homelessness (SEPH) is a community where all persons have access to safe, affordable housing, and the opportunity to achieve a higher quality of life. The mission of SEPH is to make homelessness a rare, brief, and non-recurring event by operating from a Housing First philosophy. Housing First recognizes that people are most successful when they have choice in housing and seeks to eliminate barriers such as sobriety requirements or treatment compliance. SEPH provides a full continuum of services including housing stabilization, homeless diversion, and permanent housing; and employs evidence-based and promising practices. The mission cannot be achieved without collaborating with public and private partners through the Interagency Commission on Homelessness. Special needs populations include veterans, both individuals and families, persons with behavioral health challenges, individuals with developmental disabilities, and transitioning youth, and seniors with disabilities experiencing or at risk of homelessness.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs Annual Report - 01/17/2020

“According to the most recent USDVA data projections (FY2019), there were an estimated 371,000 veterans living in Maryland. To help address the challenges facing Maryland Veterans as they retire or return home from military service the Department continues to provide safety nets, wherever possible, to enhance services provided by the USDVA and the U.S. Department of Defense…

In Fiscal Year 2019, The Service Program submitted 4,917 disability compensation and pension claims for adjudication to the USDVA. Maryland veterans received almost $34 million dollars in new/increased and one-time monthly cash benefits with support from this program. Charlotte Hall Veterans Home continues to provide quality assisted living and skilled nursing services to our aging and disabled veterans, along with eligible spouses. Their most recent 2019 year to date census reached 88% capacity. This year the Maryland Veterans Trust Fund distributed over $126,000 in grants to Maryland veterans and eligible dependents.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

VA Maryland Health Care System - 01/14/2020

“The Perry Point VA Medical Center provides a broad range of inpatient, outpatient and primary care services. As the largest inpatient facility in the VA Maryland Health Care System, the medical center provides inpatient medical, intermediate and long-term care programs, including nursing home care, rehabilitation services, geriatric evaluation and management, respite care, chronic ventilator care and hospice care.

The Perry Point VA Medical Center is a leader in providing comprehensive mental health care to Maryland’s Veterans.  The medical center offers long and short-term inpatient and outpatient mental health care, including the following specialized treatment programs:

Mental Health Intensive Case Management Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center Health Improvement Program Family Intervention Team Outpatient Trauma & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Program Substance Abuse Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Domiciliary Residential Rehabilitation Treatment (for Homeless Veterans) Compensated Work Therapy – Transitional Residence”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

WIOA Annual Report 2018 - 12/02/2019

“This publication illustrates Maryland’s successful job placement and training activities for the period of  July 1, 2018, through June 30, 2019, as required by U.S. Department of  Labor’s Training and Employment Guidance Letter No. 5-18.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

Maryland Transition Resource Guide - 11/01/2019

“This guide provides tips and resources to help plan for adulthood and life after high school. Get ready to consider choices, explore options, and take action to prepare for your future.“ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Code of Maryland Regulations Sec. 10.22.12.12. Admission to and Discharge from DDA Community-Funded Services - 07/03/2019

~~“(1) Only those individuals seeking DDA-funded services and who have been deemed eligible by the DDA in accordance with Regulations .05-.10 of this chapter may be served by community service providers in DDA-funded vacancies or with DDA-funded support services.

(2) Each provider shall report all DDA-funded vacancies to the appropriate regional office in accordance with a DDA-approved procedure, as soon as the potential vacancy is known to the provider.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Maryland Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative (GTYI) - 06/12/2019

~~“Transitioning Youth comprise a special category of eligibility and priority for services. Through the Governor's Transitioning Youth Initiative the DDA, in collaboration with the Division of Rehabilitative Services (DORS), has been able to fund supported employment and other day services for eligible graduating students who otherwise may not have received DDA services. Without the Initiative, students leaving the school system would be placed on a lengthy waiting list for adult services. The Governor's Transitioning Youth Initiative earmarks funds in the DDA budget for eligible students leaving school, regardless of the severity of their situation and their relative need for immediate services.” 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Local Integrated Plan 2016-2020 (2019 Update) - 05/30/2019

~~“The Prince George’s County Local Workforce Development Board (WDB) is the responsible entity for policydevelopment and workforce activities related to administering services and programs funded by the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act of 2014. The WDB is the link between job seekers looking to begin or change careers and businesses looking for skilled workers to maintain their productivity and competitiveness in a changing labor market.

This plan, updated in 2019, describes the mission, vision, goals and strategies the WDB will implement through 2020 to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the Prince George's County Public Workforce System, support the work of the WDB’s partners, and align with the Governors State WIOA Plan. Additionally, this plan outlines the programs and initiatives the WDB has supported and intends to employ, through competitively procured operators, service providers and partners operating the Prince George’s County Public Workforce System.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

FY20 Operating Budget; Department of Health and Human Services - 05/13/2019

~~“Community Support Network for People with Disabilities:Provides services that enable persons to remain in their home or the least restrictive setting. Assistance to clients with developmental disabilities and their families. Coordinate and monitor services and Supports for people eligible for services through the State Developmental Disabilities (DD) Administration. Service coordination to young people funded under the Autism Waiver Program. Provides financial assistance to State-funded DD providers. Funds the My Turn program for children with DD aged 3 to 13. Administers Customized Employment Public Intern Program. Conducts site visits to group homes that serve DD clients. Monitors contracts for services for people with disabilities, including visual and hearing impairments.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Developmental Disabilities Administration Employment First Webinar Meaningful Day Service Updates and Alignment - 01/01/2019

~~Overview:•Services, systems, and values are realigning to support competitive integrated employment and community participation outcomes•Services are being designed to provide a flow of services that can lead to outcomes of competitive integrated employment and/or meaningful community participation•Services are not meant to be used as respite or daycare, but instead, are habilitative in nature” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Workforce Solutions to Address Maryland’s Opioid Crisis “Policy Status Update on Employer Engagement Strategies” - 02/14/2019

~~“A key element of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and affiliated workforce programs is to strengthen employer engagement in the workforce system and to ensure employers have an active role in workforce system activities. The purpose of this section is to share information related to promising practices and strategies that have strengthened existing employer partnerships. Report the efforts that have been undertaken to receive feedback from local area employers to identify their employee pipeline needs and engage local employers to interview, assess, train, and/or hire program participants."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

DDA & DORS: Partners in Employment First - 11/03/2018

~~“Excerpts from June 21, 2018 Memorandum of Understanding:DDA & DORS will “Use the Employment First approach and establish and promote a goal that all persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) who want to work in the community will be afforded an opportunity to pursue competitive integrated employment that allows them to work the maximum number of hours consistent with their abilities and preferences.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council “2017 Legislative Overview” - 04/01/2017

~~“DDA FY2018 Budget Expansion: Approximately 789 young adults with developmental disabilities leaving school will receive employment or other day services. DDA projects that 100% of transitioning youth will receive this support.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities - 09/30/2016

~~"The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities.  “

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

“Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities” - 09/30/2016

“The primary responsibility of the IATC is to review, revise and update annually the Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities to ensure effective interagency planning and delivery of services for secondary students with disabilities. Additionally, the IATC is tasked with identifying and reporting activities of each partner which impact the delivery, quality and availability of transition services. The IATC also serves in an advisory capacity to all transition-related federal grants.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities - 07/01/2016

This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD Governor’s Interagency Transition Council (IATC) - 08/02/2007

~~The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Customized Employment Project

The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Coalition of Families

~~" Founded by a coalition of family support organizations, MCF was incorporated in 1999 as a nonprofit organization. MCF changed its name from "Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s Mental Health" to the "Maryland Coalition of Families" in 2016. MCF is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors comprised of at least 51% adult caregivers of a child or adolescent with a diagnosable emotional or behavioral disability. All of our family support staff are parents who have cared for a loved one with behavioral health needs and have been trained to help other families. “
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Learning Links - About Us

~~“Maryland Learning Links is the Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Early Intervention and Special Education Services’ (DEI/SES) online portal providing educators and leaders with the special education resources, guidance, and professional learning resources they need to improve outcomes and narrow the gap for students with disabilities.

The DEI/SES provides leadership, accountability, technical assistance, and resource management to local school systems, public agencies, and stakeholders through a seamless, comprehensive system of coordinated services to children and students with disabilities, birth through 21, and their families.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Medicaid Funded Long-Term Care Services - 03/29/2020

“This program area administers and operates Maryland's Long-Term Care Medicaid program, Coordination of Community Services, Community First Choice (CFC). CFC Supports Planners and Nurse Monitors provide a continuum of services designed to allow people of all ages and in need of long-term care to live in the community, rather than in institutions. Adult Evaluation and Review Services (AERS) provides mandatory medical evaluations for clients seeking these services and for those referred by Adult Protective Services. In addition, this program area provides service coordination to eligible young people funded under the Maryland Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Autism Waiver Program).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment: Transforming & Improving Practices, Customized Technical Assistance (TIP) Grants - 01/01/2018

“Council Goal: Children and adults with developmental disabilities meaningfully participate in all facets of community life, and are valued and supported by their communities.

 

Council Objectives: Increase community-based employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities, including people with significant support needs.

 

In collaboration with people with developmental disabilities, their families, and stakeholders, increase opportunities for people with developmental disabilities living in rural areas to find and maintain employment by reducing barriers unique to rural areas.

 

Goals of Initiative: This purpose of this initiative is to improve the employment outcomes of people with developmental disabilities and to support them in having meaningful days when not working. Grants will build the capacity of community service providers licensed by the Developmental Disabilities Administration.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Maryland PROMISE - 01/01/2018

~~“MD Transitioning Youth with Disabilities provided enhanced and coordinated services and supports to Maryland youth between the ages 14 -16 who received Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Such services and supports included:• Transition planning• Financial planning and benefits management• Employment and post-secondary education preparation activities• Social and health linkages (for example, self-advocacy, youth development activities, health and wellness information)All services and supports were customized to the individual youth and services provided by Maryland PROMISE were also extended to family members.The primary goal of the state initiative was to assist youth recipients achieve better post-school outcomes, including graduating from high school readiness for college and a career, completing post-secondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. More about Maryland PROMISE is available by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Maryland’s Disability Employment Initiative - 07/17/2017

Purpose: To provide policy guidance on Maryland’s Disability Employment Initiative

 

“The U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL)’s Employment and Training Administration and Office of Disability

Employment Policy jointly fund Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) projects to provide an opportunity for

states to improve meaningful participation of youth and adults with disabilities, including individuals with significant disabilities, in the workplace.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

14(c) Certificate Program Resources - 01/21/2017

~~“This page is a list of links about the 14(C) subminimum wage program including a Q&A about career counseling for workers earning less than minimum wage and benefits planning services for subminimum wage workers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Innovations in Maryland’s Local Workforce Plans A BEST PRACTICES GUIDE - 01/01/2017

~~“Title IV: Vocational Rehabilitation Services - Department of Rehabilitative Services (DORS)

DORS prepares people with disabilities to go to work and helps them to stay on the job. Rehabilitation counselors in DORS Region 5 field offices in Baltimore County provide or arrange for services that may include career counseling, assistive technology, vocational training and/or job placement assistance. DORS staff have specific areas of expertise to work with populations with significant disabilities. There are technical specialists who work with individuals with chronic illness, learning disabilities, traumatic brain injury, orthopedic issues, and intellectual disabilities.

In addition to services delivered via field offices, DORS also contracts with CCBC’s Center for Alternative and Supported Education (CASE). CASE’s Single Step program serves approximately 100 to 200 Baltimore County DORS participants annually who have cognitive, developmental, and mental health disabilities, providing academic, pre-vocational, social and independent living skills for students with special needs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council Webinar: “Everything You Wanted to Know about DDA but Were Afraid to Ask” - 11/14/2016

“Schools are required to begin transition planning for students at age 14. With new Service options* available it is important to start early, educate yourself on new models and options, visit programs, and let your IEP team know about the new options. Schools are required to invite DORS to the IEP meeting beginning at age 18 and any other relevant entity. Ask your local Coordination of Community Service agency to attend the IEP meeting to ensure there are links between the school and the DDA system.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Transforming and Improving Practices through Customized Technical Assistance (TIP) Grants” - 10/03/2016

“The purpose of this initiative is to improve the employment outcomes of people with developmental disabilities by building the capacity of community service providers licensed by the Developmental Disabilities Administration. Through customized technical assistance by subject matter experts, providers will improve the way services are provided so that more people with developmental disabilities are supported to get and keep the meaningful work they want in their communities and to have meaningful days when not working. All grant recipients will participate in a learning community to share their efforts to improve employment outcomes and receive mutual peer support.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Montgomery County, MD Customized Employment Intern Project (MCPIP) - 10/09/2015

An example of a successful County program serving individuals with significant disabilities is the Montgomery County Customized Employment Public Intern Project (MCPIP). Created in 2007, MCPIP provides flexible employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities to fulfill the work requirements of County departments. Department representatives work with a customized employment career specialist to identify and create part-time positions based on a department’s workforce needs. 

MCPIP participants serve as paid interns in department positions based on their individual job interests, skills and competencies. MCPIP interns gain valuable work experience by developing on-the-job skills to help them compete for County merit positions or opportunities in other organizations

Maryland’s Montgomery County government has adopted a policy to create internships for career seekers with significant disabilities, based on a Customized Employment (CE) strategy. This demand-driven CE policy creates the position for a CE Specialist at TransCen, Inc., a local workforce development intermediary, to conduct an analysis of a department’s need within the Montgomery County government.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Customized Employment Project

~~"The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 19

Transition Services - 03/25/2020

“The Maryland School for the Blind’s Transition program assists students and their families as they prepare to leave school and move to:

Post-secondary educationVocational trainingIntegrated employment (including supported employment)Continuing educationAdult servicesIndependent livingCommunity participation

As students complete their educational entitlement programs, they enter the adult service world of eligibility, where individuals may be deemed eligible for services based on agency guidelines and funding availability.  Establishing linkages with adult funding agencies such as the Developmental Disabilities Administrations (DDA) and the Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) is an integral part of transitioning and learning to navigate the adult service world.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Annual Maryland Transition Conference 2019 - 11/07/2019

~~“Help us celebrate the partnerships between public vocational rehabilitation, community organizations, and the Maryland workforce partners that create successful outcomes for Marylanders with disabilities who want to work.Mark your calendars for November 7 and 8, 2019.  This year's venue is the Sheraton Baltimore North, in Towson, Maryland.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Works Programs & Initiatives - 10/17/2019

"‘[Maryland Works is] a statewide membership association that expands employment and business ownership opportunities for people with disabilities and other barriers to employment.

Our Programs & Initiatives:

We are organized into three programs that provide services and support for organizations, career counseling professionals, and individuals with disabilities.The Provider Network is comprised of nonprofit community-based organizations that offer quality training, employment, and other services for people with disabilities.The Workforce Network is made up of a wide range of workforce development and other career counseling professionals.

The Employment Works Program creates quality employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities while providing the State of Maryland with high-quality services and commodities”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Low Intensity Support Service (LISS) Program Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) - 06/30/2019

~~“The DDA’s Low Intensity Support Services (LISS) program serves children and adults with DD/IDD living at home with their family, or adults with DD living in their own home in the community.• It is flexible to meet the needs of children, adults and their families as they grow and change across the lifespan.• Provides up to $2,000 to assist children, adults and their families with purchasing services and/or items to address their needs, and,• Enhances or improves the person’s or family’s quality of life and promotes independence and community integration.More information about the application process is available on our website." 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Maryland Employment First Summit - Oct. 11, 2019 - 06/18/2019

~~“October is Disability Employment Awareness month. To help us celebrate and learn together, please mark your calendars for the Developmental Disability Administration's (DDA) annual Employment First Summit on Friday, Oct. 11.                                                    Join us to receive Employment First updates, messages from collaboration partners, and guest speakers highlighting success stories and best practices in Employment First. More information will be sent out in the coming weeks, including a registration link; so stay tuned!” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Benefits and Claims Assistance - 06/05/2019

~~This document is a list of organizations that provide benefits and claims assistance services for veterans.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Assistive Technology - 05/16/2019

~~This document is a list of organizations that provide assistive technology services for persons with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Mental / Behavioral Health Resources - 05/15/2019

~~This document is a list of organizations that provide help, including employment services, for persons with mental health disabilities

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

Project HIRE Disability Apprenticeship Program - 04/03/2019

~~“Project HIRE, an apprenticeship program, which provides individuals with developmental and/or intellectual disabilities between the ages of 18 and 25 a meaningful paid job training experience with a Prince George’s County Government agency. 

Participants will be placed within a Host County agency for a period of one year and during this time they will have an opportunity to enhance current skills, learn new skills, and gain on the job work experience.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Compass, Inc. - 01/01/2019

~~“Compass, Inc. exists to support individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to live the lives they desire in communities of their choice. To fulfill this mission, we are fully committed to upholding the goals and principals shared with the Developmental Disabilities Administration that every individual will have the freedom to make choices, the supports they need to live the life they choose, authority over services and supports, responsibility for organizing resources, and the aspiration and drive to live as responsible, contributing members of their communities.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

United States vs. Baltimore County, MD - 08/07/2012

The decree requires the County to  adopt new policies and procedures regarding the administration of medical examinations and inquiries and provide training on the ADA to all current supervisory employees and all employees who participate in making personnel decisions

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Provider Types Enrolled - 01/22/2019

~~“For Medicaid providers:1.All provider types must be managed by their Medicaid provider type identifier which includes (Exhibit3: Provider Matrix)…Specialized providers to serve children and adolescents in the 1915(i) State Plan Amendment (SPA) program described in more detail in Sec. 2.3.11Special Projects/New Initiatives” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Medicaid Community Options Waiver (formerly Waiver for Older Adults) - 01/01/2018

“Until recently, the Maryland Community Options Medicaid Waiver was called the Waiver for Older Adults. That program and the Living at Home Medicaid Waiver are now merged under this new title. This waiver is also called the Home and Community-Based Options (HCBO) Waiver and, in this article, it is referred to as simply the CO Waiver.

 

The new CO waiver allows elderly individuals and those with physical disabilities who need nursing home level care to receive care services in their home or a group living community facility instead. Group living communities can include assisted living residences, provided they are participating in the program and willing to accept the Medicaid payment rates.

 

The CO Waiver is popular both with families and the state of Maryland, but for different reasons. Participants generally prefer to remain living at home for as long as possible; this waiver assists them in doing so. The cost of caring for someone at home is also less expensive for the state than it would be to place the individual in a nursing home. This is because home care utilizes caregiving assistance from family members.

 

Maryland Medicaid programs in general are sometimes referred to as Medical Assistance (MA).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1115 HealthChoice Waiver Renewal - 01/01/2017

~The Maryland Department of Health (the Department) is proposing an amendment to its §1115 demonstration waiver known as HealthChoice, which the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has authorized through December 31, 2021. HealthChoice, first implemented in 1997 under the authority of §1115 of the Social Security Act, is Maryland’s statewide mandatory managed care program for Medicaid enrollees. Under HealthChoice, eligible families and individuals are required to enroll in a managed care organization (MCO) that has been approved by the Department. Each MCO is responsible for ensuring that HealthChoice enrollees have access to a network of medical providers that can meet their health needs.

The State’s 30-day public comment period was open from May 21, 2018 through June 19, 2018. The draft waiver amendment application is available here. The final submitted waiver amendment application is available here. Hard copies of the application may be obtained by calling (410) 767-5677.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MD HCBS Transition Plan - 09/02/2016

Maryland receives funding from the federal government to help pay for services provided in programs such as the Autism, Brain Injury, Community Pathways, Community Options, Model, and Medical Day Waivers and a program that helps children, youth and families. Last year, the federal government put out new rules that states must follow to continue to receive funding to pay for services. Maryland reviewed programs and found areas that do not meet the rules and must be changed. This plan gives information about the new rules; the States review of programs and the plan to fix areas; and input received from various stakeholders like participants, family members, self-advocates, and others.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Guide to Maryland Medical Assistance Coverage” - 08/01/2016

“The purpose of a home and community based services waiver program, also known as a “1915(c) waiver,” is to enable children or aged, blind, or disabled adults requiring a nursing facility level of care to reside in their homes or community settings rather than in a medical institution. • Services for waiver participants are federally matched expenses, although these services are not included in the State Medicaid Plan. • Each waiver program has different medical and other non-financial criteria for its targeted population.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MD Community Pathways (0023.R06.00) - 07/01/2013

Provides community residential hab, community supported living arrangements, expanded day hab-employment discovery and customization, expanded day hab-supported employment, live-in caregiver, medical day care, resource coordination, respite, traditional day hab, assistive technology and adaptive equipment, behavioral supports, environmental accessibility adaptations, expanded day hab-community learning, family/individual support, residential hab II, transition, transportation for individual w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland DoE ESEA Flexibility Waiver - 05/29/2012

“MSDE’s core values of commitment to every student, belief that all students can and must learn, certainty that schools  must help students grow, and conviction that the educator evaluation system must be equitable are achieved through data-driven accountability systems, high standards of excellence from teachers and principals and dynamic collaboration between Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and MSDE.  Maryland’s ambitious mission is to provide every student with a world-class education that ensures post-graduation college- and career-readiness”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD New Directions Independence Plus Waiver (0424.R01.00) - 07/01/2008

Provides community supported living arrangements, expanded day hab-supported employment, expanded day hab-employment discovery and customization, live-in caregiver, medical day care, resource coordination, respite, traditional day hab, support brokerage, assistive technology and adaptative equipment, behavioral supports, environmental accessibility adaptation, expanded day hab-community learning, family/individual support, transition, transportation for individuals w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age.

This waiver expired 06/30/2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) in Maryland will help people transition from an institution, for example a nursing facility, to community living in an apartment, private home, or small group setting. MFP initiatives increase outreach to individuals in institutions and decrease barriers to transition. New efforts under MFP include peer mentoring, enhanced transition assistance, improved information technology, housing assistance, flexible transition funds, and the addition of waiver services to existing waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Community First Choice

“The program provide assistance with activities of daily living to Medicaid recipients who have a chronic illness, medical condition or disability. Services are provided in the eligible individual's home or community residence (waiver participants may receive services in an assisted living facility). Other services in each program vary.  Please see each program’s fact sheet for information about the specific services provided through the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The numerous efforts to support individuals with disabilities in securing and sustaining competitive, integrated employment in the Old Line State of Maryland are more than you can imagine. We're open for business, and welcome the skills and talents of workers with disabilities! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Maryland’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
-0.16%
Change from
2017 to 2018
6,042,718
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.67%
Change from
2017 to 2018
341,159
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.01%
Change from
2017 to 2018
149,359
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.4%
Change from
2017 to 2018
43.78%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.42%
Change from
2017 to 2018
80.77%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 6,016,447 6,052,177 6,042,718
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 334,505 335,461 341,159
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 137,517 141,870 149,359
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,716,777 2,733,682 2,711,665
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.11% 42.29% 43.78%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.21% 80.43% 80.77%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.30% 4.10% 3.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.70% 17.70% 16.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.70% 8.30% 8.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 303,117 304,396 322,325
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 353,003 355,747 353,747
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 405,250 384,006 392,131
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 200,243 212,801 215,937
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 34,281 38,339 43,047
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,983 3,041 3,061
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 22,124 25,795 27,051
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 14,959 18,249 21,063
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 10,239 16,000 16,522

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,308 6,375 6,090
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.90% 5.90% 5.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 130,269 129,481 126,920

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 12,955 13,764 16,358
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 31,395 32,876 41,349
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 59,031 58,225 71,761
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.90% 23.60% 22.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.20% 5.00% 3.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 18.10% 18.70% 15.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.30% 5.90% 3.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,268 2,675 3,047
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 11,435 10,146 13,981
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,362 3,186 3,418
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 10,425 9,388 8,821
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06 0.07 0.08

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 56 56 96
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 35 34 50
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00% 61.00% 52.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.59 0.57 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,222
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 209 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 253 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 531 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,359 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 764 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,103 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 35.20% 20.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,178 10,569 10,790
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 204,612 207,082 205,144
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 166 182 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 328 179 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $75,498,000 $59,262,000 $59,181,431
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $171,675,000 $180,016,327
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $10,955,000 $15,191,591
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 37.00% 33.00% 30.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A 676 976
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A 0 2,111
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A 9,131 8,942
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 81.80 11.20 65.28

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.95% 69.73% 70.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 12.95% 12.04% 12.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 6.93% 6.86% 6.77%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.49% 98.86% 97.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 23.45% 22.66% 26.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.63% 58.09% 65.07%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 61.47% 72.93% 79.63%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 31.18% 35.43% 38.61%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 4,727,875
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 5,994
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 267,634
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 2,927,591
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,195,225
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 162
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 2,256
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,418
AbilityOne wages (products). $2,320,330
AbilityOne wages (services). $37,326,061

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 2 2 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 22 21 13
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 25 24 13
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 172 140 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,056 2,124 1,159
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,229 2,265 1,159

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Every working age Marylander with a disability, including those with significant disabilities, must have access to opportunities that lead to employment in competitive, integrated settings. The opportunity to learn necessary skills and receive needed support through the State’s workforce system and its key partners enables individuals with disabilities to experience success in the full cross section of Maryland’s businesses and industries. Employment is critical to ensuring quality lives for Marylanders with disabilities while reducing reliance on public assistance and strengthening the economic fabric of the State.

Marylanders with disabilities possess the ability to contribute to the state’s economic growth and achieve financial self-sufficiency. Historically, however, this population has had a low level of workforce participation, particularly those with the most significant disabilities. In an effort to capitalize on the attributes of this untapped workforce, Maryland’s workforce system will play a key role in embracing nationally recognized best practices including Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals with significant disabilities can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate support. All aspects of the workforce system, including state partner agencies, local public and private partners, and businesses will coordinate to effectively strengthen employment outcomes for Marylanders with disabilities. (Page 46-47) Title I

1. The Council commends DORS for the progress made in developing a comprehensive QA case review process to be implemented no later than July 1, 2014. The Council looks forward to hearing results of the initial “beta” year of implementation. The Council recommends that the agency address the methodology of consumer satisfaction surveys and explore web-based survey; consider strategies to expand sample size; reach underrepresented groups; preserve anonymity; and explore web-based surveys, follow-up phone calls, and other response methods.
2. The Council recommends that DORS develop training for staff to expand knowledge and understanding of disabilities and functional capacities; means to mitigate limitations, such as Assistive Technology; and impact on employment as a basis for providing effective career counseling.
3. The Council recommends that DORS continue collaboration with local providers, the Maryland Department of Disabilities, and the Developmental Disabilities Administration, at the state and local levels, as related to the Employment First initiative. This should include an exploration of programmatic barriers to success and cross-agency training needs.
4. The Council recognizes the continuing barrier that lack of transportation causes for individuals with disabilities seeking employment statewide. The Council will work with DORS staff to determine the status of federal and state transportation efforts that may improve transportation resources for individuals with disabilities.
5. The Council recommends that DORS continue to explore, identify, and implement innovative practices in job development and placement, including evaluating the effectiveness of the new Business Services Branch. (Page 240) Title I

Behavioral Health Administration - This cooperative agreement, most recently updated effective December 2011, addresses referrals between agencies and specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, as well as cross-training for staff.
Developmental Disabilities Administration - MSDE, DORS, and the Maryland Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Administration updated and approved the Cooperative Agreement, Employment Services in October 2013. It focuses on implementation of Employment First in Maryland and addresses referral between agencies and specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment. It also describes cross-training activities. (Page 243-244) Title I

DORS is a partner with other state agencies (including WIOA partner, DLLR) and Community Rehabilitation Programs in implementing Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals, including those with significant disabilities, consider employment on a preferred basis in planning for their lives. Employment First is consistent with DORS’ belief that individuals with disabilities, even the most significant disabilities, can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate supports. Supported employment is appropriate for individuals in Employment First and is the means to assure the best chance for success in employment. Benefits planning is an important part of services for individuals served through Employment First. (Page 252) Title I

DORS has entered into a cooperative agreement with the Maryland Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA), to provide for increased interagency cooperation, to ensure the maximum utilization of appropriate programs and resources in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, to expand and improve services to individuals with significant disabilities, and to maximize the use of comparable benefits. The agreement sets forth terms and conditions under which DORS and DDA will cooperate in the provision of services. The formal interagency cooperative agreement identifies policies, practices, and procedures that are coordinated between DORS and DDA (particularly definitions, standards for eligibility, the joint sharing and use of evaluations and assessments, and procedures for making referrals). It also identifies available resources and defines the financial responsibility of each agency for paying for necessary services, consistent with state law and procedures for resolving disputes between agencies, and includes all additional components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation and coordination.
DORS and DDA updated and approved the Cooperative Agreement, Employment Services, in October 2013. The agreement focuses on the implementation of Employment First in Maryland. It addresses referral between agencies, specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, and describes cross-training activities. (Page 257) Title I

1. Evaluate agency resources which support BHA Evidence-Based Practice Supported Employment (EBPSE) and consumers who receive Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) services.
2. Collaborate with DDA and clarify procedures, including those related to Employment First, to ensure seamless delivery of services.
3. Continue strategic activities that will meet the unique needs of individuals with Autism spectrum disorders preparing for employment.
4. The DORS Multi-Cultural workgroup will continue to develop and publicize specialized resources for minority groups. (Page 321) Title IV

DORS is a partner with other state agencies, including WIOA partner DLLR, and Community Rehabilitation Programs in implementing Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals with signi4268ficant disabilities consider competitive, integrated employment on a preferred basis in planning for their lives. Employment First is consistent with DORS’ belief that individuals with disabilities, even the most significant disabilities, can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate supports. Supported employment is appropriate for individuals in Employment First and is the means to assure the best chance for success in employment. Benefits planning is an important part of services for individuals served through Employment First. (Page 372-373) Title IV

Currently, Maryland’s TCA workforce programs are built on connecting individuals to work participation activities that ultimately result in permanent employment. Local Departments of Social Services (LDSS) workforce programs are operated through pay-for-performance vendors, vendors, or the LDSS themselves. This allows the LDSS to achieve the federal TANF performance measure of 50 percent for WPR. DHS will continue to deploy an “employment first” model, but with TANF’s new mandated partnership in the WIOA system, DHS can leverage the myriad of opportunities that the WIOA Partners will offer to improve upon the employment and training trajectories of TCA recipients in Maryland.  (Page 383) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~To increase the workforce system’s capacity to effectively serve individuals with disabilities, Maryland’s DEI provides for an array of professional development opportunities. Throughout the DEI grant period, Local Workforce Development Area staff will receive professional development and technical assistance opportunities, including the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) Competency-based Certificate Training, which places an emphasis on Customized Employment.
Customized Employment allows for an individualized approach to supporting jobseekers and employers in meeting their goals and typically involves four components: (1) discovery and assessment; (2) job search planning; (3) job development and negotiation; and (4) post-employment support. Depending on the needs of the jobseeker, accommodations or recognition of jobseeker limitations may take place at any point in the training process. (Page 149) Title I

7. Improve information and referral services to AJCs and other workforce partners for individuals on the DORS waiting list, especially Social Security Ticket to Work holders who may benefit from Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA) programs and Employment Network services, while waiting for DORS services to be available.
8. Improve the variety of employment opportunities available to DORS consumers by increasing staff knowledge of current labor market trends; by collaborating with community colleges to develop pre-apprenticeships and RA programs for high growth industries in Maryland in collaboration with workforce and educational partners; by providing customized employment services; and by increasing opportunities for DORS consumers to participate in internships.
9. Create a catalogue of standard letters in the same foreign languages for which the DORS Application is already available to ensure individual understanding of services and their rights and responsibilities, during the rehabilitation process.
10. Increase technology training opportunities for DORS consumers to include advanced training on Apple software/devices and access technology used in competitive integrated employment.
11. Expand and increase, as appropriate, the programs and services designed specifically for individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing, including students in need of Pre-ETS, by evaluating the Rehabilitation Communication Services pilot to determine whether services and outcomes have improved, establishing an in-state Pre-ETS program to complement existing out-of-state programs, and providing consultation services for other WIOA workforce programs on using technology to communicate with deaf individuals. (Page 270) Title I

Information from both CRPs and DORS staff indicates: a desire for additional training and job placement programs for consumers available in all geographic areas, more training available for CPRs to increase skill level of job placement staff (especially related to customized employment and disability information as it pertains to an individual’s limitations on a job and in the selection of an appropriate placement), and higher level skills training in IT, administrative, and medical office work. Additionally, there were numerous comments from both CRPs and DORS staff that better collaboration is needed in the areas of communication, especially in returning phone calls and emails. (Page 312) Title IV

• Develop additional training for both CRPs and DORS staff in service areas, particularly for job development and services that are new to both entities such as customized employment.
• Continue to enhance collaboration between DORS and CRPs focusing on communication and working relationships.
• Determine if inactive CRPs will begin to provide services to DORS consumers and if not, remove from DORS CPR list.
• Develop resources, including CRPs, for DORS counselors to be able to access employment services for individuals requiring professional level job placement.
• Expand the number of CRPs to provide employment services for specialized populations including Deaf Blind, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Individuals with Blindness. (Page 313) Title IV

• The 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment will include an assessment and recommendations for expanding and improving services to students and adults with disabilities;
• In collaboration with the WIOA partners, DORS will establish linkages with businesses and employers to include training, customized employment, education and disability awareness, on-site worksite Assistive Technology services, and mentoring/internship activities;
• DORS will continue to enhance relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs to ensure availability of Community Rehabilitation Program services statewide;
• DORS will continue to expand services and outreach to individuals who are deaf-blind and provide technical assistance to staff and WIOA partners serving this population; and
• In collaboration with WIOA partners, DORS will develop relationships with employers and analyze labor trends, to increase opportunities for employment of populations that are unserved or underserved. (Page 330) Title IV

• DORS is collaborating with its WIOA partners, including those within the AJCs throughout the state, on office spaces. As leases expire, DORS will look for opportunities to expand the co-location of DORS and other WIOA partners, in an effort to assist in better serving individuals with disabilities;
• DORS will collaborate with WIOA partners to offer cross-training on disability awareness, customized employment, Assistive Technology, and other disability-specific topics;
• DORS Business Service members will collaborate with WIOA partner Business Service teams to leverage business contacts, share resources and expertise, and coordinate services that are beneficial to businesses and promote the employment of individuals with disabilities; and
• DORS will coordinate with WIOA partners, including WIOA Business Services Team and AJCs, in recruitment events and job fairs. (Page 333) Title IV

The AWARE case management system was updated four times during this FY in compliance with new federal requirements to submit case service data to RSA on a quarterly basis for open and closed cases. With each AWARE update, the Rehabilitation Service Manuals were updated with direction provided to staff.
• Training will be provided to DORS staff on changes resulting from the reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act (e.g. pre-employment transition services, customized employment, limitations on use of subminimum wage, “competitive integrated employment” criteria, and services to employers). (Page 350) Title IV

Supported employment services are defined in the regulations as ongoing support services and other appropriate services needed to support and maintain an individual with the most significant disability in supported employment, as well as services to establish and maintain a supported business enterprise or customized employment. The quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services are consistent with the definition of supported employment as it is contained in the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. Supported employment means competitive work in integrated work settings or employment in integrated work settings. Individuals with the most significant disabilities are working toward competitive work consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. These are persons including youth with the most significant disabilities:
• For whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a significant disability and
• Who, because of the nature and severity of a disability, need intensive supported employment services from the designated state unit, DORS, and extended services after transition in order to perform this work. (Page 367) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Also, in late 2016, USDOL awarded the DWDAL nearly $2.5 million to implement the state’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). Maryland’s DEI has a grant period spanning October 1,
2016 through April 1, 2020. Employing the career pathways model, Maryland’s DEI will meet the USDOL’s goals and aims to equip individuals with disabilities with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in-demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. When designing Maryland’s DEI, the State had the following goals in mind: (1) increase the number of individuals with disabilities entering competitive integrated employment via services within AJCs; (2) improve accessibility of the AJCs involved; increase the competency level and number of skilled staff in the AJCs to serve individuals with significant disabilities; (3) develop career pathways systems and programs to equip individuals with disabilities with skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them be competitive in the workforce; and, (4) create a more robust workforce system to serve individuals with disabilities within the state of Maryland, by addressing the needs of businesses. (Pages 148-149) Title I

Customized Employment allows for an individualized approach to supporting jobseekers and employers in meeting their goals and typically involves four components: (1) discovery and assessment; (2) job search planning; (3) job development and negotiation; and (4) post-employment support. Depending on the needs of the jobseeker, accommodations or recognition of jobseeker limitations may take place at any point in the training process.
In addition, to ensure the DEI’s success in Maryland, DLLR has: (1) hired a DEI program manager for the State; (2) established a statewide Cohesive Resource Committee; (3) encouraged Anne Arundel and Montgomery counties to establish local Cohesive Resource Committees; (4)
made resources available locally to hire Disability Resource Coordinators in Anne Arundel and
Montgomery counties; and, (5) encouraged the pilot counties to support individuals through an Integrated Resource Team approach. (Page 149) Title I.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Maryland recognizes that youth must truly be ready to enter into the workforce and academically prepared to enter into college. The State continues to invest in partnerships with Career Technology Education (CTE) programs for high school students. CTE programs include a work-based learning opportunity (e.g. internships, clinical experiences, or industry-mentored projects) tied to the student’s area of interest. (Page 43) Title I

3. Outline strategies to increase work-based learning experiences such as paid internships and RAs that provide jobseekers with the skills and credentials necessary to secure employment and advance in their jobs with family sustaining wages and benefits by building new sector partnerships and strengthening existing partnerships - EARN will serve as the starting point for this, as some SIPs are providing work-based learning experiences. We look forward to building on lessons learned. (Page 176) Title I

6. Incorporation of an increase in work-based learning opportunities in EARN and throughout the business-focused delivery system with the Job Driven National Emergency Grant Program - Under this system, dislocated worker services will focus on industry-driven partnerships with the business community. Utilizing this renewed focus, employer partnerships create job opportunities for dislocated workers through work based learning, on-the-job training, and customized and occupational skills training. Some EARN Maryland Partnerships are leveraging JDNEG funding, but the WIOA partners will explore ways to more effectively take advantage of this opportunity. Maryland will continue to utilize models like EARN Maryland and those established under the Job Driven National Emergency Grant program in advancing this business focused system. Under this system, dislocated worker services will focus on industry-driven partnerships with the business community. Utilizing this renewed focus, employer partnerships create job opportunities for dislocated workers through work based learning, on-the-job training, and customized and occupational skills training. (Page 177) Title I

• DORS will facilitate activities to bring state of the art transitioning services to Maryland’s students and families, including the following Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the WIOA: job exploration counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and instruction in self-advocacy.
• DORS will continue to explore, develop, and expand new initiatives and methodologies that promote the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services and successful post-school outcomes, including the following: work experience, employment, postsecondary education and training, community participation, independent living, and healthy lifestyles. These initiatives will be accomplished through a variety of cooperative agreements, cooperative funding agreements, special grants, or other innovative means. (Page 250) Title I

• Training and technical assistance to employers and WIOA partners to promote the awareness of the skills and benefits that people with disabilities can bring to their workforce. Types of training include: information on DORS services and training programs, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and federal contractor compliance with Section 503. Group training opportunities for businesses will be offered, as well as individual consultation and need-driven training for specific employers.
• Providing consultation on and support to remove disability-related obstacles to employment and the provision of reasonable accommodations for recruitment, work-based learning activities, onboarding, and retention of employees, including Assistive Technology and worksite assessments. Business Services Representatives will serve as points of contact for businesses needing guidance, and the Workforce and Technology Center Rehabilitation Technology Services unit will provide specific and applicable worksite services for consumers and employers. (Page 254) Title I

• Providing business and industry-specific career information and training sessions for consumers.
• Developing and monitoring of work-based learning and resume-building opportunities, such as internships, job shadowing, disability employment awareness month activities, volunteering, and on-the-job training, including expanding programs already in place, such as the Governor’s QUEST Internship Program and the federal agency VR internship programs.
• Promoting the federal Workforce Recruitment Program to businesses and consumers.
• Engaging businesses in Training Program Advisory Committees at DORS’ Workforce and Technology Center to ensure training programs meet business and industry needs and standards and to facilitate work-based learning and employment opportunities. (Page 255) Title I

In 2013, the CSNA reported that transitioning students need to have more opportunities for basic work experiences and exposure to role models to develop an understanding of employer expectations and to develop a strong work ethic, rather than be satisfied with remaining on government assistance. In 2016, this is still true and even more so because of the requirement to make pre-employment transition services available for students with disabilities. There are very few community rehabilitation programs that offer opportunities for youth who are deaf to participate in a work-based learning environment. Gallaudet University (GU) and National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID) continue to offer Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) summer camps and other summer learning programs on campus. DORS is committed to serving consumers that participate in these camps and summer learning programs, but the associated out-of-state costs are high. There is a need for these types of programs to be offered in-state to provide increased access for all deaf students. (Page 280) Title I

A policy and braided funding mechanism with BHA assures that the individuals BHA report as receiving SEP services are individuals referred to DORS for the provision of job coaching for job development and intensive job coaching at the onset of employment. To assess whether supported employment services for individuals with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness are being appropriately integrated between DORS and BHA statewide according to this braided-funding policy, the BHO Services Report data on the number of individuals served by County paid through June 2016 was compared to DORS data on the number of individuals with a priority population diagnosis served under an Individualized Plan for Employment through June 2016.
The results of this comparison are provided in the table below. For each County, the table displays the total number receiving any Behavioral Health Administration (BHA) services, the total receiving BHA supported employment funding, the total receiving services from DORS under an IPE, and the total number of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) approved both by DORS and BHA to provide services in the County. (Page 284) Title I

• A review of DORS information for individuals with a potential priority population diagnosis (e.g. Major Depression, Bi-Polar Disorder, or Schizophrenia) who were in an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in FY16 found that DORS is capturing a majority of the individuals reported to be receiving SEP through BHA.
• In Baltimore City it appears that DORS is working with about twice the number of individuals reported by BHA. This may be due to a number of factors: counselors, other than those with the behavioral health supported employment expertise, are working with those individuals and are not aware of supports available in the community, miscoding of primary diagnosis, or they may be carryover cases from previous years that have been closed/discharged from the BHA system.
• In Region 6, there appears to be a need for additional CRPs and additional counselors with a technical specialty to service this population. (Page 287) Title I

• DORS may wish to pilot various case management approaches which appear to hold promise. For instance, the agency may choose to assign counselors a specialty based upon their work strengths. For example, Counselor A may meet with a consumer to gather all pertinent intake information (e.g. demographics, documentation of disability, etc.), then Counselor B may provide all services related to implementation of the IPE, while Counselor C may manage all financial matters for an assigned number of consumers (e.g. issue and track purchase authorizations and Maintenance and Transportation logs), Counselor D may assist consumers to access services in the community to address barriers affecting their ability to become or maintain employment. (Page 291) Title I

1. Ensure that VR counselors and staff work with high school students with disabilities, families, school personnel, business partners, and community partners to help these students prepare for and achieve employment and self-sufficiency.
2. Emphasize and implement transition services, including work-based learning experiences such as Project Search, internships, and summer work-based learning experiences to promote long-term career success and leadership, including expanding transitioning services through federal initiatives, such as the Maryland Workplace Collaborative.
3. Provide Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including the following services: job exploration counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training, and instruction on Self-Advocacy for students with disabilities who are 14-21 years old.
4. Provide training and support to DORS transition counselors and pre-employment transition services counselors through the Transition Specialists Group and other meetings, the Transition Conference, and training programs. Training shall help counselors identify and develop tools and resources related to postsecondary education and best practices in working with families and transitioning students. (Pages 316- 317) Title IV

1. Continue to have the Business Services Representatives in each region assist with enhancing services to businesses to include recruitment assistance, technical assistance for tax incentives, development of work-based learning opportunities, OJT and customized training, education, and disability awareness training.
2. Engage with businesses through the CSAVR National Employment Team (NET) activities, including use of the national Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP).
3. Collaborate with WIOA partners and community rehabilitation programs to leverage business contacts, share resources and expertise, and coordinate services that are beneficial to businesses and promote the employment of individuals with disabilities. (Pages 320) Title IV

o The number of services to businesses will increase as compared to the previous year, and will be documented in the AWARE employer module, as well as through a pilot using the MWE to measure effectiveness in serving employers.
o The number of work-based learning opportunities, including but not limited to QUEST, Summer Youth Employment, and On-the-Job Training opportunities, will increase as compared to the previous year and be tracked through the AWARE case management system. (Pages 320) Title IV

Individuals shall be placed in priority categories at the time of eligibility determination. Depending upon DORS’ resources, the categories shall be closed for services in ascending order beginning with Category III and proceeding to Categories II and I. Services shall be provided only to those individuals in an open category. However, DORS shall continue to plan for and provide services to any individual determined eligible prior to the date on which the Order of Selection category to which the individual has been assigned has been closed, irrespective of the severity of the individual’s disability.
DORS staff will be advised via formal issuance when categories are closed or reopened. Consumers shall be taken off the waiting list when resources are available to provide services, based on their application date.
The Order of Selection categories are as follows:
• I. Individuals with Most Significant Disabilities.
• II. Individuals with Significant Disabilities.
• III. Individuals with Non-Severe Disabilities.
Under the order of selection, DORS will continue to emphasize and enhance services to students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. (Page 325) Title IV

DORS provides VR services and pre-employment transition services in partnership with local education agencies, workforce partners, and businesses that lead to successful outcomes in postsecondary education and employment for students with disabilities.
• DORS will ensure that VR counselors and staff work with high school students (including those in special education, with 504 plans, with severe medical conditions, and those who have a disability for purposes of section 504), families, school personnel, and community partners to help students prepare for and achieve employment and self-sufficiency;
• DORS will continue to emphasize and implement evidence-based transition practices, including work-based experiences such as Project Search, internships, and summer employment to promote long-term career success and leadership, including expanding transitioning services at the Workforce and Technology Center (especially for consumers not planning to attend college);
• DORS will implement the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, including the following services: Job Exploration Counseling, Work-based learning experiences, Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, Workplace readiness training, and Instruction on Self-Advocacy for high school students with disabilities who are 14-21 years old; and
• The Division will continue to provide training and support to transition counselors through the Transition Specialists Group and other meetings, the Transition Conference, and training programs. Training shall help counselors identify and develop tools and resources related to postsecondary education and best practices in working with families and transitioning students. The agency will also collaborate with Developmental Disabilities Administration and clarify procedures to ensure seamless transition for individuals receiving Developmental Disabilities Administration assistance. (Page 331-332) Title IV

1. Ensure that VR counselors and staff work with high school students with disabilities, families, school personnel, and community partners to help these students prepare for and achieve employment and self-sufficiency.
2. Emphasize and implement transition services, including work-based learning experiences such as Project Search, internships, and summer employment to promote long-term career success and leadership, including expanding transitioning services at the Workforce and Technology Center.
3. Provide Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) including the following services: job exploration counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training, and instruction on self-advocacy for students with disabilities who are 14-21 years old. (Page 335) Title IV

4. Provide training and support to DORS transition counselors through the Transition Specialists Group and other meetings, the Transition Conference and training programs. Training shall help counselors identify and develop tools and resources related to postsecondary education and best practices in working with families and transitioning students. (Page 335) Title IV

DORS saw a decrease in the number of students who achieved employment outcomes from 849 in FY 16 to 590 in FY 17. This decrease was partially due to the new emphasis on providing pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities and partially because DORS discontinued assisting individuals to obtain employment in jobs created for the purpose of employing individuals with disabilities because they do not fit the definition of “integrated” employment.
• Funding will be provided to support leadership programs for youth with disabilities.
During FY17, DORS contributed $17,130.00 to support the Maryland Youth Leadership Forum for youth with disabilities.
• The DORS Transition Specialists Group will meet at least semiannually and include staff training on pertinent topics (e.g. pre-employment transition services), and will identify, develop and disseminate tools and resources for transitioning students related to postsecondary education. (Page 336) Title IV

1. The Business Services Representatives in each region will assist with enhancing services to businesses to include recruitment assistance, technical assistance for tax incentives, development of work-based learning opportunities, OJT and customized training, education, and disability awareness training.
2. The Business Relations Branch will assist counselors and consumers to use Labor Market Information when identifying appropriate employment goals (Needs Assessment Rec. 8). (Page 341) Title IV

o The number of work-based learning opportunities, including QUEST and On-the-Job Training opportunities, will increase and be tracked through the AWARE case management system.
61 QUEST internship opportunities were made available, and 34 individuals completed QUEST internships. The number of opportunities decreased; however, nine intern host agencies offered three month extensions to their interns in lieu of advertising for a new intern. This allowed those individuals to gain additional skills and six months of experience, which is the minimum requirement for many entry level state positions. In addition, 33 work-based learning activities and 26 on-the-job training (OJT) activities were documented in AWARE. (Page 342) Title IV

1. Ensure that VR counselors and staff work with high school students with disabilities, families, school personnel, and community partners to help these students prepare for and achieve employment and self-sufficiency.
2. Emphasize and implement transition services, including work-based learning experiences such as Project Search, internships, and summer employment to promote long-term career success and leadership, including expanding transitioning services at the Workforce and Technology Center.
3. Provide Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) including the following services: job exploration counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training, and instruction on self-advocacy for students with disabilities who are 14-21 years old. (Page 352) Title IV

During FY 17, DORS served 5,568 individuals with supported employment identified as a service on their IPEs, which exceeded the goal to serve 4,000. During FY17, DORS and the Maryland Behavioral Health Administration (BHA) have been updating the MOU to meet the requirements under WIOA, specifically, the process for serving youth with serious and persistent mental illness. This agreement, which identifies the roles and responsibilities of both partners at the state and local level, will further strengthen the collaborative relationship between both agencies. Also, throughout FY17, DORS and DDA have been actively updating their cooperative agreement to reflect collaborative practices and changes related to WIOA. DORS anticipates finalizing both cooperative agreements in 2018. (Page 369) Title IV

The state of Maryland developed a comprehensive approach to the adolescent pregnancy problem including:
o Improvements in education, such as providing sexuality education, access to contraceptives and other health promotion services to reach out-of-school adolescents;
o Community based programs, such as local multimedia promotion of responsible decision-making on sexual matters;
o Enhanced social services, such as physical and sexual abuse prevention at primary, secondary, and tertiary levels;
o Employment development, such as school-to-work opportunities in partnership with private business and public agencies; and
o Health initiatives, such as improved access to birth control counseling and services for sexually active adolescents and parenting classes for every pregnant teenager and her partner. Programs and services for people in this age group will be improved or added, as needed. (Page 420) Title IV

Each SCSEP participant works with a SCSEP employment specialist and a AJC staff person to identify the services that would best assist with career goals and movement toward unsubsidized employment. The staff search for opportunities to utilize services provided under WIOA and other related programs available in the local job center. It is the goal of SCSEP to provide and utilize services and programs that are available in the AJCs to assist participants to attain individual and program goals. Participants are assessed and referred to additional services available in each AJC that will aid in reaching employment goals of their Individual Employment Plan (IEP).
MD SCSEP has integrated into DLLR’s AJCs. To strengthen these partnerships, MD SCSEP staff periodically schedule joint meetings with the LEAs at these AJCs to find ways to work together more efficiently. Joint meetings will also ensure that all participants receiving services within the local AJCs become informed of the wealth of supportive services. (Page 513) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~2016 through April 1, 2020. Employing the career pathways model, Maryland’s DEI will meet the USDOL’s goals and aims to equip individuals with disabilities with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in-demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. When designing Maryland’s DEI, the State had the following goals in mind: (1) increase the number of individuals with disabilities entering competitive integrated employment via services within AJCs; (2) improve accessibility of the AJCs involved; increase the competency level and number of skilled staff in the AJCs to serve individuals with significant disabilities; (3) develop career pathways systems and programs to equip individuals with disabilities with skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them be competitive in the workforce; and, (4) create a more robust workforce system to serve individuals with disabilities within the state of Maryland, by addressing the needs of businesses. (Page 148-149) Title IV

DORS maintains a Staff Specialist for Transition position to lead the following activities:
• Coordinate all VR and Pre-Employment Transition Service activities and projects with other WIOA partners to facilitate access to WIOA Programs, such as the Youth Program, the career pathways system, and apprenticeship programs. Also coordinate with other state agencies, community organizations, public and private facilities, local DORS field offices, and employers.
• Collaborate with the DORS Grants Administrator and WIOA partners in responding to federal and state transition requests for proposals and in implementing cooperative agreements.
• Develop, update, and monitor transition documents in collaboration with WIOA partners in responding to federal and state transition requests for proposals and in implementing cooperative agreements.
• Provide program information to state level transition personnel and to the local education agencies through in-service training and publications.
• Serve as consultative staff for the Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities.
• Facilitate an intra-agency transition group for counselors who provide transitioning services for the purpose of information sharing and ongoing training.
• Provide guidance to community rehabilitation programs and providers submitting proposals for the provision of pre-employment transition services. (Page 249) Title I

1. Continue to have the Business Services Representatives in each region assist with enhancing services to businesses to include recruitment assistance, technical assistance for tax incentives, development of work-based learning opportunities, OJT and customized training, education, and disability awareness training.
2. Engage with businesses through the CSAVR National Employment Team (NET) activities, including use of the national Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP).
3. Collaborate with WIOA partners and community rehabilitation programs to leverage business contacts, share resources and expertise, and coordinate services that are beneficial to businesses and promote the employment of individuals with disabilities. (Page 320) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Connecting Individuals with Disabilities to Apprenticeship Opportunities The State of Maryland is committed to providing opportunities for individuals with disabilities, and the RA program is no exception. RAs offer young adults, including those with disabilities, career pathways that provides employment as the individual learns on the job. Focused attention is directed towards developing relationships with RA Sponsors/employers to encourage increased participation of individuals with disabilities in RA programs. Outreach efforts to identify and educate individuals with disabilities on the value of and opportunities in RA programs include, but are not limited to: o Working with State VR agencies, the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS), convening a roundtable of employers who hire people with disabilities to introduce the concept of developing apprenticeable occupations; S o Showcasing a Registered Apprenticeship model among disability-friendly businesses; and o Establishing public-private partnerships to develop outreach strategies for those individuals with disabilities. (Page 182) Title I

RA programs combine work-based learning and classroom training to help successful program completers obtain secure, full-time journeyman positions. DLLR’s Apprenticeship and Training Program offers over 100 active apprenticeship programs. The state measure the outcomes of these services through their MWE in the form of reports that are developed to measure the specific services for both the DVOP and AJC delivery system. (Page 436) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~7. Improve information and referral services to AJCs and other workforce partners for individuals on the DORS waiting list, especially Social Security Ticket to Work holders who may benefit from Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA) programs and Employment Network services, while waiting for DORS services to be available.
8. Improve the variety of employment opportunities available to DORS consumers by increasing staff knowledge of current labor market trends; by collaborating with community colleges to develop pre-apprenticeships and RA programs for high growth industries in Maryland in collaboration with workforce and educational partners; by providing customized employment services; and by increasing opportunities for DORS consumers to participate in internships.
9. Create a catalogue of standard letters in the same foreign languages for which the DORS Application is already available to ensure individual understanding of services and their rights and responsibilities, during the rehabilitation process. (Page 270) Title I

Respondents identified the following needs/concerns:
• Length of waiting list to access services and lack of results;
• Insufficient number of rehabilitation counselors for the Deaf (RCDs);
• Communication (including interpreters) and lack of job coaches;
• Lack of awareness of accommodations needed for Deaf employees;
• Lack of accessibility to accommodations needed for Deaf employees;
• Discrimination;
• Lack of English skills;
• Lack of Driver’s License; and
• Issues with SSI/SSDI.
In addition, respondents spoke of perceived barriers to accessing DORS services, including unresponsiveness on the part of the counselors, and spoke of the need to reduce the waiting list, to have more counselors to respond to inquiries, to increase availability of job coaching services, to provide assistance with college and finding internships, and to provide more interpreting services. (Page 279) Title I

• Via the Ticket to Work Verification Portal, DORS Program Income staff determined that 44 percent of those currently waiting for services are Ticket holders, indicating that at least five percent of consumers on the waiting list became Social Security beneficiaries after entering the waiting list.
• Since counselors and consumers do not routinely communicate during this waiting period, counselors often miss potential opportunities to request new diagnostic information from the Disability Determination Services regarding their consumers—information which, if available, may provide sufficient support for increasing their consumer’s disability priority to Category I: Most Significantly Disabled.
• These individuals may be considered underserved because they are most likely not being advised by their DORS counselors of services available through Work Incentive Program and Assistance (WIPA) providers and/or Employment Networks. (Page 293) Title I

Develop a system for routinely comparing the DORS waiting list with the Disability Determination Services (DDS) list of open claims so that counselors may have the opportunity to secure the consumer’s permission to request any available documentation when it is most readily available.
• Implement a strategy for informing Social Security beneficiaries in general and Social Security Ticket to Work holders in particular about WIPA and EN services that may be available while they are waiting for agency services to be available. (Page 293) Title I

Strategies: DORS will
1. Cross-train staff regarding services available from WIOA partners at the state and local level.
2. Participate in meetings regarding WIOA policy development and partnerships.
3. Participate in local planning meetings regarding service provision and collaboration in AJCs.
4. Strengthen referral procedures to increase engagement of consumers, including Consumers on the DORS waiting list, with WIOA partners.
5. Develop and implement procedures for referring consumers whose cases were recently closed to Maryland Employment Networks.
Performance Measures by September 30, 2018:
• Disability awareness training for WIOA partners will be provided.
• A common referral form and release of confidentiality will be developed.
• A baseline number of individuals involved in services provided by WIOA partners will be determined, using AWARE documentation.
• Develop a method for tracking ticket hand-offs to Maryland Employment Networks. (Page 320-321) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~DLLR will make SCSEP participants a part of their pipeline of talent identified by business services staff. Business services staff will be trained to understand the program and participants as potential candidates for openings.
MD SCSEP will also continue to cultivate and grow relationships with host agency partners who have demonstrated their commitment to employing older workers by hiring SCSEP participants. Proper exit and follow-up procedures are critical to this area of employer engagement and will be measured as a job performance standard of MD SCSEP staff. The program aims to develop an internal network of training and job referral completely comprised of proven hiring and training partners. These partners will assist MD SCSEP in advocating for older workers as viable human capital for Maryland businesses and agencies, and the program will rely on them to increase host agency, training partner, and employer recruitment and retention.

Senior Service America, Inc. (SSAI) Long-Term Strategy for Engaging Employers
Senior Service America’s, Inc. (SSAI’s) sub grantees have well-established partnerships with local Chambers of Commerce. Sub grantees often attend meetings in order to network with local business representatives. Through training provided by SSAI, sub grantees regularly get on a Chamber’s agenda to engage employers by promoting both SCSEP and job ready participants. In PY2014, SSAI Field Support Program Officers introduced an Employer Outreach Kit to a pilot group of sub grantees. The kit includes both three-minute and ten-minute talking points, a PowerPoint presentation, general presentation tips, suggested wording for an elevator pitch, and advice on how to handle both cold and warm calls with employers. This kit has been proven to save a great deal of preparation time and has increased subgrantee staff confidence about engaging employers. Further improvements to the kit will be made as MD SCSEP expands its use in future PYs. (Page 526) Title IV

Data Collection

DORS also monitors performance on an ongoing basis. DORS staff have access to AWARE VR standardized performance reports on an ongoing basis - weekly, monthly, quarterly, and annual reports. Performance is monitored regularly to ensure progress toward the achievement of performance goals. Additionally, Alliance Enterprises has been working with DORS and other VR agencies to develop new data reporting elements in accordance with WIOA common performance measures. As Alliance Enterprises updates AWARE, DORS will ensure that staff are provided necessary training. Also, DORS staff will continue to work with its workforce partners toward implementing WIOA common performance measures. (Page 90) Title I

DORS and other VR agencies to develop new data reporting elements in accordance with WIOA common performance measures. As Alliance Enterprises updates AWARE, DORS will ensure that staff are provided necessary training. Also, DORS staff will continue to work with its workforce partners toward implementing WIOA common performance measures. (Page 138) Title I

Performance Measures by September 30, 2018: • Meet federal performance standards for timely determination of eligibility and development of the Individualized Plan for Employment. • Provide staff training related to the new federal common performance measures for WIOA programs. • OBVS will achieve 108 competitive integrated employment outcomes. • The Business Enterprise Program will recruit, train, and license six new managers and establish new vending sites where available. • OBVS will close 190 ILOB cases successful. • An increased number of consumers who are blind/vision impaired or Deaf-Blind will be referred to WTC compared to the previous year. • OBVS will achieve at least 85 percent consumer satisfaction based upon Consumer surveys. • OBVS will serve more Consumers who are Deaf-Blind as compared to the previous year. (Page 318) Title IV

Objective 4.1 - Implement strategies required by the WIOA, consistent with WIOA final regulation, including Title IV, Amendments to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and in consultation with the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the Maryland State Rehabilitation Council, other core programs identified within the Combined State Plan, and the Technical Assistance Centers. Strategies: 1. DORS will collaborate with workforce partners to update and implement the Combined State Plan. 2. Implement MOU/RSAs with workforce partners required for DORS to fulfill new federal reporting requirements. 3. Identify a technology training team to increase effective use of current technology for case management. 4. Develop strategy for use of Career Index Plus to enhance vocational guidance and counseling for development of the Individualized Plan for Employment. 5. Provide ongoing training to staff regarding the Rehabilitation Act and implications for DORS policy, procedures, and data collection. 6. Leverage electronic communication strategies to gather information from DORS consumers during service delivery as well as post-exit. Performance Measures by September 30, 2018: • DORS Rehabilitation Services Manuals, publications, and the AWARE case management system will be updated consistent with changes in the Rehabilitation Act. • Ongoing training will be provided to DORS staff regarding the Rehabilitation Act (e.g. pre-employment transition services, supported employment, limitations on use of subminimum wage, competitive integrated employment criteria, measurable skills gains, and services to employers). • The DORS section of the Combined State Plan will be updated. • DORS will request and receive UI wage data from DLLR four times per year, as required for federal reporting. • Electronic communication procedures for requesting and collecting information from DORS consumers will be implemented. (Page 323) Title IV

• DORS will continue to actively participate with the WIOA partners on the WIOA Workgroups. The collaboration will ensure effective and efficient implementation of new common performance accountability measures in Maryland, identification of best presentation of WIOA performance reports for the state and for Local Areas, development of recommendations for additional measures, and negotiation of levels of performance/adjustment factors; • DORS and the other WIOA Core Programs will establish base-line or benchmarking data in the first year of data collection for the new Common Performance measures; • In order to secure wage data for DORS consumers working in other states, DORS will explore strategies with DLLR to access Wage Record Interchange System wage reporting system; • DORS will review data sharing agreement with the WIOA partners as described within this plan for possible revisions to have better access to wage data; and • Federal employment data is available through FEDES, which is operated by the University of Baltimore, Jacob France Institute under contract with DLLR and the USDOL. DORS will work with WIOA partners to review existing agreement and take appropriate actions to ensure access to federal wage records. (Page 332) Title I

1. Provide high quality comprehensive services to eligible individuals with significant disabilities in keeping with the WIOA and Federal Regulations, the Code of Maryland regulation, and DORS Policy. 2. Collaborate with WTC in assuring consumers with all disabilities receive services offered at WTC in a seamless and timely manner. 3. Strengthen relationships with WIOA partners to improve employment outcomes and reporting on common performance measures for DORS consumers (Needs Assessment Rec. 1). 4. In conjunction with the Staff Specialist for Community Rehabilitation Programs, OFS management will continue to enhance relationships with community rehabilitation programs. (Page 353) Title IV

• Meet federal performance standards for timely determination of eligibility and development of the Individualized Plan for Employment. During FY 17, OFS achieved 98 percent eligibility determination timeliness compliance, compared to 93 percent in FY 16, and 91 percent Individualized Plan for Employment development timeliness compliance, compared to 81 percent in FY 16. • Provide staff training related to the new federal and state common measures for CORE WIOA Core Programs. DORS provided and/or supported two learning events pertaining to WIOA state and federal common performance measures. • OFS will achieve at least 85 percent consumer satisfaction. 93 percent overall customer satisfaction achieved. • OFS will achieve 1,910 employment outcomes. (Page 337) Title IV

511

~~The Need of Individuals with Most Significant Disabilities for Supported Employment Services in Maryland
An increased need for supported employment services, including extended services for youth with most significant disabilities for a period not to exceed four years, is anticipated for several reasons:
• Section 511 of WIOA states that the DSU must provide youth with disabilities documentation that the youth have completed certain activities, such as receipt of transition services and Pre-Employment Transition services, under the VR program prior to the youth engaging in subminimum wage employment.
• In Maryland Senate Bill 417/House Bill 420: Individuals with Disabilities: Minimum Wage and Community Integration (Ken Capone Equal Employment Act) was passed during the 2016 Maryland Legislative Session. The bill phases out the authority for the Commissioner of Labor and Industry to authorize a work activities center or other sheltered workshop to pay a subminimum wage to an employee with a disability. It also restricts the authority of a work activities center or other sheltered workshop to pay a subminimum wage and/or a sub-prevailing wage to an employee with a disability. Beginning October 1, 2020, the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) may not fund providers that pay individuals less than the minimum wage under a specified federal certificate. (Page 273) Title IV

Examine DORS policy regarding supported employment in light of WIOA requirements regarding Section 511 and provisions for customized employment and extended services.
• Develop a strategy for increasing the number of students with disabilities exiting high school to whom extended services can be made available.
• Update the DORS and DDA MOU, considering whether a braided funding mechanism similar to the DORS and BHA model can be utilized.
• Partner with DDA, BHA, and 14c certificate holders to plan for implementation of Section 511 requirements.
Individuals who are Blind/Visually Impaired and Deaf-Blind
As reported in the 2013 State Plan Needs Assessment, the Maryland DORS and the Office for Blindness and Vision Services (OBVS) are committed to providing quality and specialized services to Maryland citizens who are Blind, Visually Impaired, and Deaf-Blind. Together, the Office for Blindness and Vision Services and the State Rehabilitation Council, Blind Services Committee Provides oversight and leadership in guiding policies and enhancing services to Maryland citizens. The Office for Blindness and Vision Services (OBVS) operates the following programs and services for eligible participants:
i. VR Counselors are located throughout the state in DORS field offices and at the Workforce and Technology Center. The staff provides employment and independent living services for individuals who have a goal of employment.
ii. Rehabilitation Teachers for the Blind are also located throughout the state in DORS field offices and at the Workforce and Technology Center. The staff provides independent living assessments and services to individuals who have a goal of employment. Additionally, these Rehabilitation Teachers provide in-home teaching for the Independent Living Older Blind Grant (ILOB). They assess for areas such as: mobility training, household management skills, and communication device training. (Page 275) Title IV

WIOA Section 511 does not require a DSU to identify individuals who are currently earning sub-minimum wage. However, DORS has compelling reasons for developing a proactive approach for managing these referrals, including the sheer number of individuals in Maryland currently earning sub-minimum wage who could self-refer or be referred to the agency at any time to obtain the documentation required to continue earning sub-minimum wages, and the implications of Maryland SB 417/HB 420: Individuals With Disabilities: Minimum Wage and Community Integration (Ken Capone Equal Employment Act), signed into law on May 19, 2016. Because the majority of 14c certificate holders are also programs funded by the Developmental Disabilities Administration, it is understood that the majority of individuals working for subminimum wage are individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. As such, this section of the Needs Assessment will focus on the use of 14c certificates in Maryland and the impact for VR in providing the services required by WIOA for individuals employed in these settings.
Prevalence

Data available on the DLLR, Wage and Hour Division (WHD) was reviewed for Maryland. This data was current through March 2016. Information was compared to the DORS Fee Schedule to determine which geographic regions the providers primarily serve.
An analysis of the information available noted that 36 CRPs have 14c certificates permitting them to pay sub-minimum wages. All but two of the CRPs are currently providing services for Maryland VR. Of the 36 CRPs mentioned above, 3,469 Individuals are being paid through the use of sub minimum wage certificates. Five CRPs have more than 200 individuals involved in subminimum wage work. Of the top five, the highest is 387 and the lowest 214. (Page 282) Title IV

• Review literature from Office of Disability Employment Policy and Vermont Conversion Institute and, in collaboration with CRPs, evaluate how to implement 511 WIOA requirements within the agency and each region.
• Establish a process for obtaining consumer information from CRPs with 14c certificates for individuals working at subminimum wage.
• Provide training opportunities to DORS staff and CRPs in the implementation of Section 511 especially around competitive integrated employment. (Page 283) Title IV

• It is anticipated based on data collected that the number of students accessing DORS services will increase each year.
• It is anticipated based on data collected that the number of HS students with Autism will increase each year.
• It is anticipated that the number of students with IDD accessing DORS services will increase each year as a result of WIOA requirements related to Section 511.
• DORS Transitioning caseloads will continue to grow each year. (Page 310) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Maryland is dedicated to ensuring that communication regarding the state’s implementation efforts is not a singular event. Beginning in 2016, the WIOA partners leverage mass communication systems, such as GovDelivery/Granicus, to ensure that important messages regarding implementation are continually provided in a unified manner to frontline staff, local providers, and other stakeholders. Furthermore, Maryland is dedicated to utilizing WIOA implementation funding to ensure that local and state staff are provided professional development and other training opportunities. (Page 56) Title I

The third convening, in the winter of 2017, unpacked the WIOA Section 188 Nondiscrimination and subsequent guidance, overviewing topics such as the State Nondiscrimination Plan and Language Access Plan, compliance deadlines, Benchmarks, WIOA target populations and priority of service, and cultural competency. In-depth topics included language access training, Equal Opportunity Officer Training, disability accessibility, the discrimination complaint process, understanding immigration and eligibility documents, and more. (Page 56) Title I

Within DHS’ Family Investment Administration is the Maryland Office for Refugees and Asylees (MORA), which provides support and services to federally-recognized refugees and other humanitarian immigrants including asylees, certified Victims of Trafficking, Special Immigrant Visa holders from Iraq and Afghanistan, Cuban and Haitian entrants, and certain Amerasians. MORA has helped more than 40,000 refugees and eligible humanitarian immigrants make Maryland their home through a statewide network of public and private organizations. MORA provides transitional cash assistance, employment services, English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes, vocational training, health case management, and other supportive services. MORA partners assist individuals to become independent, contributing members to the national and local economy through a number of transitional services aimed at helping the clients achieve social and economic self-sufficiency. The Task Force has already provided key input into the workforce system. In 2017, the Task Force issued the first ever Maryland Workforce System Survey: Serving Limited English Proficiency (LEP) Individuals and Skilled Immigrants. The tool surveyed WIOA partners from DLLR, Local Areas, DORS, and local departments of social services regarding how the workforce system engages immigrants and those with limited English proficiency. There were 428 responses, 51% of which were from those in direct-service positions. Respondents indicated that staff is interested in learning how to enhance service to these populations through cross-training and professional development opportunities. The complete survey is available here: http://www.dllr.state.md.us/employment/wdskilledimmigrantsurvey.pdf. The Task Force was also key in establishing Maryland’s Third WIOA Convening in January 2018 that focused on training for Local Areas and state staff on the provisions of Section 188 of WIOA, the State’s Non-Discrimination Plan, and DWDAL’s proposed Language Access Plan. (Page 70) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. WIOA System Accessibility for All Marylanders Maryland’s WIOA oversight entities are committed to ensuring that individuals with disabilities have equal access to all WIOA covered programs and activities. The State of Maryland will ensure that sub-recipients establish and implement appropriate procedures and processes under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Rehabilitation Act -Title IV. The State of Maryland has taken necessary steps to identify compliance under Section 188 of WIOA, which contains provisions identical to those in Section 188 of WIA, as well as 29 CFR Part 38, which is similar to 29 CFR Part 37. Additionally, the state will ensure that all Local Areas comply with provisions that prohibit discrimination against individuals who apply to, participate in, work for, or come into contact with programs and activities that receive financial assistance from USDOL, United States Department of Education, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Section 188 of WIOA prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status, and gender identity), national origin (including LEP), age, disability, or political affiliation or belief, or against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship status or participation in any WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. Section 188 also requires that reasonable accommodations be provided to eligible individuals with disabilities. AJCs are expected to meet the needs of their customers by ensuring universal access to their programs and activities for all eligible individuals. Universal access includes performance of the following functions: o Understanding local needs; o Marketing and outreach; o Involving community groups and schools; o Affecting collaboration, including partnerships and linkages; o Staff training; o Intake, registration and orientation; o Assessments and screening; and o Service delivery. (Page 146-147) Title I

Maryland’s AJCs are required to provide reasonable accommodation for individuals with disabilities to ensure equal access and opportunity. The term “reasonable accommodation” is defined as “modifications or adjustments to an application/registration process that enables a qualified applicant/registrant with a disability to be considered for the aid, benefits, services, training or employment that the qualified applicant/registrant desires;” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to perform the essential functions of a job, or receive aid, benefits, services, or training equal to that provided to qualified individuals without disabilities,” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to enjoy the same benefits and privileges of the aid.” AJC will make visible to participants that: o Section 188 implements the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA, which are contained in Section 188 of the statute. o Section 188 prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status, and gender identity), national origin (including LEP), age, disability, or political affiliation or belief, or against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship status or participation in any WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. o Section 188 also requires that reasonable accommodations be provided to qualified individuals with disabilities in certain circumstances. (Page 147) Title I

The guidelines for the development and submission of each grant recipient’s Local WIOA Plan included the requirement that recipients describe the steps they would take to ensure that communications with individuals with disabilities, including individuals with visual or hearing impairments, are as effective as communications with others. Additionally, to ensure staff are properly trained on topics related to EO, Maryland held its 3rd WIOA Convening in the winter of 2017 to unpack the WIOA Section 188 Nondiscrimination and subsequent guidance, overviewing topics such as the State Nondiscrimination Plan and Language Access Plan, compliance deadlines, Benchmarks of Success, WIOA target populations and priority of service, and cultural competency. In-depth topics included language access training, Equal Opportunity Officer Training, disability accessibility, the discrimination complaint process, understanding immigration and eligibility documents, and more. (Page 148) Title I

Maryland’s Nondiscrimination Plan fulfills the requirements of WIOA Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 38. The plan states that it is the policy of the State of Maryland to not discriminate against any individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status, and gender identity), national origin (including LEP), age, disability, or political affiliation or belief, or against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship status or participation in any WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. (Page 152) Title I

A day-long convening in 2017 unpacked the WIOA Section 188 Nondiscrimination and subsequent guidance. Workshops focused on topics such as the State Nondiscrimination Plan and Language Access Plan, compliance deadlines, Benchmarks, WIOA target populations and priority of service, and cultural competency. Language access training, Equal Opportunity Officer Training, disability accessibility, the discrimination complaint process, understanding immigration and eligibility documents, and other similar key topics were covered. In addition to the State-wide convenings, the State is looking towards online resources, as well. DLLR is working to develop a presence on the “The Hub” for virtual training and workforce system resources. “The Hub” is a learning management system available to all Maryland State agencies that is maintained by Maryland’s Department of Budget and Management (DBM). In 2017, DLLR utilized WIOA implementation funds to purchase licenses for this state learning management software for the benefit of local partners. The WIOA partners will use the Hub as the platform on which state and local partners, including Wagner-Peyser staff, will be able to access a variety of training modules and resources. “The Hub” has the capacity to create two home pages: one for DLLR-DWDAL internal training content and a second for content added by external partners. The external home page presents an excellent opportunity to facilitate improved service integration across the system. For example, each partner can post a “101” module that provides other partners with the basics on that organization’s mission, target audiences, resources, key initiatives, etc. (Page 157) Title I

Vets

For WIOA programs under DLLR’s oversight, in order to confirm compliance under Section 188, DWDAL state Regional Program Monitors will conduct an onsite review. Prior to the commencement of the visit, the Monitor will confirm with the Program Manager or Director that notification of the visit was received, staff are aware, and requested information prior to the visit is unchanged. The Program Monitor will observe the site’s triage system, confirm that appropriate federal signs are visible to participants, and examine the kiosk to confirm that appropriate WIOA, Veteran, ITA, and OJT information is available. A site walk-through will determine whether: o EO Law Posters are in plain sight, centrally located, in needed languages and provide state and local EO Officer contact information; o WIOA, Veteran, ITA, and OJT Literature are present; o EO tagline is inserted and correct; o TTY/TDD or Relay Service number is provided where phone numbers are listed; o Site is accessible, i.e. ADA compliant; o Disability entrance signage is present; o Entrance and parking lot are accessible; and o There are both Accessible stations and Assistive Technology. (Pages 149-150) Title I

Men and women who have served in the U.S. armed forces or who have been the spouses of service members have made significant sacrifices on behalf of the United States. In recognition of their service, and in accordance with the WIOA, the Jobs for Veterans Act of 2002[i] and the Veterans’ Benefits, Healthcare, and Information Technology Act of 2006[ii], Maryland is committed to prioritizing services to Veterans and spouses who meet the criteria for “covered persons.” Maryland’s workforce system must ensure that members of this population have access to services that enable them to qualify for, find, and keep good civilian jobs in occupations with career pathways. (Page 142) Title I

Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVERs) conduct outreach to local employers to assist Veterans in gaining employment. Outreach activities conducted by LVERs include: conducting seminars for employers, job search workshops, and facilitating access to occupational training, and placement services. The DVOPS and LVER roles have defined, differentiated duties that are designed to function in a complementary fashion. Both staff positions are dedicated resources for the exclusive purpose of serving Veterans, other eligible covered persons, transitioning service members, their spouses, and, indirectly, employers. DVOP staff assist veterans and other eligible veterans and other eligible persons with: • Finding a job, • Enrolling in training or applying for educational assistance (credential attainment); • Connecting to resources/information related to meeting immediate needs such as housing/food/mental health services. (Page 429) Title IV

On-the-job training (OJT) is training conducted by an employer that occurs while a participant is engaged in productive work. OJT optimizes the resources available under workforce development initiatives to meet the needs of employers and job seekers. Employers generally pay a reduced OJT wage (generally 40-50 percent of wages) to employ participants, while they train for the job. RA programs combine work-based learning and classroom training to help successful program completers obtain secure, full-time journeyman positions. DLLR’s Apprenticeship and Training Program offers over 100 active apprenticeship programs. The state measure the outcomes of these services through their MWE in the form of reports that are developed to measure the specific services for both the DVOP and AJC delivery system. (Page 436) Title IV

Mental Health

~~Maryland Statewide Independent Living Council
• Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council
• Maryland Mental Health Advisory Board
• Department of Health, Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Committee
Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities Under Executive Order 01.01.2007.13 (Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Students with Disabilities)
• The Maryland Coordinating Committee for Human Services Transportation
• Department of Health/Developmental Disabilities Administration, Maryland Department of Disabilities Employment First, The Maryland Library for the Blind, and Physically Handicapped Advisory Board
• Local Coordinating Councils
• Maryland Special Education state Advisory Committee (Page 244-245) Title I

DORS has also entered into a cooperative agreement with the Department of Health, Behavioral Health Administration. The cooperative agreement, most recently updated effective December 2011, addresses referrals between agencies and specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, as well as cross-training for staff. (Page 257) Title I

Information from the 2013 Comprehensive Needs Assessment noted that the utilization of mental health supported employment services varies by county. Additionally, a documented need was to examine longitudinal data to inform program development and staff and provider training. (Page 283) Title I

Information from CRPs that attended the public meetings indicated a need for employment services for students with mental health needs and a need for funding to develop programs not just fee-for-service. Areas for expansion include CRPs for the Deaf Blind, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Individuals with Blindness. These are also addressed in other areas within the needs assessment. (Page 313) Title IV

DORS has a strong partnership with Maryland’s mental health system related to Evidence-Based Practice in Supported Employment. This is based on overwhelming evidence that supported employment is the most effective route to competitive employment for consumers with severe mental illness. The partnership is characterized by streamlined access to VR services through guest access of VR counselors into the Behavioral Health Administration’s Administrative Service Organization’s case management system; presumption of eligibility for VR services for individuals determined eligible for Supported Employment through the Behavioral Health Administration; and adherence to principles of Evidence-based Practice in Supported Employment.
These principles include:
• Competitive employment is the goal.
• Eligibility for Evidence-Based Practice is based on consumer choice. Consumers are considered work ready when they say they want to work.
• Job search starts soon after a consumer expresses interest in working.
• Supported employment is integrated with treatment. Employment specialists have frequent meetings with the treatment team to integrate supported employment with mental health treatment. (DORS staff participation is critical to success.)
• Follow-along supports are continuous. Employment supports are never terminated unless the consumer directly requests it.
• Consumer preferences are important. Consumer preference plays a key role in determining the type of job that is sought, the nature of supports provided, and the decision about disability disclosure.
• Employment specialists practice systematic job development, based on consumer work preferences and face-to-face meetings with consumers, and gather information about job opportunities and assess whether they may be a good job fit for an individual. Employment specialists continue to make periodic visits to promote networking and achievement of employment.
• Personalized benefits planning is provided.  (Page 372) Title IV

Family Preservation represents a variety of programs available to families to provide supportive services to promote safety and well-being of children and their families. This includes families with identified stresses around family life, including disruption, child abuse and neglect issues, domestic violence, homelessness, substance abuse, mental health, physical health, and educational concerns, who are within 200 percent of the poverty level. The principal purpose behind these programs is to enable children to continue to live and thrive in their home with their parents or relatives. Each program is child safety based, goal oriented, family focused, flexible, provided in the home or community, culturally relevant and sensitive, and designed to build on family strengths and unity. Manageable caseload sizes and a team approach of social worker and case associate are an integral part of all services. Each service has designated timeframes, with the possibility for limited extensions when service goals have not been realized. Employment and self-sufficiency are program goals and part of the mutually agreed upon family service agreement. This program provides non-assistance. (Pages 401-402) Title IV

Maryland provides an extensive array of services to families and children under its Social Services Block Grant, Community Action Block Grant, Title IV-B State Plan, the Child and Maternal Health Block Grant, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Block Grant plans that are reasonably calculated to accomplish the third and fourth purposes of TANF. To the extent that the state expends state or local funds on these services that exceed available block grant funds, the state reserves the option to use TANF funds or TANF-MOE as appropriate and reported in the state’s fiscal reports subject to federal limitations. The funds claimed for these will be for non-assistance. (Page 410) Title IV

There are a variety of programs available to families to provide supportive services to promote safety and well-being of children and their families, promote stability and permanency, preserve family unity, and build empowerment, self-sufficiency, and psychosocial well- being. This includes families with identified stresses around family life, including disruption, child abuse and neglect issues, domestic violence, homelessness, substance abuse, mental health, physical health, and educational concerns. These programs help families by providing: protective services or potential protective services to families, family support through projects such as parenting classes and after school programs, and family preservation, through grants for Interagency Family Preservation Services and through other means as appropriate, such as by counseling families in crisis, referring them to other existing services, and providing a wide range of service to the family to maximize the chances the children grow up in safe, stable, and loving homes. The programs include, but are not limited to, Families Now, Intensive Family Services, Continuing Protective Services, Services to Families with Children, Kinship Care, Parent Aide Services, and those provided through Inter-Agency Agreements such as the Family Recovery Program. These programs prevent or reduce out-of-wedlock pregnancies and encourage the formation and maintenance of two parent families, since the ultimate goal of all of them is to provide a safe home for children in a stable, two-parent environment. These programs provide non-assistance. (Page 415- 416) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Maryland is thereby implementing an integrative UI/Workforce IT tool utilizing Geographic Solution, Inc.’s Reemployment Exchange Module (REX) to facilitate claimant job searches and return to work efforts. The REX Module was secured as an effective system connectivity integration solution for Maryland DUI and DWDAL. DUI’s legacy system, the Maryland Automated Benefit System (MABS), runs on a separate and distinct mainframe platform that was built in the early 1980s. This outdated system requires convoluted custom programs to be written in order to make minor changes to the system or develop system-to-system data sharing methodologies. The REX Module is comprised of progressive functionality components which will help boost service delivery efforts and facilitate the ultimate sharing of real-time information between staff and systems. REX will immediately display suitable job openings to claimants that closely match their recent/past employment, educational background, desired occupation, and skill set; automatically create a reemployment roadmap designed to help the claimant obtain employment; display real time Labor Market Information to help claimants make intelligent sources and provide claimants real-time access to a comprehensive list of openings repeatedly upon entering the system; allow claimants to enter job search contact information within the system; send system-generated alert notifications to claimants when they are not meeting work search requirements/established thresholds; monitor and notify claimants as to whether they have active online resume and virtual recruiters; and allow staff to view claimants’ ongoing work search status. (Page 453) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 92

Medicaid Funded Long-Term Care Services - 03/29/2020

“This program area administers and operates Maryland's Long-Term Care Medicaid program, Coordination of Community Services, Community First Choice (CFC). CFC Supports Planners and Nurse Monitors provide a continuum of services designed to allow people of all ages and in need of long-term care to live in the community, rather than in institutions. Adult Evaluation and Review Services (AERS) provides mandatory medical evaluations for clients seeking these services and for those referred by Adult Protective Services. In addition, this program area provides service coordination to eligible young people funded under the Maryland Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Autism Waiver Program).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Special Needs Housing - 03/26/2020

“FUNCTION

 

The vision of the staff of Services to End and Prevent Homelessness (SEPH) is a community where all persons have access to safe, affordable housing, and the opportunity to achieve a higher quality of life. The mission of SEPH is to make homelessness a rare, brief, and non-recurring event by operating from a Housing First philosophy. Housing First recognizes that people are most successful when they have choice in housing and seeks to eliminate barriers such as sobriety requirements or treatment compliance. SEPH provides a full continuum of services including housing stabilization, homeless diversion, and permanent housing; and employs evidence-based and promising practices. The mission cannot be achieved without collaborating with public and private partners through the Interagency Commission on Homelessness. Special needs populations include veterans, both individuals and families, persons with behavioral health challenges, individuals with developmental disabilities, and transitioning youth, and seniors with disabilities experiencing or at risk of homelessness.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Transition Services - 03/25/2020

“The Maryland School for the Blind’s Transition program assists students and their families as they prepare to leave school and move to:

Post-secondary educationVocational trainingIntegrated employment (including supported employment)Continuing educationAdult servicesIndependent livingCommunity participation

As students complete their educational entitlement programs, they enter the adult service world of eligibility, where individuals may be deemed eligible for services based on agency guidelines and funding availability.  Establishing linkages with adult funding agencies such as the Developmental Disabilities Administrations (DDA) and the Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) is an integral part of transitioning and learning to navigate the adult service world.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs Annual Report - 01/17/2020

“According to the most recent USDVA data projections (FY2019), there were an estimated 371,000 veterans living in Maryland. To help address the challenges facing Maryland Veterans as they retire or return home from military service the Department continues to provide safety nets, wherever possible, to enhance services provided by the USDVA and the U.S. Department of Defense…

In Fiscal Year 2019, The Service Program submitted 4,917 disability compensation and pension claims for adjudication to the USDVA. Maryland veterans received almost $34 million dollars in new/increased and one-time monthly cash benefits with support from this program. Charlotte Hall Veterans Home continues to provide quality assisted living and skilled nursing services to our aging and disabled veterans, along with eligible spouses. Their most recent 2019 year to date census reached 88% capacity. This year the Maryland Veterans Trust Fund distributed over $126,000 in grants to Maryland veterans and eligible dependents.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

VA Maryland Health Care System - 01/14/2020

“The Perry Point VA Medical Center provides a broad range of inpatient, outpatient and primary care services. As the largest inpatient facility in the VA Maryland Health Care System, the medical center provides inpatient medical, intermediate and long-term care programs, including nursing home care, rehabilitation services, geriatric evaluation and management, respite care, chronic ventilator care and hospice care.

The Perry Point VA Medical Center is a leader in providing comprehensive mental health care to Maryland’s Veterans.  The medical center offers long and short-term inpatient and outpatient mental health care, including the following specialized treatment programs:

Mental Health Intensive Case Management Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center Health Improvement Program Family Intervention Team Outpatient Trauma & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Program Substance Abuse Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Domiciliary Residential Rehabilitation Treatment (for Homeless Veterans) Compensated Work Therapy – Transitional Residence”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

WIOA Annual Report 2018 - 12/02/2019

“This publication illustrates Maryland’s successful job placement and training activities for the period of  July 1, 2018, through June 30, 2019, as required by U.S. Department of  Labor’s Training and Employment Guidance Letter No. 5-18.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

Annual Maryland Transition Conference 2019 - 11/07/2019

~~“Help us celebrate the partnerships between public vocational rehabilitation, community organizations, and the Maryland workforce partners that create successful outcomes for Marylanders with disabilities who want to work.Mark your calendars for November 7 and 8, 2019.  This year's venue is the Sheraton Baltimore North, in Towson, Maryland.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Transition Resource Guide - 11/01/2019

“This guide provides tips and resources to help plan for adulthood and life after high school. Get ready to consider choices, explore options, and take action to prepare for your future.“ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Works Programs & Initiatives - 10/17/2019

"‘[Maryland Works is] a statewide membership association that expands employment and business ownership opportunities for people with disabilities and other barriers to employment.

Our Programs & Initiatives:

We are organized into three programs that provide services and support for organizations, career counseling professionals, and individuals with disabilities.The Provider Network is comprised of nonprofit community-based organizations that offer quality training, employment, and other services for people with disabilities.The Workforce Network is made up of a wide range of workforce development and other career counseling professionals.

The Employment Works Program creates quality employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities while providing the State of Maryland with high-quality services and commodities”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Code of Maryland Regulations Sec. 10.22.12.12. Admission to and Discharge from DDA Community-Funded Services - 07/03/2019

~~“(1) Only those individuals seeking DDA-funded services and who have been deemed eligible by the DDA in accordance with Regulations .05-.10 of this chapter may be served by community service providers in DDA-funded vacancies or with DDA-funded support services.

(2) Each provider shall report all DDA-funded vacancies to the appropriate regional office in accordance with a DDA-approved procedure, as soon as the potential vacancy is known to the provider.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Maryland Minimum Wage Act of 2014 (HB 0295/CH0262) - 07/01/2018

“Incrementally increasing the State minimum wage rate to $10.10 beginning July 1, 2018; authorizing specified employers to pay employees under the age of 20 years a specified wage under specified circumstances; requiring the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to increase reimbursement of community providers serving individuals with developmental disabilities; requiring the Governor, in specified fiscal years, to include in a specified budget proposal specified funding increases; etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

SB 0344/HB0448 “Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program - Account Clarifications” - 04/11/2017

~~“Clarifying that a specified amount may be contributed in each calendar year to an account for a disabled individual under the Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program; providing that contributions to an ABLE account may not exceed a specified maximum amount; and requiring the Maryland 529 Board to adopt specified procedures to ensure that specified contributions to ABLE accounts do not exceed a specified maximum limit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

HB 420/SB 417: Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA) - 05/19/2016

MDLC Board member Ken Capone, People on the Go, MDLC, and other advocates and coalition partners led this strong and successful effort to abolish the payment of subminimum wages to people with disabilities in Maryland. Like SB 765, the bill will become a national model when signed into law and make Maryland the second U.S. state to eliminate this discriminatory exception to Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. The EEA will phase out “sheltered workshops” that pay people as little as pennies per hour and require the Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration to implement a 4-year transition plan to move individuals from segregated day programs to competitive integrated employment. MDLC participates on the Employment First Steering Committee that is developing the policies and infrastructure to support transition to competitive integrated employment.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

HB 431/SB 355: ABLE Act - 04/12/2016

 Federal law enacted in December 2014 authorized states to establish tax-advantaged savings program to help people with disabilities save limited amounts for disability-related expenses (such as health care, assistive technology, education, employment supports and housing) without losing eligibility for certain public benefits. Maryland legislation enacted in 2015 established the ABLE Task Force to make recommendations for an ABLE Program, resulting in this year’s bill. College Savings Plans of Maryland and the Maryland Department of Disabilities and will co-manage the program. Governor Hogan committed $745,000 for program start-up costs and signed the legislation into law on April 12, 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maryland HB 473 - 05/12/2015

Altering the amount of a credit against specified State taxes for wages and child care or transportation expenses related to qualified employees with disabilities; and applying the Act to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2014.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

An Act Concerning Reasonable Accommodations For Disabilities Due to Pregnancy (HB804/SB784) - 04/08/2013

“[The Act] will require employers with more than 15 employees to provide reasonable accommodations to workers experiencing a disability caused or contributed by pregnancy. […] The Act prohibits an employer from refusing to make a reasonable accommodation for the known disability of a worker that is caused by pregnancy […]” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Hogan Administration Proclaims November Hire A Veteran Month - 11/01/2018

~~“Governor Larry Hogan has signed an official proclamation designating November as “Hire A Veteran” Month in Maryland. The month-long observance raises awareness of veteran employment opportunities, and familiarizes citizens, business, and others with the many workforce services available to veteran jobseekers and employers.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 01.01.2017.23 Maryland Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/10/2017

“Now, therefore, I, Lawrence J. Hogan, Jr., Governor of the State of Maryland, by virtue of the power invested in my by the constitution and the laws of Maryland, declare the following:

 

Each State department, board, agency, authority, board, or instrumentality controlled by the Governor (an “Executive unit”) shall annually observe October as Disability Employment Awareness Month to celebrate the many and varied contributions of people with disabilities.The Department of Disabilities […] shall: reinforce the value and talents people with disabilities add to Maryland’s workplaces and communitiesIncreasing public awarenessTo promote individuals with disabilities’ access to technology”

 

Rescinds Executive Order 01.01.2009.10

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order 01.01.2009.10 Maryland Disability History and Awareness Month - 07/26/2009

“Now, therefore, I, Martin O’Malley, Governor of the State of Maryland […] hereby proclaim the following executive order, effective immediately.

State of Maryland Executive Branch agencies shall annually observe October as Disability History and Awareness Month.

The Department of Disabilities shall take steps to increase public awareness of the history of disabilities and the disability rights movement […]

The Maryland State Department of Education shall encourage and assist local boards of education to provide instruction in the history of disabilities, people with disabilities, and the disability rights movement during the observance of Disability History Awareness Month.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Executive Order 01.01.2007.13 - 08/02/2007

"It is the policy of the State of Maryland to ensure a smooth and effective transition for all students with disabilities from secondary education to adult services such as postsecondary education and employment; and to provide transition planning for students and families that is student focused and family-centered, based on individual strengths and needs, utilizes best practices, and leads to outcomes in the most integrated setting appropriate; and It is deemed necessary to establish an Interagency Transition Council to recommend policies and identify the funding requirements to ensure effective, efficient, and comprehensive delivery of services that will most effectively meet the transition needs of Maryland students with disabilities."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 10 of 26

Special Needs Housing - 03/26/2020

“FUNCTION

 

The vision of the staff of Services to End and Prevent Homelessness (SEPH) is a community where all persons have access to safe, affordable housing, and the opportunity to achieve a higher quality of life. The mission of SEPH is to make homelessness a rare, brief, and non-recurring event by operating from a Housing First philosophy. Housing First recognizes that people are most successful when they have choice in housing and seeks to eliminate barriers such as sobriety requirements or treatment compliance. SEPH provides a full continuum of services including housing stabilization, homeless diversion, and permanent housing; and employs evidence-based and promising practices. The mission cannot be achieved without collaborating with public and private partners through the Interagency Commission on Homelessness. Special needs populations include veterans, both individuals and families, persons with behavioral health challenges, individuals with developmental disabilities, and transitioning youth, and seniors with disabilities experiencing or at risk of homelessness.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs Annual Report - 01/17/2020

“According to the most recent USDVA data projections (FY2019), there were an estimated 371,000 veterans living in Maryland. To help address the challenges facing Maryland Veterans as they retire or return home from military service the Department continues to provide safety nets, wherever possible, to enhance services provided by the USDVA and the U.S. Department of Defense…

In Fiscal Year 2019, The Service Program submitted 4,917 disability compensation and pension claims for adjudication to the USDVA. Maryland veterans received almost $34 million dollars in new/increased and one-time monthly cash benefits with support from this program. Charlotte Hall Veterans Home continues to provide quality assisted living and skilled nursing services to our aging and disabled veterans, along with eligible spouses. Their most recent 2019 year to date census reached 88% capacity. This year the Maryland Veterans Trust Fund distributed over $126,000 in grants to Maryland veterans and eligible dependents.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

VA Maryland Health Care System - 01/14/2020

“The Perry Point VA Medical Center provides a broad range of inpatient, outpatient and primary care services. As the largest inpatient facility in the VA Maryland Health Care System, the medical center provides inpatient medical, intermediate and long-term care programs, including nursing home care, rehabilitation services, geriatric evaluation and management, respite care, chronic ventilator care and hospice care.

The Perry Point VA Medical Center is a leader in providing comprehensive mental health care to Maryland’s Veterans.  The medical center offers long and short-term inpatient and outpatient mental health care, including the following specialized treatment programs:

Mental Health Intensive Case Management Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center Health Improvement Program Family Intervention Team Outpatient Trauma & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Program Substance Abuse Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Domiciliary Residential Rehabilitation Treatment (for Homeless Veterans) Compensated Work Therapy – Transitional Residence”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

WIOA Annual Report 2018 - 12/02/2019

“This publication illustrates Maryland’s successful job placement and training activities for the period of  July 1, 2018, through June 30, 2019, as required by U.S. Department of  Labor’s Training and Employment Guidance Letter No. 5-18.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

Maryland Transition Resource Guide - 11/01/2019

“This guide provides tips and resources to help plan for adulthood and life after high school. Get ready to consider choices, explore options, and take action to prepare for your future.“ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Code of Maryland Regulations Sec. 10.22.12.12. Admission to and Discharge from DDA Community-Funded Services - 07/03/2019

~~“(1) Only those individuals seeking DDA-funded services and who have been deemed eligible by the DDA in accordance with Regulations .05-.10 of this chapter may be served by community service providers in DDA-funded vacancies or with DDA-funded support services.

(2) Each provider shall report all DDA-funded vacancies to the appropriate regional office in accordance with a DDA-approved procedure, as soon as the potential vacancy is known to the provider.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Maryland Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative (GTYI) - 06/12/2019

~~“Transitioning Youth comprise a special category of eligibility and priority for services. Through the Governor's Transitioning Youth Initiative the DDA, in collaboration with the Division of Rehabilitative Services (DORS), has been able to fund supported employment and other day services for eligible graduating students who otherwise may not have received DDA services. Without the Initiative, students leaving the school system would be placed on a lengthy waiting list for adult services. The Governor's Transitioning Youth Initiative earmarks funds in the DDA budget for eligible students leaving school, regardless of the severity of their situation and their relative need for immediate services.” 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Local Integrated Plan 2016-2020 (2019 Update) - 05/30/2019

~~“The Prince George’s County Local Workforce Development Board (WDB) is the responsible entity for policydevelopment and workforce activities related to administering services and programs funded by the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act of 2014. The WDB is the link between job seekers looking to begin or change careers and businesses looking for skilled workers to maintain their productivity and competitiveness in a changing labor market.

This plan, updated in 2019, describes the mission, vision, goals and strategies the WDB will implement through 2020 to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the Prince George's County Public Workforce System, support the work of the WDB’s partners, and align with the Governors State WIOA Plan. Additionally, this plan outlines the programs and initiatives the WDB has supported and intends to employ, through competitively procured operators, service providers and partners operating the Prince George’s County Public Workforce System.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

FY20 Operating Budget; Department of Health and Human Services - 05/13/2019

~~“Community Support Network for People with Disabilities:Provides services that enable persons to remain in their home or the least restrictive setting. Assistance to clients with developmental disabilities and their families. Coordinate and monitor services and Supports for people eligible for services through the State Developmental Disabilities (DD) Administration. Service coordination to young people funded under the Autism Waiver Program. Provides financial assistance to State-funded DD providers. Funds the My Turn program for children with DD aged 3 to 13. Administers Customized Employment Public Intern Program. Conducts site visits to group homes that serve DD clients. Monitors contracts for services for people with disabilities, including visual and hearing impairments.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Developmental Disabilities Administration Employment First Webinar Meaningful Day Service Updates and Alignment - 01/01/2019

~~Overview:•Services, systems, and values are realigning to support competitive integrated employment and community participation outcomes•Services are being designed to provide a flow of services that can lead to outcomes of competitive integrated employment and/or meaningful community participation•Services are not meant to be used as respite or daycare, but instead, are habilitative in nature” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Workforce Solutions to Address Maryland’s Opioid Crisis “Policy Status Update on Employer Engagement Strategies” - 02/14/2019

~~“A key element of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and affiliated workforce programs is to strengthen employer engagement in the workforce system and to ensure employers have an active role in workforce system activities. The purpose of this section is to share information related to promising practices and strategies that have strengthened existing employer partnerships. Report the efforts that have been undertaken to receive feedback from local area employers to identify their employee pipeline needs and engage local employers to interview, assess, train, and/or hire program participants."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

DDA & DORS: Partners in Employment First - 11/03/2018

~~“Excerpts from June 21, 2018 Memorandum of Understanding:DDA & DORS will “Use the Employment First approach and establish and promote a goal that all persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) who want to work in the community will be afforded an opportunity to pursue competitive integrated employment that allows them to work the maximum number of hours consistent with their abilities and preferences.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council “2017 Legislative Overview” - 04/01/2017

~~“DDA FY2018 Budget Expansion: Approximately 789 young adults with developmental disabilities leaving school will receive employment or other day services. DDA projects that 100% of transitioning youth will receive this support.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities - 09/30/2016

~~"The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities.  “

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

“Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities” - 09/30/2016

“The primary responsibility of the IATC is to review, revise and update annually the Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities to ensure effective interagency planning and delivery of services for secondary students with disabilities. Additionally, the IATC is tasked with identifying and reporting activities of each partner which impact the delivery, quality and availability of transition services. The IATC also serves in an advisory capacity to all transition-related federal grants.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities - 07/01/2016

This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD Governor’s Interagency Transition Council (IATC) - 08/02/2007

~~The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Customized Employment Project

The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Coalition of Families

~~" Founded by a coalition of family support organizations, MCF was incorporated in 1999 as a nonprofit organization. MCF changed its name from "Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s Mental Health" to the "Maryland Coalition of Families" in 2016. MCF is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors comprised of at least 51% adult caregivers of a child or adolescent with a diagnosable emotional or behavioral disability. All of our family support staff are parents who have cared for a loved one with behavioral health needs and have been trained to help other families. “
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Learning Links - About Us

~~“Maryland Learning Links is the Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Early Intervention and Special Education Services’ (DEI/SES) online portal providing educators and leaders with the special education resources, guidance, and professional learning resources they need to improve outcomes and narrow the gap for students with disabilities.

The DEI/SES provides leadership, accountability, technical assistance, and resource management to local school systems, public agencies, and stakeholders through a seamless, comprehensive system of coordinated services to children and students with disabilities, birth through 21, and their families.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Medicaid Funded Long-Term Care Services - 03/29/2020

“This program area administers and operates Maryland's Long-Term Care Medicaid program, Coordination of Community Services, Community First Choice (CFC). CFC Supports Planners and Nurse Monitors provide a continuum of services designed to allow people of all ages and in need of long-term care to live in the community, rather than in institutions. Adult Evaluation and Review Services (AERS) provides mandatory medical evaluations for clients seeking these services and for those referred by Adult Protective Services. In addition, this program area provides service coordination to eligible young people funded under the Maryland Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Autism Waiver Program).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment: Transforming & Improving Practices, Customized Technical Assistance (TIP) Grants - 01/01/2018

“Council Goal: Children and adults with developmental disabilities meaningfully participate in all facets of community life, and are valued and supported by their communities.

 

Council Objectives: Increase community-based employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities, including people with significant support needs.

 

In collaboration with people with developmental disabilities, their families, and stakeholders, increase opportunities for people with developmental disabilities living in rural areas to find and maintain employment by reducing barriers unique to rural areas.

 

Goals of Initiative: This purpose of this initiative is to improve the employment outcomes of people with developmental disabilities and to support them in having meaningful days when not working. Grants will build the capacity of community service providers licensed by the Developmental Disabilities Administration.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Maryland PROMISE - 01/01/2018

~~“MD Transitioning Youth with Disabilities provided enhanced and coordinated services and supports to Maryland youth between the ages 14 -16 who received Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Such services and supports included:• Transition planning• Financial planning and benefits management• Employment and post-secondary education preparation activities• Social and health linkages (for example, self-advocacy, youth development activities, health and wellness information)All services and supports were customized to the individual youth and services provided by Maryland PROMISE were also extended to family members.The primary goal of the state initiative was to assist youth recipients achieve better post-school outcomes, including graduating from high school readiness for college and a career, completing post-secondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. More about Maryland PROMISE is available by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Maryland’s Disability Employment Initiative - 07/17/2017

Purpose: To provide policy guidance on Maryland’s Disability Employment Initiative

 

“The U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL)’s Employment and Training Administration and Office of Disability

Employment Policy jointly fund Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) projects to provide an opportunity for

states to improve meaningful participation of youth and adults with disabilities, including individuals with significant disabilities, in the workplace.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

14(c) Certificate Program Resources - 01/21/2017

~~“This page is a list of links about the 14(C) subminimum wage program including a Q&A about career counseling for workers earning less than minimum wage and benefits planning services for subminimum wage workers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Innovations in Maryland’s Local Workforce Plans A BEST PRACTICES GUIDE - 01/01/2017

~~“Title IV: Vocational Rehabilitation Services - Department of Rehabilitative Services (DORS)

DORS prepares people with disabilities to go to work and helps them to stay on the job. Rehabilitation counselors in DORS Region 5 field offices in Baltimore County provide or arrange for services that may include career counseling, assistive technology, vocational training and/or job placement assistance. DORS staff have specific areas of expertise to work with populations with significant disabilities. There are technical specialists who work with individuals with chronic illness, learning disabilities, traumatic brain injury, orthopedic issues, and intellectual disabilities.

In addition to services delivered via field offices, DORS also contracts with CCBC’s Center for Alternative and Supported Education (CASE). CASE’s Single Step program serves approximately 100 to 200 Baltimore County DORS participants annually who have cognitive, developmental, and mental health disabilities, providing academic, pre-vocational, social and independent living skills for students with special needs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council Webinar: “Everything You Wanted to Know about DDA but Were Afraid to Ask” - 11/14/2016

“Schools are required to begin transition planning for students at age 14. With new Service options* available it is important to start early, educate yourself on new models and options, visit programs, and let your IEP team know about the new options. Schools are required to invite DORS to the IEP meeting beginning at age 18 and any other relevant entity. Ask your local Coordination of Community Service agency to attend the IEP meeting to ensure there are links between the school and the DDA system.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Transforming and Improving Practices through Customized Technical Assistance (TIP) Grants” - 10/03/2016

“The purpose of this initiative is to improve the employment outcomes of people with developmental disabilities by building the capacity of community service providers licensed by the Developmental Disabilities Administration. Through customized technical assistance by subject matter experts, providers will improve the way services are provided so that more people with developmental disabilities are supported to get and keep the meaningful work they want in their communities and to have meaningful days when not working. All grant recipients will participate in a learning community to share their efforts to improve employment outcomes and receive mutual peer support.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Montgomery County, MD Customized Employment Intern Project (MCPIP) - 10/09/2015

An example of a successful County program serving individuals with significant disabilities is the Montgomery County Customized Employment Public Intern Project (MCPIP). Created in 2007, MCPIP provides flexible employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities to fulfill the work requirements of County departments. Department representatives work with a customized employment career specialist to identify and create part-time positions based on a department’s workforce needs. 

MCPIP participants serve as paid interns in department positions based on their individual job interests, skills and competencies. MCPIP interns gain valuable work experience by developing on-the-job skills to help them compete for County merit positions or opportunities in other organizations

Maryland’s Montgomery County government has adopted a policy to create internships for career seekers with significant disabilities, based on a Customized Employment (CE) strategy. This demand-driven CE policy creates the position for a CE Specialist at TransCen, Inc., a local workforce development intermediary, to conduct an analysis of a department’s need within the Montgomery County government.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Customized Employment Project

~~"The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 19

Transition Services - 03/25/2020

“The Maryland School for the Blind’s Transition program assists students and their families as they prepare to leave school and move to:

Post-secondary educationVocational trainingIntegrated employment (including supported employment)Continuing educationAdult servicesIndependent livingCommunity participation

As students complete their educational entitlement programs, they enter the adult service world of eligibility, where individuals may be deemed eligible for services based on agency guidelines and funding availability.  Establishing linkages with adult funding agencies such as the Developmental Disabilities Administrations (DDA) and the Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) is an integral part of transitioning and learning to navigate the adult service world.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Annual Maryland Transition Conference 2019 - 11/07/2019

~~“Help us celebrate the partnerships between public vocational rehabilitation, community organizations, and the Maryland workforce partners that create successful outcomes for Marylanders with disabilities who want to work.Mark your calendars for November 7 and 8, 2019.  This year's venue is the Sheraton Baltimore North, in Towson, Maryland.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Works Programs & Initiatives - 10/17/2019

"‘[Maryland Works is] a statewide membership association that expands employment and business ownership opportunities for people with disabilities and other barriers to employment.

Our Programs & Initiatives:

We are organized into three programs that provide services and support for organizations, career counseling professionals, and individuals with disabilities.The Provider Network is comprised of nonprofit community-based organizations that offer quality training, employment, and other services for people with disabilities.The Workforce Network is made up of a wide range of workforce development and other career counseling professionals.

The Employment Works Program creates quality employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities while providing the State of Maryland with high-quality services and commodities”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Low Intensity Support Service (LISS) Program Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) - 06/30/2019

~~“The DDA’s Low Intensity Support Services (LISS) program serves children and adults with DD/IDD living at home with their family, or adults with DD living in their own home in the community.• It is flexible to meet the needs of children, adults and their families as they grow and change across the lifespan.• Provides up to $2,000 to assist children, adults and their families with purchasing services and/or items to address their needs, and,• Enhances or improves the person’s or family’s quality of life and promotes independence and community integration.More information about the application process is available on our website." 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Maryland Employment First Summit - Oct. 11, 2019 - 06/18/2019

~~“October is Disability Employment Awareness month. To help us celebrate and learn together, please mark your calendars for the Developmental Disability Administration's (DDA) annual Employment First Summit on Friday, Oct. 11.                                                    Join us to receive Employment First updates, messages from collaboration partners, and guest speakers highlighting success stories and best practices in Employment First. More information will be sent out in the coming weeks, including a registration link; so stay tuned!” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Benefits and Claims Assistance - 06/05/2019

~~This document is a list of organizations that provide benefits and claims assistance services for veterans.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Assistive Technology - 05/16/2019

~~This document is a list of organizations that provide assistive technology services for persons with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Mental / Behavioral Health Resources - 05/15/2019

~~This document is a list of organizations that provide help, including employment services, for persons with mental health disabilities

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

Project HIRE Disability Apprenticeship Program - 04/03/2019

~~“Project HIRE, an apprenticeship program, which provides individuals with developmental and/or intellectual disabilities between the ages of 18 and 25 a meaningful paid job training experience with a Prince George’s County Government agency. 

Participants will be placed within a Host County agency for a period of one year and during this time they will have an opportunity to enhance current skills, learn new skills, and gain on the job work experience.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Compass, Inc. - 01/01/2019

~~“Compass, Inc. exists to support individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to live the lives they desire in communities of their choice. To fulfill this mission, we are fully committed to upholding the goals and principals shared with the Developmental Disabilities Administration that every individual will have the freedom to make choices, the supports they need to live the life they choose, authority over services and supports, responsibility for organizing resources, and the aspiration and drive to live as responsible, contributing members of their communities.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

United States vs. Baltimore County, MD - 08/07/2012

The decree requires the County to  adopt new policies and procedures regarding the administration of medical examinations and inquiries and provide training on the ADA to all current supervisory employees and all employees who participate in making personnel decisions

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Provider Types Enrolled - 01/22/2019

~~“For Medicaid providers:1.All provider types must be managed by their Medicaid provider type identifier which includes (Exhibit3: Provider Matrix)…Specialized providers to serve children and adolescents in the 1915(i) State Plan Amendment (SPA) program described in more detail in Sec. 2.3.11Special Projects/New Initiatives” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Medicaid Community Options Waiver (formerly Waiver for Older Adults) - 01/01/2018

“Until recently, the Maryland Community Options Medicaid Waiver was called the Waiver for Older Adults. That program and the Living at Home Medicaid Waiver are now merged under this new title. This waiver is also called the Home and Community-Based Options (HCBO) Waiver and, in this article, it is referred to as simply the CO Waiver.

 

The new CO waiver allows elderly individuals and those with physical disabilities who need nursing home level care to receive care services in their home or a group living community facility instead. Group living communities can include assisted living residences, provided they are participating in the program and willing to accept the Medicaid payment rates.

 

The CO Waiver is popular both with families and the state of Maryland, but for different reasons. Participants generally prefer to remain living at home for as long as possible; this waiver assists them in doing so. The cost of caring for someone at home is also less expensive for the state than it would be to place the individual in a nursing home. This is because home care utilizes caregiving assistance from family members.

 

Maryland Medicaid programs in general are sometimes referred to as Medical Assistance (MA).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1115 HealthChoice Waiver Renewal - 01/01/2017

~The Maryland Department of Health (the Department) is proposing an amendment to its §1115 demonstration waiver known as HealthChoice, which the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has authorized through December 31, 2021. HealthChoice, first implemented in 1997 under the authority of §1115 of the Social Security Act, is Maryland’s statewide mandatory managed care program for Medicaid enrollees. Under HealthChoice, eligible families and individuals are required to enroll in a managed care organization (MCO) that has been approved by the Department. Each MCO is responsible for ensuring that HealthChoice enrollees have access to a network of medical providers that can meet their health needs.

The State’s 30-day public comment period was open from May 21, 2018 through June 19, 2018. The draft waiver amendment application is available here. The final submitted waiver amendment application is available here. Hard copies of the application may be obtained by calling (410) 767-5677.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MD HCBS Transition Plan - 09/02/2016

Maryland receives funding from the federal government to help pay for services provided in programs such as the Autism, Brain Injury, Community Pathways, Community Options, Model, and Medical Day Waivers and a program that helps children, youth and families. Last year, the federal government put out new rules that states must follow to continue to receive funding to pay for services. Maryland reviewed programs and found areas that do not meet the rules and must be changed. This plan gives information about the new rules; the States review of programs and the plan to fix areas; and input received from various stakeholders like participants, family members, self-advocates, and others.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

“Guide to Maryland Medical Assistance Coverage” - 08/01/2016

“The purpose of a home and community based services waiver program, also known as a “1915(c) waiver,” is to enable children or aged, blind, or disabled adults requiring a nursing facility level of care to reside in their homes or community settings rather than in a medical institution. • Services for waiver participants are federally matched expenses, although these services are not included in the State Medicaid Plan. • Each waiver program has different medical and other non-financial criteria for its targeted population.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MD Community Pathways (0023.R06.00) - 07/01/2013

Provides community residential hab, community supported living arrangements, expanded day hab-employment discovery and customization, expanded day hab-supported employment, live-in caregiver, medical day care, resource coordination, respite, traditional day hab, assistive technology and adaptive equipment, behavioral supports, environmental accessibility adaptations, expanded day hab-community learning, family/individual support, residential hab II, transition, transportation for individual w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland DoE ESEA Flexibility Waiver - 05/29/2012

“MSDE’s core values of commitment to every student, belief that all students can and must learn, certainty that schools  must help students grow, and conviction that the educator evaluation system must be equitable are achieved through data-driven accountability systems, high standards of excellence from teachers and principals and dynamic collaboration between Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and MSDE.  Maryland’s ambitious mission is to provide every student with a world-class education that ensures post-graduation college- and career-readiness”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD New Directions Independence Plus Waiver (0424.R01.00) - 07/01/2008

Provides community supported living arrangements, expanded day hab-supported employment, expanded day hab-employment discovery and customization, live-in caregiver, medical day care, resource coordination, respite, traditional day hab, support brokerage, assistive technology and adaptative equipment, behavioral supports, environmental accessibility adaptation, expanded day hab-community learning, family/individual support, transition, transportation for individuals w/ID/DD ages 0 - no max age.

This waiver expired 06/30/2013.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) in Maryland will help people transition from an institution, for example a nursing facility, to community living in an apartment, private home, or small group setting. MFP initiatives increase outreach to individuals in institutions and decrease barriers to transition. New efforts under MFP include peer mentoring, enhanced transition assistance, improved information technology, housing assistance, flexible transition funds, and the addition of waiver services to existing waivers.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Community First Choice

“The program provide assistance with activities of daily living to Medicaid recipients who have a chronic illness, medical condition or disability. Services are provided in the eligible individual's home or community residence (waiver participants may receive services in an assisted living facility). Other services in each program vary.  Please see each program’s fact sheet for information about the specific services provided through the program.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The numerous efforts to support individuals with disabilities in securing and sustaining competitive, integrated employment in the Old Line State of Maryland are more than you can imagine. We're open for business, and welcome the skills and talents of workers with disabilities! 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Maryland’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
-0.16%
Change from
2017 to 2018
6,042,718
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.67%
Change from
2017 to 2018
341,159
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.01%
Change from
2017 to 2018
149,359
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.4%
Change from
2017 to 2018
43.78%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.42%
Change from
2017 to 2018
80.77%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 6,016,447 6,052,177 6,042,718
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 334,505 335,461 341,159
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 137,517 141,870 149,359
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,716,777 2,733,682 2,711,665
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.11% 42.29% 43.78%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 80.21% 80.43% 80.77%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.30% 4.10% 3.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.70% 17.70% 16.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 8.70% 8.30% 8.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 303,117 304,396 322,325
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 353,003 355,747 353,747
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 405,250 384,006 392,131
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 200,243 212,801 215,937
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 34,281 38,339 43,047
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,983 3,041 3,061
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 22,124 25,795 27,051
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 14,959 18,249 21,063
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 10,239 16,000 16,522

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,308 6,375 6,090
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 5.90% 5.90% 5.70%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 130,269 129,481 126,920

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 12,955 13,764 16,358
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 31,395 32,876 41,349
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 59,031 58,225 71,761
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.90% 23.60% 22.80%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.20% 5.00% 3.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 18.10% 18.70% 15.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.30% 5.90% 3.80%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 3,268 2,675 3,047
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 11,435 10,146 13,981
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 3,362 3,186 3,418
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 10,425 9,388 8,821
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06 0.07 0.08

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 56 56 96
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 35 34 50
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 63.00% 61.00% 52.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.59 0.57 0.83

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,222
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 209 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 253 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 531 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,359 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 764 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,103 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 35.20% 20.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 10,178 10,569 10,790
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 204,612 207,082 205,144
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 166 182 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 328 179 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $75,498,000 $59,262,000 $59,181,431
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $171,675,000 $180,016,327
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $10,955,000 $15,191,591
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 37.00% 33.00% 30.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. N/A 676 976
Number of people served in facility based work. N/A 0 2,111
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A 9,131 8,942
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 81.80 11.20 65.28

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 68.95% 69.73% 70.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 12.95% 12.04% 12.04%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 6.93% 6.86% 6.77%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.49% 98.86% 97.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 23.45% 22.66% 26.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 54.63% 58.09% 65.07%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 61.47% 72.93% 79.63%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 31.18% 35.43% 38.61%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 4,727,875
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 5,994
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 267,634
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 2,927,591
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,195,225
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 162
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 2,256
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,418
AbilityOne wages (products). $2,320,330
AbilityOne wages (services). $37,326,061

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 2 2 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 22 21 13
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 25 24 13
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 172 140 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,056 2,124 1,159
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,229 2,265 1,159

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~Every working age Marylander with a disability, including those with significant disabilities, must have access to opportunities that lead to employment in competitive, integrated settings. The opportunity to learn necessary skills and receive needed support through the State’s workforce system and its key partners enables individuals with disabilities to experience success in the full cross section of Maryland’s businesses and industries. Employment is critical to ensuring quality lives for Marylanders with disabilities while reducing reliance on public assistance and strengthening the economic fabric of the State.

Marylanders with disabilities possess the ability to contribute to the state’s economic growth and achieve financial self-sufficiency. Historically, however, this population has had a low level of workforce participation, particularly those with the most significant disabilities. In an effort to capitalize on the attributes of this untapped workforce, Maryland’s workforce system will play a key role in embracing nationally recognized best practices including Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals with significant disabilities can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate support. All aspects of the workforce system, including state partner agencies, local public and private partners, and businesses will coordinate to effectively strengthen employment outcomes for Marylanders with disabilities. (Page 46-47) Title I

1. The Council commends DORS for the progress made in developing a comprehensive QA case review process to be implemented no later than July 1, 2014. The Council looks forward to hearing results of the initial “beta” year of implementation. The Council recommends that the agency address the methodology of consumer satisfaction surveys and explore web-based survey; consider strategies to expand sample size; reach underrepresented groups; preserve anonymity; and explore web-based surveys, follow-up phone calls, and other response methods.
2. The Council recommends that DORS develop training for staff to expand knowledge and understanding of disabilities and functional capacities; means to mitigate limitations, such as Assistive Technology; and impact on employment as a basis for providing effective career counseling.
3. The Council recommends that DORS continue collaboration with local providers, the Maryland Department of Disabilities, and the Developmental Disabilities Administration, at the state and local levels, as related to the Employment First initiative. This should include an exploration of programmatic barriers to success and cross-agency training needs.
4. The Council recognizes the continuing barrier that lack of transportation causes for individuals with disabilities seeking employment statewide. The Council will work with DORS staff to determine the status of federal and state transportation efforts that may improve transportation resources for individuals with disabilities.
5. The Council recommends that DORS continue to explore, identify, and implement innovative practices in job development and placement, including evaluating the effectiveness of the new Business Services Branch. (Page 240) Title I

Behavioral Health Administration - This cooperative agreement, most recently updated effective December 2011, addresses referrals between agencies and specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, as well as cross-training for staff.
Developmental Disabilities Administration - MSDE, DORS, and the Maryland Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Administration updated and approved the Cooperative Agreement, Employment Services in October 2013. It focuses on implementation of Employment First in Maryland and addresses referral between agencies and specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment. It also describes cross-training activities. (Page 243-244) Title I

DORS is a partner with other state agencies (including WIOA partner, DLLR) and Community Rehabilitation Programs in implementing Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals, including those with significant disabilities, consider employment on a preferred basis in planning for their lives. Employment First is consistent with DORS’ belief that individuals with disabilities, even the most significant disabilities, can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate supports. Supported employment is appropriate for individuals in Employment First and is the means to assure the best chance for success in employment. Benefits planning is an important part of services for individuals served through Employment First. (Page 252) Title I

DORS has entered into a cooperative agreement with the Maryland Department of Health, Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA), to provide for increased interagency cooperation, to ensure the maximum utilization of appropriate programs and resources in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities, to expand and improve services to individuals with significant disabilities, and to maximize the use of comparable benefits. The agreement sets forth terms and conditions under which DORS and DDA will cooperate in the provision of services. The formal interagency cooperative agreement identifies policies, practices, and procedures that are coordinated between DORS and DDA (particularly definitions, standards for eligibility, the joint sharing and use of evaluations and assessments, and procedures for making referrals). It also identifies available resources and defines the financial responsibility of each agency for paying for necessary services, consistent with state law and procedures for resolving disputes between agencies, and includes all additional components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation and coordination.
DORS and DDA updated and approved the Cooperative Agreement, Employment Services, in October 2013. The agreement focuses on the implementation of Employment First in Maryland. It addresses referral between agencies, specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, and describes cross-training activities. (Page 257) Title I

1. Evaluate agency resources which support BHA Evidence-Based Practice Supported Employment (EBPSE) and consumers who receive Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) services.
2. Collaborate with DDA and clarify procedures, including those related to Employment First, to ensure seamless delivery of services.
3. Continue strategic activities that will meet the unique needs of individuals with Autism spectrum disorders preparing for employment.
4. The DORS Multi-Cultural workgroup will continue to develop and publicize specialized resources for minority groups. (Page 321) Title IV

DORS is a partner with other state agencies, including WIOA partner DLLR, and Community Rehabilitation Programs in implementing Employment First, a national effort to assure that all individuals with signi4268ficant disabilities consider competitive, integrated employment on a preferred basis in planning for their lives. Employment First is consistent with DORS’ belief that individuals with disabilities, even the most significant disabilities, can work in meaningful positions in integrated settings when provided with adequate, appropriate supports. Supported employment is appropriate for individuals in Employment First and is the means to assure the best chance for success in employment. Benefits planning is an important part of services for individuals served through Employment First. (Page 372-373) Title IV

Currently, Maryland’s TCA workforce programs are built on connecting individuals to work participation activities that ultimately result in permanent employment. Local Departments of Social Services (LDSS) workforce programs are operated through pay-for-performance vendors, vendors, or the LDSS themselves. This allows the LDSS to achieve the federal TANF performance measure of 50 percent for WPR. DHS will continue to deploy an “employment first” model, but with TANF’s new mandated partnership in the WIOA system, DHS can leverage the myriad of opportunities that the WIOA Partners will offer to improve upon the employment and training trajectories of TCA recipients in Maryland.  (Page 383) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~To increase the workforce system’s capacity to effectively serve individuals with disabilities, Maryland’s DEI provides for an array of professional development opportunities. Throughout the DEI grant period, Local Workforce Development Area staff will receive professional development and technical assistance opportunities, including the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) Competency-based Certificate Training, which places an emphasis on Customized Employment.
Customized Employment allows for an individualized approach to supporting jobseekers and employers in meeting their goals and typically involves four components: (1) discovery and assessment; (2) job search planning; (3) job development and negotiation; and (4) post-employment support. Depending on the needs of the jobseeker, accommodations or recognition of jobseeker limitations may take place at any point in the training process. (Page 149) Title I

7. Improve information and referral services to AJCs and other workforce partners for individuals on the DORS waiting list, especially Social Security Ticket to Work holders who may benefit from Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA) programs and Employment Network services, while waiting for DORS services to be available.
8. Improve the variety of employment opportunities available to DORS consumers by increasing staff knowledge of current labor market trends; by collaborating with community colleges to develop pre-apprenticeships and RA programs for high growth industries in Maryland in collaboration with workforce and educational partners; by providing customized employment services; and by increasing opportunities for DORS consumers to participate in internships.
9. Create a catalogue of standard letters in the same foreign languages for which the DORS Application is already available to ensure individual understanding of services and their rights and responsibilities, during the rehabilitation process.
10. Increase technology training opportunities for DORS consumers to include advanced training on Apple software/devices and access technology used in competitive integrated employment.
11. Expand and increase, as appropriate, the programs and services designed specifically for individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing, including students in need of Pre-ETS, by evaluating the Rehabilitation Communication Services pilot to determine whether services and outcomes have improved, establishing an in-state Pre-ETS program to complement existing out-of-state programs, and providing consultation services for other WIOA workforce programs on using technology to communicate with deaf individuals. (Page 270) Title I

Information from both CRPs and DORS staff indicates: a desire for additional training and job placement programs for consumers available in all geographic areas, more training available for CPRs to increase skill level of job placement staff (especially related to customized employment and disability information as it pertains to an individual’s limitations on a job and in the selection of an appropriate placement), and higher level skills training in IT, administrative, and medical office work. Additionally, there were numerous comments from both CRPs and DORS staff that better collaboration is needed in the areas of communication, especially in returning phone calls and emails. (Page 312) Title IV

• Develop additional training for both CRPs and DORS staff in service areas, particularly for job development and services that are new to both entities such as customized employment.
• Continue to enhance collaboration between DORS and CRPs focusing on communication and working relationships.
• Determine if inactive CRPs will begin to provide services to DORS consumers and if not, remove from DORS CPR list.
• Develop resources, including CRPs, for DORS counselors to be able to access employment services for individuals requiring professional level job placement.
• Expand the number of CRPs to provide employment services for specialized populations including Deaf Blind, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Individuals with Blindness. (Page 313) Title IV

• The 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment will include an assessment and recommendations for expanding and improving services to students and adults with disabilities;
• In collaboration with the WIOA partners, DORS will establish linkages with businesses and employers to include training, customized employment, education and disability awareness, on-site worksite Assistive Technology services, and mentoring/internship activities;
• DORS will continue to enhance relationships with Community Rehabilitation Programs to ensure availability of Community Rehabilitation Program services statewide;
• DORS will continue to expand services and outreach to individuals who are deaf-blind and provide technical assistance to staff and WIOA partners serving this population; and
• In collaboration with WIOA partners, DORS will develop relationships with employers and analyze labor trends, to increase opportunities for employment of populations that are unserved or underserved. (Page 330) Title IV

• DORS is collaborating with its WIOA partners, including those within the AJCs throughout the state, on office spaces. As leases expire, DORS will look for opportunities to expand the co-location of DORS and other WIOA partners, in an effort to assist in better serving individuals with disabilities;
• DORS will collaborate with WIOA partners to offer cross-training on disability awareness, customized employment, Assistive Technology, and other disability-specific topics;
• DORS Business Service members will collaborate with WIOA partner Business Service teams to leverage business contacts, share resources and expertise, and coordinate services that are beneficial to businesses and promote the employment of individuals with disabilities; and
• DORS will coordinate with WIOA partners, including WIOA Business Services Team and AJCs, in recruitment events and job fairs. (Page 333) Title IV

The AWARE case management system was updated four times during this FY in compliance with new federal requirements to submit case service data to RSA on a quarterly basis for open and closed cases. With each AWARE update, the Rehabilitation Service Manuals were updated with direction provided to staff.
• Training will be provided to DORS staff on changes resulting from the reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act (e.g. pre-employment transition services, customized employment, limitations on use of subminimum wage, “competitive integrated employment” criteria, and services to employers). (Page 350) Title IV

Supported employment services are defined in the regulations as ongoing support services and other appropriate services needed to support and maintain an individual with the most significant disability in supported employment, as well as services to establish and maintain a supported business enterprise or customized employment. The quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services are consistent with the definition of supported employment as it is contained in the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. Supported employment means competitive work in integrated work settings or employment in integrated work settings. Individuals with the most significant disabilities are working toward competitive work consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. These are persons including youth with the most significant disabilities:
• For whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred or for whom competitive employment has been interrupted or intermittent as a result of a significant disability and
• Who, because of the nature and severity of a disability, need intensive supported employment services from the designated state unit, DORS, and extended services after transition in order to perform this work. (Page 367) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~Also, in late 2016, USDOL awarded the DWDAL nearly $2.5 million to implement the state’s Disability Employment Initiative (DEI). Maryland’s DEI has a grant period spanning October 1,
2016 through April 1, 2020. Employing the career pathways model, Maryland’s DEI will meet the USDOL’s goals and aims to equip individuals with disabilities with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in-demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. When designing Maryland’s DEI, the State had the following goals in mind: (1) increase the number of individuals with disabilities entering competitive integrated employment via services within AJCs; (2) improve accessibility of the AJCs involved; increase the competency level and number of skilled staff in the AJCs to serve individuals with significant disabilities; (3) develop career pathways systems and programs to equip individuals with disabilities with skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them be competitive in the workforce; and, (4) create a more robust workforce system to serve individuals with disabilities within the state of Maryland, by addressing the needs of businesses. (Pages 148-149) Title I

Customized Employment allows for an individualized approach to supporting jobseekers and employers in meeting their goals and typically involves four components: (1) discovery and assessment; (2) job search planning; (3) job development and negotiation; and (4) post-employment support. Depending on the needs of the jobseeker, accommodations or recognition of jobseeker limitations may take place at any point in the training process.
In addition, to ensure the DEI’s success in Maryland, DLLR has: (1) hired a DEI program manager for the State; (2) established a statewide Cohesive Resource Committee; (3) encouraged Anne Arundel and Montgomery counties to establish local Cohesive Resource Committees; (4)
made resources available locally to hire Disability Resource Coordinators in Anne Arundel and
Montgomery counties; and, (5) encouraged the pilot counties to support individuals through an Integrated Resource Team approach. (Page 149) Title I.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Maryland recognizes that youth must truly be ready to enter into the workforce and academically prepared to enter into college. The State continues to invest in partnerships with Career Technology Education (CTE) programs for high school students. CTE programs include a work-based learning opportunity (e.g. internships, clinical experiences, or industry-mentored projects) tied to the student’s area of interest. (Page 43) Title I

3. Outline strategies to increase work-based learning experiences such as paid internships and RAs that provide jobseekers with the skills and credentials necessary to secure employment and advance in their jobs with family sustaining wages and benefits by building new sector partnerships and strengthening existing partnerships - EARN will serve as the starting point for this, as some SIPs are providing work-based learning experiences. We look forward to building on lessons learned. (Page 176) Title I

6. Incorporation of an increase in work-based learning opportunities in EARN and throughout the business-focused delivery system with the Job Driven National Emergency Grant Program - Under this system, dislocated worker services will focus on industry-driven partnerships with the business community. Utilizing this renewed focus, employer partnerships create job opportunities for dislocated workers through work based learning, on-the-job training, and customized and occupational skills training. Some EARN Maryland Partnerships are leveraging JDNEG funding, but the WIOA partners will explore ways to more effectively take advantage of this opportunity. Maryland will continue to utilize models like EARN Maryland and those established under the Job Driven National Emergency Grant program in advancing this business focused system. Under this system, dislocated worker services will focus on industry-driven partnerships with the business community. Utilizing this renewed focus, employer partnerships create job opportunities for dislocated workers through work based learning, on-the-job training, and customized and occupational skills training. (Page 177) Title I

• DORS will facilitate activities to bring state of the art transitioning services to Maryland’s students and families, including the following Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the WIOA: job exploration counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living, and instruction in self-advocacy.
• DORS will continue to explore, develop, and expand new initiatives and methodologies that promote the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services and successful post-school outcomes, including the following: work experience, employment, postsecondary education and training, community participation, independent living, and healthy lifestyles. These initiatives will be accomplished through a variety of cooperative agreements, cooperative funding agreements, special grants, or other innovative means. (Page 250) Title I

• Training and technical assistance to employers and WIOA partners to promote the awareness of the skills and benefits that people with disabilities can bring to their workforce. Types of training include: information on DORS services and training programs, disability awareness, requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and federal contractor compliance with Section 503. Group training opportunities for businesses will be offered, as well as individual consultation and need-driven training for specific employers.
• Providing consultation on and support to remove disability-related obstacles to employment and the provision of reasonable accommodations for recruitment, work-based learning activities, onboarding, and retention of employees, including Assistive Technology and worksite assessments. Business Services Representatives will serve as points of contact for businesses needing guidance, and the Workforce and Technology Center Rehabilitation Technology Services unit will provide specific and applicable worksite services for consumers and employers. (Page 254) Title I

• Providing business and industry-specific career information and training sessions for consumers.
• Developing and monitoring of work-based learning and resume-building opportunities, such as internships, job shadowing, disability employment awareness month activities, volunteering, and on-the-job training, including expanding programs already in place, such as the Governor’s QUEST Internship Program and the federal agency VR internship programs.
• Promoting the federal Workforce Recruitment Program to businesses and consumers.
• Engaging businesses in Training Program Advisory Committees at DORS’ Workforce and Technology Center to ensure training programs meet business and industry needs and standards and to facilitate work-based learning and employment opportunities. (Page 255) Title I

In 2013, the CSNA reported that transitioning students need to have more opportunities for basic work experiences and exposure to role models to develop an understanding of employer expectations and to develop a strong work ethic, rather than be satisfied with remaining on government assistance. In 2016, this is still true and even more so because of the requirement to make pre-employment transition services available for students with disabilities. There are very few community rehabilitation programs that offer opportunities for youth who are deaf to participate in a work-based learning environment. Gallaudet University (GU) and National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID) continue to offer Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) summer camps and other summer learning programs on campus. DORS is committed to serving consumers that participate in these camps and summer learning programs, but the associated out-of-state costs are high. There is a need for these types of programs to be offered in-state to provide increased access for all deaf students. (Page 280) Title I

A policy and braided funding mechanism with BHA assures that the individuals BHA report as receiving SEP services are individuals referred to DORS for the provision of job coaching for job development and intensive job coaching at the onset of employment. To assess whether supported employment services for individuals with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness are being appropriately integrated between DORS and BHA statewide according to this braided-funding policy, the BHO Services Report data on the number of individuals served by County paid through June 2016 was compared to DORS data on the number of individuals with a priority population diagnosis served under an Individualized Plan for Employment through June 2016.
The results of this comparison are provided in the table below. For each County, the table displays the total number receiving any Behavioral Health Administration (BHA) services, the total receiving BHA supported employment funding, the total receiving services from DORS under an IPE, and the total number of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) approved both by DORS and BHA to provide services in the County. (Page 284) Title I

• A review of DORS information for individuals with a potential priority population diagnosis (e.g. Major Depression, Bi-Polar Disorder, or Schizophrenia) who were in an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) in FY16 found that DORS is capturing a majority of the individuals reported to be receiving SEP through BHA.
• In Baltimore City it appears that DORS is working with about twice the number of individuals reported by BHA. This may be due to a number of factors: counselors, other than those with the behavioral health supported employment expertise, are working with those individuals and are not aware of supports available in the community, miscoding of primary diagnosis, or they may be carryover cases from previous years that have been closed/discharged from the BHA system.
• In Region 6, there appears to be a need for additional CRPs and additional counselors with a technical specialty to service this population. (Page 287) Title I

• DORS may wish to pilot various case management approaches which appear to hold promise. For instance, the agency may choose to assign counselors a specialty based upon their work strengths. For example, Counselor A may meet with a consumer to gather all pertinent intake information (e.g. demographics, documentation of disability, etc.), then Counselor B may provide all services related to implementation of the IPE, while Counselor C may manage all financial matters for an assigned number of consumers (e.g. issue and track purchase authorizations and Maintenance and Transportation logs), Counselor D may assist consumers to access services in the community to address barriers affecting their ability to become or maintain employment. (Page 291) Title I

1. Ensure that VR counselors and staff work with high school students with disabilities, families, school personnel, business partners, and community partners to help these students prepare for and achieve employment and self-sufficiency.
2. Emphasize and implement transition services, including work-based learning experiences such as Project Search, internships, and summer work-based learning experiences to promote long-term career success and leadership, including expanding transitioning services through federal initiatives, such as the Maryland Workplace Collaborative.
3. Provide Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), including the following services: job exploration counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training, and instruction on Self-Advocacy for students with disabilities who are 14-21 years old.
4. Provide training and support to DORS transition counselors and pre-employment transition services counselors through the Transition Specialists Group and other meetings, the Transition Conference, and training programs. Training shall help counselors identify and develop tools and resources related to postsecondary education and best practices in working with families and transitioning students. (Pages 316- 317) Title IV

1. Continue to have the Business Services Representatives in each region assist with enhancing services to businesses to include recruitment assistance, technical assistance for tax incentives, development of work-based learning opportunities, OJT and customized training, education, and disability awareness training.
2. Engage with businesses through the CSAVR National Employment Team (NET) activities, including use of the national Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP).
3. Collaborate with WIOA partners and community rehabilitation programs to leverage business contacts, share resources and expertise, and coordinate services that are beneficial to businesses and promote the employment of individuals with disabilities. (Pages 320) Title IV

o The number of services to businesses will increase as compared to the previous year, and will be documented in the AWARE employer module, as well as through a pilot using the MWE to measure effectiveness in serving employers.
o The number of work-based learning opportunities, including but not limited to QUEST, Summer Youth Employment, and On-the-Job Training opportunities, will increase as compared to the previous year and be tracked through the AWARE case management system. (Pages 320) Title IV

Individuals shall be placed in priority categories at the time of eligibility determination. Depending upon DORS’ resources, the categories shall be closed for services in ascending order beginning with Category III and proceeding to Categories II and I. Services shall be provided only to those individuals in an open category. However, DORS shall continue to plan for and provide services to any individual determined eligible prior to the date on which the Order of Selection category to which the individual has been assigned has been closed, irrespective of the severity of the individual’s disability.
DORS staff will be advised via formal issuance when categories are closed or reopened. Consumers shall be taken off the waiting list when resources are available to provide services, based on their application date.
The Order of Selection categories are as follows:
• I. Individuals with Most Significant Disabilities.
• II. Individuals with Significant Disabilities.
• III. Individuals with Non-Severe Disabilities.
Under the order of selection, DORS will continue to emphasize and enhance services to students with disabilities transitioning from school to work. (Page 325) Title IV

DORS provides VR services and pre-employment transition services in partnership with local education agencies, workforce partners, and businesses that lead to successful outcomes in postsecondary education and employment for students with disabilities.
• DORS will ensure that VR counselors and staff work with high school students (including those in special education, with 504 plans, with severe medical conditions, and those who have a disability for purposes of section 504), families, school personnel, and community partners to help students prepare for and achieve employment and self-sufficiency;
• DORS will continue to emphasize and implement evidence-based transition practices, including work-based experiences such as Project Search, internships, and summer employment to promote long-term career success and leadership, including expanding transitioning services at the Workforce and Technology Center (especially for consumers not planning to attend college);
• DORS will implement the provision of Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, including the following services: Job Exploration Counseling, Work-based learning experiences, Counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, Workplace readiness training, and Instruction on Self-Advocacy for high school students with disabilities who are 14-21 years old; and
• The Division will continue to provide training and support to transition counselors through the Transition Specialists Group and other meetings, the Transition Conference, and training programs. Training shall help counselors identify and develop tools and resources related to postsecondary education and best practices in working with families and transitioning students. The agency will also collaborate with Developmental Disabilities Administration and clarify procedures to ensure seamless transition for individuals receiving Developmental Disabilities Administration assistance. (Page 331-332) Title IV

1. Ensure that VR counselors and staff work with high school students with disabilities, families, school personnel, and community partners to help these students prepare for and achieve employment and self-sufficiency.
2. Emphasize and implement transition services, including work-based learning experiences such as Project Search, internships, and summer employment to promote long-term career success and leadership, including expanding transitioning services at the Workforce and Technology Center.
3. Provide Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) including the following services: job exploration counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training, and instruction on self-advocacy for students with disabilities who are 14-21 years old. (Page 335) Title IV

4. Provide training and support to DORS transition counselors through the Transition Specialists Group and other meetings, the Transition Conference and training programs. Training shall help counselors identify and develop tools and resources related to postsecondary education and best practices in working with families and transitioning students. (Page 335) Title IV

DORS saw a decrease in the number of students who achieved employment outcomes from 849 in FY 16 to 590 in FY 17. This decrease was partially due to the new emphasis on providing pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities and partially because DORS discontinued assisting individuals to obtain employment in jobs created for the purpose of employing individuals with disabilities because they do not fit the definition of “integrated” employment.
• Funding will be provided to support leadership programs for youth with disabilities.
During FY17, DORS contributed $17,130.00 to support the Maryland Youth Leadership Forum for youth with disabilities.
• The DORS Transition Specialists Group will meet at least semiannually and include staff training on pertinent topics (e.g. pre-employment transition services), and will identify, develop and disseminate tools and resources for transitioning students related to postsecondary education. (Page 336) Title IV

1. The Business Services Representatives in each region will assist with enhancing services to businesses to include recruitment assistance, technical assistance for tax incentives, development of work-based learning opportunities, OJT and customized training, education, and disability awareness training.
2. The Business Relations Branch will assist counselors and consumers to use Labor Market Information when identifying appropriate employment goals (Needs Assessment Rec. 8). (Page 341) Title IV

o The number of work-based learning opportunities, including QUEST and On-the-Job Training opportunities, will increase and be tracked through the AWARE case management system.
61 QUEST internship opportunities were made available, and 34 individuals completed QUEST internships. The number of opportunities decreased; however, nine intern host agencies offered three month extensions to their interns in lieu of advertising for a new intern. This allowed those individuals to gain additional skills and six months of experience, which is the minimum requirement for many entry level state positions. In addition, 33 work-based learning activities and 26 on-the-job training (OJT) activities were documented in AWARE. (Page 342) Title IV

1. Ensure that VR counselors and staff work with high school students with disabilities, families, school personnel, and community partners to help these students prepare for and achieve employment and self-sufficiency.
2. Emphasize and implement transition services, including work-based learning experiences such as Project Search, internships, and summer employment to promote long-term career success and leadership, including expanding transitioning services at the Workforce and Technology Center.
3. Provide Pre-Employment Transition Services as outlined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) including the following services: job exploration counseling, work-based learning experiences, counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training, and instruction on self-advocacy for students with disabilities who are 14-21 years old. (Page 352) Title IV

During FY 17, DORS served 5,568 individuals with supported employment identified as a service on their IPEs, which exceeded the goal to serve 4,000. During FY17, DORS and the Maryland Behavioral Health Administration (BHA) have been updating the MOU to meet the requirements under WIOA, specifically, the process for serving youth with serious and persistent mental illness. This agreement, which identifies the roles and responsibilities of both partners at the state and local level, will further strengthen the collaborative relationship between both agencies. Also, throughout FY17, DORS and DDA have been actively updating their cooperative agreement to reflect collaborative practices and changes related to WIOA. DORS anticipates finalizing both cooperative agreements in 2018. (Page 369) Title IV

The state of Maryland developed a comprehensive approach to the adolescent pregnancy problem including:
o Improvements in education, such as providing sexuality education, access to contraceptives and other health promotion services to reach out-of-school adolescents;
o Community based programs, such as local multimedia promotion of responsible decision-making on sexual matters;
o Enhanced social services, such as physical and sexual abuse prevention at primary, secondary, and tertiary levels;
o Employment development, such as school-to-work opportunities in partnership with private business and public agencies; and
o Health initiatives, such as improved access to birth control counseling and services for sexually active adolescents and parenting classes for every pregnant teenager and her partner. Programs and services for people in this age group will be improved or added, as needed. (Page 420) Title IV

Each SCSEP participant works with a SCSEP employment specialist and a AJC staff person to identify the services that would best assist with career goals and movement toward unsubsidized employment. The staff search for opportunities to utilize services provided under WIOA and other related programs available in the local job center. It is the goal of SCSEP to provide and utilize services and programs that are available in the AJCs to assist participants to attain individual and program goals. Participants are assessed and referred to additional services available in each AJC that will aid in reaching employment goals of their Individual Employment Plan (IEP).
MD SCSEP has integrated into DLLR’s AJCs. To strengthen these partnerships, MD SCSEP staff periodically schedule joint meetings with the LEAs at these AJCs to find ways to work together more efficiently. Joint meetings will also ensure that all participants receiving services within the local AJCs become informed of the wealth of supportive services. (Page 513) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~2016 through April 1, 2020. Employing the career pathways model, Maryland’s DEI will meet the USDOL’s goals and aims to equip individuals with disabilities with the skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them obtain in-demand jobs, increase earnings, and advance their careers. When designing Maryland’s DEI, the State had the following goals in mind: (1) increase the number of individuals with disabilities entering competitive integrated employment via services within AJCs; (2) improve accessibility of the AJCs involved; increase the competency level and number of skilled staff in the AJCs to serve individuals with significant disabilities; (3) develop career pathways systems and programs to equip individuals with disabilities with skills, competencies, and credentials necessary to help them be competitive in the workforce; and, (4) create a more robust workforce system to serve individuals with disabilities within the state of Maryland, by addressing the needs of businesses. (Page 148-149) Title IV

DORS maintains a Staff Specialist for Transition position to lead the following activities:
• Coordinate all VR and Pre-Employment Transition Service activities and projects with other WIOA partners to facilitate access to WIOA Programs, such as the Youth Program, the career pathways system, and apprenticeship programs. Also coordinate with other state agencies, community organizations, public and private facilities, local DORS field offices, and employers.
• Collaborate with the DORS Grants Administrator and WIOA partners in responding to federal and state transition requests for proposals and in implementing cooperative agreements.
• Develop, update, and monitor transition documents in collaboration with WIOA partners in responding to federal and state transition requests for proposals and in implementing cooperative agreements.
• Provide program information to state level transition personnel and to the local education agencies through in-service training and publications.
• Serve as consultative staff for the Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities.
• Facilitate an intra-agency transition group for counselors who provide transitioning services for the purpose of information sharing and ongoing training.
• Provide guidance to community rehabilitation programs and providers submitting proposals for the provision of pre-employment transition services. (Page 249) Title I

1. Continue to have the Business Services Representatives in each region assist with enhancing services to businesses to include recruitment assistance, technical assistance for tax incentives, development of work-based learning opportunities, OJT and customized training, education, and disability awareness training.
2. Engage with businesses through the CSAVR National Employment Team (NET) activities, including use of the national Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP).
3. Collaborate with WIOA partners and community rehabilitation programs to leverage business contacts, share resources and expertise, and coordinate services that are beneficial to businesses and promote the employment of individuals with disabilities. (Page 320) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Connecting Individuals with Disabilities to Apprenticeship Opportunities The State of Maryland is committed to providing opportunities for individuals with disabilities, and the RA program is no exception. RAs offer young adults, including those with disabilities, career pathways that provides employment as the individual learns on the job. Focused attention is directed towards developing relationships with RA Sponsors/employers to encourage increased participation of individuals with disabilities in RA programs. Outreach efforts to identify and educate individuals with disabilities on the value of and opportunities in RA programs include, but are not limited to: o Working with State VR agencies, the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS), convening a roundtable of employers who hire people with disabilities to introduce the concept of developing apprenticeable occupations; S o Showcasing a Registered Apprenticeship model among disability-friendly businesses; and o Establishing public-private partnerships to develop outreach strategies for those individuals with disabilities. (Page 182) Title I

RA programs combine work-based learning and classroom training to help successful program completers obtain secure, full-time journeyman positions. DLLR’s Apprenticeship and Training Program offers over 100 active apprenticeship programs. The state measure the outcomes of these services through their MWE in the form of reports that are developed to measure the specific services for both the DVOP and AJC delivery system. (Page 436) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~7. Improve information and referral services to AJCs and other workforce partners for individuals on the DORS waiting list, especially Social Security Ticket to Work holders who may benefit from Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA) programs and Employment Network services, while waiting for DORS services to be available.
8. Improve the variety of employment opportunities available to DORS consumers by increasing staff knowledge of current labor market trends; by collaborating with community colleges to develop pre-apprenticeships and RA programs for high growth industries in Maryland in collaboration with workforce and educational partners; by providing customized employment services; and by increasing opportunities for DORS consumers to participate in internships.
9. Create a catalogue of standard letters in the same foreign languages for which the DORS Application is already available to ensure individual understanding of services and their rights and responsibilities, during the rehabilitation process. (Page 270) Title I

Respondents identified the following needs/concerns:
• Length of waiting list to access services and lack of results;
• Insufficient number of rehabilitation counselors for the Deaf (RCDs);
• Communication (including interpreters) and lack of job coaches;
• Lack of awareness of accommodations needed for Deaf employees;
• Lack of accessibility to accommodations needed for Deaf employees;
• Discrimination;
• Lack of English skills;
• Lack of Driver’s License; and
• Issues with SSI/SSDI.
In addition, respondents spoke of perceived barriers to accessing DORS services, including unresponsiveness on the part of the counselors, and spoke of the need to reduce the waiting list, to have more counselors to respond to inquiries, to increase availability of job coaching services, to provide assistance with college and finding internships, and to provide more interpreting services. (Page 279) Title I

• Via the Ticket to Work Verification Portal, DORS Program Income staff determined that 44 percent of those currently waiting for services are Ticket holders, indicating that at least five percent of consumers on the waiting list became Social Security beneficiaries after entering the waiting list.
• Since counselors and consumers do not routinely communicate during this waiting period, counselors often miss potential opportunities to request new diagnostic information from the Disability Determination Services regarding their consumers—information which, if available, may provide sufficient support for increasing their consumer’s disability priority to Category I: Most Significantly Disabled.
• These individuals may be considered underserved because they are most likely not being advised by their DORS counselors of services available through Work Incentive Program and Assistance (WIPA) providers and/or Employment Networks. (Page 293) Title I

Develop a system for routinely comparing the DORS waiting list with the Disability Determination Services (DDS) list of open claims so that counselors may have the opportunity to secure the consumer’s permission to request any available documentation when it is most readily available.
• Implement a strategy for informing Social Security beneficiaries in general and Social Security Ticket to Work holders in particular about WIPA and EN services that may be available while they are waiting for agency services to be available. (Page 293) Title I

Strategies: DORS will
1. Cross-train staff regarding services available from WIOA partners at the state and local level.
2. Participate in meetings regarding WIOA policy development and partnerships.
3. Participate in local planning meetings regarding service provision and collaboration in AJCs.
4. Strengthen referral procedures to increase engagement of consumers, including Consumers on the DORS waiting list, with WIOA partners.
5. Develop and implement procedures for referring consumers whose cases were recently closed to Maryland Employment Networks.
Performance Measures by September 30, 2018:
• Disability awareness training for WIOA partners will be provided.
• A common referral form and release of confidentiality will be developed.
• A baseline number of individuals involved in services provided by WIOA partners will be determined, using AWARE documentation.
• Develop a method for tracking ticket hand-offs to Maryland Employment Networks. (Page 320-321) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~DLLR will make SCSEP participants a part of their pipeline of talent identified by business services staff. Business services staff will be trained to understand the program and participants as potential candidates for openings.
MD SCSEP will also continue to cultivate and grow relationships with host agency partners who have demonstrated their commitment to employing older workers by hiring SCSEP participants. Proper exit and follow-up procedures are critical to this area of employer engagement and will be measured as a job performance standard of MD SCSEP staff. The program aims to develop an internal network of training and job referral completely comprised of proven hiring and training partners. These partners will assist MD SCSEP in advocating for older workers as viable human capital for Maryland businesses and agencies, and the program will rely on them to increase host agency, training partner, and employer recruitment and retention.

Senior Service America, Inc. (SSAI) Long-Term Strategy for Engaging Employers
Senior Service America’s, Inc. (SSAI’s) sub grantees have well-established partnerships with local Chambers of Commerce. Sub grantees often attend meetings in order to network with local business representatives. Through training provided by SSAI, sub grantees regularly get on a Chamber’s agenda to engage employers by promoting both SCSEP and job ready participants. In PY2014, SSAI Field Support Program Officers introduced an Employer Outreach Kit to a pilot group of sub grantees. The kit includes both three-minute and ten-minute talking points, a PowerPoint presentation, general presentation tips, suggested wording for an elevator pitch, and advice on how to handle both cold and warm calls with employers. This kit has been proven to save a great deal of preparation time and has increased subgrantee staff confidence about engaging employers. Further improvements to the kit will be made as MD SCSEP expands its use in future PYs. (Page 526) Title IV

Data Collection

DORS also monitors performance on an ongoing basis. DORS staff have access to AWARE VR standardized performance reports on an ongoing basis - weekly, monthly, quarterly, and annual reports. Performance is monitored regularly to ensure progress toward the achievement of performance goals. Additionally, Alliance Enterprises has been working with DORS and other VR agencies to develop new data reporting elements in accordance with WIOA common performance measures. As Alliance Enterprises updates AWARE, DORS will ensure that staff are provided necessary training. Also, DORS staff will continue to work with its workforce partners toward implementing WIOA common performance measures. (Page 90) Title I

DORS and other VR agencies to develop new data reporting elements in accordance with WIOA common performance measures. As Alliance Enterprises updates AWARE, DORS will ensure that staff are provided necessary training. Also, DORS staff will continue to work with its workforce partners toward implementing WIOA common performance measures. (Page 138) Title I

Performance Measures by September 30, 2018: • Meet federal performance standards for timely determination of eligibility and development of the Individualized Plan for Employment. • Provide staff training related to the new federal common performance measures for WIOA programs. • OBVS will achieve 108 competitive integrated employment outcomes. • The Business Enterprise Program will recruit, train, and license six new managers and establish new vending sites where available. • OBVS will close 190 ILOB cases successful. • An increased number of consumers who are blind/vision impaired or Deaf-Blind will be referred to WTC compared to the previous year. • OBVS will achieve at least 85 percent consumer satisfaction based upon Consumer surveys. • OBVS will serve more Consumers who are Deaf-Blind as compared to the previous year. (Page 318) Title IV

Objective 4.1 - Implement strategies required by the WIOA, consistent with WIOA final regulation, including Title IV, Amendments to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and in consultation with the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the Maryland State Rehabilitation Council, other core programs identified within the Combined State Plan, and the Technical Assistance Centers. Strategies: 1. DORS will collaborate with workforce partners to update and implement the Combined State Plan. 2. Implement MOU/RSAs with workforce partners required for DORS to fulfill new federal reporting requirements. 3. Identify a technology training team to increase effective use of current technology for case management. 4. Develop strategy for use of Career Index Plus to enhance vocational guidance and counseling for development of the Individualized Plan for Employment. 5. Provide ongoing training to staff regarding the Rehabilitation Act and implications for DORS policy, procedures, and data collection. 6. Leverage electronic communication strategies to gather information from DORS consumers during service delivery as well as post-exit. Performance Measures by September 30, 2018: • DORS Rehabilitation Services Manuals, publications, and the AWARE case management system will be updated consistent with changes in the Rehabilitation Act. • Ongoing training will be provided to DORS staff regarding the Rehabilitation Act (e.g. pre-employment transition services, supported employment, limitations on use of subminimum wage, competitive integrated employment criteria, measurable skills gains, and services to employers). • The DORS section of the Combined State Plan will be updated. • DORS will request and receive UI wage data from DLLR four times per year, as required for federal reporting. • Electronic communication procedures for requesting and collecting information from DORS consumers will be implemented. (Page 323) Title IV

• DORS will continue to actively participate with the WIOA partners on the WIOA Workgroups. The collaboration will ensure effective and efficient implementation of new common performance accountability measures in Maryland, identification of best presentation of WIOA performance reports for the state and for Local Areas, development of recommendations for additional measures, and negotiation of levels of performance/adjustment factors; • DORS and the other WIOA Core Programs will establish base-line or benchmarking data in the first year of data collection for the new Common Performance measures; • In order to secure wage data for DORS consumers working in other states, DORS will explore strategies with DLLR to access Wage Record Interchange System wage reporting system; • DORS will review data sharing agreement with the WIOA partners as described within this plan for possible revisions to have better access to wage data; and • Federal employment data is available through FEDES, which is operated by the University of Baltimore, Jacob France Institute under contract with DLLR and the USDOL. DORS will work with WIOA partners to review existing agreement and take appropriate actions to ensure access to federal wage records. (Page 332) Title I

1. Provide high quality comprehensive services to eligible individuals with significant disabilities in keeping with the WIOA and Federal Regulations, the Code of Maryland regulation, and DORS Policy. 2. Collaborate with WTC in assuring consumers with all disabilities receive services offered at WTC in a seamless and timely manner. 3. Strengthen relationships with WIOA partners to improve employment outcomes and reporting on common performance measures for DORS consumers (Needs Assessment Rec. 1). 4. In conjunction with the Staff Specialist for Community Rehabilitation Programs, OFS management will continue to enhance relationships with community rehabilitation programs. (Page 353) Title IV

• Meet federal performance standards for timely determination of eligibility and development of the Individualized Plan for Employment. During FY 17, OFS achieved 98 percent eligibility determination timeliness compliance, compared to 93 percent in FY 16, and 91 percent Individualized Plan for Employment development timeliness compliance, compared to 81 percent in FY 16. • Provide staff training related to the new federal and state common measures for CORE WIOA Core Programs. DORS provided and/or supported two learning events pertaining to WIOA state and federal common performance measures. • OFS will achieve at least 85 percent consumer satisfaction. 93 percent overall customer satisfaction achieved. • OFS will achieve 1,910 employment outcomes. (Page 337) Title IV

511

~~The Need of Individuals with Most Significant Disabilities for Supported Employment Services in Maryland
An increased need for supported employment services, including extended services for youth with most significant disabilities for a period not to exceed four years, is anticipated for several reasons:
• Section 511 of WIOA states that the DSU must provide youth with disabilities documentation that the youth have completed certain activities, such as receipt of transition services and Pre-Employment Transition services, under the VR program prior to the youth engaging in subminimum wage employment.
• In Maryland Senate Bill 417/House Bill 420: Individuals with Disabilities: Minimum Wage and Community Integration (Ken Capone Equal Employment Act) was passed during the 2016 Maryland Legislative Session. The bill phases out the authority for the Commissioner of Labor and Industry to authorize a work activities center or other sheltered workshop to pay a subminimum wage to an employee with a disability. It also restricts the authority of a work activities center or other sheltered workshop to pay a subminimum wage and/or a sub-prevailing wage to an employee with a disability. Beginning October 1, 2020, the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) may not fund providers that pay individuals less than the minimum wage under a specified federal certificate. (Page 273) Title IV

Examine DORS policy regarding supported employment in light of WIOA requirements regarding Section 511 and provisions for customized employment and extended services.
• Develop a strategy for increasing the number of students with disabilities exiting high school to whom extended services can be made available.
• Update the DORS and DDA MOU, considering whether a braided funding mechanism similar to the DORS and BHA model can be utilized.
• Partner with DDA, BHA, and 14c certificate holders to plan for implementation of Section 511 requirements.
Individuals who are Blind/Visually Impaired and Deaf-Blind
As reported in the 2013 State Plan Needs Assessment, the Maryland DORS and the Office for Blindness and Vision Services (OBVS) are committed to providing quality and specialized services to Maryland citizens who are Blind, Visually Impaired, and Deaf-Blind. Together, the Office for Blindness and Vision Services and the State Rehabilitation Council, Blind Services Committee Provides oversight and leadership in guiding policies and enhancing services to Maryland citizens. The Office for Blindness and Vision Services (OBVS) operates the following programs and services for eligible participants:
i. VR Counselors are located throughout the state in DORS field offices and at the Workforce and Technology Center. The staff provides employment and independent living services for individuals who have a goal of employment.
ii. Rehabilitation Teachers for the Blind are also located throughout the state in DORS field offices and at the Workforce and Technology Center. The staff provides independent living assessments and services to individuals who have a goal of employment. Additionally, these Rehabilitation Teachers provide in-home teaching for the Independent Living Older Blind Grant (ILOB). They assess for areas such as: mobility training, household management skills, and communication device training. (Page 275) Title IV

WIOA Section 511 does not require a DSU to identify individuals who are currently earning sub-minimum wage. However, DORS has compelling reasons for developing a proactive approach for managing these referrals, including the sheer number of individuals in Maryland currently earning sub-minimum wage who could self-refer or be referred to the agency at any time to obtain the documentation required to continue earning sub-minimum wages, and the implications of Maryland SB 417/HB 420: Individuals With Disabilities: Minimum Wage and Community Integration (Ken Capone Equal Employment Act), signed into law on May 19, 2016. Because the majority of 14c certificate holders are also programs funded by the Developmental Disabilities Administration, it is understood that the majority of individuals working for subminimum wage are individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. As such, this section of the Needs Assessment will focus on the use of 14c certificates in Maryland and the impact for VR in providing the services required by WIOA for individuals employed in these settings.
Prevalence

Data available on the DLLR, Wage and Hour Division (WHD) was reviewed for Maryland. This data was current through March 2016. Information was compared to the DORS Fee Schedule to determine which geographic regions the providers primarily serve.
An analysis of the information available noted that 36 CRPs have 14c certificates permitting them to pay sub-minimum wages. All but two of the CRPs are currently providing services for Maryland VR. Of the 36 CRPs mentioned above, 3,469 Individuals are being paid through the use of sub minimum wage certificates. Five CRPs have more than 200 individuals involved in subminimum wage work. Of the top five, the highest is 387 and the lowest 214. (Page 282) Title IV

• Review literature from Office of Disability Employment Policy and Vermont Conversion Institute and, in collaboration with CRPs, evaluate how to implement 511 WIOA requirements within the agency and each region.
• Establish a process for obtaining consumer information from CRPs with 14c certificates for individuals working at subminimum wage.
• Provide training opportunities to DORS staff and CRPs in the implementation of Section 511 especially around competitive integrated employment. (Page 283) Title IV

• It is anticipated based on data collected that the number of students accessing DORS services will increase each year.
• It is anticipated based on data collected that the number of HS students with Autism will increase each year.
• It is anticipated that the number of students with IDD accessing DORS services will increase each year as a result of WIOA requirements related to Section 511.
• DORS Transitioning caseloads will continue to grow each year. (Page 310) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

Maryland is dedicated to ensuring that communication regarding the state’s implementation efforts is not a singular event. Beginning in 2016, the WIOA partners leverage mass communication systems, such as GovDelivery/Granicus, to ensure that important messages regarding implementation are continually provided in a unified manner to frontline staff, local providers, and other stakeholders. Furthermore, Maryland is dedicated to utilizing WIOA implementation funding to ensure that local and state staff are provided professional development and other training opportunities. (Page 56) Title I

The third convening, in the winter of 2017, unpacked the WIOA Section 188 Nondiscrimination and subsequent guidance, overviewing topics such as the State Nondiscrimination Plan and Language Access Plan, compliance deadlines, Benchmarks, WIOA target populations and priority of service, and cultural competency. In-depth topics included language access training, Equal Opportunity Officer Training, disability accessibility, the discrimination complaint process, understanding immigration and eligibility documents, and more. (Page 56) Title I

Within DHS’ Family Investment Administration is the Maryland Office for Refugees and Asylees (MORA), which provides support and services to federally-recognized refugees and other humanitarian immigrants including asylees, certified Victims of Trafficking, Special Immigrant Visa holders from Iraq and Afghanistan, Cuban and Haitian entrants, and certain Amerasians. MORA has helped more than 40,000 refugees and eligible humanitarian immigrants make Maryland their home through a statewide network of public and private organizations. MORA provides transitional cash assistance, employment services, English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes, vocational training, health case management, and other supportive services. MORA partners assist individuals to become independent, contributing members to the national and local economy through a number of transitional services aimed at helping the clients achieve social and economic self-sufficiency. The Task Force has already provided key input into the workforce system. In 2017, the Task Force issued the first ever Maryland Workforce System Survey: Serving Limited English Proficiency (LEP) Individuals and Skilled Immigrants. The tool surveyed WIOA partners from DLLR, Local Areas, DORS, and local departments of social services regarding how the workforce system engages immigrants and those with limited English proficiency. There were 428 responses, 51% of which were from those in direct-service positions. Respondents indicated that staff is interested in learning how to enhance service to these populations through cross-training and professional development opportunities. The complete survey is available here: http://www.dllr.state.md.us/employment/wdskilledimmigrantsurvey.pdf. The Task Force was also key in establishing Maryland’s Third WIOA Convening in January 2018 that focused on training for Local Areas and state staff on the provisions of Section 188 of WIOA, the State’s Non-Discrimination Plan, and DWDAL’s proposed Language Access Plan. (Page 70) Title I

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria. WIOA System Accessibility for All Marylanders Maryland’s WIOA oversight entities are committed to ensuring that individuals with disabilities have equal access to all WIOA covered programs and activities. The State of Maryland will ensure that sub-recipients establish and implement appropriate procedures and processes under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Rehabilitation Act -Title IV. The State of Maryland has taken necessary steps to identify compliance under Section 188 of WIOA, which contains provisions identical to those in Section 188 of WIA, as well as 29 CFR Part 38, which is similar to 29 CFR Part 37. Additionally, the state will ensure that all Local Areas comply with provisions that prohibit discrimination against individuals who apply to, participate in, work for, or come into contact with programs and activities that receive financial assistance from USDOL, United States Department of Education, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Section 188 of WIOA prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status, and gender identity), national origin (including LEP), age, disability, or political affiliation or belief, or against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship status or participation in any WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. Section 188 also requires that reasonable accommodations be provided to eligible individuals with disabilities. AJCs are expected to meet the needs of their customers by ensuring universal access to their programs and activities for all eligible individuals. Universal access includes performance of the following functions: o Understanding local needs; o Marketing and outreach; o Involving community groups and schools; o Affecting collaboration, including partnerships and linkages; o Staff training; o Intake, registration and orientation; o Assessments and screening; and o Service delivery. (Page 146-147) Title I

Maryland’s AJCs are required to provide reasonable accommodation for individuals with disabilities to ensure equal access and opportunity. The term “reasonable accommodation” is defined as “modifications or adjustments to an application/registration process that enables a qualified applicant/registrant with a disability to be considered for the aid, benefits, services, training or employment that the qualified applicant/registrant desires;” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to perform the essential functions of a job, or receive aid, benefits, services, or training equal to that provided to qualified individuals without disabilities,” or “modifications or adjustments that enable a qualified individual with a disability to enjoy the same benefits and privileges of the aid.” AJC will make visible to participants that: o Section 188 implements the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of WIOA, which are contained in Section 188 of the statute. o Section 188 prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status, and gender identity), national origin (including LEP), age, disability, or political affiliation or belief, or against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship status or participation in any WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. o Section 188 also requires that reasonable accommodations be provided to qualified individuals with disabilities in certain circumstances. (Page 147) Title I

The guidelines for the development and submission of each grant recipient’s Local WIOA Plan included the requirement that recipients describe the steps they would take to ensure that communications with individuals with disabilities, including individuals with visual or hearing impairments, are as effective as communications with others. Additionally, to ensure staff are properly trained on topics related to EO, Maryland held its 3rd WIOA Convening in the winter of 2017 to unpack the WIOA Section 188 Nondiscrimination and subsequent guidance, overviewing topics such as the State Nondiscrimination Plan and Language Access Plan, compliance deadlines, Benchmarks of Success, WIOA target populations and priority of service, and cultural competency. In-depth topics included language access training, Equal Opportunity Officer Training, disability accessibility, the discrimination complaint process, understanding immigration and eligibility documents, and more. (Page 148) Title I

Maryland’s Nondiscrimination Plan fulfills the requirements of WIOA Section 188 and 29 CFR Part 38. The plan states that it is the policy of the State of Maryland to not discriminate against any individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, childbirth, and related medical conditions, transgender status, and gender identity), national origin (including LEP), age, disability, or political affiliation or belief, or against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship status or participation in any WIOA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. (Page 152) Title I

A day-long convening in 2017 unpacked the WIOA Section 188 Nondiscrimination and subsequent guidance. Workshops focused on topics such as the State Nondiscrimination Plan and Language Access Plan, compliance deadlines, Benchmarks, WIOA target populations and priority of service, and cultural competency. Language access training, Equal Opportunity Officer Training, disability accessibility, the discrimination complaint process, understanding immigration and eligibility documents, and other similar key topics were covered. In addition to the State-wide convenings, the State is looking towards online resources, as well. DLLR is working to develop a presence on the “The Hub” for virtual training and workforce system resources. “The Hub” is a learning management system available to all Maryland State agencies that is maintained by Maryland’s Department of Budget and Management (DBM). In 2017, DLLR utilized WIOA implementation funds to purchase licenses for this state learning management software for the benefit of local partners. The WIOA partners will use the Hub as the platform on which state and local partners, including Wagner-Peyser staff, will be able to access a variety of training modules and resources. “The Hub” has the capacity to create two home pages: one for DLLR-DWDAL internal training content and a second for content added by external partners. The external home page presents an excellent opportunity to facilitate improved service integration across the system. For example, each partner can post a “101” module that provides other partners with the basics on that organization’s mission, target audiences, resources, key initiatives, etc. (Page 157) Title I

Vets

For WIOA programs under DLLR’s oversight, in order to confirm compliance under Section 188, DWDAL state Regional Program Monitors will conduct an onsite review. Prior to the commencement of the visit, the Monitor will confirm with the Program Manager or Director that notification of the visit was received, staff are aware, and requested information prior to the visit is unchanged. The Program Monitor will observe the site’s triage system, confirm that appropriate federal signs are visible to participants, and examine the kiosk to confirm that appropriate WIOA, Veteran, ITA, and OJT information is available. A site walk-through will determine whether: o EO Law Posters are in plain sight, centrally located, in needed languages and provide state and local EO Officer contact information; o WIOA, Veteran, ITA, and OJT Literature are present; o EO tagline is inserted and correct; o TTY/TDD or Relay Service number is provided where phone numbers are listed; o Site is accessible, i.e. ADA compliant; o Disability entrance signage is present; o Entrance and parking lot are accessible; and o There are both Accessible stations and Assistive Technology. (Pages 149-150) Title I

Men and women who have served in the U.S. armed forces or who have been the spouses of service members have made significant sacrifices on behalf of the United States. In recognition of their service, and in accordance with the WIOA, the Jobs for Veterans Act of 2002[i] and the Veterans’ Benefits, Healthcare, and Information Technology Act of 2006[ii], Maryland is committed to prioritizing services to Veterans and spouses who meet the criteria for “covered persons.” Maryland’s workforce system must ensure that members of this population have access to services that enable them to qualify for, find, and keep good civilian jobs in occupations with career pathways. (Page 142) Title I

Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVERs) conduct outreach to local employers to assist Veterans in gaining employment. Outreach activities conducted by LVERs include: conducting seminars for employers, job search workshops, and facilitating access to occupational training, and placement services. The DVOPS and LVER roles have defined, differentiated duties that are designed to function in a complementary fashion. Both staff positions are dedicated resources for the exclusive purpose of serving Veterans, other eligible covered persons, transitioning service members, their spouses, and, indirectly, employers. DVOP staff assist veterans and other eligible veterans and other eligible persons with: • Finding a job, • Enrolling in training or applying for educational assistance (credential attainment); • Connecting to resources/information related to meeting immediate needs such as housing/food/mental health services. (Page 429) Title IV

On-the-job training (OJT) is training conducted by an employer that occurs while a participant is engaged in productive work. OJT optimizes the resources available under workforce development initiatives to meet the needs of employers and job seekers. Employers generally pay a reduced OJT wage (generally 40-50 percent of wages) to employ participants, while they train for the job. RA programs combine work-based learning and classroom training to help successful program completers obtain secure, full-time journeyman positions. DLLR’s Apprenticeship and Training Program offers over 100 active apprenticeship programs. The state measure the outcomes of these services through their MWE in the form of reports that are developed to measure the specific services for both the DVOP and AJC delivery system. (Page 436) Title IV

Mental Health

~~Maryland Statewide Independent Living Council
• Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council
• Maryland Mental Health Advisory Board
• Department of Health, Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Committee
Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities Under Executive Order 01.01.2007.13 (Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Students with Disabilities)
• The Maryland Coordinating Committee for Human Services Transportation
• Department of Health/Developmental Disabilities Administration, Maryland Department of Disabilities Employment First, The Maryland Library for the Blind, and Physically Handicapped Advisory Board
• Local Coordinating Councils
• Maryland Special Education state Advisory Committee (Page 244-245) Title I

DORS has also entered into a cooperative agreement with the Department of Health, Behavioral Health Administration. The cooperative agreement, most recently updated effective December 2011, addresses referrals between agencies and specifies shared responsibilities for funding of supported employment, as well as cross-training for staff. (Page 257) Title I

Information from the 2013 Comprehensive Needs Assessment noted that the utilization of mental health supported employment services varies by county. Additionally, a documented need was to examine longitudinal data to inform program development and staff and provider training. (Page 283) Title I

Information from CRPs that attended the public meetings indicated a need for employment services for students with mental health needs and a need for funding to develop programs not just fee-for-service. Areas for expansion include CRPs for the Deaf Blind, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Individuals with Blindness. These are also addressed in other areas within the needs assessment. (Page 313) Title IV

DORS has a strong partnership with Maryland’s mental health system related to Evidence-Based Practice in Supported Employment. This is based on overwhelming evidence that supported employment is the most effective route to competitive employment for consumers with severe mental illness. The partnership is characterized by streamlined access to VR services through guest access of VR counselors into the Behavioral Health Administration’s Administrative Service Organization’s case management system; presumption of eligibility for VR services for individuals determined eligible for Supported Employment through the Behavioral Health Administration; and adherence to principles of Evidence-based Practice in Supported Employment.
These principles include:
• Competitive employment is the goal.
• Eligibility for Evidence-Based Practice is based on consumer choice. Consumers are considered work ready when they say they want to work.
• Job search starts soon after a consumer expresses interest in working.
• Supported employment is integrated with treatment. Employment specialists have frequent meetings with the treatment team to integrate supported employment with mental health treatment. (DORS staff participation is critical to success.)
• Follow-along supports are continuous. Employment supports are never terminated unless the consumer directly requests it.
• Consumer preferences are important. Consumer preference plays a key role in determining the type of job that is sought, the nature of supports provided, and the decision about disability disclosure.
• Employment specialists practice systematic job development, based on consumer work preferences and face-to-face meetings with consumers, and gather information about job opportunities and assess whether they may be a good job fit for an individual. Employment specialists continue to make periodic visits to promote networking and achievement of employment.
• Personalized benefits planning is provided.  (Page 372) Title IV

Family Preservation represents a variety of programs available to families to provide supportive services to promote safety and well-being of children and their families. This includes families with identified stresses around family life, including disruption, child abuse and neglect issues, domestic violence, homelessness, substance abuse, mental health, physical health, and educational concerns, who are within 200 percent of the poverty level. The principal purpose behind these programs is to enable children to continue to live and thrive in their home with their parents or relatives. Each program is child safety based, goal oriented, family focused, flexible, provided in the home or community, culturally relevant and sensitive, and designed to build on family strengths and unity. Manageable caseload sizes and a team approach of social worker and case associate are an integral part of all services. Each service has designated timeframes, with the possibility for limited extensions when service goals have not been realized. Employment and self-sufficiency are program goals and part of the mutually agreed upon family service agreement. This program provides non-assistance. (Pages 401-402) Title IV

Maryland provides an extensive array of services to families and children under its Social Services Block Grant, Community Action Block Grant, Title IV-B State Plan, the Child and Maternal Health Block Grant, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Block Grant plans that are reasonably calculated to accomplish the third and fourth purposes of TANF. To the extent that the state expends state or local funds on these services that exceed available block grant funds, the state reserves the option to use TANF funds or TANF-MOE as appropriate and reported in the state’s fiscal reports subject to federal limitations. The funds claimed for these will be for non-assistance. (Page 410) Title IV

There are a variety of programs available to families to provide supportive services to promote safety and well-being of children and their families, promote stability and permanency, preserve family unity, and build empowerment, self-sufficiency, and psychosocial well- being. This includes families with identified stresses around family life, including disruption, child abuse and neglect issues, domestic violence, homelessness, substance abuse, mental health, physical health, and educational concerns. These programs help families by providing: protective services or potential protective services to families, family support through projects such as parenting classes and after school programs, and family preservation, through grants for Interagency Family Preservation Services and through other means as appropriate, such as by counseling families in crisis, referring them to other existing services, and providing a wide range of service to the family to maximize the chances the children grow up in safe, stable, and loving homes. The programs include, but are not limited to, Families Now, Intensive Family Services, Continuing Protective Services, Services to Families with Children, Kinship Care, Parent Aide Services, and those provided through Inter-Agency Agreements such as the Family Recovery Program. These programs prevent or reduce out-of-wedlock pregnancies and encourage the formation and maintenance of two parent families, since the ultimate goal of all of them is to provide a safe home for children in a stable, two-parent environment. These programs provide non-assistance. (Page 415- 416) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Maryland is thereby implementing an integrative UI/Workforce IT tool utilizing Geographic Solution, Inc.’s Reemployment Exchange Module (REX) to facilitate claimant job searches and return to work efforts. The REX Module was secured as an effective system connectivity integration solution for Maryland DUI and DWDAL. DUI’s legacy system, the Maryland Automated Benefit System (MABS), runs on a separate and distinct mainframe platform that was built in the early 1980s. This outdated system requires convoluted custom programs to be written in order to make minor changes to the system or develop system-to-system data sharing methodologies. The REX Module is comprised of progressive functionality components which will help boost service delivery efforts and facilitate the ultimate sharing of real-time information between staff and systems. REX will immediately display suitable job openings to claimants that closely match their recent/past employment, educational background, desired occupation, and skill set; automatically create a reemployment roadmap designed to help the claimant obtain employment; display real time Labor Market Information to help claimants make intelligent sources and provide claimants real-time access to a comprehensive list of openings repeatedly upon entering the system; allow claimants to enter job search contact information within the system; send system-generated alert notifications to claimants when they are not meeting work search requirements/established thresholds; monitor and notify claimants as to whether they have active online resume and virtual recruiters; and allow staff to view claimants’ ongoing work search status. (Page 453) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 92

Medicaid Funded Long-Term Care Services - 03/29/2020

“This program area administers and operates Maryland's Long-Term Care Medicaid program, Coordination of Community Services, Community First Choice (CFC). CFC Supports Planners and Nurse Monitors provide a continuum of services designed to allow people of all ages and in need of long-term care to live in the community, rather than in institutions. Adult Evaluation and Review Services (AERS) provides mandatory medical evaluations for clients seeking these services and for those referred by Adult Protective Services. In addition, this program area provides service coordination to eligible young people funded under the Maryland Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Autism Waiver Program).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Special Needs Housing - 03/26/2020

“FUNCTION

 

The vision of the staff of Services to End and Prevent Homelessness (SEPH) is a community where all persons have access to safe, affordable housing, and the opportunity to achieve a higher quality of life. The mission of SEPH is to make homelessness a rare, brief, and non-recurring event by operating from a Housing First philosophy. Housing First recognizes that people are most successful when they have choice in housing and seeks to eliminate barriers such as sobriety requirements or treatment compliance. SEPH provides a full continuum of services including housing stabilization, homeless diversion, and permanent housing; and employs evidence-based and promising practices. The mission cannot be achieved without collaborating with public and private partners through the Interagency Commission on Homelessness. Special needs populations include veterans, both individuals and families, persons with behavioral health challenges, individuals with developmental disabilities, and transitioning youth, and seniors with disabilities experiencing or at risk of homelessness.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Transition Services - 03/25/2020

“The Maryland School for the Blind’s Transition program assists students and their families as they prepare to leave school and move to:

Post-secondary educationVocational trainingIntegrated employment (including supported employment)Continuing educationAdult servicesIndependent livingCommunity participation

As students complete their educational entitlement programs, they enter the adult service world of eligibility, where individuals may be deemed eligible for services based on agency guidelines and funding availability.  Establishing linkages with adult funding agencies such as the Developmental Disabilities Administrations (DDA) and the Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) is an integral part of transitioning and learning to navigate the adult service world.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs Annual Report - 01/17/2020

“According to the most recent USDVA data projections (FY2019), there were an estimated 371,000 veterans living in Maryland. To help address the challenges facing Maryland Veterans as they retire or return home from military service the Department continues to provide safety nets, wherever possible, to enhance services provided by the USDVA and the U.S. Department of Defense…

In Fiscal Year 2019, The Service Program submitted 4,917 disability compensation and pension claims for adjudication to the USDVA. Maryland veterans received almost $34 million dollars in new/increased and one-time monthly cash benefits with support from this program. Charlotte Hall Veterans Home continues to provide quality assisted living and skilled nursing services to our aging and disabled veterans, along with eligible spouses. Their most recent 2019 year to date census reached 88% capacity. This year the Maryland Veterans Trust Fund distributed over $126,000 in grants to Maryland veterans and eligible dependents.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

VA Maryland Health Care System - 01/14/2020

“The Perry Point VA Medical Center provides a broad range of inpatient, outpatient and primary care services. As the largest inpatient facility in the VA Maryland Health Care System, the medical center provides inpatient medical, intermediate and long-term care programs, including nursing home care, rehabilitation services, geriatric evaluation and management, respite care, chronic ventilator care and hospice care.

The Perry Point VA Medical Center is a leader in providing comprehensive mental health care to Maryland’s Veterans.  The medical center offers long and short-term inpatient and outpatient mental health care, including the following specialized treatment programs:

Mental Health Intensive Case Management Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center Health Improvement Program Family Intervention Team Outpatient Trauma & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Program Substance Abuse Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Domiciliary Residential Rehabilitation Treatment (for Homeless Veterans) Compensated Work Therapy – Transitional Residence”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

WIOA Annual Report 2018 - 12/02/2019

“This publication illustrates Maryland’s successful job placement and training activities for the period of  July 1, 2018, through June 30, 2019, as required by U.S. Department of  Labor’s Training and Employment Guidance Letter No. 5-18.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

Annual Maryland Transition Conference 2019 - 11/07/2019

~~“Help us celebrate the partnerships between public vocational rehabilitation, community organizations, and the Maryland workforce partners that create successful outcomes for Marylanders with disabilities who want to work.Mark your calendars for November 7 and 8, 2019.  This year's venue is the Sheraton Baltimore North, in Towson, Maryland.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Transition Resource Guide - 11/01/2019

“This guide provides tips and resources to help plan for adulthood and life after high school. Get ready to consider choices, explore options, and take action to prepare for your future.“ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Works Programs & Initiatives - 10/17/2019

"‘[Maryland Works is] a statewide membership association that expands employment and business ownership opportunities for people with disabilities and other barriers to employment.

Our Programs & Initiatives:

We are organized into three programs that provide services and support for organizations, career counseling professionals, and individuals with disabilities.The Provider Network is comprised of nonprofit community-based organizations that offer quality training, employment, and other services for people with disabilities.The Workforce Network is made up of a wide range of workforce development and other career counseling professionals.

The Employment Works Program creates quality employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities while providing the State of Maryland with high-quality services and commodities”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Code of Maryland Regulations Sec. 10.22.12.12. Admission to and Discharge from DDA Community-Funded Services - 07/03/2019

~~“(1) Only those individuals seeking DDA-funded services and who have been deemed eligible by the DDA in accordance with Regulations .05-.10 of this chapter may be served by community service providers in DDA-funded vacancies or with DDA-funded support services.

(2) Each provider shall report all DDA-funded vacancies to the appropriate regional office in accordance with a DDA-approved procedure, as soon as the potential vacancy is known to the provider.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Maryland Minimum Wage Act of 2014 (HB 0295/CH0262) - 07/01/2018

“Incrementally increasing the State minimum wage rate to $10.10 beginning July 1, 2018; authorizing specified employers to pay employees under the age of 20 years a specified wage under specified circumstances; requiring the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to increase reimbursement of community providers serving individuals with developmental disabilities; requiring the Governor, in specified fiscal years, to include in a specified budget proposal specified funding increases; etc.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

SB 0344/HB0448 “Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program - Account Clarifications” - 04/11/2017

~~“Clarifying that a specified amount may be contributed in each calendar year to an account for a disabled individual under the Maryland Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program; providing that contributions to an ABLE account may not exceed a specified maximum amount; and requiring the Maryland 529 Board to adopt specified procedures to ensure that specified contributions to ABLE accounts do not exceed a specified maximum limit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

HB 420/SB 417: Ken Capone Equal Employment Act (EEA) - 05/19/2016

MDLC Board member Ken Capone, People on the Go, MDLC, and other advocates and coalition partners led this strong and successful effort to abolish the payment of subminimum wages to people with disabilities in Maryland. Like SB 765, the bill will become a national model when signed into law and make Maryland the second U.S. state to eliminate this discriminatory exception to Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. The EEA will phase out “sheltered workshops” that pay people as little as pennies per hour and require the Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration to implement a 4-year transition plan to move individuals from segregated day programs to competitive integrated employment. MDLC participates on the Employment First Steering Committee that is developing the policies and infrastructure to support transition to competitive integrated employment.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

HB 431/SB 355: ABLE Act - 04/12/2016

 Federal law enacted in December 2014 authorized states to establish tax-advantaged savings program to help people with disabilities save limited amounts for disability-related expenses (such as health care, assistive technology, education, employment supports and housing) without losing eligibility for certain public benefits. Maryland legislation enacted in 2015 established the ABLE Task Force to make recommendations for an ABLE Program, resulting in this year’s bill. College Savings Plans of Maryland and the Maryland Department of Disabilities and will co-manage the program. Governor Hogan committed $745,000 for program start-up costs and signed the legislation into law on April 12, 2016.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Maryland HB 473 - 05/12/2015

Altering the amount of a credit against specified State taxes for wages and child care or transportation expenses related to qualified employees with disabilities; and applying the Act to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2014.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Citations

An Act Concerning Reasonable Accommodations For Disabilities Due to Pregnancy (HB804/SB784) - 04/08/2013

“[The Act] will require employers with more than 15 employees to provide reasonable accommodations to workers experiencing a disability caused or contributed by pregnancy. […] The Act prohibits an employer from refusing to make a reasonable accommodation for the known disability of a worker that is caused by pregnancy […]” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Hogan Administration Proclaims November Hire A Veteran Month - 11/01/2018

~~“Governor Larry Hogan has signed an official proclamation designating November as “Hire A Veteran” Month in Maryland. The month-long observance raises awareness of veteran employment opportunities, and familiarizes citizens, business, and others with the many workforce services available to veteran jobseekers and employers.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 01.01.2017.23 Maryland Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/10/2017

“Now, therefore, I, Lawrence J. Hogan, Jr., Governor of the State of Maryland, by virtue of the power invested in my by the constitution and the laws of Maryland, declare the following:

 

Each State department, board, agency, authority, board, or instrumentality controlled by the Governor (an “Executive unit”) shall annually observe October as Disability Employment Awareness Month to celebrate the many and varied contributions of people with disabilities.The Department of Disabilities […] shall: reinforce the value and talents people with disabilities add to Maryland’s workplaces and communitiesIncreasing public awarenessTo promote individuals with disabilities’ access to technology”

 

Rescinds Executive Order 01.01.2009.10

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Executive Order 01.01.2009.10 Maryland Disability History and Awareness Month - 07/26/2009

“Now, therefore, I, Martin O’Malley, Governor of the State of Maryland […] hereby proclaim the following executive order, effective immediately.

State of Maryland Executive Branch agencies shall annually observe October as Disability History and Awareness Month.

The Department of Disabilities shall take steps to increase public awareness of the history of disabilities and the disability rights movement […]

The Maryland State Department of Education shall encourage and assist local boards of education to provide instruction in the history of disabilities, people with disabilities, and the disability rights movement during the observance of Disability History Awareness Month.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Executive Order 01.01.2007.13 - 08/02/2007

"It is the policy of the State of Maryland to ensure a smooth and effective transition for all students with disabilities from secondary education to adult services such as postsecondary education and employment; and to provide transition planning for students and families that is student focused and family-centered, based on individual strengths and needs, utilizes best practices, and leads to outcomes in the most integrated setting appropriate; and It is deemed necessary to establish an Interagency Transition Council to recommend policies and identify the funding requirements to ensure effective, efficient, and comprehensive delivery of services that will most effectively meet the transition needs of Maryland students with disabilities."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 10 of 26

Special Needs Housing - 03/26/2020

“FUNCTION

 

The vision of the staff of Services to End and Prevent Homelessness (SEPH) is a community where all persons have access to safe, affordable housing, and the opportunity to achieve a higher quality of life. The mission of SEPH is to make homelessness a rare, brief, and non-recurring event by operating from a Housing First philosophy. Housing First recognizes that people are most successful when they have choice in housing and seeks to eliminate barriers such as sobriety requirements or treatment compliance. SEPH provides a full continuum of services including housing stabilization, homeless diversion, and permanent housing; and employs evidence-based and promising practices. The mission cannot be achieved without collaborating with public and private partners through the Interagency Commission on Homelessness. Special needs populations include veterans, both individuals and families, persons with behavioral health challenges, individuals with developmental disabilities, and transitioning youth, and seniors with disabilities experiencing or at risk of homelessness.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Veterans

Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs Annual Report - 01/17/2020

“According to the most recent USDVA data projections (FY2019), there were an estimated 371,000 veterans living in Maryland. To help address the challenges facing Maryland Veterans as they retire or return home from military service the Department continues to provide safety nets, wherever possible, to enhance services provided by the USDVA and the U.S. Department of Defense…

In Fiscal Year 2019, The Service Program submitted 4,917 disability compensation and pension claims for adjudication to the USDVA. Maryland veterans received almost $34 million dollars in new/increased and one-time monthly cash benefits with support from this program. Charlotte Hall Veterans Home continues to provide quality assisted living and skilled nursing services to our aging and disabled veterans, along with eligible spouses. Their most recent 2019 year to date census reached 88% capacity. This year the Maryland Veterans Trust Fund distributed over $126,000 in grants to Maryland veterans and eligible dependents.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

VA Maryland Health Care System - 01/14/2020

“The Perry Point VA Medical Center provides a broad range of inpatient, outpatient and primary care services. As the largest inpatient facility in the VA Maryland Health Care System, the medical center provides inpatient medical, intermediate and long-term care programs, including nursing home care, rehabilitation services, geriatric evaluation and management, respite care, chronic ventilator care and hospice care.

The Perry Point VA Medical Center is a leader in providing comprehensive mental health care to Maryland’s Veterans.  The medical center offers long and short-term inpatient and outpatient mental health care, including the following specialized treatment programs:

Mental Health Intensive Case Management Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery Center Health Improvement Program Family Intervention Team Outpatient Trauma & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Program Substance Abuse Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Domiciliary Residential Rehabilitation Treatment (for Homeless Veterans) Compensated Work Therapy – Transitional Residence”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

WIOA Annual Report 2018 - 12/02/2019

“This publication illustrates Maryland’s successful job placement and training activities for the period of  July 1, 2018, through June 30, 2019, as required by U.S. Department of  Labor’s Training and Employment Guidance Letter No. 5-18.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Apprenticeship
  • Veterans
  • WIOA

Maryland Transition Resource Guide - 11/01/2019

“This guide provides tips and resources to help plan for adulthood and life after high school. Get ready to consider choices, explore options, and take action to prepare for your future.“ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Code of Maryland Regulations Sec. 10.22.12.12. Admission to and Discharge from DDA Community-Funded Services - 07/03/2019

~~“(1) Only those individuals seeking DDA-funded services and who have been deemed eligible by the DDA in accordance with Regulations .05-.10 of this chapter may be served by community service providers in DDA-funded vacancies or with DDA-funded support services.

(2) Each provider shall report all DDA-funded vacancies to the appropriate regional office in accordance with a DDA-approved procedure, as soon as the potential vacancy is known to the provider.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Maryland Governor’s Transitioning Youth Initiative (GTYI) - 06/12/2019

~~“Transitioning Youth comprise a special category of eligibility and priority for services. Through the Governor's Transitioning Youth Initiative the DDA, in collaboration with the Division of Rehabilitative Services (DORS), has been able to fund supported employment and other day services for eligible graduating students who otherwise may not have received DDA services. Without the Initiative, students leaving the school system would be placed on a lengthy waiting list for adult services. The Governor's Transitioning Youth Initiative earmarks funds in the DDA budget for eligible students leaving school, regardless of the severity of their situation and their relative need for immediate services.” 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act Local Integrated Plan 2016-2020 (2019 Update) - 05/30/2019

~~“The Prince George’s County Local Workforce Development Board (WDB) is the responsible entity for policydevelopment and workforce activities related to administering services and programs funded by the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act of 2014. The WDB is the link between job seekers looking to begin or change careers and businesses looking for skilled workers to maintain their productivity and competitiveness in a changing labor market.

This plan, updated in 2019, describes the mission, vision, goals and strategies the WDB will implement through 2020 to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the Prince George's County Public Workforce System, support the work of the WDB’s partners, and align with the Governors State WIOA Plan. Additionally, this plan outlines the programs and initiatives the WDB has supported and intends to employ, through competitively procured operators, service providers and partners operating the Prince George’s County Public Workforce System.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

FY20 Operating Budget; Department of Health and Human Services - 05/13/2019

~~“Community Support Network for People with Disabilities:Provides services that enable persons to remain in their home or the least restrictive setting. Assistance to clients with developmental disabilities and their families. Coordinate and monitor services and Supports for people eligible for services through the State Developmental Disabilities (DD) Administration. Service coordination to young people funded under the Autism Waiver Program. Provides financial assistance to State-funded DD providers. Funds the My Turn program for children with DD aged 3 to 13. Administers Customized Employment Public Intern Program. Conducts site visits to group homes that serve DD clients. Monitors contracts for services for people with disabilities, including visual and hearing impairments.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Developmental Disabilities Administration Employment First Webinar Meaningful Day Service Updates and Alignment - 01/01/2019

~~Overview:•Services, systems, and values are realigning to support competitive integrated employment and community participation outcomes•Services are being designed to provide a flow of services that can lead to outcomes of competitive integrated employment and/or meaningful community participation•Services are not meant to be used as respite or daycare, but instead, are habilitative in nature” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Workforce Solutions to Address Maryland’s Opioid Crisis “Policy Status Update on Employer Engagement Strategies” - 02/14/2019

~~“A key element of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and affiliated workforce programs is to strengthen employer engagement in the workforce system and to ensure employers have an active role in workforce system activities. The purpose of this section is to share information related to promising practices and strategies that have strengthened existing employer partnerships. Report the efforts that have been undertaken to receive feedback from local area employers to identify their employee pipeline needs and engage local employers to interview, assess, train, and/or hire program participants."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

DDA & DORS: Partners in Employment First - 11/03/2018

~~“Excerpts from June 21, 2018 Memorandum of Understanding:DDA & DORS will “Use the Employment First approach and establish and promote a goal that all persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) who want to work in the community will be afforded an opportunity to pursue competitive integrated employment that allows them to work the maximum number of hours consistent with their abilities and preferences.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council “2017 Legislative Overview” - 04/01/2017

~~“DDA FY2018 Budget Expansion: Approximately 789 young adults with developmental disabilities leaving school will receive employment or other day services. DDA projects that 100% of transitioning youth will receive this support.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities - 09/30/2016

~~"The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities.  “

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

“Governor’s Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities” - 09/30/2016

“The primary responsibility of the IATC is to review, revise and update annually the Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities to ensure effective interagency planning and delivery of services for secondary students with disabilities. Additionally, the IATC is tasked with identifying and reporting activities of each partner which impact the delivery, quality and availability of transition services. The IATC also serves in an advisory capacity to all transition-related federal grants.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

FY2017 Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities - 07/01/2016

This is a document of the approved goals for students with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to post-secondary school or employment. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

MD Governor’s Interagency Transition Council (IATC) - 08/02/2007

~~The Interagency Transition Council for Youth with Disabilities (IATC) is a partnership of State and local government agencies, educators, family members and advocates. The IATC's purpose is to help improve the policies and practices that affect Maryland students with disabilities preparing to transition from high school to adult services, college, employment, and independent living. It meets at least four times a year and regularly creates and reviews an Interagency State Plan for Transitioning Youth with Disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Customized Employment Project

The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work.

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Coalition of Families

~~" Founded by a coalition of family support organizations, MCF was incorporated in 1999 as a nonprofit organization. MCF changed its name from "Maryland Coalition of Families for Children’s Mental Health" to the "Maryland Coalition of Families" in 2016. MCF is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors comprised of at least 51% adult caregivers of a child or adolescent with a diagnosable emotional or behavioral disability. All of our family support staff are parents who have cared for a loved one with behavioral health needs and have been trained to help other families. “
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Learning Links - About Us

~~“Maryland Learning Links is the Maryland State Department of Education, Division of Early Intervention and Special Education Services’ (DEI/SES) online portal providing educators and leaders with the special education resources, guidance, and professional learning resources they need to improve outcomes and narrow the gap for students with disabilities.

The DEI/SES provides leadership, accountability, technical assistance, and resource management to local school systems, public agencies, and stakeholders through a seamless, comprehensive system of coordinated services to children and students with disabilities, birth through 21, and their families.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Medicaid Funded Long-Term Care Services - 03/29/2020

“This program area administers and operates Maryland's Long-Term Care Medicaid program, Coordination of Community Services, Community First Choice (CFC). CFC Supports Planners and Nurse Monitors provide a continuum of services designed to allow people of all ages and in need of long-term care to live in the community, rather than in institutions. Adult Evaluation and Review Services (AERS) provides mandatory medical evaluations for clients seeking these services and for those referred by Adult Protective Services. In addition, this program area provides service coordination to eligible young people funded under the Maryland Home and Community Based Services Waiver for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Autism Waiver Program).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Employment: Transforming & Improving Practices, Customized Technical Assistance (TIP) Grants - 01/01/2018

“Council Goal: Children and adults with developmental disabilities meaningfully participate in all facets of community life, and are valued and supported by their communities.

 

Council Objectives: Increase community-based employment opportunities for people with developmental disabilities, including people with significant support needs.

 

In collaboration with people with developmental disabilities, their families, and stakeholders, increase opportunities for people with developmental disabilities living in rural areas to find and maintain employment by reducing barriers unique to rural areas.

 

Goals of Initiative: This purpose of this initiative is to improve the employment outcomes of people with developmental disabilities and to support them in having meaningful days when not working. Grants will build the capacity of community service providers licensed by the Developmental Disabilities Administration.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Maryland PROMISE - 01/01/2018

~~“MD Transitioning Youth with Disabilities provided enhanced and coordinated services and supports to Maryland youth between the ages 14 -16 who received Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Such services and supports included:• Transition planning• Financial planning and benefits management• Employment and post-secondary education preparation activities• Social and health linkages (for example, self-advocacy, youth development activities, health and wellness information)All services and supports were customized to the individual youth and services provided by Maryland PROMISE were also extended to family members.The primary goal of the state initiative was to assist youth recipients achieve better post-school outcomes, including graduating from high school readiness for college and a career, completing post-secondary education and job training, and obtaining competitive employment in an integrated setting. More about Maryland PROMISE is available by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Maryland’s Disability Employment Initiative - 07/17/2017

Purpose: To provide policy guidance on Maryland’s Disability Employment Initiative

 

“The U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL)’s Employment and Training Administration and Office of Disability

Employment Policy jointly fund Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) projects to provide an opportunity for

states to improve meaningful participation of youth and adults with disabilities, including individuals with significant disabilities, in the workplace.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

14(c) Certificate Program Resources - 01/21/2017

~~“This page is a list of links about the 14(C) subminimum wage program including a Q&A about career counseling for workers earning less than minimum wage and benefits planning services for subminimum wage workers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Innovations in Maryland’s Local Workforce Plans A BEST PRACTICES GUIDE - 01/01/2017

~~“Title IV: Vocational Rehabilitation Services - Department of Rehabilitative Services (DORS)

DORS prepares people with disabilities to go to work and helps them to stay on the job. Rehabilitation counselors in DORS Region 5 field offices in Baltimore County provide or arrange for services that may include career counseling, assistive technology, vocational training and/or job placement assistance. DORS staff have specific areas of expertise to work with populations with significant disabilities. There are technical specialists who work with individuals with chronic illness, learning disabilities, traumatic brain injury, orthopedic issues, and intellectual disabilities.

In addition to services delivered via field offices, DORS also contracts with CCBC’s Center for Alternative and Supported Education (CASE). CASE’s Single Step program serves approximately 100 to 200 Baltimore County DORS participants annually who have cognitive, developmental, and mental health disabilities, providing academic, pre-vocational, social and independent living skills for students with special needs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council Webinar: “Everything You Wanted to Know about DDA but Were Afraid to Ask” - 11/14/2016

“Schools are required to begin transition planning for students at age 14. With new Service options* available it is important to start early, educate yourself on new models and options, visit programs, and let your IEP team know about the new options. Schools are required to invite DORS to the IEP meeting beginning at age 18 and any other relevant entity. Ask your local Coordination of Community Service agency to attend the IEP meeting to ensure there are links between the school and the DDA system.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

“Transforming and Improving Practices through Customized Technical Assistance (TIP) Grants” - 10/03/2016

“The purpose of this initiative is to improve the employment outcomes of people with developmental disabilities by building the capacity of community service providers licensed by the Developmental Disabilities Administration. Through customized technical assistance by subject matter experts, providers will improve the way services are provided so that more people with developmental disabilities are supported to get and keep the meaningful work they want in their communities and to have meaningful days when not working. All grant recipients will participate in a learning community to share their efforts to improve employment outcomes and receive mutual peer support.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

Montgomery County, MD Customized Employment Intern Project (MCPIP) - 10/09/2015

An example of a successful County program serving individuals with significant disabilities is the Montgomery County Customized Employment Public Intern Project (MCPIP). Created in 2007, MCPIP provides flexible employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities to fulfill the work requirements of County departments. Department representatives work with a customized employment career specialist to identify and create part-time positions based on a department’s workforce needs. 

MCPIP participants serve as paid interns in department positions based on their individual job interests, skills and competencies. MCPIP interns gain valuable work experience by developing on-the-job skills to help them compete for County merit positions or opportunities in other organizations

Maryland’s Montgomery County government has adopted a policy to create internships for career seekers with significant disabilities, based on a Customized Employment (CE) strategy. This demand-driven CE policy creates the position for a CE Specialist at TransCen, Inc., a local workforce development intermediary, to conduct an analysis of a department’s need within the Montgomery County government.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Customized Employment Project

~~"The Maryland Department of Disabilities and the Developmental Disabilities Administration recently announced a partnership with five providers of vocational services throughout the state to implement a two-year initiative aimed at addressing employment barriers for job seekers with developmental disabilities. The Maryland Customized Employment Project, funded through Kessler Foundation of New Jersey, represents a collaboration among state agencies, service providers, and the business community. The goal of the project is to increase the training of support staff in proven methods of customized employment strategies which lead to long term, competitive community work."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 19

Transition Services - 03/25/2020

“The Maryland School for the Blind’s Transition program assists students and their families as they prepare to leave school and move to:

Post-secondary educationVocational trainingIntegrated employment (including supported employment)Continuing educationAdult servicesIndependent livingCommunity participation

As students complete their educational entitlement programs, they enter the adult service world of eligibility, where individuals may be deemed eligible for services based on agency guidelines and funding availability.  Establishing linkages with adult funding agencies such as the Developmental Disabilities Administrations (DDA) and the Division of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) is an integral part of transitioning and learning to navigate the adult service world.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Annual Maryland Transition Conference 2019 - 11/07/2019

~~“Help us celebrate the partnerships between public vocational rehabilitation, community organizations, and the Maryland workforce partners that create successful outcomes for Marylanders with disabilities who want to work.Mark your calendars for November 7 and 8, 2019.  This year's venue is the Sheraton Baltimore North, in Towson, Maryland.”

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Maryland Works Programs & Initiatives - 10/17/2019

"‘[Maryland Works is] a statewide membership association that expands employment and business ownership opportunities for people with disabilities and other barriers to employment.

Our Programs & Initiatives:

We are organized into three programs that provide services and support for organizations, career counseling professionals, and individuals with disabilities.The Provider Network is comprised of nonprofit community-based organizations that offer quality training, employment, and other services for people with disabilities.The Workforce Network is made up of a wide range of workforce development and other career counseling professionals.

The Employment Works Program creates quality employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities while providing the State of Maryland with high-quality services and commodities”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Low Intensity Support Service (LISS) Program Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) - 06/30/2019

~~“The DDA’s Low Intensity Support Services (LISS) program serves children and adults with DD/IDD living at home with their family, or adults with DD living in their own home in the community.• It is flexible to meet the needs of children, adults and their families as they grow and change across the lifespan.• Provides up to $2,000 to assist children, adults and their families with purchasing services and/or items to address their needs, and,• Enhances or improves the person’s or family’s quality of life and promotes independence and community integration.More information about the application process is available on our website." 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Maryland Employment First Summit - Oct. 11, 2019 - 06/18/2019

~~“October is Disability Employment Awareness month. To help us celebrate and learn together, please mark your calendars for the Developmental Disability Administration's (DDA) annual Employment First Summit on Friday, Oct. 11.                                                    Join us to receive Employment First updates, messages from collaboration partners, and guest speakers highlighting success stories and best practices in Employment First. More information will be sent out in the coming weeks, including a registration link; so stay tuned!” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Benefits and Claims Assistance - 06/05/2019

~~This document is a list of organizations that provide benefits and claims assistance services for veterans.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Assistive Technology - 05/16/2019

~~This document is a list of organizations that provide assistive technology services for persons with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Mental / Behavioral Health Resources - 05/15/2019

~~This document is a list of organizations that provide help, including employment services, for persons with mental health disabilities

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Resource Leveraging

Project HIRE Disability Apprenticeship Program - 04/03/2019

~~“Project HIRE, an apprenticeship program, which provides individuals with developmental and/or intellectual disabilities between the ages of 18 and 25 a meaningful paid job training experience with a Prince George’s County Government agency. 

Participants will be placed within a Host County agency for a period of one year and during this time they will have an opportunity to enhance current skills, learn new skills, and gain on the job work experience.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Compass, Inc. - 01/01/2019

~~“Compass, Inc. exists to support individuals with developmental disabilities and their families to live the lives they desire in communities of their choice. To fulfill this mission, we are fully committed to upholding the goals and principals shared with the Developmental Disabilities Administration that every individual will have the freedom to make choices, the supports they need to live the life they choose, authority over services and supports, responsibility for organizing resources, and the aspiration and drive to live as responsible, contributing members of their communities.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

United States vs. Baltimore County, MD - 08/07/2012

The decree requires the County to  adopt new policies and procedures regarding the administration of medical examinations and inquiries and provide training on the ADA to all current supervisory employees and all employees who participate in making personnel decisions

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Provider Types Enrolled - 01/22/2019

~~“For Medicaid providers:1.All provider types must be managed by their Medicaid provider type identifier which includes (Exhibit3: Provider Matrix)…Specialized providers to serve children and adolescents in the 1915(i) State Plan Amendment (SPA) program described in more detail in Sec. 2.3.11Special Projects/New Initiatives” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Maryland Medicaid Community Options Waiver (formerly Waiver for Older Adults) - 01/01/2018

“Until recently, the Maryland Community Options Medicaid Waiver was called the Waiver for Older Adults. That program and the Living at Home Medicaid Waiver are now merged under this new title. This waiver is also called the Home and Community-Based Options (HCBO) Waiver and, in this article, it is referred to as simply the CO Waiver.

 

The new CO waiver allows elderly individuals and those with physical disabilities who need nursing home level care to receive care services in their home or a group living community facility instead. Group living communities can include assisted living residences, provided they are participating in the program and willing to accept the Medicaid payment rates.

 

The CO Waiver is popular both with families and the state of Maryland, but for different reasons. Participants generally prefer to remain living at home for as long as possible; this waiver assists them in doing so. The cost of caring for someone at home is also less expensive for the state than it would be to place the individual in a nursing home. This is because home care utilizes caregiving assistance from family members.

 

Maryland Medicaid programs in general are sometimes referred to as Medical Assistance (MA).”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

1115 HealthChoice Waiver Renewal - 01/01/2017

~The Maryland Department of Health (the Department) is proposing an amendment to its §1115 demonstration waiver known as HealthChoice, which the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has authorized through December 31, 2021. HealthChoice, first implemented in 1997 under the authority of §1115 of the Social Security Act, is Maryland’s statewide mandatory managed care program for Medicaid enrollees. Under HealthChoice, eligible families and individuals are required to enroll in a managed care organization (MCO) that has been approved by the Department. Each MCO is responsible for ensuring that HealthChoice enrollees have access to a network of medical providers that can meet their health needs.

The State’s 30-day public comment period was open from May 21, 2018 through June 19, 2018. The draft waiver amendment application is available here. The final submitted waiver amendment application is available here. Hard copies of the application may be obtained by calling (410) 767-5677.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

MD HCBS Transition Plan - 09/02/2016

Maryland receives funding from the federal government to help pay for services provided in programs such as the Autism, Brain Injury, Community Pathways, Community Options, Model, and Medical Day Waivers and a program that helps children, youth and families. Last year, the federal government put out new rules that states must follow to continue to receive funding to pay for services. Maryland reviewed programs and found areas that do not meet the rules and must be changed. This plan gives information about the new rules; the States review of programs and the plan to fix areas; and input received from various stakeholders like participants, family members, self-advocates, and others.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)