Nebraska

States - Big Screen

With the right level of focus on Employment First systems-change efforts, individuals with disabilities could be living "The Good Life" in the state of Nebraska.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nebraska’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,920,076
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0%
Change from
2016 to 2017
112,418
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.73%
Change from
2016 to 2017
55,391
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.73%
Change from
2016 to 2017
49.27%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
84.97%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 1,896,190 1,907,116 1,920,076
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 101,734 112,418 112,418
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 49,485 53,323 55,391
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 858,156 855,042 869,515
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 48.64% 47.43% 49.27%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 83.42% 83.88% 84.97%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.00% 3.20% 2.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.80% 19.10% 16.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 11.80% 10.40% 10.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 106,683 116,916 117,474
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 102,638 105,995 110,026
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 187,720 197,997 201,170
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,733 11,017 11,927
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 12,277 13,793 16,956
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,320 2,961 2,323
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,650 2,325 2,643
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 2,743 4,846 6,032
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 2,121 3,338 3,008

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,062 3,058 2,989
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 11.70% 11.70% 11.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 42,162 41,726 41,249

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,237 4,944 4,696
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 8,451 8,405 8,295
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 15,165 15,398 14,708
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 34.50% 32.10% 31.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.30% 5.40% 6.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.00% 7.40% 704.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.00% 0.70% 0.70%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 54.10% 51.10% 46.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 605 652 748
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 801 895 911
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 115 79 90
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 6,163 6,189 5,628

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,250 4,143 5,183
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.06 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 27 15
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 11 19 11
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 92.00% 70.00% 73.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.59 1.00 0.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,260
2,974
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 2 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 243 215 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 613 546 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 970 855 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 889 765 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 543 578 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 39.90% 39.90% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,715 1,429 1,547
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 61,150 61,781 61,638
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 74 79 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 190 182 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,134,000 $537,000 $573,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $34,020,000 $10,958,000 $10,410,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $113,941,000 $114,306,000 $115,596,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $84,723,000 $8,261,000 $8,744,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 4.00% 2.00% 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,546 760 768
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,011 929 876
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,551 3,535 3,533
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 8.90 5.50 5.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 76.07% 75.54% 76.75%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 6.36% 6.62% 6.68%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.22% 2.12% 2.08%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 92.25% 100.00% 89.41%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 37.05% 34.96% 38.16%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.79% 62.86% 61.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 85.01% 82.43% 78.69%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.74% 27.90% 23.68%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 165,689
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 251
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 73,915
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 88,454
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 162,369
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 82
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 167
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 249
AbilityOne wages (products). $791,551
AbilityOne wages (services). $849,657

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 10 8 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 14 10 13
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 2 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,070 469 456
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 49 32 32
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,122 503 490

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~Impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA and Nebraska’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, lead to the conclusion that an emphasis on Customized Employment can increase the opportunities for successful employment and expanded partnerships with employers. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, Nebraska is receiving intensive technical assistance and training from the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) in the following areas: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. (Page 156) Title I

Increase our capacity to provide customized employment services and options to consumers and employers. Nebraska VR is one of the states selected to receive technical assistance under the JD-VR TAC. The impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA, and the agency’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, point to an increased emphasis on Customized Employment. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, there are two areas of need for intensive technical assistance and training to be provided: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach; and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. The JD-VR TAC will work with Nebraska VR to increase our capacity to provide customized employment services through the provision of training and technical assistance. The expected outcomes are:
 An increase in the number and type of businesses adopting a customized employment approach and establishing a CE job for an individual with a significant disability.
 An increase in the number of individuals with a significant disability, especially individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability, participating in competitive integrated employment.
 An increase in the quality of employment (as determined by the salary, benefits, number of hours worked, etc.). (Page 175) Title I

6. Improving performance
Strategies to improve the performance of the State with respect to the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA.
 Develop strategies in coordination with the appropriate core partners and participating Combined State Plan program partners once benchmarks are established.
 Implement the technical assistance and training on customized employment with VR staff and providers. Technical assistance will be provided by the Job-Driven VR Technical Assistance Center. (Page 186) Title I

The services made available by Nebraska VR using Title VI and Title I funds are limited to those initial services resulting in stable job performance in an integrated competitive work setting. These may include, as appropriate to individual needs:
1. An assessment of the need for supported employment services is supplementary to and provided after an assessment of eligibility and rehabilitation needs has been determined that a person is eligible for services and is a person with a most significant disability.
2. Development and placement in competitive integrated employment includes customized employment services for the maximum number of hours possible consistent with the person’s unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, and capabilities.
3. Intensive on-the-job skills training and other training provided by skilled job trainers, co-workers, and other qualified persons is based on a systematic analysis of the work to be performed, and a systematic analysis of the employer’s performance expectations and requirements. It is conducted in accordance with a written plan identifying the methods of teaching, instruction, and behavior management necessary to enable the individual to acquire skills and master the work to be performed, to regulate behavior in accordance with the employer’s requirements and expectations, and achieve stable job performance. The training provides for a systematic reduction of intensive teaching, instruction, and behavior management methods to the lowest intervention level necessary to maintain stable job performance. (Page 192-193) Title I

For the effort to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs (CRPs), NCBVI collaborates with a wide range of community partners statewide, working together to develop and improve services. Job coaching to Supported/customized Employment clients is provided through contracts with community rehabilitation programs. Agency staff members also work with CRPs and independent living centers to assure that services are coordinated and meeting the needs of Nebraskans with disabilities, especially those who are blind or visually impaired along with multiple disabilities. NCBVI partners with community rehabilitation programs (Martin Luther Homes, Quality Living) and other entities. In addition to services specific to individuals, collaboration on other projects occurs as the need and opportunity arise. The activities enable NCBVI to inform many persons about the services available to individuals who are blind, thus expanding opportunities to those who are, or who may become, eligible for services of the Vocational Rehabilitation or the Supported Employment program. The agency website is updated continuously and provides information to the public about available services and resources, avenues to apply for services, and ask questions, and so forth. Work is being done to enhance a social media presence with information and updates about NCBVI events, activities, and services. The agency collaborates with the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Developmental Disabilities services (NDHHS-DDD) to identify potential clients, coordinate service plans and share funding for those individuals in the System who are described as blind and visually impaired. (Page 214) Title I
 

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The Council is composed of 3 subcommittees: Client Services, Employment and Transition. Each SRC member selects a subcommittee to participate in based on their interests and background. These committees provide the Council members the opportunity to focus and provide feedback on topics relevant to their individual group.

 The Client Services Committee provided feedback on client satisfaction surveys, services to VR clients and recommended cultural awareness training and technical assistance on materials and outreach strategies directed toward Nebraskans who are deaf and hard of hearing and the Latino populations. The Client Services Committee formed the subcommittee, Consumer Input Committee, as another avenue to gather feedback and recommendations. The Consumer Input Committee consists of past and present clients of Nebraska VR. This year the Consumer Input Committee reviewed: 1) Discover the Job that Works for You booklet section Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) Important Information for You, 2) Application: section Understanding Your Rights as an Applicant, 3) Marketing: Magnet Promotional Item Survey and Nebraska VR bus advertisements, and 4) MyVR Survey.
 The Employment Committee selected the Entrepreneur of Distinction Annual Award winners, discussed and provided feedback on VR job placement services, job seeking training, Certificate Programs and Project Search.
 The Transition Committee focused on policies and procedures relating to high school aged clients and families including discussions on pre-employment transition services as defined in WIOA. (Page 147) Title I
 
 The Assistive Technology Partnership/Education receives funding from Nebraska VR for the AT Education Specialists to focus on transition youth and coordinate services with Nebraska VR offices. The Education Specialists host technology conferences, participate in self-advocacy workshops, provide AT demonstrations and individualized services and AT recommendations to transition youth across the state.
 Nebraska VR supports 17 Project SEARCH sites across the state. Consistent with the national model, Project SEARCH is a partnership between Nebraska VR, a business, area school systems, the Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Assistive Technology Partnership, and Division of Developmental Disabilities. The one year school-to-work program is business led and takes place entirely in the workplace. The experience includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. While completing the rotations, the students have the opportunity to gain transferable skills, practice self-advocacy and demonstrate work readiness. Nebraska’s Project SEARCH programs are hosted in a variety of businesses including hotels, hospitals, retail and distribution. (Pages 153-154) Title I

Work-based learning experiences
Many of the activities highlighted under (1) VR Services also enhance Nebraska VR’s transition services, including pre-employment transition services. For example, as the Business Account Managers are working with employers, opportunities for students and youth are also explored. These work-based learning opportunities may include informational interviews, job shadows, company tours, On-the-Job Evaluation and Training, internships, and placement assistance.
Certificate programs
For the past several years, Nebraska VR has developed and maintained Certificate Programs. These Certificate Programs provide hands-on training for students and youth with disabilities (adult VR clients may also enroll). The specialized training results from a partnership with local Nebraska VR service offices, three to five core business partners in the area, a community college and local schools. Students take classes, tour businesses and either work part-time or participate in an internship with employer partners. The programs are business-driven, short term, real life trainings that teach both technical hard skills and soft skills. Each training opportunity gives the students an opportunity to acquire the skills that they need to pursue in-demand jobs and careers. To date, the Certificate Programs offered include: Electrician Helper, Welding, Auto Mechanic Helper, Construction, HVAC Helper, Para-educator, and Community Health Worker. Nebraska VR will explore increasing the number of Certificate Programs available in the state. (Page 156) Title I

The one year school-to-work program is business led and takes place entirely in the workplace. The experience includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. While completing the rotations, the students have the opportunity to gain transferable skills, practice self-advocacy, and demonstrate work readiness. Nebraska’s Project SEARCH programs are hosted in a variety of businesses including hotels, hospitals, retail and distribution.

There are currently two Project SEARCH Business Advisory Councils (BAC) in Nebraska. The goal of the BAC is to broaden the program across a variety of industries, provide individuals with disabilities access to the resources they need to be successfully employed in a wide-range of fields and serve as a platform to further educate business professionals about the benefits of employing individuals with disabilities. The measurable goal is 100% employment of Project SEARCH intern participants. Between the two Nebraska BACs there are more than thirty businesses involved. Nebraska VR will consider increasing the number of Project SEARCH sites available in the state and will also consider the expansion of BACs. (Page 157) Title I

VR Rehabilitation Specialists make determinations and provide specialized direct services to persons with disabilities pursuing employment goals. Their responsibilities include: eligibility, Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) and amendment approval, IPE progress, and employment outcome determinations, community assessment, career counseling, disability awareness counseling, personal adjustment counseling, rehabilitation engineering, independent living skill training, personal management training, social skills training, job placement assistance, and job retention assistance. These activities generally require independent complex decision-making and problem-solving based on extensive knowledge of disability, human behavior, the world of work, and the community.  (Pages 162-163) Title I

For FY 2018, under the Order of Selection, Nebraska VR will continue to provide services to all individuals who are already receiving services under an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) prior to final approval of the Order of Selection by RSA and implementation by Nebraska VR. The projected number of individuals not receiving services and the estimated cost for services (projected savings) is:
 Priority Group 2: 1,158 individuals, with 475 individuals projected to require cost services at an average cost of $1,739 with a projected savings of $826,090.
 Priority Group 3: 581 individuals, with 233 individuals projected to require cost services at an average cost of $1,739 with a projected savings of $405,219. (Page 171) Title I

Increase the participation of Native Americans in VR services. The State Rehabilitation Council suggested that the agency explore opportunities to collaborate with any existing American Indian VR programs in Nebraska to increase the number of Native Americans with disabilities being served. The one existing program in Nebraska is no longer funded. The agency will identify possible partnerships to encourage other eligible tribes/organizations to apply for an AIVR grant as available.
Collaborate with Workforce Development core partners on the development and availability of soft skills training for all individuals. The core partners will explore the possibility of joint soft skills training. The potential collaboration could reduce duplication and increase the availability of training opportunities across the state.
 Goal 3: Strengthen the alignment between education, training, and employer workforce needs.
Maintain the Business Account Manager model and consider expansion to other areas of the state. Nebraska VR has hired Business Account Managers (BAM) in Omaha, Norfolk, and Kearney to establish relationships with businesses, trade associations, business and human resources organizations to identify staffing patterns, skill requirements, support needs, training preferences, etc., to be an effective representative to Nebraska VR teams on behalf of businesses. (Page 174) Title I

The transition youth conferences and the Youth Leadership Council are innovation and expansion activities that focus on students who are potentially eligible or are under an IEP or Section 504 Plan. The Youth Leadership Council members reach out to other students who can benefit from VR services and serve as role models for transitioning from school to work. Transition youth conferences provide opportunities for career exploration and development of work soft skills including independent living skills. The number of youth conferences and the number of youth attending continue to increase due to additional support from VR.

The State Rehabilitation Council provides input and guidance on VR’s innovative approaches to service delivery including the Meet You Were You Are service delivery model, the use of motivational interviewing techniques, and the expanded use of social media to engage consumers (MyVR). Members also provide direction on strategies to reach underserved and unserved through expanded and innovative marketing strategies. (Page 187) Title I

Extent of supported employment services
1. Assessment of rehabilitation need for supported employment services are made available to the extent necessary to determine the nature and scope of services to be provided under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) to achieve supported employment or to determine on the basis of clear evidence that an employment outcome cannot be achieved
2. Job development including customized employment and placement services are provided to the extent necessary to place the individual into competitive integrated employment consistent with client’s informed choice.
3. Intensive on-the-job and other training services are provided to the person to the extent necessary to achieve stable job performance, or to determine on the basis of clear evidence this cannot be achieved. Services are provided for a maximum of 24 cumulative months, or for youth with a disability (16-24) utilizing Title VI funds up to 48 cumulative months unless a longer period is provided in the IPE of the person. (Page 193) Title I

Transition planning by personnel of the designated State agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and implementation of their individualized education programs;
 
Specifically, included in the agreement are provisions for consultations and technical assistance, transition planning, coordinating the IEP and the IPE for roles and responsibilities amongst key individuals, and financial responsibilities, and procedures for outreach. The purpose is to coordinate and promote the cooperation of the programs and services available to students who are blind, deaf—blind and visually impaired during the transition process. (Page 202) Title I

NCBVI provides information to educators and to VR personnel about training opportunities relevant to personnel development in the fields of both education and vocational rehabilitation. A series of personnel training sessions relating to the handbook were held in a coordinated effort between NCBVI and personnel covered by IDEA. In FFY 2014 and 2015, NCBVI Counselors continued to provide the tool, and instructions as needed, statewide to educators, parents, and other persons involved with educating blind and visually impaired school students within Nebraska. Additional joint personnel development efforts will be held when specific issues of mutual concern are identified. For example, teachers of blind children from the public school system provide presentations to NCBVI at Staff Meetings. At the NCBVI Annual State Staff Meeting in 2013, a speaker from Nebraska Department of Education/Special Populations gave a presentation on the IEP process and the role of VR Counselors in that process, working with educators, families and students. NCBVI staff members provide presentations at training sessions of the school system, university and college classes, and other opportunities which arise. We will continue to explore ways to assure success in education and quality employment. One avenue will be collaborating with the WinAHEAD organization (Western Iowa and Nebraska Association on Higher Education and Disabilities). On an ongoing basis, the primary emphasis will be individual communication between NCBVI counselors and parents, teachers and others in the education system. (Page 211) Title I

NCBVI Supported Employment clients are transitioned to extended services provided by other public agencies, non-profit organizations, employers, natural supports or other entities after no longer than 24 months, or 48 months for blind or visually impaired youth after placement in Supported Employment, unless a longer period is set forth in the IPE. The transition to extended services is based upon a) substantial progress made toward hours per week goal in the IPE, b) the client is stabilized on the job, and c) that extended services will be available and provided without a break in services.  (Page 230) Title I

Career Pathways

~~Career Pathways Advancement Project (CPAP)
Nebraska VR was one of four state VR programs to receive a Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Grant from Rehabilitation Services Administration. The Career Pathways Advancement Project (CPAP) uses an Upskill/Backfill model with a focused outreach to Nebraska VR clients successfully employed in the last four years in order to assist in career advancement options within the high demand industries of Information Technology, Manufacturing, Healthcare, Construction, and Transportation, and Distribution and Logistics. (Page 51) Title I

H. Improving access to postsecondary credentials
Describe how the State’s strategies will improve access to activities leading to recognized postsecondary credentials, including Registered Apprenticeship certificates. This includes credentials that are industry-recognized certificates, licenses or certifications, and that are portable and stackable.
Through the state’s education-related strategies, plan partners improve access to activities leading to recognized postsecondary credentials, including Registered Apprenticeship certificates, industry-recognized certificates, licenses, certifications, and credentials that are portable and stackable, including:
 Nebraska’s industry sector partnership strategy, the Next Generation Industry Partnerships initiative, which includes a focus on education and training leading to postsecondary credentials that are portable and stackable;
 regional initiatives that connect in-demand industry sectors and occupations with career pathways, will continued focus on activities leading to recognized postsecondary credentials, such as Nebraska’s Connecting SNAP Clients to Better Job Opportunities initiative (described in Section II.c.1. of this plan);
 certificate training programs that are business driven partnerships with local community colleges, Nebraska VR, and businesses within targeted in demand occupations;
 promotion of career pathways, including career readiness, throughout the one-stop delivery system; (Page 66) Title I

A 21st century understanding of the evolving labor force begins with an awareness that the workforce will continue to grow and reflect the increasing diversity of America. While increasing numbers of individuals with disabilities will be entering the labor force, such individuals currently remain a largely untapped labor source. Women’s employment rates will rise while the employment rates for men will decline slightly. The percentage of individuals from minority groups entering the workforce will also grow.
The workforce will become increasing urban and the manufacturing sector will slowly decline while the service-producing sector will grow as will e-commerce. Technology and globalization will continue to shape the labor force and require a workforce with highly technical skills. How quickly graduate rehabilitation programs will revise curriculum to prepare graduates in a 21st understanding of the evolving labor force remains to be seen. Consequently Nebraska VR must provide staff with timely training on Nebraska labor market information and trends, career pathways, the world of work and career connections in order to equipping VR staff with the knowledge to counsel individuals with disabilities in their pursuit of work and career and provide effective employment services. The outreach and partnership efforts of our Business Account Managers with Nebraska businesses will be also be critical to understanding their respective labor needs in order for VR to prepare, train and offer skilled applicants with disabilities. (Page 163) Title I

With the implementation of WIOA, it is expected that there will be a significant reversal of the decline in referrals to the VR program in recent years under the former workforce investment system. The major contributing factor was the move to on-line registration and on-line services at the One Stop Centers that was not adequately identifying applicants who had disabilities. The collaboration that has occurred among the core partners since the passage of WIOA has already resulted in a greater awareness of each core partners program and opportunities for reciprocal referrals and service coordination. Work is currently underway on the development of a common intake.
Nebraska VR staff will continue to serve on the new regional workforce boards which will now have a larger business representation. It is important that VR staff are aware of and promote among its clients, the jobs-driven, work-based learning, career pathways and industry sector initiatives put forth by the workforce development system. (Page 169) Title I

Move more individuals to economic self-sufficiency through the implementation of the Career Pathways Advancement Project. The CPAP is funded under a grant from RSA and uses an “Upskill/Backfill” model to train individuals in emerging and growing industry sectors. Career Pathway Recruiters will contact 1,200 former VR clients now working in targeted industry sectors such as information technology, manufacturing, transportation, distribution and logistics, to inform them of an opportunity to receive additional training and education to advance their careers. The grant will provide the necessary financial assistance to allow individuals with disabilities to participate in an established career pathway initiative in collaboration with the Nebraska Department of Labor, several postsecondary educational institutions, and businesses. Approximately 50-60 individuals will move up the career pathway by upgrading their skills and knowledge, creating opportunities for other individuals with disabilities to backfill the vacant positions. Individuals with disabilities will be more likely to be economically self-sufficient as they advance upward in their career pathway in the targeted high demand sectors. (Page 175) Title I

Apprenticeship
Nebraska VR has engaged in a dual customer approach to the provision of employment-related services for many years as embodied in its mission statement, “We help people with disabilities prepare for, obtain, and maintain employment while helping businesses recruit, train, and retain employees with disabilities.” This has led to a job-driven approach in Nebraska VR’s development of customized training programs such as Project SEARCH, Certificate Programs, and On the Job Evaluation and Training sites. Nebraska VR recently extended the job-driven emphasis with the implementation of a “Meet You Where You Are” model that includes a rapid engagement (Progressive Employment) focus engaging individuals in an element of work as quickly as possible. VR staff are actively involved in the recruitment and support of businesses to partner with VR on rapid engagement activities. (Page 155) Title I Certificate programs For the past several years, Nebraska VR has developed and maintained Certificate Programs. These Certificate Programs provide hands-on training for students and youth with disabilities (adult VR clients may also enroll). The specialized training results from a partnership with local Nebraska VR service offices, three to five core business partners in the area, a community college and local schools. Students take classes, tour businesses and either work part-time or participate in an internship with employer partners. The programs are business-driven, short term, real life trainings that teach both technical hard skills and soft skills. Each training opportunity gives the students an opportunity to acquire the skills that they need to pursue in-demand jobs and careers. To date, the Certificate Programs offered include: Electrician Helper, Welding, Auto Mechanic Helper, Construction, HVAC Helper, Para-educator, and Community Health Worker. Nebraska VR will explore increasing the number of Certificate Programs available in the state. (Page 156) Title I Skill training services provided in integrated competitive employment and community settings. Many individuals with cognitive disabilities struggle with traditional postsecondary classroom and/or segregated training programs. In addition to On-The-Job Training services, Certificate Programs and Project Search sites have proven to be another successful alternative for adults and students to achieve employment without pursuing postsecondary training. The collaboration between businesses and community colleges in the Certificate Programs and business and high schools in the Project Search programs results in individuals with cognitive and other impairments acquiring the desired work skills and jobs. Post-secondary training continues to be the highest expenditure category among the VR services as individuals choose careers and professions that require certificates and degrees. VR staff provides occupational information and Nebraska Labor Market data on demand occupations so clients can make an informed decision on their vocational goal. (Page 168) Title I Maintain the Business Account Manager model and consider expansion to other areas of the state. Nebraska VR has hired Business Account Managers (BAM) in Omaha, Norfolk, and Kearney to establish relationships with businesses, trade associations, business and human resources organizations to identify staffing patterns, skill requirements, support needs, training preferences, etc., to be an effective representative to Nebraska VR teams on behalf of businesses. The BAMs will seek out opportunities to establish work-based learning partnerships, OJE/OJTs, apprenticeships, and internships with businesses. These positions take a jobs driven approach in aligning the education and training requirements of businesses with the qualifications of VR eligible clients to better meet the workforce needs of employers. Maintain and expand the number of certificate programs that serve as an entry-level training program into an established career pathway. Certificate Programs offer hands-on training programs for students and adults with disabilities. This opportunity results from a partnership with local Nebraska VR service offices, three to five core business partners in the area, a community college, and local schools. The businesses have common interests in the types of skills and abilities they need to fill job vacancies. Together, the businesses work to identify exactly what they need in job candidates qualified to fill job vacancies. They can fit their hiring and retention needs with the opportunity to design a curriculum. The training includes soft skills training keying in on the basics of being on time and dependable. Work place communication skills are included. Students take classes, tour business, and either work part-time or participate in an internship with employer partners. The agency will look to expand partnerships across the state as well as beyond the current areas of auto tech, HVAC, welding, electrician and community health worker. Collect information on the business/employer level of satisfaction with VR services and programs. Nebraska VR will reinstitute an employer satisfaction survey to provide feedback on business-focused initiatives. This will be revised at the issuance of federal guidance on the final employer measures under WIOA. (Pages 174-175) Title I
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~SSDI and/or SSI recipients may be an underserved population by virtue of the fact that Nebraska VR’s percentage of clients receiving SSDI and/or SSI is below the national and agency mean. However, SSA data indicates that the state’s percentage of individual’s age 18 - 64 on SSDI or SSI on the basis of a disability is also below the national average.
As previously mentioned, youth with intellectual disabilities who exit or would like to exit school at an age appropriate time are unserved until they reach the age of 21 and can then receive Developmental Disabilities services and supports. With the proposed WIOA regulations, Nebraska VR intends to approach the HHS-Developmental Disabilities program with a plan to serve these youth prior to age 21.
Strides have continued to be made in using screening tools and specialized vocational assessments to identify Nebraska VR clients with brain injury and other cognitive disorders in order to better align services and supports required to achieve employment. The identification and use of assistive technology options have also proven to be beneficial to individuals with a brain injury.
Nebraska VR received a TBI Implementation Partnership Grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration in June 2014. The purpose of the 4-year grant is to increase access to rehabilitation and community-based services for individuals with brain injury. Nebraska VR is the lead agency for brain injury in the state and collaborates with several other state agencies and programs to carry out grant-funded activities. While progress has been made, information collected is a part of this grant finds that there are still service gaps and resources that exist for this population. (Page 169) Title I

c. The designated state unit will coordinate activities with any other State agency that is functioning as an employment network under the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency program under Section 1148 of the Social Security Act.
6. Financial Administration of the Supported Employment Program:
a. The designated State agency assures that it will expend no more than 2.5 percent of the State’s allotment under title VI for administrative costs of carrying out this program; and, the designated State agency or agencies will provide, directly or indirectly through public or private entities, non-Federal contributions in an amount that is not less than 10 percent of the costs of carrying out supported employment services provided to youth with the most significant disabilities with the funds reserved for such purpose under section 603(d) of the Rehabilitation Act, in accordance with section 606(b)(7)(G) and (H) of the Rehabilitation Act.
b. The designated State agency assures that it will use funds made available under title VI of the Rehabilitation Act only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including extended services to youth with the most significant disabilities, who are eligible to receive such services; and, that such funds are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act, when providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment, in accordance with section 606(b)(7)(A) and (D), of the Rehabilitation Act.
7. Provision of Supported Employment Services:
a. The designated State agency assures that it will provide supported employment services as defined in section 7(39) of the Rehabilitation Act.
b. The designated State agency assures that:
i. the comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome, in accordance with the requirements of section 606(b)(7)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act
ii. an individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act , which is developed and updated with title I funds, in accordance with sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 606(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act. (Page 199) Title I

Definition of Work Eligible Individuals
Nebraska excludes from the definition of Work Eligible Individuals:
a) A minor parent who is not a head-of-household
b) A non-recipient parent of children receiving TANF/MOE who is ineligible to receive assistance due to immigration status;
c) An individual receiving assistance under an approved Tribal TANF program.
d) A non-recipient parent of children receiving TANF/MOE who is not receiving TANF benefits due to receipt of SSI or SSDI. Nebraska does not consider disabled parents receiving Social Security Disability Income or Supplemental Security Income to be ‘work-eligible individuals’ because they are not included in the TANF payment unit.
e) A parent needed in the home to care for a disabled family member who is not attending school full-time.*  ( Page 239) Title IV

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) offers a wide variety of supports to help maintain individuals within their community. Specific programs which address common support needs include the Social Services Block Grant, Disabled Persons and Family Support, Lifespan Respite and Medicaid Waivers. A sampling of possible support services includes: transportation, energy assistance, housing, telephone assistance, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps), adult day care for caregivers and covering the Medicare premiums for eligible low-income beneficiaries. DHHS also coordinates the Ticket to Work program which encourages persons receiving Social Security Disability to rejoin the workforce. Ticket to Work also provides benefits counselors to help people understand whether participation impacts eligibility for other public benefits.
The local Area Agencies on Aging are familiar with the support needs of the elderly and are experienced in organizing community resources to address those needs. Nebraska currently has one program sub-grantee, National Able Network. National Able Network took over from Experience Works as the sub-grantee in December 2016 following a national Request for Proposal process for national grantees in 2016. National Able Network is also a national grantee whose service area covers most of Nebraska. National Able Network confers with the staff of each of the eight Area Agencies on Aging to address non-employment support needs of SCSEP trainees. The program is also participating in the development of the Nebraska’s Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRC). This partnership will be able to provide information to address a variety of human services as well as a referral to local agencies which provide assistance to our targeted population. The ADRC website provides linkages to a wide variety of community resources for the SCSEP participants. Coordination with ADRC will continue to enhance with the demonstration project implemented in 2016. For more information visit www.nebraska.networkofcare.org. (Page 294) Title IV

Program improvement over the next two years will increasingly focus upon growing industries, developing a closer working relationship with human service organizations, supporting employers and equitably distributing SCSEP positions across our State. Suggestions include:
1. Increase SCSEP focus upon Nebraska’s Hot Jobs. Through partnerships with other Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act organizations develop classroom and on-the job training to address our growth industries. Long term care will be a growth industry as the Baby Boom generation increasingly needs a variety of supportive services.
2. Develop a closer working relationship between SCSEP, Ticket to Work and the Centers for Independent Living.
3. Continue relationships between SCSEP, Nebraska’s Aging Network (Aging and Disability Resource Center and Area Agencies on Aging) and the State Department of Health and Human Services to address the multiple support needs common among SCSEP participants.
4. Work with Medicaid to review program guidelines which count SCSEP training income when determining program eligibility. Current rules require interested older persons to choose between training and Medicaid.
5. Review the distribution of positions to be proportional to the eligible population of persons over 55 years of age, commuting patterns, industry concentrations and education systems (community colleges) in the newly designated economic regions in the state. Distribution within rural areas will be monitored to assure equitable distribution of SCSEP positions. Shifting positions will be accomplished gradually as participants leave this program.
6. Work with SCSEP providers to assure timely reporting of participant activity into SPARQ (US Department of Labor web-based reporting system). (Pages 297-298) Title IV
 

Employer/ Business

~~ Nebraska’s Eligible Training Provider List includes programs offered by the state’s university system, as well as Registered Apprenticeship programs and private postsecondary career schools.
The Nebraska Department of Education reVISION program provides Nebraska public schools with the opportunity to analyze and transform their current career education systems in order to improve their ability to educate a qualified workforce that meets industry needs within an ever-changing economy. Working in collaboration with postsecondary education and regional workforce and economic development leaders, the reVISION process links career educators, school administrators, school counselors, and industry professionals. Under the leadership of the Nebraska Department of Education and in partnership with the Nebraska Departments of Labor and Economic Development, the reVISION process is a strategic approach for schools to analyze their current career education system and make plans, as needed, for adjustments.

 Nebraska VR has established certificate training programs that are business driven partnerships with local community colleges, Nebraska VR, and businesses within targeted in demand occupations. With a dual customer focus, the goal is to offer a short-term training and internship program that will meet the needs of businesses in high demand sectors and result in long-term employment for the individuals who participate. (Page 64) Title I
 

Data Collection
No disability specific information found regarding this element.
511

~~Impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA and Nebraska’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, lead to the conclusion that an emphasis on Customized Employment can increase the opportunities for successful employment and expanded partnerships with employers. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, Nebraska is receiving intensive technical assistance and training from the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) in the following areas: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. (Page 156) Title I

Increase our capacity to provide customized employment services and options to consumers and employers. Nebraska VR is one of the states selected to receive technical assistance under the JD-VR TAC. The impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA, and the agency’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, point to an increased emphasis on Customized Employment. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, there are two areas of need for intensive technical assistance and training to be provided: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach; and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. The JD-VR TAC will work with Nebraska VR to increase our capacity to provide customized employment services through the provision of training and technical assistance. The expected outcomes are:

An increase in the number and type of businesses adopting a customized employment approach and establishing a CE job for an individual with a significant disability.
An increase in the number of individuals with a significant disability, especially individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability, participating in competitive integrated employment.
An increase in the quality of employment (as determined by the salary, benefits, number of hours worked, etc.). (Page 175) Title I
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
The state’s compliance with the requirements of WIOA Sec. 188 and the American with Disabilities Act regarding physical and programmatic accessibility is addressed under Nebraska’s Nondiscrimination Plan, which includes provisions for EO reviews of the one-stop delivery system. A recent EO review of resource rooms in one-stop centers across the state revealed a need for new assistive technology for individuals with disabilities. In 2016, the state submitted an Unemployment Insurance Supplemental Budget Request (SBR) to fund assistive technology upgrades in 11 one-stop centers. Following approval of the request, the state worked with Assistive Technology Partnership (ATP) to identify components required to provide state-of-the art hardware and software to one-stop centers across the state. Based on the outcome of the consultation with ATP and available funding through the SBR, the state is able to upgrade assistive technology in 12 one-stop centers, as described in Table 35. (Pages 84-85) Title I Following installation of the new assistive technology during January and February 2018, training and support will be provided for one-stop center staff to ensure appropriate use and application of assistive technology. One-stop center staff will also receive training and support on addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. The state’s current policy on nondiscrimination describes requirements under WIOA Sec. 188 and 29 CFR Part 38 regarding physical and programmatic accessibility. In addition, the state’s current policy on one-stop center certification includes criteria for assessment of physical and programmatic accessibility, including the use of accessible technology to increase access to high quality workforce services for individuals with disabilities. The criteria by which local boards are required to assess a one-stop center’s physical and programmatic accessibility is listed in Tables 36 and 37. (Page 85) Title I
Vets
NEworks NEworks is a comprehensive web-based case management and reporting system used by the Nebraska Department of Labor (NDOL) for the delivery of Wagner-Peyser, WIOA, Trade Assistance Act, and Jobs for Veterans Act. The management of multiple programs within a single system allows for integrated service delivery and common performance reporting data. NEworks also functions as a self-service labor exchange for jobseekers and employers, the front-end of Unemployment Insurance, and a Labor Market Information module for public users. Additional resources include a resume builder, assessments, communication tools, the eligible training provider list, and online learning. (Page 67) Title I The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes: a. Employment, training, and job placement services How the State intends to provide employment, training and job placement services to Veterans and eligible persons under the JVSG DVOPs and LVERs have formed strong partnerships with other AJC programs to integrate Veteran services and to promote employment, training, and placement opportunities for Veterans throughout the areas of the state. This includes integration with other state and federal agencies. This integration ensures that qualified Veterans can be simultaneously enrolled with other partner programs such as Wagner-Peyser, Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA), and Vocational and Rehabilitation Employment Program (VR&E). Lincoln and Omaha DVOP staff currently attend U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Chapter 31 VR&E orientation sessions hosted in these metro VA offices. Omaha staff partners with Offutt Airman & Family Readiness staff with two significant Veteran focused job fairs each year hosted in the spring and fall. In collaboration with the Nebraska National Guard (NENG), Wagner-Peyser staff routinely attend unit demobilization and reintegration trainings to assist eligible Veterans with employment and training services. These events, known as “Yellow Ribbon Events” provide staff an opportunity to promote Veteran services to newly separated Veterans. DVOPs work with Wagner-Peyser staff to inform and education them on relevant information to promote and share. NDOL conducts training sessions to present job search, resume, and interviewing skills workshops to NENG members during weekend unit trainings and other appropriate occasions. NDOL will develop, implement, and offer new and updated informational sessions during NENG weekend training sessions as needed. State VR has developed a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Task Force and facilitates education and trainings for those providing services to this unique population. NDOL is working to ensure that all DVOP and LVER staff has the opportunity to attend these informational sessions. Traumatic Brain Injury Task Force awareness and resource emails are distributed to DVOP and LVER staff to allow them to get a better understanding of the program and its resources. This allows the DVOP and LVER staff to address the employment barriers created by TBIs. (Page 255) Title IV NDOL has partnered with the state Apprenticeship program to assist with the screening and assessment for the local electrical workers and steamfitters unions. Additionally, NDOL has developed a dedicated Veteran’s services web page outlining available resources. Through this web page, Veterans and military personnel can access a current NDOL office directory with all appropriate location and contact information. The web page includes information regarding priority of service, job search services and location sites, job fair information, and links to other Veteran service organizations, federal employment information, and state and federal benefit information. Due to the isolated nature of the Native American communities living on tribal lands in largely unpopulated rural areas of Nebraska, specific outreach plans for Native American Veterans have not been developed. Success regarding services to Veterans will be monitored and assessed through existing report mechanisms. This includes quarterly reports and reports located within NEworks. These reports currently provide information on employment and training activities on Veterans with SBE’s and the targeted population at a state, regional or local perspective. b. DVOP Specialists and LVER staff roles and responsibilities The duties assigned to DVOP specialists and LVER staff by the State; specifically implementing DVOP and LVER duties or roles and responsibilities as outlined in 38 U.S.C. § 4103A and 4104. These duties must be consistent with current guidance; DVOP Staff: Nebraska’s current staffing model is predominantly a DVOP model. All DVOPs are state merit staff and assigned to a Nebraska Department of Labor location or American Job Center. DVOPs are integrated into the one-stop delivery system and are well versed in the process of developing and maintaining strong relationships with other service providers and program partners to promote employment, training, and placement services for Veterans. (Page 256) Title IV The outlined duties do not preclude the overarching LVER responsibility to ensure that Veterans are provided the full range of labor exchange services to meet their employment and training needs. The LVER shall be available to provide guidance and/or technical assistance to NDOL staff regarding the identification and referral of those Veterans who may benefit from more intensive services provided either by DVOP staff or other partner resources. LVER staff will also conduct employer outreach either independently or through the coordinated efforts of the AJCs and NDOL locations. Through contacts within the employer community, LVER staff work to develop employment and job training opportunities, apprenticeship, and other on-the-job (OJT) training positions to benefit the Veteran community. (Page 259) Title IV NEworks provides self-service options to resources and website links that Veterans and eligible spouses can access from their residence or any accessible public computer. NEworks provides Veterans access to a vast range of job opportunities from corporate job posting boards and external job search engine websites that are imported into NEworks on a daily basis. As prescribed by the VR&E counselor, Chapter 31 Veterans may receive a wide range of services to include: labor market information, assessment, career guidance, and counseling. DVOPs provide case management services as needed, especially for those in need of placement services or other services to become “job ready”. Case management services include the development of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP), in-depth assessments, and regularly scheduled communication or follow-up until the Veteran no longer requires DVOP services or the VR&E counselor closes the Veteran’s file. (Page 266) Title IV Coordination with partner programs that have Job Training funds is key to the successful upskilling of Veterans. Co-enrollment and leveraging of resources will allow Veterans to receive the greatest amount of services. Communication between partners will occur on a formal and informal basis to allow continual support of Veterans through job training programs. Release of Information documentation will be collected when necessary, in order to allow this communication to occur between the programs and not require the Veteran to repeatedly provide the same information multiple times to partnering programs. (Page 267) Title IV
Mental Health

~~Nebraska VR seeks to work cooperatively with numerous other state and local agencies and programs. Collaborative efforts are manifested through coordinated committees throughout the state with Nebraska VR state office and local field staff actively participating. Examples of the committees Nebraska VR serves on includes, but are not limited to, Nebraska Planning Council on Developmental Disabilities, State Advisory Council on Mental Health Services, Nebraska Special Education Advisory Council Standing Committees on 1) Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2) Out of Home Placements (OHP), 3) Transition, 4) Deaf and Hard of Hearing, 5) Nebraska Youth Leadership Council, Nebraska Brain Injury Advisory Council, Local Community Resource Committees, Madonna Community Advisory Council, Assistive Technology Partnership (ATP) Advisory Council, Alternative Finance Loan Advisory Council, Nebraska Children’s Commission Juvenile Services Committee, Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness Advisory Council, Prevention Partnership with the Nebraska Children and Families Foundation, and local Chambers of Commerce, etc.
Nebraska VR maintains interagency agreements with Nebraska Health and Human Services, Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Veterans Administration-Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program for purposes of providing an understood and coordinated effort to achieve employment goals for persons with disabilities. (Page 150) Title I

Project Search agreements are maintained with these business and high schools:
 Businesses: Cabela’s, Walmart Distribution Center, Embassy Suites Downtown Omaha, Embassy Suites La Vista and Embassy Suites Lincoln, PayPal, Valmont Industries, Faith Regional Hospital, St. Francis Hospital, Mercy Medical Center, Mary Lanning Health Care, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital, Columbus Community Hospital, Monroe Meyer Institute, Nebraska Medicine, York Health Care and Good Samaritan Hospital.
 Schools: Bellevue Public School, Columbus Public Schools, Kearney Public Schools, Lincoln Public Schools, Madonna School, Millard Public Schools, Norfolk Public Schools, North Platte Public Schools, Omaha Nations Public Schools, Omaha Public Schools, Papillion LaVista School District, Westside Community Schools, Winnebago Public Schools, Norris Public Schools, Waverly Public Schools, York Public Schools and Educational Service Units 1, 2, 6, 7 & 9. (Page 151) Title I

Nebraska VR (VR) and Nebraska Health and Human Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services (DBH) have developed a Memorandum of Understanding to provide braided funding for an outcome-based milestone system of supported employment for individuals with significant behavioral health disabilities. The negotiating team consisted of the Directors of VR and DBH along with their respective Program Managers and Fiscal Administrators. The tools used to arrive at the model included: reviews of the fidelity models, a signed agreement for sharing information on mutual clients, VR contract costs and the payments to supported employment providers from the six Behavioral Health Regions who receive their funding from the Division of Behavioral Health. (Page 157) Title I

To comply with the previous CSPD requirements prior to WIOA, Nebraska VR elected in 1983 to use the coursework requirements for a Nebraska Certified Professional Counselor under the Nebraska Uniform Credentials Act. (Neb. Rev. Stat. §38-2132). Note that while Nebraska VR uses this academic coursework criteria for hiring, the certification applies only to individuals providing mental health counseling and who identify themselves as a Certified Professional Counselors. Nebraska VR neither requires staff to obtain the credential nor holds its staff out to be Certified Professional Counselors. (Page 163) Title I

Individuals with the most significant disabilities
Major service needs include —
 Impact and challenge from changing demographics in serving individuals with the most significant disabilities. Nebraska continues to see a declining rural population. 59.95% of the state’s population reside within 5 of the 93 counties. The agency must continue to look at how best to allocate staff resources throughout the state and adequately serve both population sets. As noted in the previous comprehensive assessment community resources and employment opportunities seem to follow the population shift. Individuals with serious mental health impairments continue to be the largest disability category being served by Nebraska VR.
 Challenge of locating, accessing and coordinating needed community services and supports. Consistent with prior comprehensive assessment of rehabilitation needs, individuals with the most significant work disabilities continue to have complex needs, complicated by poverty. Social services and support networks, both governmental and non-profit, have not been able to maintain much less increase service levels to meet these needs. The new governor and the legislature will be evaluating the previous trend of moving social services from local community offices to area call centers which has resulted in service access issues. However, Nebraska VR intends to maintain its strategic office locations across the state and travel to all counties. (Page 167) Title I
3. The state agency responsible for providing mental health services
Representatives of NCBVI and the Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Behavioral Health (NDHHS-DBH) have met to discuss how our two agencies can work together to promote competitive integrated employment opportunities on behalf of blind and visually impaired people with behavioral health conditions. Services include a method for providing supported employment services similar to the milestone approach used by Nebraska VR General. Other mental health services are provided statewide by various entities. NCBVI personnel in each office cooperate with those providers to ensure that mutual clients, or persons who may need both VR and mental health services, will be adequately and appropriately served. (Page 205) Title I

A. The provision of extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years
Each blind and visually impaired individual with a developmental disability has a case service coordinator employed by the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Developmental Disabilities (NDHH-DDD). The case service coordinator is responsible for developing an Individualized Service Plan (ISP) for mutual clients served by NCBVI and DDD. When supported employment services are involved, NCBVI provides incentive payments at specific intervals (start of job search, start of employment, stabilization, maintenance, and start of long-term support.). This arrangement is in accordance with the “milestones” model used by Nebraska VR General to serve clients shared with NDHHS-DDD. NCBVI representatives met with a meeting of supervisors of local field office coordinated by NHHS-DDD in November 2012 to explain how the milestone model applies to clients served by NCBVI as well as Nebraska VR General. Since then, NCBVI administrators, supervisors, and counselors continue to meet and build closer working relationships with NHHS-DDD at the state and local levels. NCBVI has also reached out to Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Behavioral Health (NDHHS-DBH) and to the Autism Center of Nebraska to create a mechanism for providing supported employment services to blind and visually impaired clients with mental health conditions and autism. Continued training regarding Supported Employment services is provided to NCBVI counselors, statewide. The total funds projected for FY 2018 is expected to be $30,000. At least 50% will be allocated to blind and visually impaired students in the pre-employment transition services categories. (Page 218) Title I

Blind and visually impaired individuals with mental health issues, acquired brain injury, or other significant disabilities with onset of disability occurring after the age of 21 may also be candidates for SE services , and NCBVI is exploring ways to expand SE opportunities with these individuals through partnerships with relevant state agencies and non-profit SE service providers.
NCBVI works to enhance the potential to achieve employment outcomes in cases that often require maximizing resources and creativity. SE funds are utilized for training of clients who are Deaf-Blind or have other multiple disabilities. As appropriate, some clients are referred to the Helen Keller National Center (HKNC) for intensive training, not available in Nebraska. In recent years, there have been more Deaf-Blind individuals who have personal goals to become employed, who qualify for Supported Employment and for whom Supported Employment is indicated. In addition to the actual job coaching and ongoing supports, it is crucial for such individuals to enhance their capabilities for productive lives. (Page 228) Title I

Collaborative working relationships with state agencies and service providers are currently being explored to extend SE service opportunities to blind and visually impaired consumers with acquired brain injury, mental health conditions, autism, or other significant secondary disabilities. These agencies or service providers include The Nebraska Department of Behavioral Health, the Nebraska Mental Health Association, and Autism Center of Nebraska.
A small number of blind and visually impaired consumers with significant, non-developmental secondary disabilities occurring after age 21 might benefit from SE services. Generally, however, if the individual has a secondary disability other than a significant behavioral health condition or autism, there may not be a source of ongoing financial support for SE services extending beyond the time allowed for NCBVI support. In such cases, the Deputy Director of Services and the immediate supervisor of field services works with the NCBVI Counselor involved to identify possible resources for the ongoing support, such as developing a PASS (Plan to Achieve Self Sufficiency) or personal resources. The Deputy Director also provides statewide training and information to NCBVI personnel regarding the SE program. (Page 229) Title I

Drug Testing and Lab Confirmation Service is defined as a point of collection test by a trained employee in which specimens such as urine, saliva, and breath are used to determine a positive or negative drug test result. Collection of a urine specimen will be conducted through line of sight observation of the client by a trained employee of the same gender. Drug testing includes the collection of a sweat specimen obtained through the use of a patch. A refusal by the client is defined as the client choosing not to provide a specimen to the Contractor at a designated time and place. All refusals must be reported to the DHHS case manager or supervisor by the end of the next business day, unless otherwise noted in the service referral. A no show by the client is defined as the client not being present to provide a specimen to the Contractor at the designated time and place. All no shows must be reported to the DHHS case manager or supervisor by the end of the next business day, unless otherwise noted in the service referral. Laboratory test confirmation is defined as screening the collected specimen by a laboratory to detect the presence of a specific drug(s) or substance(s) and the concentration of the drug(s) or substance(s) as identified and requested in the Service Referral. Laboratory test confirmation includes the written verification of the results. The Contractor’s drug testing protocol and policy shall be consistent with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The Contractor’s drug testing protocol, policy, and rates shall be submitted to each Service Area Contract Liaison where the service will be provided. (Pages 247-248) Title I

 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
NEres combines the required services of the federally funded Re-Employment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) program, along with the jobseeker requirements for regular Unemployment Insurance (UI) compensation. Based on the requirements for each specific program, NEres offers a set of universal services and meets the strictest program criteria of RESEA in order to ensure compliance with all federal and state program requirements. The identified program services required by each separate program and their relation to the universal services provided via NEres, are demonstrated in Illustration 7 and outlined below. (Page 123) Title I Nebraska Department of Labor has a contract with Geographic Solutions Inc. (GSI) for the NEworks Virtual One Stop (VOS) module system used for Employment Services, including labor exchange services. In October 2013, NDOL purchased GSI’s Re-Employment Exchange (REX) Module which allows a single sign-on for customers who utilize services through both the NEworks and Unemployment Insurance systems. In Jan 2014, NDOL transferred hosting services from the Nebraska Office of Chief Information Officer (OCIO) to GSI and added a Mobile Application module. In order to successfully implement the program design of NEres, NDOL purchased the Scheduler & Attendance Tracking Module from GSI, which: 1. Interfaces with the VOS, REX, Mobile App and Benefit Payment System (BPS). 2. Provides the functionality to schedule and track program participants per the correct fund source. The software helps maintain eligibility of benefits for UI claimants not yet employed, by providing eligibility data to the UI system. This module also allows NEres to schedule and track unemployment claimants who are required to attend an orientation and one-on-one meeting at the beginning of their unemployment claim to get them back to work sooner. This technology will replace an outdated scheduling system. (Page 127) Title I Career and training services provided by AJC and NDOL Locations include: Job Search Assistance; Job Referral; Placement Assistance for Jobseekers; Reemployment Services to unemployment insurance claimants; Recruitment services to employers with job openings. Outreach efforts include an explanation of the full menu of services available from the local AJC or NDOL Location as well as specific employment opportunities that are currently available. Support for education and training is provided through the NFJP grantee. The State Workforce Development Boards in coordination with local Workforce Development Boards provide funding recommendations, assistance and guidance on methods of allowing AJC customers to be competitive in a regional and global economy. AJC and NDOL Locations provide MSFWs with referrals to local education institutions for GED, ESL and technical skills training. (Page 133) Title I
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 41 - 50 of 63

NE Project SEARCH - 10/21/2010

 

“Project SEARCH helps students with disabilities learn vocational and competitive skills to help them enter the workplace and to become more independent in the work environment. Nebraska VR will expand Project SEARCH and its services for students with disabilities next year from seven locations statewide to ten. In each of these communities, Project SEARCH has grown through a partnership with Nebraska VR, local community businesses, local schools, the Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Assistive Technology Partnership and the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD Services).”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

NE Assistive Technology Partnership - 06/15/1989

 

“Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and the Assistive Technology Partnership (ATP) have worked together since 1989 when VR wrote the grant to establish a technology-related assistance project (ATP) in Nebraska. ATP Technology Specialists conduct on-site assessments for consumers referred by VR. The assessments may be for students preparing to work and consumers who are ready to work or returning to work after an injury or illness.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Department of Developmental Disabilities Training Resources

“The Division of Developmental Disabilities is committed to providing training that results in improved lives for our participants. Please feel free to use as many training resources as you see fit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Acquired Brain Injury Supported Employment Partners

"Nebraska VR partners with Goodwill Industries of Greater Nebraska and Career Solutions, Inc. to provide supported employment services to individuals who have experienced an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) and require specialized assistance to obtain and maintain competitive employment. Our VR liaison staff in Grand Island, Hastings, Kearney, and Omaha work jointly with employment specialists from these programs to assist individuals in overcoming employment barriers."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Medicaid State Plan

~~“The State Plan is the official document describing the nature and scope of the Nebraska Medicaid Program. There are seven sections that comprise the State Plan (Part 1) as well as many accompanying attachments and amendments (Parts 2 and 3). Each part was developed by Nebraska and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Money Follows the Person

Thousands of individuals across the country, through the efforts of Money Follows the Person and other programs, have successfully transitioned from an institutional setting to the community. Nebraska’s own transition stories are inspiring and motivating.    Depending upon your specific needs – whether you are aged, have a physical or developmental disability, or a traumatic brain injury – supportive services such as the following help people live successfully in community-based settings:    • Home Care/Chore Services     • Home-Delivered Meals     • Adult Day Health Care    • Assisted Living Service     • Nutrition Services Independence Skills Management     • Personal Emergency Response System     • Transportation     • Assistive Technology Supports and Home Modification     • Home Again Services    • Respite     • Home Health     • Habilitation Services     • Team Behavioral Consultation     • Child Care for Children with Disabilities  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Leads to Success - Seeing the Possibilities

This presentation provides an explanation of, and service descriptions and payment rates for, Supported Employment. It includes Customized Employment as a valid application as Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Nebraska Client Assistance Program Hotline

The Hotline provides information and referral to Nebraskans who have questions or concerns related to a disability. This includes information about rehabilitation services, transportation, special parking permits, legal rights, and any other questions related to a disability

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Nebraska ABLE Legislation (LB 591) - 05/27/2015

A BILL FOR AN ACT relating to revenue and taxation; to amend sections 72-1239.01, 77-3504, and 84-618, Reissue Revised Statutes of Nebraska, and sections 68-1201, 77-2715.07, and 77-2716, Revised Statutes Cumulative Supplement, 2014; to define terms; to create the achieving a better life experience program; to provide powers and duties; to change provisions relating to federal tax credits; to provide for adjustments to taxable income; to redefine household income for purposes of the homestead exemption; to provide startup funding; to harmonize provisions; to provide operative dates; to repeal the original sections; and to declare an emergency. Be it enacted by the people of the State of Nebraska.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order No. 15-03 – WIOA Partnerships - 04/01/2015

“NEBRASKA WORKFORCE INNOVATION AND OPPORTUNITY ACT

WHEREAS, the variety of employment and training programs available in Nebraska present

numerous opportunities to more effectively manage, through coordination, the workforce

development needs of the employer and applicant community'; and

WHEREAS, one agency needs to be designated as the lead agency for acting as the grant

recipient for the purpose of administering and monitoring the expenditure of grant funds received by

the State of Nebraska under pursuant to the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act…

 

May also include a representatives of community-based organizations

that have demonstrated experience and expertise in addressing the

employment, training, or education needs of individuals with barriers to

employment, including organizations that serve veterans or that provide or

support competitive, integrated en1ployment for individuals with disabilities;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Employment First Nebraska’s Welfare Reform Program - 10/23/2017

~~“Employment First is the name of Nebraska’s welfare reform program.  The primary purpose of Employment First is to provide temporary, transitional support for Nebraska families so that economic self-sufficiency is attained in as expeditious a manner as possible through the provision of training, education, and employment preparation.  Nebraska is dedicated to improving the standard of living and quality of life for each family living in the State that has had to turn to public assistance to help support their family in times of need.  We will accomplish this by promoting personal responsibility and empowering parents to support their families. "

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging

WIOA Co-Enrollment and Common Exit - 06/02/2017

~~“Under Nebraska’s Combined State Plan,1 plan partners are committed to the development and implementation of co-enrollment strategies to support program alignment and career pathways. Co-enrollment: supports coordination across core programs, including planning, reporting, and service delivery; supports a customer-centric design that allows programs to leverage resources for participants who are eligible for, and need, multiple services that cross program lines; and allows tracking career pathway participants whose service happens not within one particular Federal program and funding stream, but across multiple programs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Nebraska Programs for Addiction, Mental Health Facing Cuts - 05/21/2017

“Groups that treat people with addictions, mental health problems and developmental disabilities are bracing for state budget cuts they say could force them to reduce staffing and services for some of Nebraska's most vulnerable residents.

 

The cuts became final last week when lawmakers fell short of the votes needed to override Gov. Pete Ricketts' line-item budget vetoes.

 

Now, service providers are scrounging for places to cut in the face of rising costs and unpaid Medicaid claims from the state's new managed care system, Heritage Health. Some providers have said they're still waiting on claims the system should have paid three months ago.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

2017 Transition Summer Programs - 05/04/2017

~~“2017 Transition Summer ProgramsTwenty innovative short-term programs to provide career exploration, job readiness, and work based learning opportunities for students with disabilities during the summer of 2017 were developed.

Summary of all of the Nebraska VR SummerTransition Program proposals that were approved by the State Board of Education on May 4, 2017. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Transition Services Planner - 05/01/2017

~~“PURPOSE OF THE TRANSITION SERVICES PLANNERThe purpose of this Transition Services Planner is to provide information to educators about the Nebraska VR program. It is an instrument to help educators and Nebraska VR staff bridge the transition requirements of IDEA and WIOA while providing meaningful and effective transition services to students with disabilities. The Planner will facilitate discussion between local educators and Nebraska VR staff and serve as a catalyst to develop a written working agreement.This planning effort will help:1) Promote a coordinated effort between the school district, Educational Service Unit (ESU) and the local Nebraska VR Office;2) Implement strategies that will facilitate effective transition services and eliminate duplication of services; and,3) Ensure the development of an effective partnership on behalf of students with disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Nebraska Developmental Disabilities Provider Handbook - 01/01/2017

“DDD provides funding and oversight of community-based providers. DD services can be provided by either an independent or agency provider. Developmental Disability (DD) Services focus on helping participants live the most independent lives possible. Goals are identified and habilitation programs (training) may be developed to teach skills. Goals focus on employment, independent living, and community access. DD Service Coordination provides oversight”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE Title 404 - Community Supports Program (CSP) - 07/16/2011

Section 9-003.02D The Community Living and Day Supports service includes the following components:    • Supports to enable the individual to maintain or obtain employment. This may include someone hired to accompany and support the individual in an integrated work setting. Integrated settings are those considered as available to all members of the community. Payment for the work performed by the individual is the responsibility of the employer. Covered services do not include those provided in specialized developmental disability provider settings, workstations, or supported employment services.     • Supports to enable the individual to access services and opportunities available in community settings. This may include accessing general community activities, performing community volunteer work, and accessing services provided in community settings such as senior centers and adult day centers. Supports provided under CLDS must be those that are above and beyond the usual services provided in such a setting and not duplicate services expected to be the responsibility of the center.   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Nebraska Community Supports Program (CSP) - 07/16/2011

 “The Department offers a system of supports and services intended to allow individuals with developmental disabilities to maximize their independence as they live, work, recreate, and participate in their communities.”

 

“The Community Supports Program (CSP) is designed to offer alternatives to the traditional model of services available through the Department. The traditional model provides for services consisting of day and residential habilitation and respite care, provided only by agencies certified as specialized providers of developmental disabilities services. The CSP allows for a broader array of services to be provided by developmental disability service providers and/or other community (individual or agency) providers. This is intended to give the individual more control over the type of services received and providers of those services, as well as allowing individuals to purchase services other than habilitative training. The underlying philosophy of the Community Supports Program is to build upon the individual and family strengths and to strengthen and support informal and formal services already in place.”  

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Alliance for Full Participation - 01/12/2011

 

“The Alliance for Full Participation (AFP) is a formal partnership of leading developmental disabilities organizations with a common vision—to create a better and more fulfilling quality of life for people with developmental disabilities. AFP supports a network of state teams, dedicated to promoting full participation for people with developmental disabilities.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Planning Council on Developmental Disabilities State Plan 2017-2021

Goal 3: Employment

 Influence systems change to provide increased opportunities for more individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (I/DD) of diverse identities to pursue an employment path of their choice.

· Provide support to address barriers, advocate for, and expand opportunities for an increased number of individuals to participate in community integrated employment or entrepreneurship.

 · Increase opportunities for self-advocates to share employment experiences and promote community integrated employment and entrepreneurship with peers and stakeholders.

· Provide access to benefits planning services for an increased number of service providers, individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities and their families to support the person’s employment choices.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

Nebraska Aging and Disability Resource Center

~~“Welcome to Nebraska’s Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC) website. The ADRC was established by the Nebraska Legislature under LB 320 in 2015. The program was made permanent with LB 793 in 2018. This effort is coordinated by Nebraska’s Department of Health and Human Services’ State Unit on Aging, through local Area Agencies on Aging, and in partnership with the disability organizations listed to the left.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Mental Health Partnerships

“Nebraska Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) continues its long standing partnership with Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services - Behavioral Health Services (NE-DHHS) to make available employment services to Nebraskans with severe mental illness. VR and NE-DHHS fund six regional programs that provide Supported Employment services across the State.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Youth Leadership Council

~~“NYLC was created “by youth for youth”. We are leaders and advocates who experience a disability. We travel the state promoting disability awareness and educating our peers on transitioning to college or work.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Vocational Rehabilitation Workforce Development Partnerships

There are currently three local service delivery areas and 20 One-Stop Career Centers in Nebraska. Local Workforce Investment Boards oversee the Greater Lincoln, Greater Omaha and Greater Nebraska service delivery areas. In addition, there is a Nebraska Workforce Investment Board that is responsible for administering the statewide system. Collaboration between Nebraska VR and the other mandated partners is intended to provide:

1.     Easier access to services

2.     More comprehensive services

3.     Better labor market information

4.     A seamless system of service delivery

5.     Improved long-term employment outcomes for persons with disabilities

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

2017 Disability Employment and Inclusion Awards - 07/01/2017

“Two Nebraska VR partners received awards for their role in creating inclusive workplaces and advocacy for disability employment during a ceremony October 10 at the State Capitol.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) 2012

 

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Nebraska Money Follows the Person

Thousands of individuals across the country, through the efforts of Money Follows the Person and other programs, have successfully transitioned from an institutional setting to the community. Nebraska’s own transition stories are inspiring and motivating.    Depending upon your specific needs – whether you are aged, have a physical or developmental disability, or a traumatic brain injury – supportive services such as the following help people live successfully in community-based settings:    • Home Care/Chore Services     • Home-Delivered Meals     • Adult Day Health Care    • Assisted Living Service     • Nutrition Services Independence Skills Management     • Personal Emergency Response System     • Transportation     • Assistive Technology Supports and Home Modification     • Home Again Services    • Respite     • Home Health     • Habilitation Services     • Team Behavioral Consultation     • Child Care for Children with Disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, specifically— those who have lost their health insurance due to business and factory closures, migrant farm workers that are in a need for health insurance, and those individuals that are working contract or working from home that need health insurance. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Children's Hospital, Great Plains Regional Medical Center, Nebraska Orthopedic Hospital, Gothenburg Hospital, Nebraska Dept. of Labor (Rapid Response), Faith based groups, Food pantries, and Healthcare coalitions.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Glenn HughesPhone: (816) 524-9477Email: ghughes@hrserase.com” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ready, Set, Go - 05/01/2019

~~“There are many decisions young adults must make when planning for life after high school. These materials and resources help young adults with developmental disabilities make decisions about supports as they move from high school to adult life. Ready, Set, Go! is for:• Transition students and young adults who are eligible for services through DHHS-DD.• Family members and friends of eligible persons.• IEP team members and others working with transition students and young adults.” 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Serving Individuals with Disabilities in Workforce Services: 2018 Nebraska Workforce Conference - 05/23/2018

~~“Objectives:

-WIOA and Nebraska Vision for Customer Service-Seamlessness for Career Services in AJCs-Partnerships with the Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired and the Nebraska Vocational Rehabilitation-Responsiveness for Job Seekers with Disability-Ways to Build Service Capacity”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Department of Developmental Disabilities Training Resources

“The Division of Developmental Disabilities is committed to providing training that results in improved lives for our participants. Please feel free to use as many training resources as you see fit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Leads to Success - Seeing the Possibilities

This presentation provides an explanation of, and service descriptions and payment rates for, Supported Employment. It includes Customized Employment as a valid application as Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Opening Doors: A Transition Guide

“This protocol is the result of the dialogue and cooperation of the Nebraska

Transition Team members and other statewide representatives. Members met for three sessions with a facilitator for the purpose of better defining roles, responsibilities, tasks, principles, and relationships between entities working with blind, visually impaired, and deaf-blind children and youth…The result of this collaborative effort is intended to foster a more comprehensive seamless transition model for children and youth -birth through adulthood. By drawing on knowledge from a wide variety of resources we are able to better leverage learning, provide informed choice, and produce individual programs that are creative and responsive to needed and appropriate services”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Alliance for Full Participation Webinars - Employment First

Employment First has become a national movement among some state agencies, employment and self advocacy organizations, such as National APSE, AFP and SABE, and employment service providers. The common thread among these groups is that employment is expected to be the first priority when discussing and offering day services for youth and adults with disabilities. This session will focus on several ingredients that are important when considering setting employment as the 1st priority. Topics include career planning, how to create the expectation of work, setting employment outcomes for your agency, data collection (what’s important to track and why), and nationally recognized approaches to promote change within a service organization. 

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nebraska Medicaid State Plan

~~“The State Plan is the official document describing the nature and scope of the Nebraska Medicaid Program. There are seven sections that comprise the State Plan (Part 1) as well as many accompanying attachments and amendments (Parts 2 and 3). Each part was developed by Nebraska and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Money Follows the Person

Thousands of individuals across the country, through the efforts of Money Follows the Person and other programs, have successfully transitioned from an institutional setting to the community. Nebraska’s own transition stories are inspiring and motivating.    Depending upon your specific needs – whether you are aged, have a physical or developmental disability, or a traumatic brain injury – supportive services such as the following help people live successfully in community-based settings:    • Home Care/Chore Services     • Home-Delivered Meals     • Adult Day Health Care    • Assisted Living Service     • Nutrition Services Independence Skills Management     • Personal Emergency Response System     • Transportation     • Assistive Technology Supports and Home Modification     • Home Again Services    • Respite     • Home Health     • Habilitation Services     • Team Behavioral Consultation     • Child Care for Children with Disabilities  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE Comprehensive DD Waiver for Adults (0396.R02.00)

Provides group home residential hab, integrated community employment, prevocational workshop hab, respite, assistive technology and supports, behavioral risk services, community inclusion day hab, community living and day supports, companion home residential hab, extended family home residential hab, home mods, in-home residential hab, medical risk services, PERS, retirement services, team behavioral consultation, vehicle mods, vocational planning hab, workstation hab for individuals w/autism, MR, DD ages 21 - no max age

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE Day Services Waiver for Adults w/DD (0394.R03.00)

~~“Provides day habilitation, prevocational services, respite, supported employment – individual, adult companion service, adult day services, assistive technology, behavioral  risk services, community living and day supports, consultative assessment service, crisis intervention support, environmental modification assessment, habilitative community inclusion, habilitative workshop, home modification, integrated community employment, medical risk services, personal emergency response system (PERS)retirement services, supported employment – enclave, supported employment - follow along, team behavioral consultation, transitional services, transportation, vehicle modification, vocational planning habilitation service, workstation habilitation services for individuals w/autism, ID, DD ages 21 - no max age “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

NE HCBS Waiver for Children w/DD and their Families (4154.R06.00)

~~“Provides prevocational services, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment – individual, adult companion service, adult day services, assistive technology, consultative assessment service, crisis intervention support, environmental modification assessment, habilitative community inclusion, habilitative workshop, home modifications, homemaker services, in-home residential habilitation, personal emergency response system, supported employment – enclave, supported employment - follow along, transitional services, transportation, vehicle modification for individuals w/autism, ID/DD ages 0 to no max age “
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

With the right level of focus on Employment First systems-change efforts, individuals with disabilities could be living "The Good Life" in the state of Nebraska.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nebraska’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,920,076
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0%
Change from
2016 to 2017
112,418
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.73%
Change from
2016 to 2017
55,391
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.73%
Change from
2016 to 2017
49.27%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
84.97%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 1,896,190 1,907,116 1,920,076
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 101,734 112,418 112,418
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 49,485 53,323 55,391
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 858,156 855,042 869,515
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 48.64% 47.43% 49.27%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 83.42% 83.88% 84.97%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.00% 3.20% 2.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.80% 19.10% 16.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 11.80% 10.40% 10.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 106,683 116,916 117,474
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 102,638 105,995 110,026
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 187,720 197,997 201,170
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,733 11,017 11,927
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 12,277 13,793 16,956
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,320 2,961 2,323
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,650 2,325 2,643
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 2,743 4,846 6,032
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 2,121 3,338 3,008

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,062 3,058 2,989
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 11.70% 11.70% 11.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 42,162 41,726 41,249

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,237 4,944 4,696
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 8,451 8,405 8,295
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 15,165 15,398 14,708
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 34.50% 32.10% 31.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.30% 5.40% 6.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.00% 7.40% 704.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.00% 0.70% 0.70%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 54.10% 51.10% 46.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 605 652 748
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 801 895 911
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 115 79 90
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 6,163 6,189 5,628

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,250 4,143 5,183
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.06 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 27 15
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 11 19 11
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 92.00% 70.00% 73.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.59 1.00 0.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,260
2,974
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 2 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 243 215 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 613 546 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 970 855 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 889 765 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 543 578 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 39.90% 39.90% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,715 1,429 1,547
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 61,150 61,781 61,638
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 74 79 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 190 182 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,134,000 $537,000 $573,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $34,020,000 $10,958,000 $10,410,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $113,941,000 $114,306,000 $115,596,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $84,723,000 $8,261,000 $8,744,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 4.00% 2.00% 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,546 760 768
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,011 929 876
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,551 3,535 3,533
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 8.90 5.50 5.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 76.07% 75.54% 76.75%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 6.36% 6.62% 6.68%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.22% 2.12% 2.08%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 92.25% 100.00% 89.41%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 37.05% 34.96% 38.16%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.79% 62.86% 61.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 85.01% 82.43% 78.69%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.74% 27.90% 23.68%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 165,689
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 251
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 73,915
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 88,454
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 162,369
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 82
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 167
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 249
AbilityOne wages (products). $791,551
AbilityOne wages (services). $849,657

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 10 8 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 14 10 13
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 2 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,070 469 456
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 49 32 32
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,122 503 490

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~Impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA and Nebraska’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, lead to the conclusion that an emphasis on Customized Employment can increase the opportunities for successful employment and expanded partnerships with employers. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, Nebraska is receiving intensive technical assistance and training from the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) in the following areas: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. (Page 156) Title I

Increase our capacity to provide customized employment services and options to consumers and employers. Nebraska VR is one of the states selected to receive technical assistance under the JD-VR TAC. The impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA, and the agency’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, point to an increased emphasis on Customized Employment. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, there are two areas of need for intensive technical assistance and training to be provided: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach; and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. The JD-VR TAC will work with Nebraska VR to increase our capacity to provide customized employment services through the provision of training and technical assistance. The expected outcomes are:
 An increase in the number and type of businesses adopting a customized employment approach and establishing a CE job for an individual with a significant disability.
 An increase in the number of individuals with a significant disability, especially individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability, participating in competitive integrated employment.
 An increase in the quality of employment (as determined by the salary, benefits, number of hours worked, etc.). (Page 175) Title I

6. Improving performance
Strategies to improve the performance of the State with respect to the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA.
 Develop strategies in coordination with the appropriate core partners and participating Combined State Plan program partners once benchmarks are established.
 Implement the technical assistance and training on customized employment with VR staff and providers. Technical assistance will be provided by the Job-Driven VR Technical Assistance Center. (Page 186) Title I

The services made available by Nebraska VR using Title VI and Title I funds are limited to those initial services resulting in stable job performance in an integrated competitive work setting. These may include, as appropriate to individual needs:
1. An assessment of the need for supported employment services is supplementary to and provided after an assessment of eligibility and rehabilitation needs has been determined that a person is eligible for services and is a person with a most significant disability.
2. Development and placement in competitive integrated employment includes customized employment services for the maximum number of hours possible consistent with the person’s unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, and capabilities.
3. Intensive on-the-job skills training and other training provided by skilled job trainers, co-workers, and other qualified persons is based on a systematic analysis of the work to be performed, and a systematic analysis of the employer’s performance expectations and requirements. It is conducted in accordance with a written plan identifying the methods of teaching, instruction, and behavior management necessary to enable the individual to acquire skills and master the work to be performed, to regulate behavior in accordance with the employer’s requirements and expectations, and achieve stable job performance. The training provides for a systematic reduction of intensive teaching, instruction, and behavior management methods to the lowest intervention level necessary to maintain stable job performance. (Page 192-193) Title I

For the effort to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs (CRPs), NCBVI collaborates with a wide range of community partners statewide, working together to develop and improve services. Job coaching to Supported/customized Employment clients is provided through contracts with community rehabilitation programs. Agency staff members also work with CRPs and independent living centers to assure that services are coordinated and meeting the needs of Nebraskans with disabilities, especially those who are blind or visually impaired along with multiple disabilities. NCBVI partners with community rehabilitation programs (Martin Luther Homes, Quality Living) and other entities. In addition to services specific to individuals, collaboration on other projects occurs as the need and opportunity arise. The activities enable NCBVI to inform many persons about the services available to individuals who are blind, thus expanding opportunities to those who are, or who may become, eligible for services of the Vocational Rehabilitation or the Supported Employment program. The agency website is updated continuously and provides information to the public about available services and resources, avenues to apply for services, and ask questions, and so forth. Work is being done to enhance a social media presence with information and updates about NCBVI events, activities, and services. The agency collaborates with the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Developmental Disabilities services (NDHHS-DDD) to identify potential clients, coordinate service plans and share funding for those individuals in the System who are described as blind and visually impaired. (Page 214) Title I
 

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The Council is composed of 3 subcommittees: Client Services, Employment and Transition. Each SRC member selects a subcommittee to participate in based on their interests and background. These committees provide the Council members the opportunity to focus and provide feedback on topics relevant to their individual group.

 The Client Services Committee provided feedback on client satisfaction surveys, services to VR clients and recommended cultural awareness training and technical assistance on materials and outreach strategies directed toward Nebraskans who are deaf and hard of hearing and the Latino populations. The Client Services Committee formed the subcommittee, Consumer Input Committee, as another avenue to gather feedback and recommendations. The Consumer Input Committee consists of past and present clients of Nebraska VR. This year the Consumer Input Committee reviewed: 1) Discover the Job that Works for You booklet section Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) Important Information for You, 2) Application: section Understanding Your Rights as an Applicant, 3) Marketing: Magnet Promotional Item Survey and Nebraska VR bus advertisements, and 4) MyVR Survey.
 The Employment Committee selected the Entrepreneur of Distinction Annual Award winners, discussed and provided feedback on VR job placement services, job seeking training, Certificate Programs and Project Search.
 The Transition Committee focused on policies and procedures relating to high school aged clients and families including discussions on pre-employment transition services as defined in WIOA. (Page 147) Title I
 
 The Assistive Technology Partnership/Education receives funding from Nebraska VR for the AT Education Specialists to focus on transition youth and coordinate services with Nebraska VR offices. The Education Specialists host technology conferences, participate in self-advocacy workshops, provide AT demonstrations and individualized services and AT recommendations to transition youth across the state.
 Nebraska VR supports 17 Project SEARCH sites across the state. Consistent with the national model, Project SEARCH is a partnership between Nebraska VR, a business, area school systems, the Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Assistive Technology Partnership, and Division of Developmental Disabilities. The one year school-to-work program is business led and takes place entirely in the workplace. The experience includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. While completing the rotations, the students have the opportunity to gain transferable skills, practice self-advocacy and demonstrate work readiness. Nebraska’s Project SEARCH programs are hosted in a variety of businesses including hotels, hospitals, retail and distribution. (Pages 153-154) Title I

Work-based learning experiences
Many of the activities highlighted under (1) VR Services also enhance Nebraska VR’s transition services, including pre-employment transition services. For example, as the Business Account Managers are working with employers, opportunities for students and youth are also explored. These work-based learning opportunities may include informational interviews, job shadows, company tours, On-the-Job Evaluation and Training, internships, and placement assistance.
Certificate programs
For the past several years, Nebraska VR has developed and maintained Certificate Programs. These Certificate Programs provide hands-on training for students and youth with disabilities (adult VR clients may also enroll). The specialized training results from a partnership with local Nebraska VR service offices, three to five core business partners in the area, a community college and local schools. Students take classes, tour businesses and either work part-time or participate in an internship with employer partners. The programs are business-driven, short term, real life trainings that teach both technical hard skills and soft skills. Each training opportunity gives the students an opportunity to acquire the skills that they need to pursue in-demand jobs and careers. To date, the Certificate Programs offered include: Electrician Helper, Welding, Auto Mechanic Helper, Construction, HVAC Helper, Para-educator, and Community Health Worker. Nebraska VR will explore increasing the number of Certificate Programs available in the state. (Page 156) Title I

The one year school-to-work program is business led and takes place entirely in the workplace. The experience includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. While completing the rotations, the students have the opportunity to gain transferable skills, practice self-advocacy, and demonstrate work readiness. Nebraska’s Project SEARCH programs are hosted in a variety of businesses including hotels, hospitals, retail and distribution.

There are currently two Project SEARCH Business Advisory Councils (BAC) in Nebraska. The goal of the BAC is to broaden the program across a variety of industries, provide individuals with disabilities access to the resources they need to be successfully employed in a wide-range of fields and serve as a platform to further educate business professionals about the benefits of employing individuals with disabilities. The measurable goal is 100% employment of Project SEARCH intern participants. Between the two Nebraska BACs there are more than thirty businesses involved. Nebraska VR will consider increasing the number of Project SEARCH sites available in the state and will also consider the expansion of BACs. (Page 157) Title I

VR Rehabilitation Specialists make determinations and provide specialized direct services to persons with disabilities pursuing employment goals. Their responsibilities include: eligibility, Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) and amendment approval, IPE progress, and employment outcome determinations, community assessment, career counseling, disability awareness counseling, personal adjustment counseling, rehabilitation engineering, independent living skill training, personal management training, social skills training, job placement assistance, and job retention assistance. These activities generally require independent complex decision-making and problem-solving based on extensive knowledge of disability, human behavior, the world of work, and the community.  (Pages 162-163) Title I

For FY 2018, under the Order of Selection, Nebraska VR will continue to provide services to all individuals who are already receiving services under an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) prior to final approval of the Order of Selection by RSA and implementation by Nebraska VR. The projected number of individuals not receiving services and the estimated cost for services (projected savings) is:
 Priority Group 2: 1,158 individuals, with 475 individuals projected to require cost services at an average cost of $1,739 with a projected savings of $826,090.
 Priority Group 3: 581 individuals, with 233 individuals projected to require cost services at an average cost of $1,739 with a projected savings of $405,219. (Page 171) Title I

Increase the participation of Native Americans in VR services. The State Rehabilitation Council suggested that the agency explore opportunities to collaborate with any existing American Indian VR programs in Nebraska to increase the number of Native Americans with disabilities being served. The one existing program in Nebraska is no longer funded. The agency will identify possible partnerships to encourage other eligible tribes/organizations to apply for an AIVR grant as available.
Collaborate with Workforce Development core partners on the development and availability of soft skills training for all individuals. The core partners will explore the possibility of joint soft skills training. The potential collaboration could reduce duplication and increase the availability of training opportunities across the state.
 Goal 3: Strengthen the alignment between education, training, and employer workforce needs.
Maintain the Business Account Manager model and consider expansion to other areas of the state. Nebraska VR has hired Business Account Managers (BAM) in Omaha, Norfolk, and Kearney to establish relationships with businesses, trade associations, business and human resources organizations to identify staffing patterns, skill requirements, support needs, training preferences, etc., to be an effective representative to Nebraska VR teams on behalf of businesses. (Page 174) Title I

The transition youth conferences and the Youth Leadership Council are innovation and expansion activities that focus on students who are potentially eligible or are under an IEP or Section 504 Plan. The Youth Leadership Council members reach out to other students who can benefit from VR services and serve as role models for transitioning from school to work. Transition youth conferences provide opportunities for career exploration and development of work soft skills including independent living skills. The number of youth conferences and the number of youth attending continue to increase due to additional support from VR.

The State Rehabilitation Council provides input and guidance on VR’s innovative approaches to service delivery including the Meet You Were You Are service delivery model, the use of motivational interviewing techniques, and the expanded use of social media to engage consumers (MyVR). Members also provide direction on strategies to reach underserved and unserved through expanded and innovative marketing strategies. (Page 187) Title I

Extent of supported employment services
1. Assessment of rehabilitation need for supported employment services are made available to the extent necessary to determine the nature and scope of services to be provided under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) to achieve supported employment or to determine on the basis of clear evidence that an employment outcome cannot be achieved
2. Job development including customized employment and placement services are provided to the extent necessary to place the individual into competitive integrated employment consistent with client’s informed choice.
3. Intensive on-the-job and other training services are provided to the person to the extent necessary to achieve stable job performance, or to determine on the basis of clear evidence this cannot be achieved. Services are provided for a maximum of 24 cumulative months, or for youth with a disability (16-24) utilizing Title VI funds up to 48 cumulative months unless a longer period is provided in the IPE of the person. (Page 193) Title I

Transition planning by personnel of the designated State agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and implementation of their individualized education programs;
 
Specifically, included in the agreement are provisions for consultations and technical assistance, transition planning, coordinating the IEP and the IPE for roles and responsibilities amongst key individuals, and financial responsibilities, and procedures for outreach. The purpose is to coordinate and promote the cooperation of the programs and services available to students who are blind, deaf—blind and visually impaired during the transition process. (Page 202) Title I

NCBVI provides information to educators and to VR personnel about training opportunities relevant to personnel development in the fields of both education and vocational rehabilitation. A series of personnel training sessions relating to the handbook were held in a coordinated effort between NCBVI and personnel covered by IDEA. In FFY 2014 and 2015, NCBVI Counselors continued to provide the tool, and instructions as needed, statewide to educators, parents, and other persons involved with educating blind and visually impaired school students within Nebraska. Additional joint personnel development efforts will be held when specific issues of mutual concern are identified. For example, teachers of blind children from the public school system provide presentations to NCBVI at Staff Meetings. At the NCBVI Annual State Staff Meeting in 2013, a speaker from Nebraska Department of Education/Special Populations gave a presentation on the IEP process and the role of VR Counselors in that process, working with educators, families and students. NCBVI staff members provide presentations at training sessions of the school system, university and college classes, and other opportunities which arise. We will continue to explore ways to assure success in education and quality employment. One avenue will be collaborating with the WinAHEAD organization (Western Iowa and Nebraska Association on Higher Education and Disabilities). On an ongoing basis, the primary emphasis will be individual communication between NCBVI counselors and parents, teachers and others in the education system. (Page 211) Title I

NCBVI Supported Employment clients are transitioned to extended services provided by other public agencies, non-profit organizations, employers, natural supports or other entities after no longer than 24 months, or 48 months for blind or visually impaired youth after placement in Supported Employment, unless a longer period is set forth in the IPE. The transition to extended services is based upon a) substantial progress made toward hours per week goal in the IPE, b) the client is stabilized on the job, and c) that extended services will be available and provided without a break in services.  (Page 230) Title I

Career Pathways

~~Career Pathways Advancement Project (CPAP)
Nebraska VR was one of four state VR programs to receive a Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Grant from Rehabilitation Services Administration. The Career Pathways Advancement Project (CPAP) uses an Upskill/Backfill model with a focused outreach to Nebraska VR clients successfully employed in the last four years in order to assist in career advancement options within the high demand industries of Information Technology, Manufacturing, Healthcare, Construction, and Transportation, and Distribution and Logistics. (Page 51) Title I

H. Improving access to postsecondary credentials
Describe how the State’s strategies will improve access to activities leading to recognized postsecondary credentials, including Registered Apprenticeship certificates. This includes credentials that are industry-recognized certificates, licenses or certifications, and that are portable and stackable.
Through the state’s education-related strategies, plan partners improve access to activities leading to recognized postsecondary credentials, including Registered Apprenticeship certificates, industry-recognized certificates, licenses, certifications, and credentials that are portable and stackable, including:
 Nebraska’s industry sector partnership strategy, the Next Generation Industry Partnerships initiative, which includes a focus on education and training leading to postsecondary credentials that are portable and stackable;
 regional initiatives that connect in-demand industry sectors and occupations with career pathways, will continued focus on activities leading to recognized postsecondary credentials, such as Nebraska’s Connecting SNAP Clients to Better Job Opportunities initiative (described in Section II.c.1. of this plan);
 certificate training programs that are business driven partnerships with local community colleges, Nebraska VR, and businesses within targeted in demand occupations;
 promotion of career pathways, including career readiness, throughout the one-stop delivery system; (Page 66) Title I

A 21st century understanding of the evolving labor force begins with an awareness that the workforce will continue to grow and reflect the increasing diversity of America. While increasing numbers of individuals with disabilities will be entering the labor force, such individuals currently remain a largely untapped labor source. Women’s employment rates will rise while the employment rates for men will decline slightly. The percentage of individuals from minority groups entering the workforce will also grow.
The workforce will become increasing urban and the manufacturing sector will slowly decline while the service-producing sector will grow as will e-commerce. Technology and globalization will continue to shape the labor force and require a workforce with highly technical skills. How quickly graduate rehabilitation programs will revise curriculum to prepare graduates in a 21st understanding of the evolving labor force remains to be seen. Consequently Nebraska VR must provide staff with timely training on Nebraska labor market information and trends, career pathways, the world of work and career connections in order to equipping VR staff with the knowledge to counsel individuals with disabilities in their pursuit of work and career and provide effective employment services. The outreach and partnership efforts of our Business Account Managers with Nebraska businesses will be also be critical to understanding their respective labor needs in order for VR to prepare, train and offer skilled applicants with disabilities. (Page 163) Title I

With the implementation of WIOA, it is expected that there will be a significant reversal of the decline in referrals to the VR program in recent years under the former workforce investment system. The major contributing factor was the move to on-line registration and on-line services at the One Stop Centers that was not adequately identifying applicants who had disabilities. The collaboration that has occurred among the core partners since the passage of WIOA has already resulted in a greater awareness of each core partners program and opportunities for reciprocal referrals and service coordination. Work is currently underway on the development of a common intake.
Nebraska VR staff will continue to serve on the new regional workforce boards which will now have a larger business representation. It is important that VR staff are aware of and promote among its clients, the jobs-driven, work-based learning, career pathways and industry sector initiatives put forth by the workforce development system. (Page 169) Title I

Move more individuals to economic self-sufficiency through the implementation of the Career Pathways Advancement Project. The CPAP is funded under a grant from RSA and uses an “Upskill/Backfill” model to train individuals in emerging and growing industry sectors. Career Pathway Recruiters will contact 1,200 former VR clients now working in targeted industry sectors such as information technology, manufacturing, transportation, distribution and logistics, to inform them of an opportunity to receive additional training and education to advance their careers. The grant will provide the necessary financial assistance to allow individuals with disabilities to participate in an established career pathway initiative in collaboration with the Nebraska Department of Labor, several postsecondary educational institutions, and businesses. Approximately 50-60 individuals will move up the career pathway by upgrading their skills and knowledge, creating opportunities for other individuals with disabilities to backfill the vacant positions. Individuals with disabilities will be more likely to be economically self-sufficient as they advance upward in their career pathway in the targeted high demand sectors. (Page 175) Title I

Apprenticeship
Nebraska VR has engaged in a dual customer approach to the provision of employment-related services for many years as embodied in its mission statement, “We help people with disabilities prepare for, obtain, and maintain employment while helping businesses recruit, train, and retain employees with disabilities.” This has led to a job-driven approach in Nebraska VR’s development of customized training programs such as Project SEARCH, Certificate Programs, and On the Job Evaluation and Training sites. Nebraska VR recently extended the job-driven emphasis with the implementation of a “Meet You Where You Are” model that includes a rapid engagement (Progressive Employment) focus engaging individuals in an element of work as quickly as possible. VR staff are actively involved in the recruitment and support of businesses to partner with VR on rapid engagement activities. (Page 155) Title I Certificate programs For the past several years, Nebraska VR has developed and maintained Certificate Programs. These Certificate Programs provide hands-on training for students and youth with disabilities (adult VR clients may also enroll). The specialized training results from a partnership with local Nebraska VR service offices, three to five core business partners in the area, a community college and local schools. Students take classes, tour businesses and either work part-time or participate in an internship with employer partners. The programs are business-driven, short term, real life trainings that teach both technical hard skills and soft skills. Each training opportunity gives the students an opportunity to acquire the skills that they need to pursue in-demand jobs and careers. To date, the Certificate Programs offered include: Electrician Helper, Welding, Auto Mechanic Helper, Construction, HVAC Helper, Para-educator, and Community Health Worker. Nebraska VR will explore increasing the number of Certificate Programs available in the state. (Page 156) Title I Skill training services provided in integrated competitive employment and community settings. Many individuals with cognitive disabilities struggle with traditional postsecondary classroom and/or segregated training programs. In addition to On-The-Job Training services, Certificate Programs and Project Search sites have proven to be another successful alternative for adults and students to achieve employment without pursuing postsecondary training. The collaboration between businesses and community colleges in the Certificate Programs and business and high schools in the Project Search programs results in individuals with cognitive and other impairments acquiring the desired work skills and jobs. Post-secondary training continues to be the highest expenditure category among the VR services as individuals choose careers and professions that require certificates and degrees. VR staff provides occupational information and Nebraska Labor Market data on demand occupations so clients can make an informed decision on their vocational goal. (Page 168) Title I Maintain the Business Account Manager model and consider expansion to other areas of the state. Nebraska VR has hired Business Account Managers (BAM) in Omaha, Norfolk, and Kearney to establish relationships with businesses, trade associations, business and human resources organizations to identify staffing patterns, skill requirements, support needs, training preferences, etc., to be an effective representative to Nebraska VR teams on behalf of businesses. The BAMs will seek out opportunities to establish work-based learning partnerships, OJE/OJTs, apprenticeships, and internships with businesses. These positions take a jobs driven approach in aligning the education and training requirements of businesses with the qualifications of VR eligible clients to better meet the workforce needs of employers. Maintain and expand the number of certificate programs that serve as an entry-level training program into an established career pathway. Certificate Programs offer hands-on training programs for students and adults with disabilities. This opportunity results from a partnership with local Nebraska VR service offices, three to five core business partners in the area, a community college, and local schools. The businesses have common interests in the types of skills and abilities they need to fill job vacancies. Together, the businesses work to identify exactly what they need in job candidates qualified to fill job vacancies. They can fit their hiring and retention needs with the opportunity to design a curriculum. The training includes soft skills training keying in on the basics of being on time and dependable. Work place communication skills are included. Students take classes, tour business, and either work part-time or participate in an internship with employer partners. The agency will look to expand partnerships across the state as well as beyond the current areas of auto tech, HVAC, welding, electrician and community health worker. Collect information on the business/employer level of satisfaction with VR services and programs. Nebraska VR will reinstitute an employer satisfaction survey to provide feedback on business-focused initiatives. This will be revised at the issuance of federal guidance on the final employer measures under WIOA. (Pages 174-175) Title I
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~SSDI and/or SSI recipients may be an underserved population by virtue of the fact that Nebraska VR’s percentage of clients receiving SSDI and/or SSI is below the national and agency mean. However, SSA data indicates that the state’s percentage of individual’s age 18 - 64 on SSDI or SSI on the basis of a disability is also below the national average.
As previously mentioned, youth with intellectual disabilities who exit or would like to exit school at an age appropriate time are unserved until they reach the age of 21 and can then receive Developmental Disabilities services and supports. With the proposed WIOA regulations, Nebraska VR intends to approach the HHS-Developmental Disabilities program with a plan to serve these youth prior to age 21.
Strides have continued to be made in using screening tools and specialized vocational assessments to identify Nebraska VR clients with brain injury and other cognitive disorders in order to better align services and supports required to achieve employment. The identification and use of assistive technology options have also proven to be beneficial to individuals with a brain injury.
Nebraska VR received a TBI Implementation Partnership Grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration in June 2014. The purpose of the 4-year grant is to increase access to rehabilitation and community-based services for individuals with brain injury. Nebraska VR is the lead agency for brain injury in the state and collaborates with several other state agencies and programs to carry out grant-funded activities. While progress has been made, information collected is a part of this grant finds that there are still service gaps and resources that exist for this population. (Page 169) Title I

c. The designated state unit will coordinate activities with any other State agency that is functioning as an employment network under the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency program under Section 1148 of the Social Security Act.
6. Financial Administration of the Supported Employment Program:
a. The designated State agency assures that it will expend no more than 2.5 percent of the State’s allotment under title VI for administrative costs of carrying out this program; and, the designated State agency or agencies will provide, directly or indirectly through public or private entities, non-Federal contributions in an amount that is not less than 10 percent of the costs of carrying out supported employment services provided to youth with the most significant disabilities with the funds reserved for such purpose under section 603(d) of the Rehabilitation Act, in accordance with section 606(b)(7)(G) and (H) of the Rehabilitation Act.
b. The designated State agency assures that it will use funds made available under title VI of the Rehabilitation Act only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including extended services to youth with the most significant disabilities, who are eligible to receive such services; and, that such funds are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act, when providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment, in accordance with section 606(b)(7)(A) and (D), of the Rehabilitation Act.
7. Provision of Supported Employment Services:
a. The designated State agency assures that it will provide supported employment services as defined in section 7(39) of the Rehabilitation Act.
b. The designated State agency assures that:
i. the comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome, in accordance with the requirements of section 606(b)(7)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act
ii. an individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act , which is developed and updated with title I funds, in accordance with sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 606(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act. (Page 199) Title I

Definition of Work Eligible Individuals
Nebraska excludes from the definition of Work Eligible Individuals:
a) A minor parent who is not a head-of-household
b) A non-recipient parent of children receiving TANF/MOE who is ineligible to receive assistance due to immigration status;
c) An individual receiving assistance under an approved Tribal TANF program.
d) A non-recipient parent of children receiving TANF/MOE who is not receiving TANF benefits due to receipt of SSI or SSDI. Nebraska does not consider disabled parents receiving Social Security Disability Income or Supplemental Security Income to be ‘work-eligible individuals’ because they are not included in the TANF payment unit.
e) A parent needed in the home to care for a disabled family member who is not attending school full-time.*  ( Page 239) Title IV

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) offers a wide variety of supports to help maintain individuals within their community. Specific programs which address common support needs include the Social Services Block Grant, Disabled Persons and Family Support, Lifespan Respite and Medicaid Waivers. A sampling of possible support services includes: transportation, energy assistance, housing, telephone assistance, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps), adult day care for caregivers and covering the Medicare premiums for eligible low-income beneficiaries. DHHS also coordinates the Ticket to Work program which encourages persons receiving Social Security Disability to rejoin the workforce. Ticket to Work also provides benefits counselors to help people understand whether participation impacts eligibility for other public benefits.
The local Area Agencies on Aging are familiar with the support needs of the elderly and are experienced in organizing community resources to address those needs. Nebraska currently has one program sub-grantee, National Able Network. National Able Network took over from Experience Works as the sub-grantee in December 2016 following a national Request for Proposal process for national grantees in 2016. National Able Network is also a national grantee whose service area covers most of Nebraska. National Able Network confers with the staff of each of the eight Area Agencies on Aging to address non-employment support needs of SCSEP trainees. The program is also participating in the development of the Nebraska’s Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRC). This partnership will be able to provide information to address a variety of human services as well as a referral to local agencies which provide assistance to our targeted population. The ADRC website provides linkages to a wide variety of community resources for the SCSEP participants. Coordination with ADRC will continue to enhance with the demonstration project implemented in 2016. For more information visit www.nebraska.networkofcare.org. (Page 294) Title IV

Program improvement over the next two years will increasingly focus upon growing industries, developing a closer working relationship with human service organizations, supporting employers and equitably distributing SCSEP positions across our State. Suggestions include:
1. Increase SCSEP focus upon Nebraska’s Hot Jobs. Through partnerships with other Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act organizations develop classroom and on-the job training to address our growth industries. Long term care will be a growth industry as the Baby Boom generation increasingly needs a variety of supportive services.
2. Develop a closer working relationship between SCSEP, Ticket to Work and the Centers for Independent Living.
3. Continue relationships between SCSEP, Nebraska’s Aging Network (Aging and Disability Resource Center and Area Agencies on Aging) and the State Department of Health and Human Services to address the multiple support needs common among SCSEP participants.
4. Work with Medicaid to review program guidelines which count SCSEP training income when determining program eligibility. Current rules require interested older persons to choose between training and Medicaid.
5. Review the distribution of positions to be proportional to the eligible population of persons over 55 years of age, commuting patterns, industry concentrations and education systems (community colleges) in the newly designated economic regions in the state. Distribution within rural areas will be monitored to assure equitable distribution of SCSEP positions. Shifting positions will be accomplished gradually as participants leave this program.
6. Work with SCSEP providers to assure timely reporting of participant activity into SPARQ (US Department of Labor web-based reporting system). (Pages 297-298) Title IV
 

Employer/ Business

~~ Nebraska’s Eligible Training Provider List includes programs offered by the state’s university system, as well as Registered Apprenticeship programs and private postsecondary career schools.
The Nebraska Department of Education reVISION program provides Nebraska public schools with the opportunity to analyze and transform their current career education systems in order to improve their ability to educate a qualified workforce that meets industry needs within an ever-changing economy. Working in collaboration with postsecondary education and regional workforce and economic development leaders, the reVISION process links career educators, school administrators, school counselors, and industry professionals. Under the leadership of the Nebraska Department of Education and in partnership with the Nebraska Departments of Labor and Economic Development, the reVISION process is a strategic approach for schools to analyze their current career education system and make plans, as needed, for adjustments.

 Nebraska VR has established certificate training programs that are business driven partnerships with local community colleges, Nebraska VR, and businesses within targeted in demand occupations. With a dual customer focus, the goal is to offer a short-term training and internship program that will meet the needs of businesses in high demand sectors and result in long-term employment for the individuals who participate. (Page 64) Title I
 

Data Collection
No disability specific information found regarding this element.
511

~~Impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA and Nebraska’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, lead to the conclusion that an emphasis on Customized Employment can increase the opportunities for successful employment and expanded partnerships with employers. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, Nebraska is receiving intensive technical assistance and training from the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) in the following areas: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. (Page 156) Title I

Increase our capacity to provide customized employment services and options to consumers and employers. Nebraska VR is one of the states selected to receive technical assistance under the JD-VR TAC. The impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA, and the agency’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, point to an increased emphasis on Customized Employment. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, there are two areas of need for intensive technical assistance and training to be provided: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach; and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. The JD-VR TAC will work with Nebraska VR to increase our capacity to provide customized employment services through the provision of training and technical assistance. The expected outcomes are:

An increase in the number and type of businesses adopting a customized employment approach and establishing a CE job for an individual with a significant disability.
An increase in the number of individuals with a significant disability, especially individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability, participating in competitive integrated employment.
An increase in the quality of employment (as determined by the salary, benefits, number of hours worked, etc.). (Page 175) Title I
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
The state’s compliance with the requirements of WIOA Sec. 188 and the American with Disabilities Act regarding physical and programmatic accessibility is addressed under Nebraska’s Nondiscrimination Plan, which includes provisions for EO reviews of the one-stop delivery system. A recent EO review of resource rooms in one-stop centers across the state revealed a need for new assistive technology for individuals with disabilities. In 2016, the state submitted an Unemployment Insurance Supplemental Budget Request (SBR) to fund assistive technology upgrades in 11 one-stop centers. Following approval of the request, the state worked with Assistive Technology Partnership (ATP) to identify components required to provide state-of-the art hardware and software to one-stop centers across the state. Based on the outcome of the consultation with ATP and available funding through the SBR, the state is able to upgrade assistive technology in 12 one-stop centers, as described in Table 35. (Pages 84-85) Title I Following installation of the new assistive technology during January and February 2018, training and support will be provided for one-stop center staff to ensure appropriate use and application of assistive technology. One-stop center staff will also receive training and support on addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. The state’s current policy on nondiscrimination describes requirements under WIOA Sec. 188 and 29 CFR Part 38 regarding physical and programmatic accessibility. In addition, the state’s current policy on one-stop center certification includes criteria for assessment of physical and programmatic accessibility, including the use of accessible technology to increase access to high quality workforce services for individuals with disabilities. The criteria by which local boards are required to assess a one-stop center’s physical and programmatic accessibility is listed in Tables 36 and 37. (Page 85) Title I
Vets
NEworks NEworks is a comprehensive web-based case management and reporting system used by the Nebraska Department of Labor (NDOL) for the delivery of Wagner-Peyser, WIOA, Trade Assistance Act, and Jobs for Veterans Act. The management of multiple programs within a single system allows for integrated service delivery and common performance reporting data. NEworks also functions as a self-service labor exchange for jobseekers and employers, the front-end of Unemployment Insurance, and a Labor Market Information module for public users. Additional resources include a resume builder, assessments, communication tools, the eligible training provider list, and online learning. (Page 67) Title I The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes: a. Employment, training, and job placement services How the State intends to provide employment, training and job placement services to Veterans and eligible persons under the JVSG DVOPs and LVERs have formed strong partnerships with other AJC programs to integrate Veteran services and to promote employment, training, and placement opportunities for Veterans throughout the areas of the state. This includes integration with other state and federal agencies. This integration ensures that qualified Veterans can be simultaneously enrolled with other partner programs such as Wagner-Peyser, Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA), and Vocational and Rehabilitation Employment Program (VR&E). Lincoln and Omaha DVOP staff currently attend U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Chapter 31 VR&E orientation sessions hosted in these metro VA offices. Omaha staff partners with Offutt Airman & Family Readiness staff with two significant Veteran focused job fairs each year hosted in the spring and fall. In collaboration with the Nebraska National Guard (NENG), Wagner-Peyser staff routinely attend unit demobilization and reintegration trainings to assist eligible Veterans with employment and training services. These events, known as “Yellow Ribbon Events” provide staff an opportunity to promote Veteran services to newly separated Veterans. DVOPs work with Wagner-Peyser staff to inform and education them on relevant information to promote and share. NDOL conducts training sessions to present job search, resume, and interviewing skills workshops to NENG members during weekend unit trainings and other appropriate occasions. NDOL will develop, implement, and offer new and updated informational sessions during NENG weekend training sessions as needed. State VR has developed a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Task Force and facilitates education and trainings for those providing services to this unique population. NDOL is working to ensure that all DVOP and LVER staff has the opportunity to attend these informational sessions. Traumatic Brain Injury Task Force awareness and resource emails are distributed to DVOP and LVER staff to allow them to get a better understanding of the program and its resources. This allows the DVOP and LVER staff to address the employment barriers created by TBIs. (Page 255) Title IV NDOL has partnered with the state Apprenticeship program to assist with the screening and assessment for the local electrical workers and steamfitters unions. Additionally, NDOL has developed a dedicated Veteran’s services web page outlining available resources. Through this web page, Veterans and military personnel can access a current NDOL office directory with all appropriate location and contact information. The web page includes information regarding priority of service, job search services and location sites, job fair information, and links to other Veteran service organizations, federal employment information, and state and federal benefit information. Due to the isolated nature of the Native American communities living on tribal lands in largely unpopulated rural areas of Nebraska, specific outreach plans for Native American Veterans have not been developed. Success regarding services to Veterans will be monitored and assessed through existing report mechanisms. This includes quarterly reports and reports located within NEworks. These reports currently provide information on employment and training activities on Veterans with SBE’s and the targeted population at a state, regional or local perspective. b. DVOP Specialists and LVER staff roles and responsibilities The duties assigned to DVOP specialists and LVER staff by the State; specifically implementing DVOP and LVER duties or roles and responsibilities as outlined in 38 U.S.C. § 4103A and 4104. These duties must be consistent with current guidance; DVOP Staff: Nebraska’s current staffing model is predominantly a DVOP model. All DVOPs are state merit staff and assigned to a Nebraska Department of Labor location or American Job Center. DVOPs are integrated into the one-stop delivery system and are well versed in the process of developing and maintaining strong relationships with other service providers and program partners to promote employment, training, and placement services for Veterans. (Page 256) Title IV The outlined duties do not preclude the overarching LVER responsibility to ensure that Veterans are provided the full range of labor exchange services to meet their employment and training needs. The LVER shall be available to provide guidance and/or technical assistance to NDOL staff regarding the identification and referral of those Veterans who may benefit from more intensive services provided either by DVOP staff or other partner resources. LVER staff will also conduct employer outreach either independently or through the coordinated efforts of the AJCs and NDOL locations. Through contacts within the employer community, LVER staff work to develop employment and job training opportunities, apprenticeship, and other on-the-job (OJT) training positions to benefit the Veteran community. (Page 259) Title IV NEworks provides self-service options to resources and website links that Veterans and eligible spouses can access from their residence or any accessible public computer. NEworks provides Veterans access to a vast range of job opportunities from corporate job posting boards and external job search engine websites that are imported into NEworks on a daily basis. As prescribed by the VR&E counselor, Chapter 31 Veterans may receive a wide range of services to include: labor market information, assessment, career guidance, and counseling. DVOPs provide case management services as needed, especially for those in need of placement services or other services to become “job ready”. Case management services include the development of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP), in-depth assessments, and regularly scheduled communication or follow-up until the Veteran no longer requires DVOP services or the VR&E counselor closes the Veteran’s file. (Page 266) Title IV Coordination with partner programs that have Job Training funds is key to the successful upskilling of Veterans. Co-enrollment and leveraging of resources will allow Veterans to receive the greatest amount of services. Communication between partners will occur on a formal and informal basis to allow continual support of Veterans through job training programs. Release of Information documentation will be collected when necessary, in order to allow this communication to occur between the programs and not require the Veteran to repeatedly provide the same information multiple times to partnering programs. (Page 267) Title IV
Mental Health

~~Nebraska VR seeks to work cooperatively with numerous other state and local agencies and programs. Collaborative efforts are manifested through coordinated committees throughout the state with Nebraska VR state office and local field staff actively participating. Examples of the committees Nebraska VR serves on includes, but are not limited to, Nebraska Planning Council on Developmental Disabilities, State Advisory Council on Mental Health Services, Nebraska Special Education Advisory Council Standing Committees on 1) Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2) Out of Home Placements (OHP), 3) Transition, 4) Deaf and Hard of Hearing, 5) Nebraska Youth Leadership Council, Nebraska Brain Injury Advisory Council, Local Community Resource Committees, Madonna Community Advisory Council, Assistive Technology Partnership (ATP) Advisory Council, Alternative Finance Loan Advisory Council, Nebraska Children’s Commission Juvenile Services Committee, Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness Advisory Council, Prevention Partnership with the Nebraska Children and Families Foundation, and local Chambers of Commerce, etc.
Nebraska VR maintains interagency agreements with Nebraska Health and Human Services, Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Veterans Administration-Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program for purposes of providing an understood and coordinated effort to achieve employment goals for persons with disabilities. (Page 150) Title I

Project Search agreements are maintained with these business and high schools:
 Businesses: Cabela’s, Walmart Distribution Center, Embassy Suites Downtown Omaha, Embassy Suites La Vista and Embassy Suites Lincoln, PayPal, Valmont Industries, Faith Regional Hospital, St. Francis Hospital, Mercy Medical Center, Mary Lanning Health Care, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital, Columbus Community Hospital, Monroe Meyer Institute, Nebraska Medicine, York Health Care and Good Samaritan Hospital.
 Schools: Bellevue Public School, Columbus Public Schools, Kearney Public Schools, Lincoln Public Schools, Madonna School, Millard Public Schools, Norfolk Public Schools, North Platte Public Schools, Omaha Nations Public Schools, Omaha Public Schools, Papillion LaVista School District, Westside Community Schools, Winnebago Public Schools, Norris Public Schools, Waverly Public Schools, York Public Schools and Educational Service Units 1, 2, 6, 7 & 9. (Page 151) Title I

Nebraska VR (VR) and Nebraska Health and Human Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services (DBH) have developed a Memorandum of Understanding to provide braided funding for an outcome-based milestone system of supported employment for individuals with significant behavioral health disabilities. The negotiating team consisted of the Directors of VR and DBH along with their respective Program Managers and Fiscal Administrators. The tools used to arrive at the model included: reviews of the fidelity models, a signed agreement for sharing information on mutual clients, VR contract costs and the payments to supported employment providers from the six Behavioral Health Regions who receive their funding from the Division of Behavioral Health. (Page 157) Title I

To comply with the previous CSPD requirements prior to WIOA, Nebraska VR elected in 1983 to use the coursework requirements for a Nebraska Certified Professional Counselor under the Nebraska Uniform Credentials Act. (Neb. Rev. Stat. §38-2132). Note that while Nebraska VR uses this academic coursework criteria for hiring, the certification applies only to individuals providing mental health counseling and who identify themselves as a Certified Professional Counselors. Nebraska VR neither requires staff to obtain the credential nor holds its staff out to be Certified Professional Counselors. (Page 163) Title I

Individuals with the most significant disabilities
Major service needs include —
 Impact and challenge from changing demographics in serving individuals with the most significant disabilities. Nebraska continues to see a declining rural population. 59.95% of the state’s population reside within 5 of the 93 counties. The agency must continue to look at how best to allocate staff resources throughout the state and adequately serve both population sets. As noted in the previous comprehensive assessment community resources and employment opportunities seem to follow the population shift. Individuals with serious mental health impairments continue to be the largest disability category being served by Nebraska VR.
 Challenge of locating, accessing and coordinating needed community services and supports. Consistent with prior comprehensive assessment of rehabilitation needs, individuals with the most significant work disabilities continue to have complex needs, complicated by poverty. Social services and support networks, both governmental and non-profit, have not been able to maintain much less increase service levels to meet these needs. The new governor and the legislature will be evaluating the previous trend of moving social services from local community offices to area call centers which has resulted in service access issues. However, Nebraska VR intends to maintain its strategic office locations across the state and travel to all counties. (Page 167) Title I
3. The state agency responsible for providing mental health services
Representatives of NCBVI and the Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Behavioral Health (NDHHS-DBH) have met to discuss how our two agencies can work together to promote competitive integrated employment opportunities on behalf of blind and visually impaired people with behavioral health conditions. Services include a method for providing supported employment services similar to the milestone approach used by Nebraska VR General. Other mental health services are provided statewide by various entities. NCBVI personnel in each office cooperate with those providers to ensure that mutual clients, or persons who may need both VR and mental health services, will be adequately and appropriately served. (Page 205) Title I

A. The provision of extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years
Each blind and visually impaired individual with a developmental disability has a case service coordinator employed by the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Developmental Disabilities (NDHH-DDD). The case service coordinator is responsible for developing an Individualized Service Plan (ISP) for mutual clients served by NCBVI and DDD. When supported employment services are involved, NCBVI provides incentive payments at specific intervals (start of job search, start of employment, stabilization, maintenance, and start of long-term support.). This arrangement is in accordance with the “milestones” model used by Nebraska VR General to serve clients shared with NDHHS-DDD. NCBVI representatives met with a meeting of supervisors of local field office coordinated by NHHS-DDD in November 2012 to explain how the milestone model applies to clients served by NCBVI as well as Nebraska VR General. Since then, NCBVI administrators, supervisors, and counselors continue to meet and build closer working relationships with NHHS-DDD at the state and local levels. NCBVI has also reached out to Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Behavioral Health (NDHHS-DBH) and to the Autism Center of Nebraska to create a mechanism for providing supported employment services to blind and visually impaired clients with mental health conditions and autism. Continued training regarding Supported Employment services is provided to NCBVI counselors, statewide. The total funds projected for FY 2018 is expected to be $30,000. At least 50% will be allocated to blind and visually impaired students in the pre-employment transition services categories. (Page 218) Title I

Blind and visually impaired individuals with mental health issues, acquired brain injury, or other significant disabilities with onset of disability occurring after the age of 21 may also be candidates for SE services , and NCBVI is exploring ways to expand SE opportunities with these individuals through partnerships with relevant state agencies and non-profit SE service providers.
NCBVI works to enhance the potential to achieve employment outcomes in cases that often require maximizing resources and creativity. SE funds are utilized for training of clients who are Deaf-Blind or have other multiple disabilities. As appropriate, some clients are referred to the Helen Keller National Center (HKNC) for intensive training, not available in Nebraska. In recent years, there have been more Deaf-Blind individuals who have personal goals to become employed, who qualify for Supported Employment and for whom Supported Employment is indicated. In addition to the actual job coaching and ongoing supports, it is crucial for such individuals to enhance their capabilities for productive lives. (Page 228) Title I

Collaborative working relationships with state agencies and service providers are currently being explored to extend SE service opportunities to blind and visually impaired consumers with acquired brain injury, mental health conditions, autism, or other significant secondary disabilities. These agencies or service providers include The Nebraska Department of Behavioral Health, the Nebraska Mental Health Association, and Autism Center of Nebraska.
A small number of blind and visually impaired consumers with significant, non-developmental secondary disabilities occurring after age 21 might benefit from SE services. Generally, however, if the individual has a secondary disability other than a significant behavioral health condition or autism, there may not be a source of ongoing financial support for SE services extending beyond the time allowed for NCBVI support. In such cases, the Deputy Director of Services and the immediate supervisor of field services works with the NCBVI Counselor involved to identify possible resources for the ongoing support, such as developing a PASS (Plan to Achieve Self Sufficiency) or personal resources. The Deputy Director also provides statewide training and information to NCBVI personnel regarding the SE program. (Page 229) Title I

Drug Testing and Lab Confirmation Service is defined as a point of collection test by a trained employee in which specimens such as urine, saliva, and breath are used to determine a positive or negative drug test result. Collection of a urine specimen will be conducted through line of sight observation of the client by a trained employee of the same gender. Drug testing includes the collection of a sweat specimen obtained through the use of a patch. A refusal by the client is defined as the client choosing not to provide a specimen to the Contractor at a designated time and place. All refusals must be reported to the DHHS case manager or supervisor by the end of the next business day, unless otherwise noted in the service referral. A no show by the client is defined as the client not being present to provide a specimen to the Contractor at the designated time and place. All no shows must be reported to the DHHS case manager or supervisor by the end of the next business day, unless otherwise noted in the service referral. Laboratory test confirmation is defined as screening the collected specimen by a laboratory to detect the presence of a specific drug(s) or substance(s) and the concentration of the drug(s) or substance(s) as identified and requested in the Service Referral. Laboratory test confirmation includes the written verification of the results. The Contractor’s drug testing protocol and policy shall be consistent with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The Contractor’s drug testing protocol, policy, and rates shall be submitted to each Service Area Contract Liaison where the service will be provided. (Pages 247-248) Title I

 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
NEres combines the required services of the federally funded Re-Employment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) program, along with the jobseeker requirements for regular Unemployment Insurance (UI) compensation. Based on the requirements for each specific program, NEres offers a set of universal services and meets the strictest program criteria of RESEA in order to ensure compliance with all federal and state program requirements. The identified program services required by each separate program and their relation to the universal services provided via NEres, are demonstrated in Illustration 7 and outlined below. (Page 123) Title I Nebraska Department of Labor has a contract with Geographic Solutions Inc. (GSI) for the NEworks Virtual One Stop (VOS) module system used for Employment Services, including labor exchange services. In October 2013, NDOL purchased GSI’s Re-Employment Exchange (REX) Module which allows a single sign-on for customers who utilize services through both the NEworks and Unemployment Insurance systems. In Jan 2014, NDOL transferred hosting services from the Nebraska Office of Chief Information Officer (OCIO) to GSI and added a Mobile Application module. In order to successfully implement the program design of NEres, NDOL purchased the Scheduler & Attendance Tracking Module from GSI, which: 1. Interfaces with the VOS, REX, Mobile App and Benefit Payment System (BPS). 2. Provides the functionality to schedule and track program participants per the correct fund source. The software helps maintain eligibility of benefits for UI claimants not yet employed, by providing eligibility data to the UI system. This module also allows NEres to schedule and track unemployment claimants who are required to attend an orientation and one-on-one meeting at the beginning of their unemployment claim to get them back to work sooner. This technology will replace an outdated scheduling system. (Page 127) Title I Career and training services provided by AJC and NDOL Locations include: Job Search Assistance; Job Referral; Placement Assistance for Jobseekers; Reemployment Services to unemployment insurance claimants; Recruitment services to employers with job openings. Outreach efforts include an explanation of the full menu of services available from the local AJC or NDOL Location as well as specific employment opportunities that are currently available. Support for education and training is provided through the NFJP grantee. The State Workforce Development Boards in coordination with local Workforce Development Boards provide funding recommendations, assistance and guidance on methods of allowing AJC customers to be competitive in a regional and global economy. AJC and NDOL Locations provide MSFWs with referrals to local education institutions for GED, ESL and technical skills training. (Page 133) Title I
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 41 - 50 of 63

NE Project SEARCH - 10/21/2010

 

“Project SEARCH helps students with disabilities learn vocational and competitive skills to help them enter the workplace and to become more independent in the work environment. Nebraska VR will expand Project SEARCH and its services for students with disabilities next year from seven locations statewide to ten. In each of these communities, Project SEARCH has grown through a partnership with Nebraska VR, local community businesses, local schools, the Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Assistive Technology Partnership and the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD Services).”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

NE Assistive Technology Partnership - 06/15/1989

 

“Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and the Assistive Technology Partnership (ATP) have worked together since 1989 when VR wrote the grant to establish a technology-related assistance project (ATP) in Nebraska. ATP Technology Specialists conduct on-site assessments for consumers referred by VR. The assessments may be for students preparing to work and consumers who are ready to work or returning to work after an injury or illness.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Department of Developmental Disabilities Training Resources

“The Division of Developmental Disabilities is committed to providing training that results in improved lives for our participants. Please feel free to use as many training resources as you see fit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Acquired Brain Injury Supported Employment Partners

"Nebraska VR partners with Goodwill Industries of Greater Nebraska and Career Solutions, Inc. to provide supported employment services to individuals who have experienced an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) and require specialized assistance to obtain and maintain competitive employment. Our VR liaison staff in Grand Island, Hastings, Kearney, and Omaha work jointly with employment specialists from these programs to assist individuals in overcoming employment barriers."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Medicaid State Plan

~~“The State Plan is the official document describing the nature and scope of the Nebraska Medicaid Program. There are seven sections that comprise the State Plan (Part 1) as well as many accompanying attachments and amendments (Parts 2 and 3). Each part was developed by Nebraska and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Money Follows the Person

Thousands of individuals across the country, through the efforts of Money Follows the Person and other programs, have successfully transitioned from an institutional setting to the community. Nebraska’s own transition stories are inspiring and motivating.    Depending upon your specific needs – whether you are aged, have a physical or developmental disability, or a traumatic brain injury – supportive services such as the following help people live successfully in community-based settings:    • Home Care/Chore Services     • Home-Delivered Meals     • Adult Day Health Care    • Assisted Living Service     • Nutrition Services Independence Skills Management     • Personal Emergency Response System     • Transportation     • Assistive Technology Supports and Home Modification     • Home Again Services    • Respite     • Home Health     • Habilitation Services     • Team Behavioral Consultation     • Child Care for Children with Disabilities  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Leads to Success - Seeing the Possibilities

This presentation provides an explanation of, and service descriptions and payment rates for, Supported Employment. It includes Customized Employment as a valid application as Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Nebraska Client Assistance Program Hotline

The Hotline provides information and referral to Nebraskans who have questions or concerns related to a disability. This includes information about rehabilitation services, transportation, special parking permits, legal rights, and any other questions related to a disability

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Nebraska ABLE Legislation (LB 591) - 05/27/2015

A BILL FOR AN ACT relating to revenue and taxation; to amend sections 72-1239.01, 77-3504, and 84-618, Reissue Revised Statutes of Nebraska, and sections 68-1201, 77-2715.07, and 77-2716, Revised Statutes Cumulative Supplement, 2014; to define terms; to create the achieving a better life experience program; to provide powers and duties; to change provisions relating to federal tax credits; to provide for adjustments to taxable income; to redefine household income for purposes of the homestead exemption; to provide startup funding; to harmonize provisions; to provide operative dates; to repeal the original sections; and to declare an emergency. Be it enacted by the people of the State of Nebraska.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order No. 15-03 – WIOA Partnerships - 04/01/2015

“NEBRASKA WORKFORCE INNOVATION AND OPPORTUNITY ACT

WHEREAS, the variety of employment and training programs available in Nebraska present

numerous opportunities to more effectively manage, through coordination, the workforce

development needs of the employer and applicant community'; and

WHEREAS, one agency needs to be designated as the lead agency for acting as the grant

recipient for the purpose of administering and monitoring the expenditure of grant funds received by

the State of Nebraska under pursuant to the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act…

 

May also include a representatives of community-based organizations

that have demonstrated experience and expertise in addressing the

employment, training, or education needs of individuals with barriers to

employment, including organizations that serve veterans or that provide or

support competitive, integrated en1ployment for individuals with disabilities;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Employment First Nebraska’s Welfare Reform Program - 10/23/2017

~~“Employment First is the name of Nebraska’s welfare reform program.  The primary purpose of Employment First is to provide temporary, transitional support for Nebraska families so that economic self-sufficiency is attained in as expeditious a manner as possible through the provision of training, education, and employment preparation.  Nebraska is dedicated to improving the standard of living and quality of life for each family living in the State that has had to turn to public assistance to help support their family in times of need.  We will accomplish this by promoting personal responsibility and empowering parents to support their families. "

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging

WIOA Co-Enrollment and Common Exit - 06/02/2017

~~“Under Nebraska’s Combined State Plan,1 plan partners are committed to the development and implementation of co-enrollment strategies to support program alignment and career pathways. Co-enrollment: supports coordination across core programs, including planning, reporting, and service delivery; supports a customer-centric design that allows programs to leverage resources for participants who are eligible for, and need, multiple services that cross program lines; and allows tracking career pathway participants whose service happens not within one particular Federal program and funding stream, but across multiple programs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Nebraska Programs for Addiction, Mental Health Facing Cuts - 05/21/2017

“Groups that treat people with addictions, mental health problems and developmental disabilities are bracing for state budget cuts they say could force them to reduce staffing and services for some of Nebraska's most vulnerable residents.

 

The cuts became final last week when lawmakers fell short of the votes needed to override Gov. Pete Ricketts' line-item budget vetoes.

 

Now, service providers are scrounging for places to cut in the face of rising costs and unpaid Medicaid claims from the state's new managed care system, Heritage Health. Some providers have said they're still waiting on claims the system should have paid three months ago.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

2017 Transition Summer Programs - 05/04/2017

~~“2017 Transition Summer ProgramsTwenty innovative short-term programs to provide career exploration, job readiness, and work based learning opportunities for students with disabilities during the summer of 2017 were developed.

Summary of all of the Nebraska VR SummerTransition Program proposals that were approved by the State Board of Education on May 4, 2017. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Transition Services Planner - 05/01/2017

~~“PURPOSE OF THE TRANSITION SERVICES PLANNERThe purpose of this Transition Services Planner is to provide information to educators about the Nebraska VR program. It is an instrument to help educators and Nebraska VR staff bridge the transition requirements of IDEA and WIOA while providing meaningful and effective transition services to students with disabilities. The Planner will facilitate discussion between local educators and Nebraska VR staff and serve as a catalyst to develop a written working agreement.This planning effort will help:1) Promote a coordinated effort between the school district, Educational Service Unit (ESU) and the local Nebraska VR Office;2) Implement strategies that will facilitate effective transition services and eliminate duplication of services; and,3) Ensure the development of an effective partnership on behalf of students with disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Nebraska Developmental Disabilities Provider Handbook - 01/01/2017

“DDD provides funding and oversight of community-based providers. DD services can be provided by either an independent or agency provider. Developmental Disability (DD) Services focus on helping participants live the most independent lives possible. Goals are identified and habilitation programs (training) may be developed to teach skills. Goals focus on employment, independent living, and community access. DD Service Coordination provides oversight”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE Title 404 - Community Supports Program (CSP) - 07/16/2011

Section 9-003.02D The Community Living and Day Supports service includes the following components:    • Supports to enable the individual to maintain or obtain employment. This may include someone hired to accompany and support the individual in an integrated work setting. Integrated settings are those considered as available to all members of the community. Payment for the work performed by the individual is the responsibility of the employer. Covered services do not include those provided in specialized developmental disability provider settings, workstations, or supported employment services.     • Supports to enable the individual to access services and opportunities available in community settings. This may include accessing general community activities, performing community volunteer work, and accessing services provided in community settings such as senior centers and adult day centers. Supports provided under CLDS must be those that are above and beyond the usual services provided in such a setting and not duplicate services expected to be the responsibility of the center.   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Nebraska Community Supports Program (CSP) - 07/16/2011

 “The Department offers a system of supports and services intended to allow individuals with developmental disabilities to maximize their independence as they live, work, recreate, and participate in their communities.”

 

“The Community Supports Program (CSP) is designed to offer alternatives to the traditional model of services available through the Department. The traditional model provides for services consisting of day and residential habilitation and respite care, provided only by agencies certified as specialized providers of developmental disabilities services. The CSP allows for a broader array of services to be provided by developmental disability service providers and/or other community (individual or agency) providers. This is intended to give the individual more control over the type of services received and providers of those services, as well as allowing individuals to purchase services other than habilitative training. The underlying philosophy of the Community Supports Program is to build upon the individual and family strengths and to strengthen and support informal and formal services already in place.”  

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Alliance for Full Participation - 01/12/2011

 

“The Alliance for Full Participation (AFP) is a formal partnership of leading developmental disabilities organizations with a common vision—to create a better and more fulfilling quality of life for people with developmental disabilities. AFP supports a network of state teams, dedicated to promoting full participation for people with developmental disabilities.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Planning Council on Developmental Disabilities State Plan 2017-2021

Goal 3: Employment

 Influence systems change to provide increased opportunities for more individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (I/DD) of diverse identities to pursue an employment path of their choice.

· Provide support to address barriers, advocate for, and expand opportunities for an increased number of individuals to participate in community integrated employment or entrepreneurship.

 · Increase opportunities for self-advocates to share employment experiences and promote community integrated employment and entrepreneurship with peers and stakeholders.

· Provide access to benefits planning services for an increased number of service providers, individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities and their families to support the person’s employment choices.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

Nebraska Aging and Disability Resource Center

~~“Welcome to Nebraska’s Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC) website. The ADRC was established by the Nebraska Legislature under LB 320 in 2015. The program was made permanent with LB 793 in 2018. This effort is coordinated by Nebraska’s Department of Health and Human Services’ State Unit on Aging, through local Area Agencies on Aging, and in partnership with the disability organizations listed to the left.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Mental Health Partnerships

“Nebraska Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) continues its long standing partnership with Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services - Behavioral Health Services (NE-DHHS) to make available employment services to Nebraskans with severe mental illness. VR and NE-DHHS fund six regional programs that provide Supported Employment services across the State.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Youth Leadership Council

~~“NYLC was created “by youth for youth”. We are leaders and advocates who experience a disability. We travel the state promoting disability awareness and educating our peers on transitioning to college or work.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Vocational Rehabilitation Workforce Development Partnerships

There are currently three local service delivery areas and 20 One-Stop Career Centers in Nebraska. Local Workforce Investment Boards oversee the Greater Lincoln, Greater Omaha and Greater Nebraska service delivery areas. In addition, there is a Nebraska Workforce Investment Board that is responsible for administering the statewide system. Collaboration between Nebraska VR and the other mandated partners is intended to provide:

1.     Easier access to services

2.     More comprehensive services

3.     Better labor market information

4.     A seamless system of service delivery

5.     Improved long-term employment outcomes for persons with disabilities

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

2017 Disability Employment and Inclusion Awards - 07/01/2017

“Two Nebraska VR partners received awards for their role in creating inclusive workplaces and advocacy for disability employment during a ceremony October 10 at the State Capitol.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) 2012

 

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Nebraska Money Follows the Person

Thousands of individuals across the country, through the efforts of Money Follows the Person and other programs, have successfully transitioned from an institutional setting to the community. Nebraska’s own transition stories are inspiring and motivating.    Depending upon your specific needs – whether you are aged, have a physical or developmental disability, or a traumatic brain injury – supportive services such as the following help people live successfully in community-based settings:    • Home Care/Chore Services     • Home-Delivered Meals     • Adult Day Health Care    • Assisted Living Service     • Nutrition Services Independence Skills Management     • Personal Emergency Response System     • Transportation     • Assistive Technology Supports and Home Modification     • Home Again Services    • Respite     • Home Health     • Habilitation Services     • Team Behavioral Consultation     • Child Care for Children with Disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, specifically— those who have lost their health insurance due to business and factory closures, migrant farm workers that are in a need for health insurance, and those individuals that are working contract or working from home that need health insurance. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Children's Hospital, Great Plains Regional Medical Center, Nebraska Orthopedic Hospital, Gothenburg Hospital, Nebraska Dept. of Labor (Rapid Response), Faith based groups, Food pantries, and Healthcare coalitions.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Glenn HughesPhone: (816) 524-9477Email: ghughes@hrserase.com” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ready, Set, Go - 05/01/2019

~~“There are many decisions young adults must make when planning for life after high school. These materials and resources help young adults with developmental disabilities make decisions about supports as they move from high school to adult life. Ready, Set, Go! is for:• Transition students and young adults who are eligible for services through DHHS-DD.• Family members and friends of eligible persons.• IEP team members and others working with transition students and young adults.” 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Serving Individuals with Disabilities in Workforce Services: 2018 Nebraska Workforce Conference - 05/23/2018

~~“Objectives:

-WIOA and Nebraska Vision for Customer Service-Seamlessness for Career Services in AJCs-Partnerships with the Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired and the Nebraska Vocational Rehabilitation-Responsiveness for Job Seekers with Disability-Ways to Build Service Capacity”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Department of Developmental Disabilities Training Resources

“The Division of Developmental Disabilities is committed to providing training that results in improved lives for our participants. Please feel free to use as many training resources as you see fit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Leads to Success - Seeing the Possibilities

This presentation provides an explanation of, and service descriptions and payment rates for, Supported Employment. It includes Customized Employment as a valid application as Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Opening Doors: A Transition Guide

“This protocol is the result of the dialogue and cooperation of the Nebraska

Transition Team members and other statewide representatives. Members met for three sessions with a facilitator for the purpose of better defining roles, responsibilities, tasks, principles, and relationships between entities working with blind, visually impaired, and deaf-blind children and youth…The result of this collaborative effort is intended to foster a more comprehensive seamless transition model for children and youth -birth through adulthood. By drawing on knowledge from a wide variety of resources we are able to better leverage learning, provide informed choice, and produce individual programs that are creative and responsive to needed and appropriate services”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Alliance for Full Participation Webinars - Employment First

Employment First has become a national movement among some state agencies, employment and self advocacy organizations, such as National APSE, AFP and SABE, and employment service providers. The common thread among these groups is that employment is expected to be the first priority when discussing and offering day services for youth and adults with disabilities. This session will focus on several ingredients that are important when considering setting employment as the 1st priority. Topics include career planning, how to create the expectation of work, setting employment outcomes for your agency, data collection (what’s important to track and why), and nationally recognized approaches to promote change within a service organization. 

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nebraska Medicaid State Plan

~~“The State Plan is the official document describing the nature and scope of the Nebraska Medicaid Program. There are seven sections that comprise the State Plan (Part 1) as well as many accompanying attachments and amendments (Parts 2 and 3). Each part was developed by Nebraska and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Money Follows the Person

Thousands of individuals across the country, through the efforts of Money Follows the Person and other programs, have successfully transitioned from an institutional setting to the community. Nebraska’s own transition stories are inspiring and motivating.    Depending upon your specific needs – whether you are aged, have a physical or developmental disability, or a traumatic brain injury – supportive services such as the following help people live successfully in community-based settings:    • Home Care/Chore Services     • Home-Delivered Meals     • Adult Day Health Care    • Assisted Living Service     • Nutrition Services Independence Skills Management     • Personal Emergency Response System     • Transportation     • Assistive Technology Supports and Home Modification     • Home Again Services    • Respite     • Home Health     • Habilitation Services     • Team Behavioral Consultation     • Child Care for Children with Disabilities  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE Comprehensive DD Waiver for Adults (0396.R02.00)

Provides group home residential hab, integrated community employment, prevocational workshop hab, respite, assistive technology and supports, behavioral risk services, community inclusion day hab, community living and day supports, companion home residential hab, extended family home residential hab, home mods, in-home residential hab, medical risk services, PERS, retirement services, team behavioral consultation, vehicle mods, vocational planning hab, workstation hab for individuals w/autism, MR, DD ages 21 - no max age

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE Day Services Waiver for Adults w/DD (0394.R03.00)

~~“Provides day habilitation, prevocational services, respite, supported employment – individual, adult companion service, adult day services, assistive technology, behavioral  risk services, community living and day supports, consultative assessment service, crisis intervention support, environmental modification assessment, habilitative community inclusion, habilitative workshop, home modification, integrated community employment, medical risk services, personal emergency response system (PERS)retirement services, supported employment – enclave, supported employment - follow along, team behavioral consultation, transitional services, transportation, vehicle modification, vocational planning habilitation service, workstation habilitation services for individuals w/autism, ID, DD ages 21 - no max age “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

NE HCBS Waiver for Children w/DD and their Families (4154.R06.00)

~~“Provides prevocational services, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment – individual, adult companion service, adult day services, assistive technology, consultative assessment service, crisis intervention support, environmental modification assessment, habilitative community inclusion, habilitative workshop, home modifications, homemaker services, in-home residential habilitation, personal emergency response system, supported employment – enclave, supported employment - follow along, transitional services, transportation, vehicle modification for individuals w/autism, ID/DD ages 0 to no max age “
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

With the right level of focus on Employment First systems-change efforts, individuals with disabilities could be living "The Good Life" in the state of Nebraska.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nebraska’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,920,076
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0%
Change from
2016 to 2017
112,418
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.73%
Change from
2016 to 2017
55,391
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.73%
Change from
2016 to 2017
49.27%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
84.97%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 1,896,190 1,907,116 1,920,076
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 101,734 112,418 112,418
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 49,485 53,323 55,391
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 858,156 855,042 869,515
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 48.64% 47.43% 49.27%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 83.42% 83.88% 84.97%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.00% 3.20% 2.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.80% 19.10% 16.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 11.80% 10.40% 10.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 106,683 116,916 117,474
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 102,638 105,995 110,026
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 187,720 197,997 201,170
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,733 11,017 11,927
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 12,277 13,793 16,956
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,320 2,961 2,323
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,650 2,325 2,643
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 2,743 4,846 6,032
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 2,121 3,338 3,008

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,062 3,058 2,989
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 11.70% 11.70% 11.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 42,162 41,726 41,249

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 5,237 4,944 4,696
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 8,451 8,405 8,295
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 15,165 15,398 14,708
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 34.50% 32.10% 31.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.30% 5.40% 6.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.00% 7.40% 704.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.00% 0.70% 0.70%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 54.10% 51.10% 46.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 605 652 748
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 801 895 911
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 115 79 90
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 6,163 6,189 5,628

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,250 4,143 5,183
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.06 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 27 15
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 11 19 11
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 92.00% 70.00% 73.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.59 1.00 0.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,260
2,974
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 2 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 243 215 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 613 546 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 970 855 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 889 765 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 543 578 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 39.90% 39.90% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,715 1,429 1,547
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 61,150 61,781 61,638
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 74 79 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 190 182 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $1,134,000 $537,000 $573,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $34,020,000 $10,958,000 $10,410,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $113,941,000 $114,306,000 $115,596,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $84,723,000 $8,261,000 $8,744,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 4.00% 2.00% 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,546 760 768
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,011 929 876
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,551 3,535 3,533
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 8.90 5.50 5.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 76.07% 75.54% 76.75%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 6.36% 6.62% 6.68%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.22% 2.12% 2.08%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 92.25% 100.00% 89.41%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 37.05% 34.96% 38.16%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 66.79% 62.86% 61.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 85.01% 82.43% 78.69%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.74% 27.90% 23.68%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 165,689
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 251
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 73,915
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 88,454
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 162,369
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 82
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 167
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 249
AbilityOne wages (products). $791,551
AbilityOne wages (services). $849,657

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 10 8 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 2 1 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 14 10 13
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 2 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,070 469 456
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 49 32 32
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,122 503 490

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~Impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA and Nebraska’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, lead to the conclusion that an emphasis on Customized Employment can increase the opportunities for successful employment and expanded partnerships with employers. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, Nebraska is receiving intensive technical assistance and training from the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) in the following areas: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. (Page 156) Title I

Increase our capacity to provide customized employment services and options to consumers and employers. Nebraska VR is one of the states selected to receive technical assistance under the JD-VR TAC. The impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA, and the agency’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, point to an increased emphasis on Customized Employment. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, there are two areas of need for intensive technical assistance and training to be provided: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach; and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. The JD-VR TAC will work with Nebraska VR to increase our capacity to provide customized employment services through the provision of training and technical assistance. The expected outcomes are:
 An increase in the number and type of businesses adopting a customized employment approach and establishing a CE job for an individual with a significant disability.
 An increase in the number of individuals with a significant disability, especially individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability, participating in competitive integrated employment.
 An increase in the quality of employment (as determined by the salary, benefits, number of hours worked, etc.). (Page 175) Title I

6. Improving performance
Strategies to improve the performance of the State with respect to the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA.
 Develop strategies in coordination with the appropriate core partners and participating Combined State Plan program partners once benchmarks are established.
 Implement the technical assistance and training on customized employment with VR staff and providers. Technical assistance will be provided by the Job-Driven VR Technical Assistance Center. (Page 186) Title I

The services made available by Nebraska VR using Title VI and Title I funds are limited to those initial services resulting in stable job performance in an integrated competitive work setting. These may include, as appropriate to individual needs:
1. An assessment of the need for supported employment services is supplementary to and provided after an assessment of eligibility and rehabilitation needs has been determined that a person is eligible for services and is a person with a most significant disability.
2. Development and placement in competitive integrated employment includes customized employment services for the maximum number of hours possible consistent with the person’s unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, and capabilities.
3. Intensive on-the-job skills training and other training provided by skilled job trainers, co-workers, and other qualified persons is based on a systematic analysis of the work to be performed, and a systematic analysis of the employer’s performance expectations and requirements. It is conducted in accordance with a written plan identifying the methods of teaching, instruction, and behavior management necessary to enable the individual to acquire skills and master the work to be performed, to regulate behavior in accordance with the employer’s requirements and expectations, and achieve stable job performance. The training provides for a systematic reduction of intensive teaching, instruction, and behavior management methods to the lowest intervention level necessary to maintain stable job performance. (Page 192-193) Title I

For the effort to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs (CRPs), NCBVI collaborates with a wide range of community partners statewide, working together to develop and improve services. Job coaching to Supported/customized Employment clients is provided through contracts with community rehabilitation programs. Agency staff members also work with CRPs and independent living centers to assure that services are coordinated and meeting the needs of Nebraskans with disabilities, especially those who are blind or visually impaired along with multiple disabilities. NCBVI partners with community rehabilitation programs (Martin Luther Homes, Quality Living) and other entities. In addition to services specific to individuals, collaboration on other projects occurs as the need and opportunity arise. The activities enable NCBVI to inform many persons about the services available to individuals who are blind, thus expanding opportunities to those who are, or who may become, eligible for services of the Vocational Rehabilitation or the Supported Employment program. The agency website is updated continuously and provides information to the public about available services and resources, avenues to apply for services, and ask questions, and so forth. Work is being done to enhance a social media presence with information and updates about NCBVI events, activities, and services. The agency collaborates with the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Developmental Disabilities services (NDHHS-DDD) to identify potential clients, coordinate service plans and share funding for those individuals in the System who are described as blind and visually impaired. (Page 214) Title I
 

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The Council is composed of 3 subcommittees: Client Services, Employment and Transition. Each SRC member selects a subcommittee to participate in based on their interests and background. These committees provide the Council members the opportunity to focus and provide feedback on topics relevant to their individual group.

 The Client Services Committee provided feedback on client satisfaction surveys, services to VR clients and recommended cultural awareness training and technical assistance on materials and outreach strategies directed toward Nebraskans who are deaf and hard of hearing and the Latino populations. The Client Services Committee formed the subcommittee, Consumer Input Committee, as another avenue to gather feedback and recommendations. The Consumer Input Committee consists of past and present clients of Nebraska VR. This year the Consumer Input Committee reviewed: 1) Discover the Job that Works for You booklet section Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) Important Information for You, 2) Application: section Understanding Your Rights as an Applicant, 3) Marketing: Magnet Promotional Item Survey and Nebraska VR bus advertisements, and 4) MyVR Survey.
 The Employment Committee selected the Entrepreneur of Distinction Annual Award winners, discussed and provided feedback on VR job placement services, job seeking training, Certificate Programs and Project Search.
 The Transition Committee focused on policies and procedures relating to high school aged clients and families including discussions on pre-employment transition services as defined in WIOA. (Page 147) Title I
 
 The Assistive Technology Partnership/Education receives funding from Nebraska VR for the AT Education Specialists to focus on transition youth and coordinate services with Nebraska VR offices. The Education Specialists host technology conferences, participate in self-advocacy workshops, provide AT demonstrations and individualized services and AT recommendations to transition youth across the state.
 Nebraska VR supports 17 Project SEARCH sites across the state. Consistent with the national model, Project SEARCH is a partnership between Nebraska VR, a business, area school systems, the Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Assistive Technology Partnership, and Division of Developmental Disabilities. The one year school-to-work program is business led and takes place entirely in the workplace. The experience includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. While completing the rotations, the students have the opportunity to gain transferable skills, practice self-advocacy and demonstrate work readiness. Nebraska’s Project SEARCH programs are hosted in a variety of businesses including hotels, hospitals, retail and distribution. (Pages 153-154) Title I

Work-based learning experiences
Many of the activities highlighted under (1) VR Services also enhance Nebraska VR’s transition services, including pre-employment transition services. For example, as the Business Account Managers are working with employers, opportunities for students and youth are also explored. These work-based learning opportunities may include informational interviews, job shadows, company tours, On-the-Job Evaluation and Training, internships, and placement assistance.
Certificate programs
For the past several years, Nebraska VR has developed and maintained Certificate Programs. These Certificate Programs provide hands-on training for students and youth with disabilities (adult VR clients may also enroll). The specialized training results from a partnership with local Nebraska VR service offices, three to five core business partners in the area, a community college and local schools. Students take classes, tour businesses and either work part-time or participate in an internship with employer partners. The programs are business-driven, short term, real life trainings that teach both technical hard skills and soft skills. Each training opportunity gives the students an opportunity to acquire the skills that they need to pursue in-demand jobs and careers. To date, the Certificate Programs offered include: Electrician Helper, Welding, Auto Mechanic Helper, Construction, HVAC Helper, Para-educator, and Community Health Worker. Nebraska VR will explore increasing the number of Certificate Programs available in the state. (Page 156) Title I

The one year school-to-work program is business led and takes place entirely in the workplace. The experience includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. While completing the rotations, the students have the opportunity to gain transferable skills, practice self-advocacy, and demonstrate work readiness. Nebraska’s Project SEARCH programs are hosted in a variety of businesses including hotels, hospitals, retail and distribution.

There are currently two Project SEARCH Business Advisory Councils (BAC) in Nebraska. The goal of the BAC is to broaden the program across a variety of industries, provide individuals with disabilities access to the resources they need to be successfully employed in a wide-range of fields and serve as a platform to further educate business professionals about the benefits of employing individuals with disabilities. The measurable goal is 100% employment of Project SEARCH intern participants. Between the two Nebraska BACs there are more than thirty businesses involved. Nebraska VR will consider increasing the number of Project SEARCH sites available in the state and will also consider the expansion of BACs. (Page 157) Title I

VR Rehabilitation Specialists make determinations and provide specialized direct services to persons with disabilities pursuing employment goals. Their responsibilities include: eligibility, Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) and amendment approval, IPE progress, and employment outcome determinations, community assessment, career counseling, disability awareness counseling, personal adjustment counseling, rehabilitation engineering, independent living skill training, personal management training, social skills training, job placement assistance, and job retention assistance. These activities generally require independent complex decision-making and problem-solving based on extensive knowledge of disability, human behavior, the world of work, and the community.  (Pages 162-163) Title I

For FY 2018, under the Order of Selection, Nebraska VR will continue to provide services to all individuals who are already receiving services under an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) prior to final approval of the Order of Selection by RSA and implementation by Nebraska VR. The projected number of individuals not receiving services and the estimated cost for services (projected savings) is:
 Priority Group 2: 1,158 individuals, with 475 individuals projected to require cost services at an average cost of $1,739 with a projected savings of $826,090.
 Priority Group 3: 581 individuals, with 233 individuals projected to require cost services at an average cost of $1,739 with a projected savings of $405,219. (Page 171) Title I

Increase the participation of Native Americans in VR services. The State Rehabilitation Council suggested that the agency explore opportunities to collaborate with any existing American Indian VR programs in Nebraska to increase the number of Native Americans with disabilities being served. The one existing program in Nebraska is no longer funded. The agency will identify possible partnerships to encourage other eligible tribes/organizations to apply for an AIVR grant as available.
Collaborate with Workforce Development core partners on the development and availability of soft skills training for all individuals. The core partners will explore the possibility of joint soft skills training. The potential collaboration could reduce duplication and increase the availability of training opportunities across the state.
 Goal 3: Strengthen the alignment between education, training, and employer workforce needs.
Maintain the Business Account Manager model and consider expansion to other areas of the state. Nebraska VR has hired Business Account Managers (BAM) in Omaha, Norfolk, and Kearney to establish relationships with businesses, trade associations, business and human resources organizations to identify staffing patterns, skill requirements, support needs, training preferences, etc., to be an effective representative to Nebraska VR teams on behalf of businesses. (Page 174) Title I

The transition youth conferences and the Youth Leadership Council are innovation and expansion activities that focus on students who are potentially eligible or are under an IEP or Section 504 Plan. The Youth Leadership Council members reach out to other students who can benefit from VR services and serve as role models for transitioning from school to work. Transition youth conferences provide opportunities for career exploration and development of work soft skills including independent living skills. The number of youth conferences and the number of youth attending continue to increase due to additional support from VR.

The State Rehabilitation Council provides input and guidance on VR’s innovative approaches to service delivery including the Meet You Were You Are service delivery model, the use of motivational interviewing techniques, and the expanded use of social media to engage consumers (MyVR). Members also provide direction on strategies to reach underserved and unserved through expanded and innovative marketing strategies. (Page 187) Title I

Extent of supported employment services
1. Assessment of rehabilitation need for supported employment services are made available to the extent necessary to determine the nature and scope of services to be provided under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) to achieve supported employment or to determine on the basis of clear evidence that an employment outcome cannot be achieved
2. Job development including customized employment and placement services are provided to the extent necessary to place the individual into competitive integrated employment consistent with client’s informed choice.
3. Intensive on-the-job and other training services are provided to the person to the extent necessary to achieve stable job performance, or to determine on the basis of clear evidence this cannot be achieved. Services are provided for a maximum of 24 cumulative months, or for youth with a disability (16-24) utilizing Title VI funds up to 48 cumulative months unless a longer period is provided in the IPE of the person. (Page 193) Title I

Transition planning by personnel of the designated State agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and implementation of their individualized education programs;
 
Specifically, included in the agreement are provisions for consultations and technical assistance, transition planning, coordinating the IEP and the IPE for roles and responsibilities amongst key individuals, and financial responsibilities, and procedures for outreach. The purpose is to coordinate and promote the cooperation of the programs and services available to students who are blind, deaf—blind and visually impaired during the transition process. (Page 202) Title I

NCBVI provides information to educators and to VR personnel about training opportunities relevant to personnel development in the fields of both education and vocational rehabilitation. A series of personnel training sessions relating to the handbook were held in a coordinated effort between NCBVI and personnel covered by IDEA. In FFY 2014 and 2015, NCBVI Counselors continued to provide the tool, and instructions as needed, statewide to educators, parents, and other persons involved with educating blind and visually impaired school students within Nebraska. Additional joint personnel development efforts will be held when specific issues of mutual concern are identified. For example, teachers of blind children from the public school system provide presentations to NCBVI at Staff Meetings. At the NCBVI Annual State Staff Meeting in 2013, a speaker from Nebraska Department of Education/Special Populations gave a presentation on the IEP process and the role of VR Counselors in that process, working with educators, families and students. NCBVI staff members provide presentations at training sessions of the school system, university and college classes, and other opportunities which arise. We will continue to explore ways to assure success in education and quality employment. One avenue will be collaborating with the WinAHEAD organization (Western Iowa and Nebraska Association on Higher Education and Disabilities). On an ongoing basis, the primary emphasis will be individual communication between NCBVI counselors and parents, teachers and others in the education system. (Page 211) Title I

NCBVI Supported Employment clients are transitioned to extended services provided by other public agencies, non-profit organizations, employers, natural supports or other entities after no longer than 24 months, or 48 months for blind or visually impaired youth after placement in Supported Employment, unless a longer period is set forth in the IPE. The transition to extended services is based upon a) substantial progress made toward hours per week goal in the IPE, b) the client is stabilized on the job, and c) that extended services will be available and provided without a break in services.  (Page 230) Title I

Career Pathways

~~Career Pathways Advancement Project (CPAP)
Nebraska VR was one of four state VR programs to receive a Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Grant from Rehabilitation Services Administration. The Career Pathways Advancement Project (CPAP) uses an Upskill/Backfill model with a focused outreach to Nebraska VR clients successfully employed in the last four years in order to assist in career advancement options within the high demand industries of Information Technology, Manufacturing, Healthcare, Construction, and Transportation, and Distribution and Logistics. (Page 51) Title I

H. Improving access to postsecondary credentials
Describe how the State’s strategies will improve access to activities leading to recognized postsecondary credentials, including Registered Apprenticeship certificates. This includes credentials that are industry-recognized certificates, licenses or certifications, and that are portable and stackable.
Through the state’s education-related strategies, plan partners improve access to activities leading to recognized postsecondary credentials, including Registered Apprenticeship certificates, industry-recognized certificates, licenses, certifications, and credentials that are portable and stackable, including:
 Nebraska’s industry sector partnership strategy, the Next Generation Industry Partnerships initiative, which includes a focus on education and training leading to postsecondary credentials that are portable and stackable;
 regional initiatives that connect in-demand industry sectors and occupations with career pathways, will continued focus on activities leading to recognized postsecondary credentials, such as Nebraska’s Connecting SNAP Clients to Better Job Opportunities initiative (described in Section II.c.1. of this plan);
 certificate training programs that are business driven partnerships with local community colleges, Nebraska VR, and businesses within targeted in demand occupations;
 promotion of career pathways, including career readiness, throughout the one-stop delivery system; (Page 66) Title I

A 21st century understanding of the evolving labor force begins with an awareness that the workforce will continue to grow and reflect the increasing diversity of America. While increasing numbers of individuals with disabilities will be entering the labor force, such individuals currently remain a largely untapped labor source. Women’s employment rates will rise while the employment rates for men will decline slightly. The percentage of individuals from minority groups entering the workforce will also grow.
The workforce will become increasing urban and the manufacturing sector will slowly decline while the service-producing sector will grow as will e-commerce. Technology and globalization will continue to shape the labor force and require a workforce with highly technical skills. How quickly graduate rehabilitation programs will revise curriculum to prepare graduates in a 21st understanding of the evolving labor force remains to be seen. Consequently Nebraska VR must provide staff with timely training on Nebraska labor market information and trends, career pathways, the world of work and career connections in order to equipping VR staff with the knowledge to counsel individuals with disabilities in their pursuit of work and career and provide effective employment services. The outreach and partnership efforts of our Business Account Managers with Nebraska businesses will be also be critical to understanding their respective labor needs in order for VR to prepare, train and offer skilled applicants with disabilities. (Page 163) Title I

With the implementation of WIOA, it is expected that there will be a significant reversal of the decline in referrals to the VR program in recent years under the former workforce investment system. The major contributing factor was the move to on-line registration and on-line services at the One Stop Centers that was not adequately identifying applicants who had disabilities. The collaboration that has occurred among the core partners since the passage of WIOA has already resulted in a greater awareness of each core partners program and opportunities for reciprocal referrals and service coordination. Work is currently underway on the development of a common intake.
Nebraska VR staff will continue to serve on the new regional workforce boards which will now have a larger business representation. It is important that VR staff are aware of and promote among its clients, the jobs-driven, work-based learning, career pathways and industry sector initiatives put forth by the workforce development system. (Page 169) Title I

Move more individuals to economic self-sufficiency through the implementation of the Career Pathways Advancement Project. The CPAP is funded under a grant from RSA and uses an “Upskill/Backfill” model to train individuals in emerging and growing industry sectors. Career Pathway Recruiters will contact 1,200 former VR clients now working in targeted industry sectors such as information technology, manufacturing, transportation, distribution and logistics, to inform them of an opportunity to receive additional training and education to advance their careers. The grant will provide the necessary financial assistance to allow individuals with disabilities to participate in an established career pathway initiative in collaboration with the Nebraska Department of Labor, several postsecondary educational institutions, and businesses. Approximately 50-60 individuals will move up the career pathway by upgrading their skills and knowledge, creating opportunities for other individuals with disabilities to backfill the vacant positions. Individuals with disabilities will be more likely to be economically self-sufficient as they advance upward in their career pathway in the targeted high demand sectors. (Page 175) Title I

Apprenticeship
Nebraska VR has engaged in a dual customer approach to the provision of employment-related services for many years as embodied in its mission statement, “We help people with disabilities prepare for, obtain, and maintain employment while helping businesses recruit, train, and retain employees with disabilities.” This has led to a job-driven approach in Nebraska VR’s development of customized training programs such as Project SEARCH, Certificate Programs, and On the Job Evaluation and Training sites. Nebraska VR recently extended the job-driven emphasis with the implementation of a “Meet You Where You Are” model that includes a rapid engagement (Progressive Employment) focus engaging individuals in an element of work as quickly as possible. VR staff are actively involved in the recruitment and support of businesses to partner with VR on rapid engagement activities. (Page 155) Title I Certificate programs For the past several years, Nebraska VR has developed and maintained Certificate Programs. These Certificate Programs provide hands-on training for students and youth with disabilities (adult VR clients may also enroll). The specialized training results from a partnership with local Nebraska VR service offices, three to five core business partners in the area, a community college and local schools. Students take classes, tour businesses and either work part-time or participate in an internship with employer partners. The programs are business-driven, short term, real life trainings that teach both technical hard skills and soft skills. Each training opportunity gives the students an opportunity to acquire the skills that they need to pursue in-demand jobs and careers. To date, the Certificate Programs offered include: Electrician Helper, Welding, Auto Mechanic Helper, Construction, HVAC Helper, Para-educator, and Community Health Worker. Nebraska VR will explore increasing the number of Certificate Programs available in the state. (Page 156) Title I Skill training services provided in integrated competitive employment and community settings. Many individuals with cognitive disabilities struggle with traditional postsecondary classroom and/or segregated training programs. In addition to On-The-Job Training services, Certificate Programs and Project Search sites have proven to be another successful alternative for adults and students to achieve employment without pursuing postsecondary training. The collaboration between businesses and community colleges in the Certificate Programs and business and high schools in the Project Search programs results in individuals with cognitive and other impairments acquiring the desired work skills and jobs. Post-secondary training continues to be the highest expenditure category among the VR services as individuals choose careers and professions that require certificates and degrees. VR staff provides occupational information and Nebraska Labor Market data on demand occupations so clients can make an informed decision on their vocational goal. (Page 168) Title I Maintain the Business Account Manager model and consider expansion to other areas of the state. Nebraska VR has hired Business Account Managers (BAM) in Omaha, Norfolk, and Kearney to establish relationships with businesses, trade associations, business and human resources organizations to identify staffing patterns, skill requirements, support needs, training preferences, etc., to be an effective representative to Nebraska VR teams on behalf of businesses. The BAMs will seek out opportunities to establish work-based learning partnerships, OJE/OJTs, apprenticeships, and internships with businesses. These positions take a jobs driven approach in aligning the education and training requirements of businesses with the qualifications of VR eligible clients to better meet the workforce needs of employers. Maintain and expand the number of certificate programs that serve as an entry-level training program into an established career pathway. Certificate Programs offer hands-on training programs for students and adults with disabilities. This opportunity results from a partnership with local Nebraska VR service offices, three to five core business partners in the area, a community college, and local schools. The businesses have common interests in the types of skills and abilities they need to fill job vacancies. Together, the businesses work to identify exactly what they need in job candidates qualified to fill job vacancies. They can fit their hiring and retention needs with the opportunity to design a curriculum. The training includes soft skills training keying in on the basics of being on time and dependable. Work place communication skills are included. Students take classes, tour business, and either work part-time or participate in an internship with employer partners. The agency will look to expand partnerships across the state as well as beyond the current areas of auto tech, HVAC, welding, electrician and community health worker. Collect information on the business/employer level of satisfaction with VR services and programs. Nebraska VR will reinstitute an employer satisfaction survey to provide feedback on business-focused initiatives. This will be revised at the issuance of federal guidance on the final employer measures under WIOA. (Pages 174-175) Title I
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~SSDI and/or SSI recipients may be an underserved population by virtue of the fact that Nebraska VR’s percentage of clients receiving SSDI and/or SSI is below the national and agency mean. However, SSA data indicates that the state’s percentage of individual’s age 18 - 64 on SSDI or SSI on the basis of a disability is also below the national average.
As previously mentioned, youth with intellectual disabilities who exit or would like to exit school at an age appropriate time are unserved until they reach the age of 21 and can then receive Developmental Disabilities services and supports. With the proposed WIOA regulations, Nebraska VR intends to approach the HHS-Developmental Disabilities program with a plan to serve these youth prior to age 21.
Strides have continued to be made in using screening tools and specialized vocational assessments to identify Nebraska VR clients with brain injury and other cognitive disorders in order to better align services and supports required to achieve employment. The identification and use of assistive technology options have also proven to be beneficial to individuals with a brain injury.
Nebraska VR received a TBI Implementation Partnership Grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration in June 2014. The purpose of the 4-year grant is to increase access to rehabilitation and community-based services for individuals with brain injury. Nebraska VR is the lead agency for brain injury in the state and collaborates with several other state agencies and programs to carry out grant-funded activities. While progress has been made, information collected is a part of this grant finds that there are still service gaps and resources that exist for this population. (Page 169) Title I

c. The designated state unit will coordinate activities with any other State agency that is functioning as an employment network under the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency program under Section 1148 of the Social Security Act.
6. Financial Administration of the Supported Employment Program:
a. The designated State agency assures that it will expend no more than 2.5 percent of the State’s allotment under title VI for administrative costs of carrying out this program; and, the designated State agency or agencies will provide, directly or indirectly through public or private entities, non-Federal contributions in an amount that is not less than 10 percent of the costs of carrying out supported employment services provided to youth with the most significant disabilities with the funds reserved for such purpose under section 603(d) of the Rehabilitation Act, in accordance with section 606(b)(7)(G) and (H) of the Rehabilitation Act.
b. The designated State agency assures that it will use funds made available under title VI of the Rehabilitation Act only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including extended services to youth with the most significant disabilities, who are eligible to receive such services; and, that such funds are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act, when providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment, in accordance with section 606(b)(7)(A) and (D), of the Rehabilitation Act.
7. Provision of Supported Employment Services:
a. The designated State agency assures that it will provide supported employment services as defined in section 7(39) of the Rehabilitation Act.
b. The designated State agency assures that:
i. the comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome, in accordance with the requirements of section 606(b)(7)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act
ii. an individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act , which is developed and updated with title I funds, in accordance with sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 606(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act. (Page 199) Title I

Definition of Work Eligible Individuals
Nebraska excludes from the definition of Work Eligible Individuals:
a) A minor parent who is not a head-of-household
b) A non-recipient parent of children receiving TANF/MOE who is ineligible to receive assistance due to immigration status;
c) An individual receiving assistance under an approved Tribal TANF program.
d) A non-recipient parent of children receiving TANF/MOE who is not receiving TANF benefits due to receipt of SSI or SSDI. Nebraska does not consider disabled parents receiving Social Security Disability Income or Supplemental Security Income to be ‘work-eligible individuals’ because they are not included in the TANF payment unit.
e) A parent needed in the home to care for a disabled family member who is not attending school full-time.*  ( Page 239) Title IV

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) offers a wide variety of supports to help maintain individuals within their community. Specific programs which address common support needs include the Social Services Block Grant, Disabled Persons and Family Support, Lifespan Respite and Medicaid Waivers. A sampling of possible support services includes: transportation, energy assistance, housing, telephone assistance, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps), adult day care for caregivers and covering the Medicare premiums for eligible low-income beneficiaries. DHHS also coordinates the Ticket to Work program which encourages persons receiving Social Security Disability to rejoin the workforce. Ticket to Work also provides benefits counselors to help people understand whether participation impacts eligibility for other public benefits.
The local Area Agencies on Aging are familiar with the support needs of the elderly and are experienced in organizing community resources to address those needs. Nebraska currently has one program sub-grantee, National Able Network. National Able Network took over from Experience Works as the sub-grantee in December 2016 following a national Request for Proposal process for national grantees in 2016. National Able Network is also a national grantee whose service area covers most of Nebraska. National Able Network confers with the staff of each of the eight Area Agencies on Aging to address non-employment support needs of SCSEP trainees. The program is also participating in the development of the Nebraska’s Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRC). This partnership will be able to provide information to address a variety of human services as well as a referral to local agencies which provide assistance to our targeted population. The ADRC website provides linkages to a wide variety of community resources for the SCSEP participants. Coordination with ADRC will continue to enhance with the demonstration project implemented in 2016. For more information visit www.nebraska.networkofcare.org. (Page 294) Title IV

Program improvement over the next two years will increasingly focus upon growing industries, developing a closer working relationship with human service organizations, supporting employers and equitably distributing SCSEP positions across our State. Suggestions include:
1. Increase SCSEP focus upon Nebraska’s Hot Jobs. Through partnerships with other Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act organizations develop classroom and on-the job training to address our growth industries. Long term care will be a growth industry as the Baby Boom generation increasingly needs a variety of supportive services.
2. Develop a closer working relationship between SCSEP, Ticket to Work and the Centers for Independent Living.
3. Continue relationships between SCSEP, Nebraska’s Aging Network (Aging and Disability Resource Center and Area Agencies on Aging) and the State Department of Health and Human Services to address the multiple support needs common among SCSEP participants.
4. Work with Medicaid to review program guidelines which count SCSEP training income when determining program eligibility. Current rules require interested older persons to choose between training and Medicaid.
5. Review the distribution of positions to be proportional to the eligible population of persons over 55 years of age, commuting patterns, industry concentrations and education systems (community colleges) in the newly designated economic regions in the state. Distribution within rural areas will be monitored to assure equitable distribution of SCSEP positions. Shifting positions will be accomplished gradually as participants leave this program.
6. Work with SCSEP providers to assure timely reporting of participant activity into SPARQ (US Department of Labor web-based reporting system). (Pages 297-298) Title IV
 

Employer/ Business

~~ Nebraska’s Eligible Training Provider List includes programs offered by the state’s university system, as well as Registered Apprenticeship programs and private postsecondary career schools.
The Nebraska Department of Education reVISION program provides Nebraska public schools with the opportunity to analyze and transform their current career education systems in order to improve their ability to educate a qualified workforce that meets industry needs within an ever-changing economy. Working in collaboration with postsecondary education and regional workforce and economic development leaders, the reVISION process links career educators, school administrators, school counselors, and industry professionals. Under the leadership of the Nebraska Department of Education and in partnership with the Nebraska Departments of Labor and Economic Development, the reVISION process is a strategic approach for schools to analyze their current career education system and make plans, as needed, for adjustments.

 Nebraska VR has established certificate training programs that are business driven partnerships with local community colleges, Nebraska VR, and businesses within targeted in demand occupations. With a dual customer focus, the goal is to offer a short-term training and internship program that will meet the needs of businesses in high demand sectors and result in long-term employment for the individuals who participate. (Page 64) Title I
 

Data Collection
No disability specific information found regarding this element.
511

~~Impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA and Nebraska’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, lead to the conclusion that an emphasis on Customized Employment can increase the opportunities for successful employment and expanded partnerships with employers. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, Nebraska is receiving intensive technical assistance and training from the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) in the following areas: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. (Page 156) Title I

Increase our capacity to provide customized employment services and options to consumers and employers. Nebraska VR is one of the states selected to receive technical assistance under the JD-VR TAC. The impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA, and the agency’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, point to an increased emphasis on Customized Employment. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, there are two areas of need for intensive technical assistance and training to be provided: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach; and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. The JD-VR TAC will work with Nebraska VR to increase our capacity to provide customized employment services through the provision of training and technical assistance. The expected outcomes are:

An increase in the number and type of businesses adopting a customized employment approach and establishing a CE job for an individual with a significant disability.
An increase in the number of individuals with a significant disability, especially individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability, participating in competitive integrated employment.
An increase in the quality of employment (as determined by the salary, benefits, number of hours worked, etc.). (Page 175) Title I
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
The state’s compliance with the requirements of WIOA Sec. 188 and the American with Disabilities Act regarding physical and programmatic accessibility is addressed under Nebraska’s Nondiscrimination Plan, which includes provisions for EO reviews of the one-stop delivery system. A recent EO review of resource rooms in one-stop centers across the state revealed a need for new assistive technology for individuals with disabilities. In 2016, the state submitted an Unemployment Insurance Supplemental Budget Request (SBR) to fund assistive technology upgrades in 11 one-stop centers. Following approval of the request, the state worked with Assistive Technology Partnership (ATP) to identify components required to provide state-of-the art hardware and software to one-stop centers across the state. Based on the outcome of the consultation with ATP and available funding through the SBR, the state is able to upgrade assistive technology in 12 one-stop centers, as described in Table 35. (Pages 84-85) Title I Following installation of the new assistive technology during January and February 2018, training and support will be provided for one-stop center staff to ensure appropriate use and application of assistive technology. One-stop center staff will also receive training and support on addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. The state’s current policy on nondiscrimination describes requirements under WIOA Sec. 188 and 29 CFR Part 38 regarding physical and programmatic accessibility. In addition, the state’s current policy on one-stop center certification includes criteria for assessment of physical and programmatic accessibility, including the use of accessible technology to increase access to high quality workforce services for individuals with disabilities. The criteria by which local boards are required to assess a one-stop center’s physical and programmatic accessibility is listed in Tables 36 and 37. (Page 85) Title I
Vets
NEworks NEworks is a comprehensive web-based case management and reporting system used by the Nebraska Department of Labor (NDOL) for the delivery of Wagner-Peyser, WIOA, Trade Assistance Act, and Jobs for Veterans Act. The management of multiple programs within a single system allows for integrated service delivery and common performance reporting data. NEworks also functions as a self-service labor exchange for jobseekers and employers, the front-end of Unemployment Insurance, and a Labor Market Information module for public users. Additional resources include a resume builder, assessments, communication tools, the eligible training provider list, and online learning. (Page 67) Title I The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes: a. Employment, training, and job placement services How the State intends to provide employment, training and job placement services to Veterans and eligible persons under the JVSG DVOPs and LVERs have formed strong partnerships with other AJC programs to integrate Veteran services and to promote employment, training, and placement opportunities for Veterans throughout the areas of the state. This includes integration with other state and federal agencies. This integration ensures that qualified Veterans can be simultaneously enrolled with other partner programs such as Wagner-Peyser, Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA), and Vocational and Rehabilitation Employment Program (VR&E). Lincoln and Omaha DVOP staff currently attend U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Chapter 31 VR&E orientation sessions hosted in these metro VA offices. Omaha staff partners with Offutt Airman & Family Readiness staff with two significant Veteran focused job fairs each year hosted in the spring and fall. In collaboration with the Nebraska National Guard (NENG), Wagner-Peyser staff routinely attend unit demobilization and reintegration trainings to assist eligible Veterans with employment and training services. These events, known as “Yellow Ribbon Events” provide staff an opportunity to promote Veteran services to newly separated Veterans. DVOPs work with Wagner-Peyser staff to inform and education them on relevant information to promote and share. NDOL conducts training sessions to present job search, resume, and interviewing skills workshops to NENG members during weekend unit trainings and other appropriate occasions. NDOL will develop, implement, and offer new and updated informational sessions during NENG weekend training sessions as needed. State VR has developed a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Task Force and facilitates education and trainings for those providing services to this unique population. NDOL is working to ensure that all DVOP and LVER staff has the opportunity to attend these informational sessions. Traumatic Brain Injury Task Force awareness and resource emails are distributed to DVOP and LVER staff to allow them to get a better understanding of the program and its resources. This allows the DVOP and LVER staff to address the employment barriers created by TBIs. (Page 255) Title IV NDOL has partnered with the state Apprenticeship program to assist with the screening and assessment for the local electrical workers and steamfitters unions. Additionally, NDOL has developed a dedicated Veteran’s services web page outlining available resources. Through this web page, Veterans and military personnel can access a current NDOL office directory with all appropriate location and contact information. The web page includes information regarding priority of service, job search services and location sites, job fair information, and links to other Veteran service organizations, federal employment information, and state and federal benefit information. Due to the isolated nature of the Native American communities living on tribal lands in largely unpopulated rural areas of Nebraska, specific outreach plans for Native American Veterans have not been developed. Success regarding services to Veterans will be monitored and assessed through existing report mechanisms. This includes quarterly reports and reports located within NEworks. These reports currently provide information on employment and training activities on Veterans with SBE’s and the targeted population at a state, regional or local perspective. b. DVOP Specialists and LVER staff roles and responsibilities The duties assigned to DVOP specialists and LVER staff by the State; specifically implementing DVOP and LVER duties or roles and responsibilities as outlined in 38 U.S.C. § 4103A and 4104. These duties must be consistent with current guidance; DVOP Staff: Nebraska’s current staffing model is predominantly a DVOP model. All DVOPs are state merit staff and assigned to a Nebraska Department of Labor location or American Job Center. DVOPs are integrated into the one-stop delivery system and are well versed in the process of developing and maintaining strong relationships with other service providers and program partners to promote employment, training, and placement services for Veterans. (Page 256) Title IV The outlined duties do not preclude the overarching LVER responsibility to ensure that Veterans are provided the full range of labor exchange services to meet their employment and training needs. The LVER shall be available to provide guidance and/or technical assistance to NDOL staff regarding the identification and referral of those Veterans who may benefit from more intensive services provided either by DVOP staff or other partner resources. LVER staff will also conduct employer outreach either independently or through the coordinated efforts of the AJCs and NDOL locations. Through contacts within the employer community, LVER staff work to develop employment and job training opportunities, apprenticeship, and other on-the-job (OJT) training positions to benefit the Veteran community. (Page 259) Title IV NEworks provides self-service options to resources and website links that Veterans and eligible spouses can access from their residence or any accessible public computer. NEworks provides Veterans access to a vast range of job opportunities from corporate job posting boards and external job search engine websites that are imported into NEworks on a daily basis. As prescribed by the VR&E counselor, Chapter 31 Veterans may receive a wide range of services to include: labor market information, assessment, career guidance, and counseling. DVOPs provide case management services as needed, especially for those in need of placement services or other services to become “job ready”. Case management services include the development of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP), in-depth assessments, and regularly scheduled communication or follow-up until the Veteran no longer requires DVOP services or the VR&E counselor closes the Veteran’s file. (Page 266) Title IV Coordination with partner programs that have Job Training funds is key to the successful upskilling of Veterans. Co-enrollment and leveraging of resources will allow Veterans to receive the greatest amount of services. Communication between partners will occur on a formal and informal basis to allow continual support of Veterans through job training programs. Release of Information documentation will be collected when necessary, in order to allow this communication to occur between the programs and not require the Veteran to repeatedly provide the same information multiple times to partnering programs. (Page 267) Title IV
Mental Health

~~Nebraska VR seeks to work cooperatively with numerous other state and local agencies and programs. Collaborative efforts are manifested through coordinated committees throughout the state with Nebraska VR state office and local field staff actively participating. Examples of the committees Nebraska VR serves on includes, but are not limited to, Nebraska Planning Council on Developmental Disabilities, State Advisory Council on Mental Health Services, Nebraska Special Education Advisory Council Standing Committees on 1) Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2) Out of Home Placements (OHP), 3) Transition, 4) Deaf and Hard of Hearing, 5) Nebraska Youth Leadership Council, Nebraska Brain Injury Advisory Council, Local Community Resource Committees, Madonna Community Advisory Council, Assistive Technology Partnership (ATP) Advisory Council, Alternative Finance Loan Advisory Council, Nebraska Children’s Commission Juvenile Services Committee, Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness Advisory Council, Prevention Partnership with the Nebraska Children and Families Foundation, and local Chambers of Commerce, etc.
Nebraska VR maintains interagency agreements with Nebraska Health and Human Services, Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Veterans Administration-Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program for purposes of providing an understood and coordinated effort to achieve employment goals for persons with disabilities. (Page 150) Title I

Project Search agreements are maintained with these business and high schools:
 Businesses: Cabela’s, Walmart Distribution Center, Embassy Suites Downtown Omaha, Embassy Suites La Vista and Embassy Suites Lincoln, PayPal, Valmont Industries, Faith Regional Hospital, St. Francis Hospital, Mercy Medical Center, Mary Lanning Health Care, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital, Columbus Community Hospital, Monroe Meyer Institute, Nebraska Medicine, York Health Care and Good Samaritan Hospital.
 Schools: Bellevue Public School, Columbus Public Schools, Kearney Public Schools, Lincoln Public Schools, Madonna School, Millard Public Schools, Norfolk Public Schools, North Platte Public Schools, Omaha Nations Public Schools, Omaha Public Schools, Papillion LaVista School District, Westside Community Schools, Winnebago Public Schools, Norris Public Schools, Waverly Public Schools, York Public Schools and Educational Service Units 1, 2, 6, 7 & 9. (Page 151) Title I

Nebraska VR (VR) and Nebraska Health and Human Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services (DBH) have developed a Memorandum of Understanding to provide braided funding for an outcome-based milestone system of supported employment for individuals with significant behavioral health disabilities. The negotiating team consisted of the Directors of VR and DBH along with their respective Program Managers and Fiscal Administrators. The tools used to arrive at the model included: reviews of the fidelity models, a signed agreement for sharing information on mutual clients, VR contract costs and the payments to supported employment providers from the six Behavioral Health Regions who receive their funding from the Division of Behavioral Health. (Page 157) Title I

To comply with the previous CSPD requirements prior to WIOA, Nebraska VR elected in 1983 to use the coursework requirements for a Nebraska Certified Professional Counselor under the Nebraska Uniform Credentials Act. (Neb. Rev. Stat. §38-2132). Note that while Nebraska VR uses this academic coursework criteria for hiring, the certification applies only to individuals providing mental health counseling and who identify themselves as a Certified Professional Counselors. Nebraska VR neither requires staff to obtain the credential nor holds its staff out to be Certified Professional Counselors. (Page 163) Title I

Individuals with the most significant disabilities
Major service needs include —
 Impact and challenge from changing demographics in serving individuals with the most significant disabilities. Nebraska continues to see a declining rural population. 59.95% of the state’s population reside within 5 of the 93 counties. The agency must continue to look at how best to allocate staff resources throughout the state and adequately serve both population sets. As noted in the previous comprehensive assessment community resources and employment opportunities seem to follow the population shift. Individuals with serious mental health impairments continue to be the largest disability category being served by Nebraska VR.
 Challenge of locating, accessing and coordinating needed community services and supports. Consistent with prior comprehensive assessment of rehabilitation needs, individuals with the most significant work disabilities continue to have complex needs, complicated by poverty. Social services and support networks, both governmental and non-profit, have not been able to maintain much less increase service levels to meet these needs. The new governor and the legislature will be evaluating the previous trend of moving social services from local community offices to area call centers which has resulted in service access issues. However, Nebraska VR intends to maintain its strategic office locations across the state and travel to all counties. (Page 167) Title I
3. The state agency responsible for providing mental health services
Representatives of NCBVI and the Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Behavioral Health (NDHHS-DBH) have met to discuss how our two agencies can work together to promote competitive integrated employment opportunities on behalf of blind and visually impaired people with behavioral health conditions. Services include a method for providing supported employment services similar to the milestone approach used by Nebraska VR General. Other mental health services are provided statewide by various entities. NCBVI personnel in each office cooperate with those providers to ensure that mutual clients, or persons who may need both VR and mental health services, will be adequately and appropriately served. (Page 205) Title I

A. The provision of extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years
Each blind and visually impaired individual with a developmental disability has a case service coordinator employed by the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Developmental Disabilities (NDHH-DDD). The case service coordinator is responsible for developing an Individualized Service Plan (ISP) for mutual clients served by NCBVI and DDD. When supported employment services are involved, NCBVI provides incentive payments at specific intervals (start of job search, start of employment, stabilization, maintenance, and start of long-term support.). This arrangement is in accordance with the “milestones” model used by Nebraska VR General to serve clients shared with NDHHS-DDD. NCBVI representatives met with a meeting of supervisors of local field office coordinated by NHHS-DDD in November 2012 to explain how the milestone model applies to clients served by NCBVI as well as Nebraska VR General. Since then, NCBVI administrators, supervisors, and counselors continue to meet and build closer working relationships with NHHS-DDD at the state and local levels. NCBVI has also reached out to Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Behavioral Health (NDHHS-DBH) and to the Autism Center of Nebraska to create a mechanism for providing supported employment services to blind and visually impaired clients with mental health conditions and autism. Continued training regarding Supported Employment services is provided to NCBVI counselors, statewide. The total funds projected for FY 2018 is expected to be $30,000. At least 50% will be allocated to blind and visually impaired students in the pre-employment transition services categories. (Page 218) Title I

Blind and visually impaired individuals with mental health issues, acquired brain injury, or other significant disabilities with onset of disability occurring after the age of 21 may also be candidates for SE services , and NCBVI is exploring ways to expand SE opportunities with these individuals through partnerships with relevant state agencies and non-profit SE service providers.
NCBVI works to enhance the potential to achieve employment outcomes in cases that often require maximizing resources and creativity. SE funds are utilized for training of clients who are Deaf-Blind or have other multiple disabilities. As appropriate, some clients are referred to the Helen Keller National Center (HKNC) for intensive training, not available in Nebraska. In recent years, there have been more Deaf-Blind individuals who have personal goals to become employed, who qualify for Supported Employment and for whom Supported Employment is indicated. In addition to the actual job coaching and ongoing supports, it is crucial for such individuals to enhance their capabilities for productive lives. (Page 228) Title I

Collaborative working relationships with state agencies and service providers are currently being explored to extend SE service opportunities to blind and visually impaired consumers with acquired brain injury, mental health conditions, autism, or other significant secondary disabilities. These agencies or service providers include The Nebraska Department of Behavioral Health, the Nebraska Mental Health Association, and Autism Center of Nebraska.
A small number of blind and visually impaired consumers with significant, non-developmental secondary disabilities occurring after age 21 might benefit from SE services. Generally, however, if the individual has a secondary disability other than a significant behavioral health condition or autism, there may not be a source of ongoing financial support for SE services extending beyond the time allowed for NCBVI support. In such cases, the Deputy Director of Services and the immediate supervisor of field services works with the NCBVI Counselor involved to identify possible resources for the ongoing support, such as developing a PASS (Plan to Achieve Self Sufficiency) or personal resources. The Deputy Director also provides statewide training and information to NCBVI personnel regarding the SE program. (Page 229) Title I

Drug Testing and Lab Confirmation Service is defined as a point of collection test by a trained employee in which specimens such as urine, saliva, and breath are used to determine a positive or negative drug test result. Collection of a urine specimen will be conducted through line of sight observation of the client by a trained employee of the same gender. Drug testing includes the collection of a sweat specimen obtained through the use of a patch. A refusal by the client is defined as the client choosing not to provide a specimen to the Contractor at a designated time and place. All refusals must be reported to the DHHS case manager or supervisor by the end of the next business day, unless otherwise noted in the service referral. A no show by the client is defined as the client not being present to provide a specimen to the Contractor at the designated time and place. All no shows must be reported to the DHHS case manager or supervisor by the end of the next business day, unless otherwise noted in the service referral. Laboratory test confirmation is defined as screening the collected specimen by a laboratory to detect the presence of a specific drug(s) or substance(s) and the concentration of the drug(s) or substance(s) as identified and requested in the Service Referral. Laboratory test confirmation includes the written verification of the results. The Contractor’s drug testing protocol and policy shall be consistent with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The Contractor’s drug testing protocol, policy, and rates shall be submitted to each Service Area Contract Liaison where the service will be provided. (Pages 247-248) Title I

 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
NEres combines the required services of the federally funded Re-Employment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) program, along with the jobseeker requirements for regular Unemployment Insurance (UI) compensation. Based on the requirements for each specific program, NEres offers a set of universal services and meets the strictest program criteria of RESEA in order to ensure compliance with all federal and state program requirements. The identified program services required by each separate program and their relation to the universal services provided via NEres, are demonstrated in Illustration 7 and outlined below. (Page 123) Title I Nebraska Department of Labor has a contract with Geographic Solutions Inc. (GSI) for the NEworks Virtual One Stop (VOS) module system used for Employment Services, including labor exchange services. In October 2013, NDOL purchased GSI’s Re-Employment Exchange (REX) Module which allows a single sign-on for customers who utilize services through both the NEworks and Unemployment Insurance systems. In Jan 2014, NDOL transferred hosting services from the Nebraska Office of Chief Information Officer (OCIO) to GSI and added a Mobile Application module. In order to successfully implement the program design of NEres, NDOL purchased the Scheduler & Attendance Tracking Module from GSI, which: 1. Interfaces with the VOS, REX, Mobile App and Benefit Payment System (BPS). 2. Provides the functionality to schedule and track program participants per the correct fund source. The software helps maintain eligibility of benefits for UI claimants not yet employed, by providing eligibility data to the UI system. This module also allows NEres to schedule and track unemployment claimants who are required to attend an orientation and one-on-one meeting at the beginning of their unemployment claim to get them back to work sooner. This technology will replace an outdated scheduling system. (Page 127) Title I Career and training services provided by AJC and NDOL Locations include: Job Search Assistance; Job Referral; Placement Assistance for Jobseekers; Reemployment Services to unemployment insurance claimants; Recruitment services to employers with job openings. Outreach efforts include an explanation of the full menu of services available from the local AJC or NDOL Location as well as specific employment opportunities that are currently available. Support for education and training is provided through the NFJP grantee. The State Workforce Development Boards in coordination with local Workforce Development Boards provide funding recommendations, assistance and guidance on methods of allowing AJC customers to be competitive in a regional and global economy. AJC and NDOL Locations provide MSFWs with referrals to local education institutions for GED, ESL and technical skills training. (Page 133) Title I
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 41 - 50 of 63

NE Project SEARCH - 10/21/2010

 

“Project SEARCH helps students with disabilities learn vocational and competitive skills to help them enter the workplace and to become more independent in the work environment. Nebraska VR will expand Project SEARCH and its services for students with disabilities next year from seven locations statewide to ten. In each of these communities, Project SEARCH has grown through a partnership with Nebraska VR, local community businesses, local schools, the Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Assistive Technology Partnership and the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD Services).”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

NE Assistive Technology Partnership - 06/15/1989

 

“Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and the Assistive Technology Partnership (ATP) have worked together since 1989 when VR wrote the grant to establish a technology-related assistance project (ATP) in Nebraska. ATP Technology Specialists conduct on-site assessments for consumers referred by VR. The assessments may be for students preparing to work and consumers who are ready to work or returning to work after an injury or illness.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Department of Developmental Disabilities Training Resources

“The Division of Developmental Disabilities is committed to providing training that results in improved lives for our participants. Please feel free to use as many training resources as you see fit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Acquired Brain Injury Supported Employment Partners

"Nebraska VR partners with Goodwill Industries of Greater Nebraska and Career Solutions, Inc. to provide supported employment services to individuals who have experienced an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) and require specialized assistance to obtain and maintain competitive employment. Our VR liaison staff in Grand Island, Hastings, Kearney, and Omaha work jointly with employment specialists from these programs to assist individuals in overcoming employment barriers."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Medicaid State Plan

~~“The State Plan is the official document describing the nature and scope of the Nebraska Medicaid Program. There are seven sections that comprise the State Plan (Part 1) as well as many accompanying attachments and amendments (Parts 2 and 3). Each part was developed by Nebraska and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Money Follows the Person

Thousands of individuals across the country, through the efforts of Money Follows the Person and other programs, have successfully transitioned from an institutional setting to the community. Nebraska’s own transition stories are inspiring and motivating.    Depending upon your specific needs – whether you are aged, have a physical or developmental disability, or a traumatic brain injury – supportive services such as the following help people live successfully in community-based settings:    • Home Care/Chore Services     • Home-Delivered Meals     • Adult Day Health Care    • Assisted Living Service     • Nutrition Services Independence Skills Management     • Personal Emergency Response System     • Transportation     • Assistive Technology Supports and Home Modification     • Home Again Services    • Respite     • Home Health     • Habilitation Services     • Team Behavioral Consultation     • Child Care for Children with Disabilities  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Leads to Success - Seeing the Possibilities

This presentation provides an explanation of, and service descriptions and payment rates for, Supported Employment. It includes Customized Employment as a valid application as Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Nebraska Client Assistance Program Hotline

The Hotline provides information and referral to Nebraskans who have questions or concerns related to a disability. This includes information about rehabilitation services, transportation, special parking permits, legal rights, and any other questions related to a disability

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Nebraska ABLE Legislation (LB 591) - 05/27/2015

A BILL FOR AN ACT relating to revenue and taxation; to amend sections 72-1239.01, 77-3504, and 84-618, Reissue Revised Statutes of Nebraska, and sections 68-1201, 77-2715.07, and 77-2716, Revised Statutes Cumulative Supplement, 2014; to define terms; to create the achieving a better life experience program; to provide powers and duties; to change provisions relating to federal tax credits; to provide for adjustments to taxable income; to redefine household income for purposes of the homestead exemption; to provide startup funding; to harmonize provisions; to provide operative dates; to repeal the original sections; and to declare an emergency. Be it enacted by the people of the State of Nebraska.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order No. 15-03 – WIOA Partnerships - 04/01/2015

“NEBRASKA WORKFORCE INNOVATION AND OPPORTUNITY ACT

WHEREAS, the variety of employment and training programs available in Nebraska present

numerous opportunities to more effectively manage, through coordination, the workforce

development needs of the employer and applicant community'; and

WHEREAS, one agency needs to be designated as the lead agency for acting as the grant

recipient for the purpose of administering and monitoring the expenditure of grant funds received by

the State of Nebraska under pursuant to the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act…

 

May also include a representatives of community-based organizations

that have demonstrated experience and expertise in addressing the

employment, training, or education needs of individuals with barriers to

employment, including organizations that serve veterans or that provide or

support competitive, integrated en1ployment for individuals with disabilities;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Employment First Nebraska’s Welfare Reform Program - 10/23/2017

~~“Employment First is the name of Nebraska’s welfare reform program.  The primary purpose of Employment First is to provide temporary, transitional support for Nebraska families so that economic self-sufficiency is attained in as expeditious a manner as possible through the provision of training, education, and employment preparation.  Nebraska is dedicated to improving the standard of living and quality of life for each family living in the State that has had to turn to public assistance to help support their family in times of need.  We will accomplish this by promoting personal responsibility and empowering parents to support their families. "

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging

WIOA Co-Enrollment and Common Exit - 06/02/2017

~~“Under Nebraska’s Combined State Plan,1 plan partners are committed to the development and implementation of co-enrollment strategies to support program alignment and career pathways. Co-enrollment: supports coordination across core programs, including planning, reporting, and service delivery; supports a customer-centric design that allows programs to leverage resources for participants who are eligible for, and need, multiple services that cross program lines; and allows tracking career pathway participants whose service happens not within one particular Federal program and funding stream, but across multiple programs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Nebraska Programs for Addiction, Mental Health Facing Cuts - 05/21/2017

“Groups that treat people with addictions, mental health problems and developmental disabilities are bracing for state budget cuts they say could force them to reduce staffing and services for some of Nebraska's most vulnerable residents.

 

The cuts became final last week when lawmakers fell short of the votes needed to override Gov. Pete Ricketts' line-item budget vetoes.

 

Now, service providers are scrounging for places to cut in the face of rising costs and unpaid Medicaid claims from the state's new managed care system, Heritage Health. Some providers have said they're still waiting on claims the system should have paid three months ago.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

2017 Transition Summer Programs - 05/04/2017

~~“2017 Transition Summer ProgramsTwenty innovative short-term programs to provide career exploration, job readiness, and work based learning opportunities for students with disabilities during the summer of 2017 were developed.

Summary of all of the Nebraska VR SummerTransition Program proposals that were approved by the State Board of Education on May 4, 2017. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Transition Services Planner - 05/01/2017

~~“PURPOSE OF THE TRANSITION SERVICES PLANNERThe purpose of this Transition Services Planner is to provide information to educators about the Nebraska VR program. It is an instrument to help educators and Nebraska VR staff bridge the transition requirements of IDEA and WIOA while providing meaningful and effective transition services to students with disabilities. The Planner will facilitate discussion between local educators and Nebraska VR staff and serve as a catalyst to develop a written working agreement.This planning effort will help:1) Promote a coordinated effort between the school district, Educational Service Unit (ESU) and the local Nebraska VR Office;2) Implement strategies that will facilitate effective transition services and eliminate duplication of services; and,3) Ensure the development of an effective partnership on behalf of students with disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Nebraska Developmental Disabilities Provider Handbook - 01/01/2017

“DDD provides funding and oversight of community-based providers. DD services can be provided by either an independent or agency provider. Developmental Disability (DD) Services focus on helping participants live the most independent lives possible. Goals are identified and habilitation programs (training) may be developed to teach skills. Goals focus on employment, independent living, and community access. DD Service Coordination provides oversight”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE Title 404 - Community Supports Program (CSP) - 07/16/2011

Section 9-003.02D The Community Living and Day Supports service includes the following components:    • Supports to enable the individual to maintain or obtain employment. This may include someone hired to accompany and support the individual in an integrated work setting. Integrated settings are those considered as available to all members of the community. Payment for the work performed by the individual is the responsibility of the employer. Covered services do not include those provided in specialized developmental disability provider settings, workstations, or supported employment services.     • Supports to enable the individual to access services and opportunities available in community settings. This may include accessing general community activities, performing community volunteer work, and accessing services provided in community settings such as senior centers and adult day centers. Supports provided under CLDS must be those that are above and beyond the usual services provided in such a setting and not duplicate services expected to be the responsibility of the center.   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Nebraska Community Supports Program (CSP) - 07/16/2011

 “The Department offers a system of supports and services intended to allow individuals with developmental disabilities to maximize their independence as they live, work, recreate, and participate in their communities.”

 

“The Community Supports Program (CSP) is designed to offer alternatives to the traditional model of services available through the Department. The traditional model provides for services consisting of day and residential habilitation and respite care, provided only by agencies certified as specialized providers of developmental disabilities services. The CSP allows for a broader array of services to be provided by developmental disability service providers and/or other community (individual or agency) providers. This is intended to give the individual more control over the type of services received and providers of those services, as well as allowing individuals to purchase services other than habilitative training. The underlying philosophy of the Community Supports Program is to build upon the individual and family strengths and to strengthen and support informal and formal services already in place.”  

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Alliance for Full Participation - 01/12/2011

 

“The Alliance for Full Participation (AFP) is a formal partnership of leading developmental disabilities organizations with a common vision—to create a better and more fulfilling quality of life for people with developmental disabilities. AFP supports a network of state teams, dedicated to promoting full participation for people with developmental disabilities.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Planning Council on Developmental Disabilities State Plan 2017-2021

Goal 3: Employment

 Influence systems change to provide increased opportunities for more individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (I/DD) of diverse identities to pursue an employment path of their choice.

· Provide support to address barriers, advocate for, and expand opportunities for an increased number of individuals to participate in community integrated employment or entrepreneurship.

 · Increase opportunities for self-advocates to share employment experiences and promote community integrated employment and entrepreneurship with peers and stakeholders.

· Provide access to benefits planning services for an increased number of service providers, individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities and their families to support the person’s employment choices.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

Nebraska Aging and Disability Resource Center

~~“Welcome to Nebraska’s Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC) website. The ADRC was established by the Nebraska Legislature under LB 320 in 2015. The program was made permanent with LB 793 in 2018. This effort is coordinated by Nebraska’s Department of Health and Human Services’ State Unit on Aging, through local Area Agencies on Aging, and in partnership with the disability organizations listed to the left.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Mental Health Partnerships

“Nebraska Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) continues its long standing partnership with Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services - Behavioral Health Services (NE-DHHS) to make available employment services to Nebraskans with severe mental illness. VR and NE-DHHS fund six regional programs that provide Supported Employment services across the State.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Youth Leadership Council

~~“NYLC was created “by youth for youth”. We are leaders and advocates who experience a disability. We travel the state promoting disability awareness and educating our peers on transitioning to college or work.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Vocational Rehabilitation Workforce Development Partnerships

There are currently three local service delivery areas and 20 One-Stop Career Centers in Nebraska. Local Workforce Investment Boards oversee the Greater Lincoln, Greater Omaha and Greater Nebraska service delivery areas. In addition, there is a Nebraska Workforce Investment Board that is responsible for administering the statewide system. Collaboration between Nebraska VR and the other mandated partners is intended to provide:

1.     Easier access to services

2.     More comprehensive services

3.     Better labor market information

4.     A seamless system of service delivery

5.     Improved long-term employment outcomes for persons with disabilities

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

2017 Disability Employment and Inclusion Awards - 07/01/2017

“Two Nebraska VR partners received awards for their role in creating inclusive workplaces and advocacy for disability employment during a ceremony October 10 at the State Capitol.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) 2012

 

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Nebraska Money Follows the Person

Thousands of individuals across the country, through the efforts of Money Follows the Person and other programs, have successfully transitioned from an institutional setting to the community. Nebraska’s own transition stories are inspiring and motivating.    Depending upon your specific needs – whether you are aged, have a physical or developmental disability, or a traumatic brain injury – supportive services such as the following help people live successfully in community-based settings:    • Home Care/Chore Services     • Home-Delivered Meals     • Adult Day Health Care    • Assisted Living Service     • Nutrition Services Independence Skills Management     • Personal Emergency Response System     • Transportation     • Assistive Technology Supports and Home Modification     • Home Again Services    • Respite     • Home Health     • Habilitation Services     • Team Behavioral Consultation     • Child Care for Children with Disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, specifically— those who have lost their health insurance due to business and factory closures, migrant farm workers that are in a need for health insurance, and those individuals that are working contract or working from home that need health insurance. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Children's Hospital, Great Plains Regional Medical Center, Nebraska Orthopedic Hospital, Gothenburg Hospital, Nebraska Dept. of Labor (Rapid Response), Faith based groups, Food pantries, and Healthcare coalitions.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Glenn HughesPhone: (816) 524-9477Email: ghughes@hrserase.com” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ready, Set, Go - 05/01/2019

~~“There are many decisions young adults must make when planning for life after high school. These materials and resources help young adults with developmental disabilities make decisions about supports as they move from high school to adult life. Ready, Set, Go! is for:• Transition students and young adults who are eligible for services through DHHS-DD.• Family members and friends of eligible persons.• IEP team members and others working with transition students and young adults.” 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Serving Individuals with Disabilities in Workforce Services: 2018 Nebraska Workforce Conference - 05/23/2018

~~“Objectives:

-WIOA and Nebraska Vision for Customer Service-Seamlessness for Career Services in AJCs-Partnerships with the Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired and the Nebraska Vocational Rehabilitation-Responsiveness for Job Seekers with Disability-Ways to Build Service Capacity”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Department of Developmental Disabilities Training Resources

“The Division of Developmental Disabilities is committed to providing training that results in improved lives for our participants. Please feel free to use as many training resources as you see fit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Leads to Success - Seeing the Possibilities

This presentation provides an explanation of, and service descriptions and payment rates for, Supported Employment. It includes Customized Employment as a valid application as Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Opening Doors: A Transition Guide

“This protocol is the result of the dialogue and cooperation of the Nebraska

Transition Team members and other statewide representatives. Members met for three sessions with a facilitator for the purpose of better defining roles, responsibilities, tasks, principles, and relationships between entities working with blind, visually impaired, and deaf-blind children and youth…The result of this collaborative effort is intended to foster a more comprehensive seamless transition model for children and youth -birth through adulthood. By drawing on knowledge from a wide variety of resources we are able to better leverage learning, provide informed choice, and produce individual programs that are creative and responsive to needed and appropriate services”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Alliance for Full Participation Webinars - Employment First

Employment First has become a national movement among some state agencies, employment and self advocacy organizations, such as National APSE, AFP and SABE, and employment service providers. The common thread among these groups is that employment is expected to be the first priority when discussing and offering day services for youth and adults with disabilities. This session will focus on several ingredients that are important when considering setting employment as the 1st priority. Topics include career planning, how to create the expectation of work, setting employment outcomes for your agency, data collection (what’s important to track and why), and nationally recognized approaches to promote change within a service organization. 

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nebraska Medicaid State Plan

~~“The State Plan is the official document describing the nature and scope of the Nebraska Medicaid Program. There are seven sections that comprise the State Plan (Part 1) as well as many accompanying attachments and amendments (Parts 2 and 3). Each part was developed by Nebraska and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Money Follows the Person

Thousands of individuals across the country, through the efforts of Money Follows the Person and other programs, have successfully transitioned from an institutional setting to the community. Nebraska’s own transition stories are inspiring and motivating.    Depending upon your specific needs – whether you are aged, have a physical or developmental disability, or a traumatic brain injury – supportive services such as the following help people live successfully in community-based settings:    • Home Care/Chore Services     • Home-Delivered Meals     • Adult Day Health Care    • Assisted Living Service     • Nutrition Services Independence Skills Management     • Personal Emergency Response System     • Transportation     • Assistive Technology Supports and Home Modification     • Home Again Services    • Respite     • Home Health     • Habilitation Services     • Team Behavioral Consultation     • Child Care for Children with Disabilities  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE Comprehensive DD Waiver for Adults (0396.R02.00)

Provides group home residential hab, integrated community employment, prevocational workshop hab, respite, assistive technology and supports, behavioral risk services, community inclusion day hab, community living and day supports, companion home residential hab, extended family home residential hab, home mods, in-home residential hab, medical risk services, PERS, retirement services, team behavioral consultation, vehicle mods, vocational planning hab, workstation hab for individuals w/autism, MR, DD ages 21 - no max age

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE Day Services Waiver for Adults w/DD (0394.R03.00)

~~“Provides day habilitation, prevocational services, respite, supported employment – individual, adult companion service, adult day services, assistive technology, behavioral  risk services, community living and day supports, consultative assessment service, crisis intervention support, environmental modification assessment, habilitative community inclusion, habilitative workshop, home modification, integrated community employment, medical risk services, personal emergency response system (PERS)retirement services, supported employment – enclave, supported employment - follow along, team behavioral consultation, transitional services, transportation, vehicle modification, vocational planning habilitation service, workstation habilitation services for individuals w/autism, ID, DD ages 21 - no max age “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

NE HCBS Waiver for Children w/DD and their Families (4154.R06.00)

~~“Provides prevocational services, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment – individual, adult companion service, adult day services, assistive technology, consultative assessment service, crisis intervention support, environmental modification assessment, habilitative community inclusion, habilitative workshop, home modifications, homemaker services, in-home residential habilitation, personal emergency response system, supported employment – enclave, supported employment - follow along, transitional services, transportation, vehicle modification for individuals w/autism, ID/DD ages 0 to no max age “
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

With the right level of focus on Employment First systems-change efforts, individuals with disabilities could be living "The Good Life" in the state of Nebraska.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nebraska’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,920,076
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0%
Change from
2016 to 2017
112,418
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.73%
Change from
2016 to 2017
55,391
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.73%
Change from
2016 to 2017
49.27%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
84.97%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 1,920,076
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 112,418
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 55,391
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 869,515
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 49.27%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 84.97%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 16.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 117,474
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 110,026
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 201,170
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,927
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 16,956
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,323
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,643
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 6,032
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 3,008

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,989
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 11.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 41,249

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 4,696
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 8,295
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 14,708
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 31.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 704.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 46.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 748
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 911
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 90
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 5,628

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 5,183
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 15
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 11
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 73.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,547
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 61,638
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $573,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $10,410,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $115,596,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $8,744,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 768
Number of people served in facility based work. 876
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,533
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 5.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 76.75%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 6.68%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.08%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 89.41%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 38.16%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 78.69%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.68%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 165,689
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 251
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 73,915
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 88,454
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 162,369
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 82
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 167
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 249
AbilityOne wages (products). $791,551
AbilityOne wages (services). $849,657

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 13
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 456
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 32
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 490

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~Impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA and Nebraska’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, lead to the conclusion that an emphasis on Customized Employment can increase the opportunities for successful employment and expanded partnerships with employers. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, Nebraska is receiving intensive technical assistance and training from the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) in the following areas: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. (Page 156) Title I

Increase our capacity to provide customized employment services and options to consumers and employers. Nebraska VR is one of the states selected to receive technical assistance under the JD-VR TAC. The impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA, and the agency’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, point to an increased emphasis on Customized Employment. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, there are two areas of need for intensive technical assistance and training to be provided: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach; and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. The JD-VR TAC will work with Nebraska VR to increase our capacity to provide customized employment services through the provision of training and technical assistance. The expected outcomes are:
 An increase in the number and type of businesses adopting a customized employment approach and establishing a CE job for an individual with a significant disability.
 An increase in the number of individuals with a significant disability, especially individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability, participating in competitive integrated employment.
 An increase in the quality of employment (as determined by the salary, benefits, number of hours worked, etc.). (Page 175) Title I

6. Improving performance
Strategies to improve the performance of the State with respect to the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA.
 Develop strategies in coordination with the appropriate core partners and participating Combined State Plan program partners once benchmarks are established.
 Implement the technical assistance and training on customized employment with VR staff and providers. Technical assistance will be provided by the Job-Driven VR Technical Assistance Center. (Page 186) Title I

The services made available by Nebraska VR using Title VI and Title I funds are limited to those initial services resulting in stable job performance in an integrated competitive work setting. These may include, as appropriate to individual needs:
1. An assessment of the need for supported employment services is supplementary to and provided after an assessment of eligibility and rehabilitation needs has been determined that a person is eligible for services and is a person with a most significant disability.
2. Development and placement in competitive integrated employment includes customized employment services for the maximum number of hours possible consistent with the person’s unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, and capabilities.
3. Intensive on-the-job skills training and other training provided by skilled job trainers, co-workers, and other qualified persons is based on a systematic analysis of the work to be performed, and a systematic analysis of the employer’s performance expectations and requirements. It is conducted in accordance with a written plan identifying the methods of teaching, instruction, and behavior management necessary to enable the individual to acquire skills and master the work to be performed, to regulate behavior in accordance with the employer’s requirements and expectations, and achieve stable job performance. The training provides for a systematic reduction of intensive teaching, instruction, and behavior management methods to the lowest intervention level necessary to maintain stable job performance. (Page 192-193) Title I

For the effort to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs (CRPs), NCBVI collaborates with a wide range of community partners statewide, working together to develop and improve services. Job coaching to Supported/customized Employment clients is provided through contracts with community rehabilitation programs. Agency staff members also work with CRPs and independent living centers to assure that services are coordinated and meeting the needs of Nebraskans with disabilities, especially those who are blind or visually impaired along with multiple disabilities. NCBVI partners with community rehabilitation programs (Martin Luther Homes, Quality Living) and other entities. In addition to services specific to individuals, collaboration on other projects occurs as the need and opportunity arise. The activities enable NCBVI to inform many persons about the services available to individuals who are blind, thus expanding opportunities to those who are, or who may become, eligible for services of the Vocational Rehabilitation or the Supported Employment program. The agency website is updated continuously and provides information to the public about available services and resources, avenues to apply for services, and ask questions, and so forth. Work is being done to enhance a social media presence with information and updates about NCBVI events, activities, and services. The agency collaborates with the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Developmental Disabilities services (NDHHS-DDD) to identify potential clients, coordinate service plans and share funding for those individuals in the System who are described as blind and visually impaired. (Page 214) Title I
 

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The Council is composed of 3 subcommittees: Client Services, Employment and Transition. Each SRC member selects a subcommittee to participate in based on their interests and background. These committees provide the Council members the opportunity to focus and provide feedback on topics relevant to their individual group.

 The Client Services Committee provided feedback on client satisfaction surveys, services to VR clients and recommended cultural awareness training and technical assistance on materials and outreach strategies directed toward Nebraskans who are deaf and hard of hearing and the Latino populations. The Client Services Committee formed the subcommittee, Consumer Input Committee, as another avenue to gather feedback and recommendations. The Consumer Input Committee consists of past and present clients of Nebraska VR. This year the Consumer Input Committee reviewed: 1) Discover the Job that Works for You booklet section Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) Important Information for You, 2) Application: section Understanding Your Rights as an Applicant, 3) Marketing: Magnet Promotional Item Survey and Nebraska VR bus advertisements, and 4) MyVR Survey.
 The Employment Committee selected the Entrepreneur of Distinction Annual Award winners, discussed and provided feedback on VR job placement services, job seeking training, Certificate Programs and Project Search.
 The Transition Committee focused on policies and procedures relating to high school aged clients and families including discussions on pre-employment transition services as defined in WIOA. (Page 147) Title I
 
 The Assistive Technology Partnership/Education receives funding from Nebraska VR for the AT Education Specialists to focus on transition youth and coordinate services with Nebraska VR offices. The Education Specialists host technology conferences, participate in self-advocacy workshops, provide AT demonstrations and individualized services and AT recommendations to transition youth across the state.
 Nebraska VR supports 17 Project SEARCH sites across the state. Consistent with the national model, Project SEARCH is a partnership between Nebraska VR, a business, area school systems, the Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Assistive Technology Partnership, and Division of Developmental Disabilities. The one year school-to-work program is business led and takes place entirely in the workplace. The experience includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. While completing the rotations, the students have the opportunity to gain transferable skills, practice self-advocacy and demonstrate work readiness. Nebraska’s Project SEARCH programs are hosted in a variety of businesses including hotels, hospitals, retail and distribution. (Pages 153-154) Title I

Work-based learning experiences
Many of the activities highlighted under (1) VR Services also enhance Nebraska VR’s transition services, including pre-employment transition services. For example, as the Business Account Managers are working with employers, opportunities for students and youth are also explored. These work-based learning opportunities may include informational interviews, job shadows, company tours, On-the-Job Evaluation and Training, internships, and placement assistance.
Certificate programs
For the past several years, Nebraska VR has developed and maintained Certificate Programs. These Certificate Programs provide hands-on training for students and youth with disabilities (adult VR clients may also enroll). The specialized training results from a partnership with local Nebraska VR service offices, three to five core business partners in the area, a community college and local schools. Students take classes, tour businesses and either work part-time or participate in an internship with employer partners. The programs are business-driven, short term, real life trainings that teach both technical hard skills and soft skills. Each training opportunity gives the students an opportunity to acquire the skills that they need to pursue in-demand jobs and careers. To date, the Certificate Programs offered include: Electrician Helper, Welding, Auto Mechanic Helper, Construction, HVAC Helper, Para-educator, and Community Health Worker. Nebraska VR will explore increasing the number of Certificate Programs available in the state. (Page 156) Title I

The one year school-to-work program is business led and takes place entirely in the workplace. The experience includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. While completing the rotations, the students have the opportunity to gain transferable skills, practice self-advocacy, and demonstrate work readiness. Nebraska’s Project SEARCH programs are hosted in a variety of businesses including hotels, hospitals, retail and distribution.

There are currently two Project SEARCH Business Advisory Councils (BAC) in Nebraska. The goal of the BAC is to broaden the program across a variety of industries, provide individuals with disabilities access to the resources they need to be successfully employed in a wide-range of fields and serve as a platform to further educate business professionals about the benefits of employing individuals with disabilities. The measurable goal is 100% employment of Project SEARCH intern participants. Between the two Nebraska BACs there are more than thirty businesses involved. Nebraska VR will consider increasing the number of Project SEARCH sites available in the state and will also consider the expansion of BACs. (Page 157) Title I

VR Rehabilitation Specialists make determinations and provide specialized direct services to persons with disabilities pursuing employment goals. Their responsibilities include: eligibility, Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) and amendment approval, IPE progress, and employment outcome determinations, community assessment, career counseling, disability awareness counseling, personal adjustment counseling, rehabilitation engineering, independent living skill training, personal management training, social skills training, job placement assistance, and job retention assistance. These activities generally require independent complex decision-making and problem-solving based on extensive knowledge of disability, human behavior, the world of work, and the community.  (Pages 162-163) Title I

For FY 2018, under the Order of Selection, Nebraska VR will continue to provide services to all individuals who are already receiving services under an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) prior to final approval of the Order of Selection by RSA and implementation by Nebraska VR. The projected number of individuals not receiving services and the estimated cost for services (projected savings) is:
 Priority Group 2: 1,158 individuals, with 475 individuals projected to require cost services at an average cost of $1,739 with a projected savings of $826,090.
 Priority Group 3: 581 individuals, with 233 individuals projected to require cost services at an average cost of $1,739 with a projected savings of $405,219. (Page 171) Title I

Increase the participation of Native Americans in VR services. The State Rehabilitation Council suggested that the agency explore opportunities to collaborate with any existing American Indian VR programs in Nebraska to increase the number of Native Americans with disabilities being served. The one existing program in Nebraska is no longer funded. The agency will identify possible partnerships to encourage other eligible tribes/organizations to apply for an AIVR grant as available.
Collaborate with Workforce Development core partners on the development and availability of soft skills training for all individuals. The core partners will explore the possibility of joint soft skills training. The potential collaboration could reduce duplication and increase the availability of training opportunities across the state.
 Goal 3: Strengthen the alignment between education, training, and employer workforce needs.
Maintain the Business Account Manager model and consider expansion to other areas of the state. Nebraska VR has hired Business Account Managers (BAM) in Omaha, Norfolk, and Kearney to establish relationships with businesses, trade associations, business and human resources organizations to identify staffing patterns, skill requirements, support needs, training preferences, etc., to be an effective representative to Nebraska VR teams on behalf of businesses. (Page 174) Title I

The transition youth conferences and the Youth Leadership Council are innovation and expansion activities that focus on students who are potentially eligible or are under an IEP or Section 504 Plan. The Youth Leadership Council members reach out to other students who can benefit from VR services and serve as role models for transitioning from school to work. Transition youth conferences provide opportunities for career exploration and development of work soft skills including independent living skills. The number of youth conferences and the number of youth attending continue to increase due to additional support from VR.

The State Rehabilitation Council provides input and guidance on VR’s innovative approaches to service delivery including the Meet You Were You Are service delivery model, the use of motivational interviewing techniques, and the expanded use of social media to engage consumers (MyVR). Members also provide direction on strategies to reach underserved and unserved through expanded and innovative marketing strategies. (Page 187) Title I

Extent of supported employment services
1. Assessment of rehabilitation need for supported employment services are made available to the extent necessary to determine the nature and scope of services to be provided under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) to achieve supported employment or to determine on the basis of clear evidence that an employment outcome cannot be achieved
2. Job development including customized employment and placement services are provided to the extent necessary to place the individual into competitive integrated employment consistent with client’s informed choice.
3. Intensive on-the-job and other training services are provided to the person to the extent necessary to achieve stable job performance, or to determine on the basis of clear evidence this cannot be achieved. Services are provided for a maximum of 24 cumulative months, or for youth with a disability (16-24) utilizing Title VI funds up to 48 cumulative months unless a longer period is provided in the IPE of the person. (Page 193) Title I

Transition planning by personnel of the designated State agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and implementation of their individualized education programs;
 
Specifically, included in the agreement are provisions for consultations and technical assistance, transition planning, coordinating the IEP and the IPE for roles and responsibilities amongst key individuals, and financial responsibilities, and procedures for outreach. The purpose is to coordinate and promote the cooperation of the programs and services available to students who are blind, deaf—blind and visually impaired during the transition process. (Page 202) Title I

NCBVI provides information to educators and to VR personnel about training opportunities relevant to personnel development in the fields of both education and vocational rehabilitation. A series of personnel training sessions relating to the handbook were held in a coordinated effort between NCBVI and personnel covered by IDEA. In FFY 2014 and 2015, NCBVI Counselors continued to provide the tool, and instructions as needed, statewide to educators, parents, and other persons involved with educating blind and visually impaired school students within Nebraska. Additional joint personnel development efforts will be held when specific issues of mutual concern are identified. For example, teachers of blind children from the public school system provide presentations to NCBVI at Staff Meetings. At the NCBVI Annual State Staff Meeting in 2013, a speaker from Nebraska Department of Education/Special Populations gave a presentation on the IEP process and the role of VR Counselors in that process, working with educators, families and students. NCBVI staff members provide presentations at training sessions of the school system, university and college classes, and other opportunities which arise. We will continue to explore ways to assure success in education and quality employment. One avenue will be collaborating with the WinAHEAD organization (Western Iowa and Nebraska Association on Higher Education and Disabilities). On an ongoing basis, the primary emphasis will be individual communication between NCBVI counselors and parents, teachers and others in the education system. (Page 211) Title I

NCBVI Supported Employment clients are transitioned to extended services provided by other public agencies, non-profit organizations, employers, natural supports or other entities after no longer than 24 months, or 48 months for blind or visually impaired youth after placement in Supported Employment, unless a longer period is set forth in the IPE. The transition to extended services is based upon a) substantial progress made toward hours per week goal in the IPE, b) the client is stabilized on the job, and c) that extended services will be available and provided without a break in services.  (Page 230) Title I

Career Pathways

~~Career Pathways Advancement Project (CPAP)
Nebraska VR was one of four state VR programs to receive a Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Model Demonstration Grant from Rehabilitation Services Administration. The Career Pathways Advancement Project (CPAP) uses an Upskill/Backfill model with a focused outreach to Nebraska VR clients successfully employed in the last four years in order to assist in career advancement options within the high demand industries of Information Technology, Manufacturing, Healthcare, Construction, and Transportation, and Distribution and Logistics. (Page 51) Title I

H. Improving access to postsecondary credentials
Describe how the State’s strategies will improve access to activities leading to recognized postsecondary credentials, including Registered Apprenticeship certificates. This includes credentials that are industry-recognized certificates, licenses or certifications, and that are portable and stackable.
Through the state’s education-related strategies, plan partners improve access to activities leading to recognized postsecondary credentials, including Registered Apprenticeship certificates, industry-recognized certificates, licenses, certifications, and credentials that are portable and stackable, including:
 Nebraska’s industry sector partnership strategy, the Next Generation Industry Partnerships initiative, which includes a focus on education and training leading to postsecondary credentials that are portable and stackable;
 regional initiatives that connect in-demand industry sectors and occupations with career pathways, will continued focus on activities leading to recognized postsecondary credentials, such as Nebraska’s Connecting SNAP Clients to Better Job Opportunities initiative (described in Section II.c.1. of this plan);
 certificate training programs that are business driven partnerships with local community colleges, Nebraska VR, and businesses within targeted in demand occupations;
 promotion of career pathways, including career readiness, throughout the one-stop delivery system; (Page 66) Title I

A 21st century understanding of the evolving labor force begins with an awareness that the workforce will continue to grow and reflect the increasing diversity of America. While increasing numbers of individuals with disabilities will be entering the labor force, such individuals currently remain a largely untapped labor source. Women’s employment rates will rise while the employment rates for men will decline slightly. The percentage of individuals from minority groups entering the workforce will also grow.
The workforce will become increasing urban and the manufacturing sector will slowly decline while the service-producing sector will grow as will e-commerce. Technology and globalization will continue to shape the labor force and require a workforce with highly technical skills. How quickly graduate rehabilitation programs will revise curriculum to prepare graduates in a 21st understanding of the evolving labor force remains to be seen. Consequently Nebraska VR must provide staff with timely training on Nebraska labor market information and trends, career pathways, the world of work and career connections in order to equipping VR staff with the knowledge to counsel individuals with disabilities in their pursuit of work and career and provide effective employment services. The outreach and partnership efforts of our Business Account Managers with Nebraska businesses will be also be critical to understanding their respective labor needs in order for VR to prepare, train and offer skilled applicants with disabilities. (Page 163) Title I

With the implementation of WIOA, it is expected that there will be a significant reversal of the decline in referrals to the VR program in recent years under the former workforce investment system. The major contributing factor was the move to on-line registration and on-line services at the One Stop Centers that was not adequately identifying applicants who had disabilities. The collaboration that has occurred among the core partners since the passage of WIOA has already resulted in a greater awareness of each core partners program and opportunities for reciprocal referrals and service coordination. Work is currently underway on the development of a common intake.
Nebraska VR staff will continue to serve on the new regional workforce boards which will now have a larger business representation. It is important that VR staff are aware of and promote among its clients, the jobs-driven, work-based learning, career pathways and industry sector initiatives put forth by the workforce development system. (Page 169) Title I

Move more individuals to economic self-sufficiency through the implementation of the Career Pathways Advancement Project. The CPAP is funded under a grant from RSA and uses an “Upskill/Backfill” model to train individuals in emerging and growing industry sectors. Career Pathway Recruiters will contact 1,200 former VR clients now working in targeted industry sectors such as information technology, manufacturing, transportation, distribution and logistics, to inform them of an opportunity to receive additional training and education to advance their careers. The grant will provide the necessary financial assistance to allow individuals with disabilities to participate in an established career pathway initiative in collaboration with the Nebraska Department of Labor, several postsecondary educational institutions, and businesses. Approximately 50-60 individuals will move up the career pathway by upgrading their skills and knowledge, creating opportunities for other individuals with disabilities to backfill the vacant positions. Individuals with disabilities will be more likely to be economically self-sufficient as they advance upward in their career pathway in the targeted high demand sectors. (Page 175) Title I

Apprenticeship
Nebraska VR has engaged in a dual customer approach to the provision of employment-related services for many years as embodied in its mission statement, “We help people with disabilities prepare for, obtain, and maintain employment while helping businesses recruit, train, and retain employees with disabilities.” This has led to a job-driven approach in Nebraska VR’s development of customized training programs such as Project SEARCH, Certificate Programs, and On the Job Evaluation and Training sites. Nebraska VR recently extended the job-driven emphasis with the implementation of a “Meet You Where You Are” model that includes a rapid engagement (Progressive Employment) focus engaging individuals in an element of work as quickly as possible. VR staff are actively involved in the recruitment and support of businesses to partner with VR on rapid engagement activities. (Page 155) Title I Certificate programs For the past several years, Nebraska VR has developed and maintained Certificate Programs. These Certificate Programs provide hands-on training for students and youth with disabilities (adult VR clients may also enroll). The specialized training results from a partnership with local Nebraska VR service offices, three to five core business partners in the area, a community college and local schools. Students take classes, tour businesses and either work part-time or participate in an internship with employer partners. The programs are business-driven, short term, real life trainings that teach both technical hard skills and soft skills. Each training opportunity gives the students an opportunity to acquire the skills that they need to pursue in-demand jobs and careers. To date, the Certificate Programs offered include: Electrician Helper, Welding, Auto Mechanic Helper, Construction, HVAC Helper, Para-educator, and Community Health Worker. Nebraska VR will explore increasing the number of Certificate Programs available in the state. (Page 156) Title I Skill training services provided in integrated competitive employment and community settings. Many individuals with cognitive disabilities struggle with traditional postsecondary classroom and/or segregated training programs. In addition to On-The-Job Training services, Certificate Programs and Project Search sites have proven to be another successful alternative for adults and students to achieve employment without pursuing postsecondary training. The collaboration between businesses and community colleges in the Certificate Programs and business and high schools in the Project Search programs results in individuals with cognitive and other impairments acquiring the desired work skills and jobs. Post-secondary training continues to be the highest expenditure category among the VR services as individuals choose careers and professions that require certificates and degrees. VR staff provides occupational information and Nebraska Labor Market data on demand occupations so clients can make an informed decision on their vocational goal. (Page 168) Title I Maintain the Business Account Manager model and consider expansion to other areas of the state. Nebraska VR has hired Business Account Managers (BAM) in Omaha, Norfolk, and Kearney to establish relationships with businesses, trade associations, business and human resources organizations to identify staffing patterns, skill requirements, support needs, training preferences, etc., to be an effective representative to Nebraska VR teams on behalf of businesses. The BAMs will seek out opportunities to establish work-based learning partnerships, OJE/OJTs, apprenticeships, and internships with businesses. These positions take a jobs driven approach in aligning the education and training requirements of businesses with the qualifications of VR eligible clients to better meet the workforce needs of employers. Maintain and expand the number of certificate programs that serve as an entry-level training program into an established career pathway. Certificate Programs offer hands-on training programs for students and adults with disabilities. This opportunity results from a partnership with local Nebraska VR service offices, three to five core business partners in the area, a community college, and local schools. The businesses have common interests in the types of skills and abilities they need to fill job vacancies. Together, the businesses work to identify exactly what they need in job candidates qualified to fill job vacancies. They can fit their hiring and retention needs with the opportunity to design a curriculum. The training includes soft skills training keying in on the basics of being on time and dependable. Work place communication skills are included. Students take classes, tour business, and either work part-time or participate in an internship with employer partners. The agency will look to expand partnerships across the state as well as beyond the current areas of auto tech, HVAC, welding, electrician and community health worker. Collect information on the business/employer level of satisfaction with VR services and programs. Nebraska VR will reinstitute an employer satisfaction survey to provide feedback on business-focused initiatives. This will be revised at the issuance of federal guidance on the final employer measures under WIOA. (Pages 174-175) Title I
Work Incentives & Benefits

~~SSDI and/or SSI recipients may be an underserved population by virtue of the fact that Nebraska VR’s percentage of clients receiving SSDI and/or SSI is below the national and agency mean. However, SSA data indicates that the state’s percentage of individual’s age 18 - 64 on SSDI or SSI on the basis of a disability is also below the national average.
As previously mentioned, youth with intellectual disabilities who exit or would like to exit school at an age appropriate time are unserved until they reach the age of 21 and can then receive Developmental Disabilities services and supports. With the proposed WIOA regulations, Nebraska VR intends to approach the HHS-Developmental Disabilities program with a plan to serve these youth prior to age 21.
Strides have continued to be made in using screening tools and specialized vocational assessments to identify Nebraska VR clients with brain injury and other cognitive disorders in order to better align services and supports required to achieve employment. The identification and use of assistive technology options have also proven to be beneficial to individuals with a brain injury.
Nebraska VR received a TBI Implementation Partnership Grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration in June 2014. The purpose of the 4-year grant is to increase access to rehabilitation and community-based services for individuals with brain injury. Nebraska VR is the lead agency for brain injury in the state and collaborates with several other state agencies and programs to carry out grant-funded activities. While progress has been made, information collected is a part of this grant finds that there are still service gaps and resources that exist for this population. (Page 169) Title I

c. The designated state unit will coordinate activities with any other State agency that is functioning as an employment network under the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency program under Section 1148 of the Social Security Act.
6. Financial Administration of the Supported Employment Program:
a. The designated State agency assures that it will expend no more than 2.5 percent of the State’s allotment under title VI for administrative costs of carrying out this program; and, the designated State agency or agencies will provide, directly or indirectly through public or private entities, non-Federal contributions in an amount that is not less than 10 percent of the costs of carrying out supported employment services provided to youth with the most significant disabilities with the funds reserved for such purpose under section 603(d) of the Rehabilitation Act, in accordance with section 606(b)(7)(G) and (H) of the Rehabilitation Act.
b. The designated State agency assures that it will use funds made available under title VI of the Rehabilitation Act only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including extended services to youth with the most significant disabilities, who are eligible to receive such services; and, that such funds are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act, when providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment, in accordance with section 606(b)(7)(A) and (D), of the Rehabilitation Act.
7. Provision of Supported Employment Services:
a. The designated State agency assures that it will provide supported employment services as defined in section 7(39) of the Rehabilitation Act.
b. The designated State agency assures that:
i. the comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome, in accordance with the requirements of section 606(b)(7)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act
ii. an individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act , which is developed and updated with title I funds, in accordance with sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 606(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act. (Page 199) Title I

Definition of Work Eligible Individuals
Nebraska excludes from the definition of Work Eligible Individuals:
a) A minor parent who is not a head-of-household
b) A non-recipient parent of children receiving TANF/MOE who is ineligible to receive assistance due to immigration status;
c) An individual receiving assistance under an approved Tribal TANF program.
d) A non-recipient parent of children receiving TANF/MOE who is not receiving TANF benefits due to receipt of SSI or SSDI. Nebraska does not consider disabled parents receiving Social Security Disability Income or Supplemental Security Income to be ‘work-eligible individuals’ because they are not included in the TANF payment unit.
e) A parent needed in the home to care for a disabled family member who is not attending school full-time.*  ( Page 239) Title IV

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) offers a wide variety of supports to help maintain individuals within their community. Specific programs which address common support needs include the Social Services Block Grant, Disabled Persons and Family Support, Lifespan Respite and Medicaid Waivers. A sampling of possible support services includes: transportation, energy assistance, housing, telephone assistance, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps), adult day care for caregivers and covering the Medicare premiums for eligible low-income beneficiaries. DHHS also coordinates the Ticket to Work program which encourages persons receiving Social Security Disability to rejoin the workforce. Ticket to Work also provides benefits counselors to help people understand whether participation impacts eligibility for other public benefits.
The local Area Agencies on Aging are familiar with the support needs of the elderly and are experienced in organizing community resources to address those needs. Nebraska currently has one program sub-grantee, National Able Network. National Able Network took over from Experience Works as the sub-grantee in December 2016 following a national Request for Proposal process for national grantees in 2016. National Able Network is also a national grantee whose service area covers most of Nebraska. National Able Network confers with the staff of each of the eight Area Agencies on Aging to address non-employment support needs of SCSEP trainees. The program is also participating in the development of the Nebraska’s Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRC). This partnership will be able to provide information to address a variety of human services as well as a referral to local agencies which provide assistance to our targeted population. The ADRC website provides linkages to a wide variety of community resources for the SCSEP participants. Coordination with ADRC will continue to enhance with the demonstration project implemented in 2016. For more information visit www.nebraska.networkofcare.org. (Page 294) Title IV

Program improvement over the next two years will increasingly focus upon growing industries, developing a closer working relationship with human service organizations, supporting employers and equitably distributing SCSEP positions across our State. Suggestions include:
1. Increase SCSEP focus upon Nebraska’s Hot Jobs. Through partnerships with other Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act organizations develop classroom and on-the job training to address our growth industries. Long term care will be a growth industry as the Baby Boom generation increasingly needs a variety of supportive services.
2. Develop a closer working relationship between SCSEP, Ticket to Work and the Centers for Independent Living.
3. Continue relationships between SCSEP, Nebraska’s Aging Network (Aging and Disability Resource Center and Area Agencies on Aging) and the State Department of Health and Human Services to address the multiple support needs common among SCSEP participants.
4. Work with Medicaid to review program guidelines which count SCSEP training income when determining program eligibility. Current rules require interested older persons to choose between training and Medicaid.
5. Review the distribution of positions to be proportional to the eligible population of persons over 55 years of age, commuting patterns, industry concentrations and education systems (community colleges) in the newly designated economic regions in the state. Distribution within rural areas will be monitored to assure equitable distribution of SCSEP positions. Shifting positions will be accomplished gradually as participants leave this program.
6. Work with SCSEP providers to assure timely reporting of participant activity into SPARQ (US Department of Labor web-based reporting system). (Pages 297-298) Title IV
 

Employer/ Business

~~ Nebraska’s Eligible Training Provider List includes programs offered by the state’s university system, as well as Registered Apprenticeship programs and private postsecondary career schools.
The Nebraska Department of Education reVISION program provides Nebraska public schools with the opportunity to analyze and transform their current career education systems in order to improve their ability to educate a qualified workforce that meets industry needs within an ever-changing economy. Working in collaboration with postsecondary education and regional workforce and economic development leaders, the reVISION process links career educators, school administrators, school counselors, and industry professionals. Under the leadership of the Nebraska Department of Education and in partnership with the Nebraska Departments of Labor and Economic Development, the reVISION process is a strategic approach for schools to analyze their current career education system and make plans, as needed, for adjustments.

 Nebraska VR has established certificate training programs that are business driven partnerships with local community colleges, Nebraska VR, and businesses within targeted in demand occupations. With a dual customer focus, the goal is to offer a short-term training and internship program that will meet the needs of businesses in high demand sectors and result in long-term employment for the individuals who participate. (Page 64) Title I
 

Data Collection
No disability specific information found regarding this element.
511

~~Impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA and Nebraska’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, lead to the conclusion that an emphasis on Customized Employment can increase the opportunities for successful employment and expanded partnerships with employers. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, Nebraska is receiving intensive technical assistance and training from the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) in the following areas: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. (Page 156) Title I

Increase our capacity to provide customized employment services and options to consumers and employers. Nebraska VR is one of the states selected to receive technical assistance under the JD-VR TAC. The impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA, and the agency’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, point to an increased emphasis on Customized Employment. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, there are two areas of need for intensive technical assistance and training to be provided: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach; and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. The JD-VR TAC will work with Nebraska VR to increase our capacity to provide customized employment services through the provision of training and technical assistance. The expected outcomes are:

An increase in the number and type of businesses adopting a customized employment approach and establishing a CE job for an individual with a significant disability.
An increase in the number of individuals with a significant disability, especially individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability, participating in competitive integrated employment.
An increase in the quality of employment (as determined by the salary, benefits, number of hours worked, etc.). (Page 175) Title I
 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188
The state’s compliance with the requirements of WIOA Sec. 188 and the American with Disabilities Act regarding physical and programmatic accessibility is addressed under Nebraska’s Nondiscrimination Plan, which includes provisions for EO reviews of the one-stop delivery system. A recent EO review of resource rooms in one-stop centers across the state revealed a need for new assistive technology for individuals with disabilities. In 2016, the state submitted an Unemployment Insurance Supplemental Budget Request (SBR) to fund assistive technology upgrades in 11 one-stop centers. Following approval of the request, the state worked with Assistive Technology Partnership (ATP) to identify components required to provide state-of-the art hardware and software to one-stop centers across the state. Based on the outcome of the consultation with ATP and available funding through the SBR, the state is able to upgrade assistive technology in 12 one-stop centers, as described in Table 35. (Pages 84-85) Title I Following installation of the new assistive technology during January and February 2018, training and support will be provided for one-stop center staff to ensure appropriate use and application of assistive technology. One-stop center staff will also receive training and support on addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. The state’s current policy on nondiscrimination describes requirements under WIOA Sec. 188 and 29 CFR Part 38 regarding physical and programmatic accessibility. In addition, the state’s current policy on one-stop center certification includes criteria for assessment of physical and programmatic accessibility, including the use of accessible technology to increase access to high quality workforce services for individuals with disabilities. The criteria by which local boards are required to assess a one-stop center’s physical and programmatic accessibility is listed in Tables 36 and 37. (Page 85) Title I
Vets
NEworks NEworks is a comprehensive web-based case management and reporting system used by the Nebraska Department of Labor (NDOL) for the delivery of Wagner-Peyser, WIOA, Trade Assistance Act, and Jobs for Veterans Act. The management of multiple programs within a single system allows for integrated service delivery and common performance reporting data. NEworks also functions as a self-service labor exchange for jobseekers and employers, the front-end of Unemployment Insurance, and a Labor Market Information module for public users. Additional resources include a resume builder, assessments, communication tools, the eligible training provider list, and online learning. (Page 67) Title I The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually. In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes: a. Employment, training, and job placement services How the State intends to provide employment, training and job placement services to Veterans and eligible persons under the JVSG DVOPs and LVERs have formed strong partnerships with other AJC programs to integrate Veteran services and to promote employment, training, and placement opportunities for Veterans throughout the areas of the state. This includes integration with other state and federal agencies. This integration ensures that qualified Veterans can be simultaneously enrolled with other partner programs such as Wagner-Peyser, Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA), and Vocational and Rehabilitation Employment Program (VR&E). Lincoln and Omaha DVOP staff currently attend U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Chapter 31 VR&E orientation sessions hosted in these metro VA offices. Omaha staff partners with Offutt Airman & Family Readiness staff with two significant Veteran focused job fairs each year hosted in the spring and fall. In collaboration with the Nebraska National Guard (NENG), Wagner-Peyser staff routinely attend unit demobilization and reintegration trainings to assist eligible Veterans with employment and training services. These events, known as “Yellow Ribbon Events” provide staff an opportunity to promote Veteran services to newly separated Veterans. DVOPs work with Wagner-Peyser staff to inform and education them on relevant information to promote and share. NDOL conducts training sessions to present job search, resume, and interviewing skills workshops to NENG members during weekend unit trainings and other appropriate occasions. NDOL will develop, implement, and offer new and updated informational sessions during NENG weekend training sessions as needed. State VR has developed a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Task Force and facilitates education and trainings for those providing services to this unique population. NDOL is working to ensure that all DVOP and LVER staff has the opportunity to attend these informational sessions. Traumatic Brain Injury Task Force awareness and resource emails are distributed to DVOP and LVER staff to allow them to get a better understanding of the program and its resources. This allows the DVOP and LVER staff to address the employment barriers created by TBIs. (Page 255) Title IV NDOL has partnered with the state Apprenticeship program to assist with the screening and assessment for the local electrical workers and steamfitters unions. Additionally, NDOL has developed a dedicated Veteran’s services web page outlining available resources. Through this web page, Veterans and military personnel can access a current NDOL office directory with all appropriate location and contact information. The web page includes information regarding priority of service, job search services and location sites, job fair information, and links to other Veteran service organizations, federal employment information, and state and federal benefit information. Due to the isolated nature of the Native American communities living on tribal lands in largely unpopulated rural areas of Nebraska, specific outreach plans for Native American Veterans have not been developed. Success regarding services to Veterans will be monitored and assessed through existing report mechanisms. This includes quarterly reports and reports located within NEworks. These reports currently provide information on employment and training activities on Veterans with SBE’s and the targeted population at a state, regional or local perspective. b. DVOP Specialists and LVER staff roles and responsibilities The duties assigned to DVOP specialists and LVER staff by the State; specifically implementing DVOP and LVER duties or roles and responsibilities as outlined in 38 U.S.C. § 4103A and 4104. These duties must be consistent with current guidance; DVOP Staff: Nebraska’s current staffing model is predominantly a DVOP model. All DVOPs are state merit staff and assigned to a Nebraska Department of Labor location or American Job Center. DVOPs are integrated into the one-stop delivery system and are well versed in the process of developing and maintaining strong relationships with other service providers and program partners to promote employment, training, and placement services for Veterans. (Page 256) Title IV The outlined duties do not preclude the overarching LVER responsibility to ensure that Veterans are provided the full range of labor exchange services to meet their employment and training needs. The LVER shall be available to provide guidance and/or technical assistance to NDOL staff regarding the identification and referral of those Veterans who may benefit from more intensive services provided either by DVOP staff or other partner resources. LVER staff will also conduct employer outreach either independently or through the coordinated efforts of the AJCs and NDOL locations. Through contacts within the employer community, LVER staff work to develop employment and job training opportunities, apprenticeship, and other on-the-job (OJT) training positions to benefit the Veteran community. (Page 259) Title IV NEworks provides self-service options to resources and website links that Veterans and eligible spouses can access from their residence or any accessible public computer. NEworks provides Veterans access to a vast range of job opportunities from corporate job posting boards and external job search engine websites that are imported into NEworks on a daily basis. As prescribed by the VR&E counselor, Chapter 31 Veterans may receive a wide range of services to include: labor market information, assessment, career guidance, and counseling. DVOPs provide case management services as needed, especially for those in need of placement services or other services to become “job ready”. Case management services include the development of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP), in-depth assessments, and regularly scheduled communication or follow-up until the Veteran no longer requires DVOP services or the VR&E counselor closes the Veteran’s file. (Page 266) Title IV Coordination with partner programs that have Job Training funds is key to the successful upskilling of Veterans. Co-enrollment and leveraging of resources will allow Veterans to receive the greatest amount of services. Communication between partners will occur on a formal and informal basis to allow continual support of Veterans through job training programs. Release of Information documentation will be collected when necessary, in order to allow this communication to occur between the programs and not require the Veteran to repeatedly provide the same information multiple times to partnering programs. (Page 267) Title IV
Mental Health

~~Nebraska VR seeks to work cooperatively with numerous other state and local agencies and programs. Collaborative efforts are manifested through coordinated committees throughout the state with Nebraska VR state office and local field staff actively participating. Examples of the committees Nebraska VR serves on includes, but are not limited to, Nebraska Planning Council on Developmental Disabilities, State Advisory Council on Mental Health Services, Nebraska Special Education Advisory Council Standing Committees on 1) Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2) Out of Home Placements (OHP), 3) Transition, 4) Deaf and Hard of Hearing, 5) Nebraska Youth Leadership Council, Nebraska Brain Injury Advisory Council, Local Community Resource Committees, Madonna Community Advisory Council, Assistive Technology Partnership (ATP) Advisory Council, Alternative Finance Loan Advisory Council, Nebraska Children’s Commission Juvenile Services Committee, Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness Advisory Council, Prevention Partnership with the Nebraska Children and Families Foundation, and local Chambers of Commerce, etc.
Nebraska VR maintains interagency agreements with Nebraska Health and Human Services, Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Veterans Administration-Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program for purposes of providing an understood and coordinated effort to achieve employment goals for persons with disabilities. (Page 150) Title I

Project Search agreements are maintained with these business and high schools:
 Businesses: Cabela’s, Walmart Distribution Center, Embassy Suites Downtown Omaha, Embassy Suites La Vista and Embassy Suites Lincoln, PayPal, Valmont Industries, Faith Regional Hospital, St. Francis Hospital, Mercy Medical Center, Mary Lanning Health Care, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital, Children’s Hospital, Columbus Community Hospital, Monroe Meyer Institute, Nebraska Medicine, York Health Care and Good Samaritan Hospital.
 Schools: Bellevue Public School, Columbus Public Schools, Kearney Public Schools, Lincoln Public Schools, Madonna School, Millard Public Schools, Norfolk Public Schools, North Platte Public Schools, Omaha Nations Public Schools, Omaha Public Schools, Papillion LaVista School District, Westside Community Schools, Winnebago Public Schools, Norris Public Schools, Waverly Public Schools, York Public Schools and Educational Service Units 1, 2, 6, 7 & 9. (Page 151) Title I

Nebraska VR (VR) and Nebraska Health and Human Services, Division of Behavioral Health Services (DBH) have developed a Memorandum of Understanding to provide braided funding for an outcome-based milestone system of supported employment for individuals with significant behavioral health disabilities. The negotiating team consisted of the Directors of VR and DBH along with their respective Program Managers and Fiscal Administrators. The tools used to arrive at the model included: reviews of the fidelity models, a signed agreement for sharing information on mutual clients, VR contract costs and the payments to supported employment providers from the six Behavioral Health Regions who receive their funding from the Division of Behavioral Health. (Page 157) Title I

To comply with the previous CSPD requirements prior to WIOA, Nebraska VR elected in 1983 to use the coursework requirements for a Nebraska Certified Professional Counselor under the Nebraska Uniform Credentials Act. (Neb. Rev. Stat. §38-2132). Note that while Nebraska VR uses this academic coursework criteria for hiring, the certification applies only to individuals providing mental health counseling and who identify themselves as a Certified Professional Counselors. Nebraska VR neither requires staff to obtain the credential nor holds its staff out to be Certified Professional Counselors. (Page 163) Title I

Individuals with the most significant disabilities
Major service needs include —
 Impact and challenge from changing demographics in serving individuals with the most significant disabilities. Nebraska continues to see a declining rural population. 59.95% of the state’s population reside within 5 of the 93 counties. The agency must continue to look at how best to allocate staff resources throughout the state and adequately serve both population sets. As noted in the previous comprehensive assessment community resources and employment opportunities seem to follow the population shift. Individuals with serious mental health impairments continue to be the largest disability category being served by Nebraska VR.
 Challenge of locating, accessing and coordinating needed community services and supports. Consistent with prior comprehensive assessment of rehabilitation needs, individuals with the most significant work disabilities continue to have complex needs, complicated by poverty. Social services and support networks, both governmental and non-profit, have not been able to maintain much less increase service levels to meet these needs. The new governor and the legislature will be evaluating the previous trend of moving social services from local community offices to area call centers which has resulted in service access issues. However, Nebraska VR intends to maintain its strategic office locations across the state and travel to all counties. (Page 167) Title I
3. The state agency responsible for providing mental health services
Representatives of NCBVI and the Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Behavioral Health (NDHHS-DBH) have met to discuss how our two agencies can work together to promote competitive integrated employment opportunities on behalf of blind and visually impaired people with behavioral health conditions. Services include a method for providing supported employment services similar to the milestone approach used by Nebraska VR General. Other mental health services are provided statewide by various entities. NCBVI personnel in each office cooperate with those providers to ensure that mutual clients, or persons who may need both VR and mental health services, will be adequately and appropriately served. (Page 205) Title I

A. The provision of extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years
Each blind and visually impaired individual with a developmental disability has a case service coordinator employed by the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Developmental Disabilities (NDHH-DDD). The case service coordinator is responsible for developing an Individualized Service Plan (ISP) for mutual clients served by NCBVI and DDD. When supported employment services are involved, NCBVI provides incentive payments at specific intervals (start of job search, start of employment, stabilization, maintenance, and start of long-term support.). This arrangement is in accordance with the “milestones” model used by Nebraska VR General to serve clients shared with NDHHS-DDD. NCBVI representatives met with a meeting of supervisors of local field office coordinated by NHHS-DDD in November 2012 to explain how the milestone model applies to clients served by NCBVI as well as Nebraska VR General. Since then, NCBVI administrators, supervisors, and counselors continue to meet and build closer working relationships with NHHS-DDD at the state and local levels. NCBVI has also reached out to Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Behavioral Health (NDHHS-DBH) and to the Autism Center of Nebraska to create a mechanism for providing supported employment services to blind and visually impaired clients with mental health conditions and autism. Continued training regarding Supported Employment services is provided to NCBVI counselors, statewide. The total funds projected for FY 2018 is expected to be $30,000. At least 50% will be allocated to blind and visually impaired students in the pre-employment transition services categories. (Page 218) Title I

Blind and visually impaired individuals with mental health issues, acquired brain injury, or other significant disabilities with onset of disability occurring after the age of 21 may also be candidates for SE services , and NCBVI is exploring ways to expand SE opportunities with these individuals through partnerships with relevant state agencies and non-profit SE service providers.
NCBVI works to enhance the potential to achieve employment outcomes in cases that often require maximizing resources and creativity. SE funds are utilized for training of clients who are Deaf-Blind or have other multiple disabilities. As appropriate, some clients are referred to the Helen Keller National Center (HKNC) for intensive training, not available in Nebraska. In recent years, there have been more Deaf-Blind individuals who have personal goals to become employed, who qualify for Supported Employment and for whom Supported Employment is indicated. In addition to the actual job coaching and ongoing supports, it is crucial for such individuals to enhance their capabilities for productive lives. (Page 228) Title I

Collaborative working relationships with state agencies and service providers are currently being explored to extend SE service opportunities to blind and visually impaired consumers with acquired brain injury, mental health conditions, autism, or other significant secondary disabilities. These agencies or service providers include The Nebraska Department of Behavioral Health, the Nebraska Mental Health Association, and Autism Center of Nebraska.
A small number of blind and visually impaired consumers with significant, non-developmental secondary disabilities occurring after age 21 might benefit from SE services. Generally, however, if the individual has a secondary disability other than a significant behavioral health condition or autism, there may not be a source of ongoing financial support for SE services extending beyond the time allowed for NCBVI support. In such cases, the Deputy Director of Services and the immediate supervisor of field services works with the NCBVI Counselor involved to identify possible resources for the ongoing support, such as developing a PASS (Plan to Achieve Self Sufficiency) or personal resources. The Deputy Director also provides statewide training and information to NCBVI personnel regarding the SE program. (Page 229) Title I

Drug Testing and Lab Confirmation Service is defined as a point of collection test by a trained employee in which specimens such as urine, saliva, and breath are used to determine a positive or negative drug test result. Collection of a urine specimen will be conducted through line of sight observation of the client by a trained employee of the same gender. Drug testing includes the collection of a sweat specimen obtained through the use of a patch. A refusal by the client is defined as the client choosing not to provide a specimen to the Contractor at a designated time and place. All refusals must be reported to the DHHS case manager or supervisor by the end of the next business day, unless otherwise noted in the service referral. A no show by the client is defined as the client not being present to provide a specimen to the Contractor at the designated time and place. All no shows must be reported to the DHHS case manager or supervisor by the end of the next business day, unless otherwise noted in the service referral. Laboratory test confirmation is defined as screening the collected specimen by a laboratory to detect the presence of a specific drug(s) or substance(s) and the concentration of the drug(s) or substance(s) as identified and requested in the Service Referral. Laboratory test confirmation includes the written verification of the results. The Contractor’s drug testing protocol and policy shall be consistent with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The Contractor’s drug testing protocol, policy, and rates shall be submitted to each Service Area Contract Liaison where the service will be provided. (Pages 247-248) Title I

 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)
NEres combines the required services of the federally funded Re-Employment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) program, along with the jobseeker requirements for regular Unemployment Insurance (UI) compensation. Based on the requirements for each specific program, NEres offers a set of universal services and meets the strictest program criteria of RESEA in order to ensure compliance with all federal and state program requirements. The identified program services required by each separate program and their relation to the universal services provided via NEres, are demonstrated in Illustration 7 and outlined below. (Page 123) Title I Nebraska Department of Labor has a contract with Geographic Solutions Inc. (GSI) for the NEworks Virtual One Stop (VOS) module system used for Employment Services, including labor exchange services. In October 2013, NDOL purchased GSI’s Re-Employment Exchange (REX) Module which allows a single sign-on for customers who utilize services through both the NEworks and Unemployment Insurance systems. In Jan 2014, NDOL transferred hosting services from the Nebraska Office of Chief Information Officer (OCIO) to GSI and added a Mobile Application module. In order to successfully implement the program design of NEres, NDOL purchased the Scheduler & Attendance Tracking Module from GSI, which: 1. Interfaces with the VOS, REX, Mobile App and Benefit Payment System (BPS). 2. Provides the functionality to schedule and track program participants per the correct fund source. The software helps maintain eligibility of benefits for UI claimants not yet employed, by providing eligibility data to the UI system. This module also allows NEres to schedule and track unemployment claimants who are required to attend an orientation and one-on-one meeting at the beginning of their unemployment claim to get them back to work sooner. This technology will replace an outdated scheduling system. (Page 127) Title I Career and training services provided by AJC and NDOL Locations include: Job Search Assistance; Job Referral; Placement Assistance for Jobseekers; Reemployment Services to unemployment insurance claimants; Recruitment services to employers with job openings. Outreach efforts include an explanation of the full menu of services available from the local AJC or NDOL Location as well as specific employment opportunities that are currently available. Support for education and training is provided through the NFJP grantee. The State Workforce Development Boards in coordination with local Workforce Development Boards provide funding recommendations, assistance and guidance on methods of allowing AJC customers to be competitive in a regional and global economy. AJC and NDOL Locations provide MSFWs with referrals to local education institutions for GED, ESL and technical skills training. (Page 133) Title I
Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 41 - 50 of 63

NE Project SEARCH - 10/21/2010

 

“Project SEARCH helps students with disabilities learn vocational and competitive skills to help them enter the workplace and to become more independent in the work environment. Nebraska VR will expand Project SEARCH and its services for students with disabilities next year from seven locations statewide to ten. In each of these communities, Project SEARCH has grown through a partnership with Nebraska VR, local community businesses, local schools, the Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Assistive Technology Partnership and the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DD Services).”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

NE Assistive Technology Partnership - 06/15/1989

 

“Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and the Assistive Technology Partnership (ATP) have worked together since 1989 when VR wrote the grant to establish a technology-related assistance project (ATP) in Nebraska. ATP Technology Specialists conduct on-site assessments for consumers referred by VR. The assessments may be for students preparing to work and consumers who are ready to work or returning to work after an injury or illness.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Department of Developmental Disabilities Training Resources

“The Division of Developmental Disabilities is committed to providing training that results in improved lives for our participants. Please feel free to use as many training resources as you see fit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Acquired Brain Injury Supported Employment Partners

"Nebraska VR partners with Goodwill Industries of Greater Nebraska and Career Solutions, Inc. to provide supported employment services to individuals who have experienced an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) and require specialized assistance to obtain and maintain competitive employment. Our VR liaison staff in Grand Island, Hastings, Kearney, and Omaha work jointly with employment specialists from these programs to assist individuals in overcoming employment barriers."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Medicaid State Plan

~~“The State Plan is the official document describing the nature and scope of the Nebraska Medicaid Program. There are seven sections that comprise the State Plan (Part 1) as well as many accompanying attachments and amendments (Parts 2 and 3). Each part was developed by Nebraska and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Money Follows the Person

Thousands of individuals across the country, through the efforts of Money Follows the Person and other programs, have successfully transitioned from an institutional setting to the community. Nebraska’s own transition stories are inspiring and motivating.    Depending upon your specific needs – whether you are aged, have a physical or developmental disability, or a traumatic brain injury – supportive services such as the following help people live successfully in community-based settings:    • Home Care/Chore Services     • Home-Delivered Meals     • Adult Day Health Care    • Assisted Living Service     • Nutrition Services Independence Skills Management     • Personal Emergency Response System     • Transportation     • Assistive Technology Supports and Home Modification     • Home Again Services    • Respite     • Home Health     • Habilitation Services     • Team Behavioral Consultation     • Child Care for Children with Disabilities  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Leads to Success - Seeing the Possibilities

This presentation provides an explanation of, and service descriptions and payment rates for, Supported Employment. It includes Customized Employment as a valid application as Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Nebraska Client Assistance Program Hotline

The Hotline provides information and referral to Nebraskans who have questions or concerns related to a disability. This includes information about rehabilitation services, transportation, special parking permits, legal rights, and any other questions related to a disability

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Nebraska ABLE Legislation (LB 591) - 05/27/2015

A BILL FOR AN ACT relating to revenue and taxation; to amend sections 72-1239.01, 77-3504, and 84-618, Reissue Revised Statutes of Nebraska, and sections 68-1201, 77-2715.07, and 77-2716, Revised Statutes Cumulative Supplement, 2014; to define terms; to create the achieving a better life experience program; to provide powers and duties; to change provisions relating to federal tax credits; to provide for adjustments to taxable income; to redefine household income for purposes of the homestead exemption; to provide startup funding; to harmonize provisions; to provide operative dates; to repeal the original sections; and to declare an emergency. Be it enacted by the people of the State of Nebraska.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Executive Order No. 15-03 – WIOA Partnerships - 04/01/2015

“NEBRASKA WORKFORCE INNOVATION AND OPPORTUNITY ACT

WHEREAS, the variety of employment and training programs available in Nebraska present

numerous opportunities to more effectively manage, through coordination, the workforce

development needs of the employer and applicant community'; and

WHEREAS, one agency needs to be designated as the lead agency for acting as the grant

recipient for the purpose of administering and monitoring the expenditure of grant funds received by

the State of Nebraska under pursuant to the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act…

 

May also include a representatives of community-based organizations

that have demonstrated experience and expertise in addressing the

employment, training, or education needs of individuals with barriers to

employment, including organizations that serve veterans or that provide or

support competitive, integrated en1ployment for individuals with disabilities;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Employment First Nebraska’s Welfare Reform Program - 10/23/2017

~~“Employment First is the name of Nebraska’s welfare reform program.  The primary purpose of Employment First is to provide temporary, transitional support for Nebraska families so that economic self-sufficiency is attained in as expeditious a manner as possible through the provision of training, education, and employment preparation.  Nebraska is dedicated to improving the standard of living and quality of life for each family living in the State that has had to turn to public assistance to help support their family in times of need.  We will accomplish this by promoting personal responsibility and empowering parents to support their families. "

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging

WIOA Co-Enrollment and Common Exit - 06/02/2017

~~“Under Nebraska’s Combined State Plan,1 plan partners are committed to the development and implementation of co-enrollment strategies to support program alignment and career pathways. Co-enrollment: supports coordination across core programs, including planning, reporting, and service delivery; supports a customer-centric design that allows programs to leverage resources for participants who are eligible for, and need, multiple services that cross program lines; and allows tracking career pathway participants whose service happens not within one particular Federal program and funding stream, but across multiple programs.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Nebraska Programs for Addiction, Mental Health Facing Cuts - 05/21/2017

“Groups that treat people with addictions, mental health problems and developmental disabilities are bracing for state budget cuts they say could force them to reduce staffing and services for some of Nebraska's most vulnerable residents.

 

The cuts became final last week when lawmakers fell short of the votes needed to override Gov. Pete Ricketts' line-item budget vetoes.

 

Now, service providers are scrounging for places to cut in the face of rising costs and unpaid Medicaid claims from the state's new managed care system, Heritage Health. Some providers have said they're still waiting on claims the system should have paid three months ago.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health

2017 Transition Summer Programs - 05/04/2017

~~“2017 Transition Summer ProgramsTwenty innovative short-term programs to provide career exploration, job readiness, and work based learning opportunities for students with disabilities during the summer of 2017 were developed.

Summary of all of the Nebraska VR SummerTransition Program proposals that were approved by the State Board of Education on May 4, 2017. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Transition Services Planner - 05/01/2017

~~“PURPOSE OF THE TRANSITION SERVICES PLANNERThe purpose of this Transition Services Planner is to provide information to educators about the Nebraska VR program. It is an instrument to help educators and Nebraska VR staff bridge the transition requirements of IDEA and WIOA while providing meaningful and effective transition services to students with disabilities. The Planner will facilitate discussion between local educators and Nebraska VR staff and serve as a catalyst to develop a written working agreement.This planning effort will help:1) Promote a coordinated effort between the school district, Educational Service Unit (ESU) and the local Nebraska VR Office;2) Implement strategies that will facilitate effective transition services and eliminate duplication of services; and,3) Ensure the development of an effective partnership on behalf of students with disabilities.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Nebraska Developmental Disabilities Provider Handbook - 01/01/2017

“DDD provides funding and oversight of community-based providers. DD services can be provided by either an independent or agency provider. Developmental Disability (DD) Services focus on helping participants live the most independent lives possible. Goals are identified and habilitation programs (training) may be developed to teach skills. Goals focus on employment, independent living, and community access. DD Service Coordination provides oversight”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE Title 404 - Community Supports Program (CSP) - 07/16/2011

Section 9-003.02D The Community Living and Day Supports service includes the following components:    • Supports to enable the individual to maintain or obtain employment. This may include someone hired to accompany and support the individual in an integrated work setting. Integrated settings are those considered as available to all members of the community. Payment for the work performed by the individual is the responsibility of the employer. Covered services do not include those provided in specialized developmental disability provider settings, workstations, or supported employment services.     • Supports to enable the individual to access services and opportunities available in community settings. This may include accessing general community activities, performing community volunteer work, and accessing services provided in community settings such as senior centers and adult day centers. Supports provided under CLDS must be those that are above and beyond the usual services provided in such a setting and not duplicate services expected to be the responsibility of the center.   
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Nebraska Community Supports Program (CSP) - 07/16/2011

 “The Department offers a system of supports and services intended to allow individuals with developmental disabilities to maximize their independence as they live, work, recreate, and participate in their communities.”

 

“The Community Supports Program (CSP) is designed to offer alternatives to the traditional model of services available through the Department. The traditional model provides for services consisting of day and residential habilitation and respite care, provided only by agencies certified as specialized providers of developmental disabilities services. The CSP allows for a broader array of services to be provided by developmental disability service providers and/or other community (individual or agency) providers. This is intended to give the individual more control over the type of services received and providers of those services, as well as allowing individuals to purchase services other than habilitative training. The underlying philosophy of the Community Supports Program is to build upon the individual and family strengths and to strengthen and support informal and formal services already in place.”  

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Alliance for Full Participation - 01/12/2011

 

“The Alliance for Full Participation (AFP) is a formal partnership of leading developmental disabilities organizations with a common vision—to create a better and more fulfilling quality of life for people with developmental disabilities. AFP supports a network of state teams, dedicated to promoting full participation for people with developmental disabilities.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Planning Council on Developmental Disabilities State Plan 2017-2021

Goal 3: Employment

 Influence systems change to provide increased opportunities for more individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (I/DD) of diverse identities to pursue an employment path of their choice.

· Provide support to address barriers, advocate for, and expand opportunities for an increased number of individuals to participate in community integrated employment or entrepreneurship.

 · Increase opportunities for self-advocates to share employment experiences and promote community integrated employment and entrepreneurship with peers and stakeholders.

· Provide access to benefits planning services for an increased number of service providers, individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities and their families to support the person’s employment choices.

 

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

Nebraska Aging and Disability Resource Center

~~“Welcome to Nebraska’s Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC) website. The ADRC was established by the Nebraska Legislature under LB 320 in 2015. The program was made permanent with LB 793 in 2018. This effort is coordinated by Nebraska’s Department of Health and Human Services’ State Unit on Aging, through local Area Agencies on Aging, and in partnership with the disability organizations listed to the left.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Mental Health Partnerships

“Nebraska Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) continues its long standing partnership with Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services - Behavioral Health Services (NE-DHHS) to make available employment services to Nebraskans with severe mental illness. VR and NE-DHHS fund six regional programs that provide Supported Employment services across the State.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Youth Leadership Council

~~“NYLC was created “by youth for youth”. We are leaders and advocates who experience a disability. We travel the state promoting disability awareness and educating our peers on transitioning to college or work.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Vocational Rehabilitation Workforce Development Partnerships

There are currently three local service delivery areas and 20 One-Stop Career Centers in Nebraska. Local Workforce Investment Boards oversee the Greater Lincoln, Greater Omaha and Greater Nebraska service delivery areas. In addition, there is a Nebraska Workforce Investment Board that is responsible for administering the statewide system. Collaboration between Nebraska VR and the other mandated partners is intended to provide:

1.     Easier access to services

2.     More comprehensive services

3.     Better labor market information

4.     A seamless system of service delivery

5.     Improved long-term employment outcomes for persons with disabilities

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

2017 Disability Employment and Inclusion Awards - 07/01/2017

“Two Nebraska VR partners received awards for their role in creating inclusive workplaces and advocacy for disability employment during a ceremony October 10 at the State Capitol.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE SAMHSA Employment Development Initiative (EDI) 2012

 

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Nebraska Money Follows the Person

Thousands of individuals across the country, through the efforts of Money Follows the Person and other programs, have successfully transitioned from an institutional setting to the community. Nebraska’s own transition stories are inspiring and motivating.    Depending upon your specific needs – whether you are aged, have a physical or developmental disability, or a traumatic brain injury – supportive services such as the following help people live successfully in community-based settings:    • Home Care/Chore Services     • Home-Delivered Meals     • Adult Day Health Care    • Assisted Living Service     • Nutrition Services Independence Skills Management     • Personal Emergency Response System     • Transportation     • Assistive Technology Supports and Home Modification     • Home Again Services    • Respite     • Home Health     • Habilitation Services     • Team Behavioral Consultation     • Child Care for Children with Disabilities  

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“HRS Erase Inc. dba Resolute was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations, specifically— those who have lost their health insurance due to business and factory closures, migrant farm workers that are in a need for health insurance, and those individuals that are working contract or working from home that need health insurance. There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Children's Hospital, Great Plains Regional Medical Center, Nebraska Orthopedic Hospital, Gothenburg Hospital, Nebraska Dept. of Labor (Rapid Response), Faith based groups, Food pantries, and Healthcare coalitions.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Glenn HughesPhone: (816) 524-9477Email: ghughes@hrserase.com” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ready, Set, Go - 05/01/2019

~~“There are many decisions young adults must make when planning for life after high school. These materials and resources help young adults with developmental disabilities make decisions about supports as they move from high school to adult life. Ready, Set, Go! is for:• Transition students and young adults who are eligible for services through DHHS-DD.• Family members and friends of eligible persons.• IEP team members and others working with transition students and young adults.” 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Serving Individuals with Disabilities in Workforce Services: 2018 Nebraska Workforce Conference - 05/23/2018

~~“Objectives:

-WIOA and Nebraska Vision for Customer Service-Seamlessness for Career Services in AJCs-Partnerships with the Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired and the Nebraska Vocational Rehabilitation-Responsiveness for Job Seekers with Disability-Ways to Build Service Capacity”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Department of Developmental Disabilities Training Resources

“The Division of Developmental Disabilities is committed to providing training that results in improved lives for our participants. Please feel free to use as many training resources as you see fit.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Supported Employment Leads to Success - Seeing the Possibilities

This presentation provides an explanation of, and service descriptions and payment rates for, Supported Employment. It includes Customized Employment as a valid application as Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Opening Doors: A Transition Guide

“This protocol is the result of the dialogue and cooperation of the Nebraska

Transition Team members and other statewide representatives. Members met for three sessions with a facilitator for the purpose of better defining roles, responsibilities, tasks, principles, and relationships between entities working with blind, visually impaired, and deaf-blind children and youth…The result of this collaborative effort is intended to foster a more comprehensive seamless transition model for children and youth -birth through adulthood. By drawing on knowledge from a wide variety of resources we are able to better leverage learning, provide informed choice, and produce individual programs that are creative and responsive to needed and appropriate services”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Nebraska Alliance for Full Participation Webinars - Employment First

Employment First has become a national movement among some state agencies, employment and self advocacy organizations, such as National APSE, AFP and SABE, and employment service providers. The common thread among these groups is that employment is expected to be the first priority when discussing and offering day services for youth and adults with disabilities. This session will focus on several ingredients that are important when considering setting employment as the 1st priority. Topics include career planning, how to create the expectation of work, setting employment outcomes for your agency, data collection (what’s important to track and why), and nationally recognized approaches to promote change within a service organization. 

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 11 - 16 of 16

Nebraska Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 07/02/2008

U.S. v. Nebraska – 8:08CV271

…In accordance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), 42 U.S.C. § 12132, and implementing regulation 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d), the State shall ensure that each  BSDC resident is served in the most integrated setting appropriate to meet each person’s  individualized needs. To this end, the State shall actively pursue the appropriate discharge of BSDC residents from BSDC and provide them with adequate and appropriate protections, supports, and services, consistent with each person’s individualized needs, in the most integrated setting in which they can be reasonably accommodated, and where the individual does not object….

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

Nebraska Medicaid State Plan

~~“The State Plan is the official document describing the nature and scope of the Nebraska Medicaid Program. There are seven sections that comprise the State Plan (Part 1) as well as many accompanying attachments and amendments (Parts 2 and 3). Each part was developed by Nebraska and approved by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Money Follows the Person

Thousands of individuals across the country, through the efforts of Money Follows the Person and other programs, have successfully transitioned from an institutional setting to the community. Nebraska’s own transition stories are inspiring and motivating.    Depending upon your specific needs – whether you are aged, have a physical or developmental disability, or a traumatic brain injury – supportive services such as the following help people live successfully in community-based settings:    • Home Care/Chore Services     • Home-Delivered Meals     • Adult Day Health Care    • Assisted Living Service     • Nutrition Services Independence Skills Management     • Personal Emergency Response System     • Transportation     • Assistive Technology Supports and Home Modification     • Home Again Services    • Respite     • Home Health     • Habilitation Services     • Team Behavioral Consultation     • Child Care for Children with Disabilities  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE Comprehensive DD Waiver for Adults (0396.R02.00)

Provides group home residential hab, integrated community employment, prevocational workshop hab, respite, assistive technology and supports, behavioral risk services, community inclusion day hab, community living and day supports, companion home residential hab, extended family home residential hab, home mods, in-home residential hab, medical risk services, PERS, retirement services, team behavioral consultation, vehicle mods, vocational planning hab, workstation hab for individuals w/autism, MR, DD ages 21 - no max age

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NE Day Services Waiver for Adults w/DD (0394.R03.00)

~~“Provides day habilitation, prevocational services, respite, supported employment – individual, adult companion service, adult day services, assistive technology, behavioral  risk services, community living and day supports, consultative assessment service, crisis intervention support, environmental modification assessment, habilitative community inclusion, habilitative workshop, home modification, integrated community employment, medical risk services, personal emergency response system (PERS)retirement services, supported employment – enclave, supported employment - follow along, team behavioral consultation, transitional services, transportation, vehicle modification, vocational planning habilitation service, workstation habilitation services for individuals w/autism, ID, DD ages 21 - no max age “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

NE HCBS Waiver for Children w/DD and their Families (4154.R06.00)

~~“Provides prevocational services, residential habilitation, respite, supported employment – individual, adult companion service, adult day services, assistive technology, consultative assessment service, crisis intervention support, environmental modification assessment, habilitative community inclusion, habilitative workshop, home modifications, homemaker services, in-home residential habilitation, personal emergency response system, supported employment – enclave, supported employment - follow along, transitional services, transportation, vehicle modification for individuals w/autism, ID/DD ages 0 to no max age “
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

With the right level of focus on Employment First systems-change efforts, individuals with disabilities could be living "The Good Life" in the state of Nebraska.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Nebraska’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
1,920,076
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0%
Change from
2016 to 2017
112,418
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
3.73%
Change from
2016 to 2017
55,391
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.73%
Change from
2016 to 2017
49.27%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.28%
Change from
2016 to 2017
84.97%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 1,920,076
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 112,418
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 55,391
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 869,515
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 49.27%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 84.97%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.90%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 16.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 117,474
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 110,026
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 201,170
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,927
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 16,956
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,323
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,643
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 6,032
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 3,008

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 2,989
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 11.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 41,249

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 4,696
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 8,295
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 14,708
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 31.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 704.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 46.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 748
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 911
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 90
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 5,628

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 5,183
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.06

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 15
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 11
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 73.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.58

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,547
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 61,638
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $573,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $10,410,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $115,596,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $8,744,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 2.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 768
Number of people served in facility based work. 876
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,533
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 5.50

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 76.75%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 6.68%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.08%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 89.41%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 38.16%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.84%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 78.69%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 23.68%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 165,689
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 251
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 73,915
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 88,454
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 162,369
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 82
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 167
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 249
AbilityOne wages (products). $791,551
AbilityOne wages (services). $849,657

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 11
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 13
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 456
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 32
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 490

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~Impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA and Nebraska’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, lead to the conclusion that an emphasis on Customized Employment can increase the opportunities for successful employment and expanded partnerships with employers. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, Nebraska is receiving intensive technical assistance and training from the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) in the following areas: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. (Page 156) Title I

Increase our capacity to provide customized employment services and options to consumers and employers. Nebraska VR is one of the states selected to receive technical assistance under the JD-VR TAC. The impending changes in Section 511 of WIOA, and the agency’s experience in working with individuals with significant disabilities, point to an increased emphasis on Customized Employment. In order for Nebraska VR to be successful in the implementation of Customized Employment services for individuals with significant disabilities, there are two areas of need for intensive technical assistance and training to be provided: 1) strategies to increase employer awareness and acceptance of a Customized Employment approach; and 2) training to VR staff at all levels to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and buy-in to the Customized Employment approach and to work with businesses to negotiate customized employment opportunities. The JD-VR TAC will work with Nebraska VR to increase our capacity to provide customized employment services through the provision of training and technical assistance. The expected outcomes are:
 An increase in the number and type of businesses adopting a customized employment approach and establishing a CE job for an individual with a significant disability.
 An increase in the number of individuals with a significant disability, especially individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability, participating in competitive integrated employment.
 An increase in the quality of employment (as determined by the salary, benefits, number of hours worked, etc.). (Page 175) Title I

6. Improving performance
Strategies to improve the performance of the State with respect to the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA.
 Develop strategies in coordination with the appropriate core partners and participating Combined State Plan program partners once benchmarks are established.
 Implement the technical assistance and training on customized employment with VR staff and providers. Technical assistance will be provided by the Job-Driven VR Technical Assistance Center. (Page 186) Title I

The services made available by Nebraska VR using Title VI and Title I funds are limited to those initial services resulting in stable job performance in an integrated competitive work setting. These may include, as appropriate to individual needs:
1. An assessment of the need for supported employment services is supplementary to and provided after an assessment of eligibility and rehabilitation needs has been determined that a person is eligible for services and is a person with a most significant disability.
2. Development and placement in competitive integrated employment includes customized employment services for the maximum number of hours possible consistent with the person’s unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, and capabilities.
3. Intensive on-the-job skills training and other training provided by skilled job trainers, co-workers, and other qualified persons is based on a systematic analysis of the work to be performed, and a systematic analysis of the employer’s performance expectations and requirements. It is conducted in accordance with a written plan identifying the methods of teaching, instruction, and behavior management necessary to enable the individual to acquire skills and master the work to be performed, to regulate behavior in accordance with the employer’s requirements and expectations, and achieve stable job performance. The training provides for a systematic reduction of intensive teaching, instruction, and behavior management methods to the lowest intervention level necessary to maintain stable job performance. (Page 192-193) Title I

For the effort to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs (CRPs), NCBVI collaborates with a wide range of community partners statewide, working together to develop and improve services. Job coaching to Supported/customized Employment clients is provided through contracts with community rehabilitation programs. Agency staff members also work with CRPs and independent living centers to assure that services are coordinated and meeting the needs of Nebraskans with disabilities, especially those who are blind or visually impaired along with multiple disabilities. NCBVI partners with community rehabilitation programs (Martin Luther Homes, Quality Living) and other entities. In addition to services specific to individuals, collaboration on other projects occurs as the need and opportunity arise. The activities enable NCBVI to inform many persons about the services available to individuals who are blind, thus expanding opportunities to those who are, or who may become, eligible for services of the Vocational Rehabilitation or the Supported Employment program. The agency website is updated continuously and provides information to the public about available services and resources, avenues to apply for services, and ask questions, and so forth. Work is being done to enhance a social media presence with information and updates about NCBVI events, activities, and services. The agency collaborates with the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services-Division of Developmental Disabilities services (NDHHS-DDD) to identify potential clients, coordinate service plans and share funding for those individuals in the System who are described as blind and visually impaired. (Page 214) Title I
 

 

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element..

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~The Council is composed of 3 subcommittees: Client Services, Employment and Transition. Each SRC member selects a subcommittee to participate in based on their interests and background. These committees provide the Council members the opportunity to focus and provide feedback on topics relevant to their individual group.

 The Client Services Committee provided feedback on client satisfaction surveys, services to VR clients and recommended cultural awareness training and technical assistance on materials and outreach strategies directed toward Nebraskans who are deaf and hard of hearing and the Latino populations. The Client Services Committee formed the subcommittee, Consumer Input Committee, as another avenue to gather feedback and recommendations. The Consumer Input Committee consists of past and present clients of Nebraska VR. This year the Consumer Input Committee reviewed: 1) Discover the Job that Works for You booklet section Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) Important Information for You, 2) Application: section Understanding Your Rights as an Applicant, 3) Marketing: Magnet Promotional Item Survey and Nebraska VR bus advertisements, and 4) MyVR Survey.
 The Employment Committee selected the Entrepreneur of Distinction Annual Award winners, discussed and provided feedback on VR job placement services, job seeking training, Certificate Programs and Project Search.
 The Transition Committee focused on policies and procedures relating to high school aged clients and families including discussions on pre-employment transition services as defined in WIOA. (Page 147) Title I
 
 The Assistive Technology Partnership/Education receives funding from Nebraska VR for the AT Education Specialists to focus on transition youth and coordinate services with Nebraska VR offices. The Education Specialists host technology conferences, participate in self-advocacy workshops, provide AT demonstrations and individualized services and AT recommendations to transition youth across the state.
 Nebraska VR supports 17 Project SEARCH sites across the state. Consistent with the national model, Project SEARCH is a partnership between Nebraska VR, a business, area school systems, the Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Assistive Technology Partnership, and Division of Developmental Disabilities. The one year school-to-work program is business led and takes place entirely in the workplace. The experience includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. While completing the rotations, the students have the opportunity to gain transferable skills, practice self-advocacy and demonstrate work readiness. Nebraska’s Project SEARCH programs are hosted in a variety of businesses including hotels, hospitals, retail and distribution. (Pages 153-154) Title I

Work-based learning experiences
Many of the activities highlighted under (1) VR Services also enhance Nebraska VR’s transition services, including pre-employment transition services. For example, as the Business Account Managers are working with employers, opportunities for students and youth are also explored. These work-based learning opportunities may include informational interviews, job shadows, company tours, On-the-Job Evaluation and Training, internships, and placement assistance.
Certificate programs
For the past several years, Nebraska VR has developed and maintained Certificate Programs. These Certificate Programs provide hands-on training for students and youth with disabilities (adult VR clients may also enroll). The specialized training results from a partnership with local Nebraska VR service offices, three to five core business partners in the area, a community college and local schools. Students take classes, tour businesses and either work part-time or participate in an internship with employer partners. The programs are business-driven, short term, real life trainings that teach both technical hard skills and soft skills. Each training opportunity gives the students an opportunity to acquire the skills that they need to pursue in-demand jobs and careers. To date, the Certificate Programs offered include: Electrician Helper, Welding, Auto Mechanic Helper, Construction, HVAC Helper, Para-educator, and Community Health Worker. Nebraska VR will explore increasing the number of Certificate Programs available in the state. (Page 156) Title I

The one year school-to-work program is business led and takes place entirely in the workplace. The experience includes a combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and hands-on training through worksite rotations. While completing the rotations, the students have the opportunity to gain transferable skills, practice self-advocacy, and demonstrate work readiness. Nebraska’s Project SEARCH programs are hosted in a variety of businesses including hotels, hospitals, retail and distribution.

There are currently two Project SEARCH Business Advisory Councils (BAC) in Nebraska. The goal of the BAC is to broaden the program across a variety of industries, provide individuals with disabilities access to the resources they need to be successfully employed in a wide-range of fields and serve as a platform to further educate business professionals about the benefits of employing individuals with disabilities. The measurable goal is 100% employment of Project SEARCH intern participants. Between the two Nebraska BACs there are more than thirty businesses involved. Nebraska VR will consider increasing the number of Project SEARCH sites available in the state and will also consider the expansion of BACs. (Page 157) Title I

VR Rehabilitation Specialists make determinations and provide specialized direct services to persons with disabilities pursuing employment goals. Their responsibilities include: eligibility, Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) and amendment approval, IPE progress, and employment outcome determinations, community assessment, career counseling, disability awareness counseling, personal adjustment counseling, rehabilitation engineering, independent living skill training, personal management training, social skills training, job placement assistance, and job retention assistance. These activities generally require independent complex decision-making and problem-solving based on extensive knowledge of disability, human behavior, the world of work, and the community.  (Pages 162-163) Title I

For FY 2018, under the Order of Selection, Nebraska VR will continue to provide services to all individuals who are already receiving services under an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) prior to final approval of the Order of Selection by RSA and implementation by Nebraska VR. The projected number of individuals not receiving services and the estimated cost for services (projected savings) is:
 Priority Group 2: 1,158 individuals, with 475 individuals projected to require cost services at an average cost of $1,739 with a projected savings of $826,090.
 Priority Group 3: 581 individuals, with 233 individuals projected to require cost services at an average cost of $1,739 with a projected savings of $405,219. (Page 171) Title I

Increase the participation of Native Americans in VR services. The State Rehabilitation Council suggested that the agency explore opportunities to collaborate with any existing American Indian VR programs in Nebraska to increase the number of Native Americans with disabilities being served. The one existing program in Nebraska is no longer funded. The agency will identify possible partnerships to encourage other eligible tribes/organizations to apply for an AIVR grant as available.
Collaborate with Workforce Development core partners on the development and availability of soft skills training for all individuals. The core partners will explore the possibility of joint soft skills training. The potential collaboration could reduce duplication and increase the availability of training opportunities across the state.
 Goal 3: Strengthen the alignment between education, training, and employer workforce needs.
Maintain the Business Account Manager model and consider expansion to other areas of the state. Nebraska VR has hired Business Account Managers (BAM) in Omaha, Norfolk, and Kearney to establish relationships with businesses, trade associations, business and human resources organizations to identify staffing patterns, skill requirements, support needs, training preferences, etc., to be an effective representative to Nebraska VR teams on behalf of businesses. (Page 174) Title I

The transition youth conferences and the Youth Leadership Council are inno