New Mexico

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State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Mexico’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2016 to 2017
2,088,070
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.21%
Change from
2016 to 2017
169,264
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
57,005
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.17%
Change from
2016 to 2017
33.68%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
71.45%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 2,085,109 2,081,015 2,088,070
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 156,118 153,667 169,264
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 48,139 49,084 57,005
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 771,842 767,544 751,217
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.84% 31.94% 33.68%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 72.13% 71.93% 71.45%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.60% 6.70% 6.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.80% 21.80% 24.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 19.70% 19.60% 18.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 153,260 152,374 164,508
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 153,746 156,357 157,848
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 229,605 227,405 249,066
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 8,543 5,326 5,551
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 131,181 138,305 147,519
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 27,226 28,096 30,655
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,526 1,475 2,111
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 9,540 12,297 8,640
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 30,453 33,628 26,067

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,876 1,901 1,809
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.30% 3.40% 3.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 65,167 64,822 64,863

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 978 852 912
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,795 2,173 2,067
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 3,988 3,195 3,254
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 24.50% 26.70% 28.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.40% 1.40% 1.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 2.70% 3.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.80% N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 130 100 82
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A 186 230
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 292 N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,574 4,564 4,782
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 7 16
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 2
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 86.00% 13.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.34 0.29 0.10

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,018
2,231
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 17 22 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 319 329 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 526 553 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 574 634 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 375 444 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 207 249 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 21.80% 21.30% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,303 2,435 2,437
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 100,060 100,897 101,334
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 57 69 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 46 48 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $7,288,000 $8,215,000 $7,888,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $12,807,000 $6,612,000 $5,896,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $25,673,000 $40,366,000 $34,916,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 32.00% 30.00% 24.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,565 2,607 3,135
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,684 452 500
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 51.50 51.60 55.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 50.61% 49.80% 49.82%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.64% 19.19% 18.62%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.91% 0.92% 0.87%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.36% 87.25% 93.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 43.26% 42.85% 41.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 76.10% 75.34% 76.39%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.71% 81.37% 80.94%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.84% 32.49% 35.26%
Source:
Office of Special Education Programs "OSEP Grads360"

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 711,613
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 877
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 392
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 392
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,148,725

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 4 5 3
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4 5 3
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 182 520 430
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 182 520 430

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Customized Employment

Term funding support from agencies providing supported employment. The Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health, provides long term funding for supported employment to provider agencies under the Developmental Disabilities Waiver and Mi Via Waivers. The Division works collaboratively with the Behavioral Health Services Division, Department of Health, New Mexico Department of Human Services, and the NM Behavioral Health Collaborative to assure ongoing support services for individuals with severe disabling mental illness served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment.

4. The Division continues to work with other state agencies under memoranda of understanding focusing on serving individuals with the most significant disabilities under supported employment plans.

5. Individual placements in integrated work settings at wages comparable to non–disabled peers performing similar work continue to be emphasized.

6. The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. One result of this collaboration in FFY 2014 was the training of 16 field staff in the Discovery process for non– traditional career development. Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 294)

Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 300)

In addition to expanding the number of personnel, NMDVR is planning customer service trainings to enhance quality and consistency of service. The agency is also providing specific Supported Employment training to current field staff. This will serve to increase staff expertise in identifying customized employment and individualized training strategies for participants. (Page 307)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found

DEI/DRC

No specific disability related information found

Competitive Integrated Employment

This regional program is set to begin its pilot in Albuquerque–area retail locations in 2016. The development of this program is the first of its’ kind for NMDVR with hopes of gaining statewide traction. Building on the success of the Skills to Work model, also called Place and Train. Dependent on it success, BSS will work with businesses throughout New Mexico to implement this model in their workplaces. Two initiatives were included in the New Mexico Blueprint for Prosperity that will allow DVR to expand place and train opportunities for job seekers with disabilities and New Mexico businesses to target job seekers with disabilities, including veterans with service– related disabilities, in their recruitment and hiring. (Page 267)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

In addition to a summer job in a competitive integrated setting, The Commission’s Students in Transition to Employment Program includes a significant workplace readiness training component. However, in order to expand workplace readiness training services, the Commission will begin offering additional workshops and seminars. The Commission has recently added staff to its Albuquerque Skills Center specifically for this purpose. The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year, during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and training on various assistive technology software and hardware; note–taking skills, Braille, math, college success, summer employment preparation, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy.

e. Instruction in self–advocacy, which may include peer mentoring. (Page 374)

The agency has also created the Skills Center, a training site to meet the needs of vocational rehabilitation consumers and potential vocational rehabilitation consumers. The agency is scheduling a variety of activities in the Skills Center. These activities include meetings, workshops, seminars, and other training events such as the summer Students in Transition to Employment Program. The Commission has recently added staff to its Albuquerque Skills Center specifically for this purpose. The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, adults, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year. To meet the particular needs of transition students, training will be scheduled during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and assistive technology hardware and software; Braille, math, note–taking skills, college success, STEP prep, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy. (Page 383)

School to Work Transition

The vocational rehabilitation programs use a case management system called Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment (AWARE) that is specifically designed for vocational rehabilitation programs. This system enables counselors to manage cases, managers to monitor cases, and the agency to prepare and submit required reports to RSA in a timely manner. All client data is captured and maintained in the AWARE case management system, such as information on client employment outcomes, including position title, employer, wages, hours, benefits, etc., and is provided to the Rehabilitation Services Administration, U. S. Department of Education through quarterly and annual reports. The company that programs the software will revise the system to produce any WIOA required data. Due to the especially strict confidentiality requirements imposed by the Rehabilitation Act and the sensitive nature of information about disabilities and medical conditions, the case management system is a closed system, accessible only by authorized employees. NMDWS has established a data sharing agreement to provide necessary wage data to support the programs’ activities. (Page 112)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Project Search programs across the state. DVR collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work. NM DVR employs a Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each Project Search site. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address Social Security Disability/ Social Security Income concerns and to address benefits income and impact to employment. The Division has established a replica of Project Search in New Mexico. Currently UNM Hospital and Hilton Garden Inn Gallup are providing training and internship rotations for 19 students. Project Search allows for three (3) rotations to occur at in various departments. These rotations provide candidates with the opportunity to learn the skills and abilities needed to be successful in the community and subsequently in a career of their choice. Job coaches and teachers will be on site at all times teaching curriculum and job skills. The goal of Project Search is to assure that each candidate will be employed following the completion of the year–long program. Collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, Gallup McKinley schools, UNM/CDD, Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD), UNM Hospital, Hilton Garden Inn Gallup, and Best Buddies (Albuquerque Long term provider) and Empowerment ( Gallup Long term provider) have been established. (Page 257)

The agreements with individual Local Education Agencies identify: 

  1. Policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated between the agencies, including definitions, eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services, policies and procedures for making referrals, procedures for outreach students receiving special education services and in need of transition service, practices and procedures also address time–frames for evaluation and follow–up with students;
  2. The roles of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
  3. Procedures for providing training, consultation, and technical assistance to assist staff of State and local educational agencies as to the availability, benefits of, and eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services;
  4. Available resources, including sources of funds for the development and expansion of services;
  5. The financial responsibility of each agency in providing services to students with disabilities who are receiving special education services consistent with State law;
  6. Procedures for resolving disputes between the agencies that are parties to the agreement; and
  7. All other components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation among agencies, including procedures to facilitate the development of local teams to coordinate the provision of services to students with disabilities, sharing data, and coordinating joint training of staff providing transition services. 

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices.

The Mentoring Diverse Abilities program funding has ended, however transition services continue to be provided by both NMDVR and the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Programs throughout the state. (Page 260)

The agreements with individual Local Education Agencies identify: 

  1. Policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated between the agencies, including definitions, eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services, policies and procedures for making referrals, procedures for outreach students receiving special education services and in need of transition service, practices and procedures also address time–frames for evaluation and follow–up with students;
  2. The roles of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
  3. Procedures for providing training, consultation, and technical assistance to assist staff of State and local educational agencies as to the availability, benefits of, and eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services;
  4. Available resources, including sources of funds for the development and expansion of services;
  5. The financial responsibility of each agency in providing services to students with disabilities who are receiving special education services consistent with State law;
  6. Procedures for resolving disputes between the agencies that are parties to the agreement; and
  7. All other components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation among agencies, including procedures to facilitate the development of local teams to coordinate the provision of services to students with disabilities, sharing data, and coordinating joint training of staff providing transition services. (Page 262)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Supported Employment programs across the state. Services that are provided at Center for Development and Disability include education, advocacy, and outreach in the field of Supported Employment. Services are available through Partners for Employment to participants and their families, community providers, job developers, job coaches, employers, as well as, educational facilities. DVR also collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work.

NM DVR employs Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each area of the state. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address SSD (I) to address benefits income and impact to employment.

The NM Department of Health is the state agency responsible for administering Developmental Disabilities Waiver funding under Title XIX of the Social Security Act. Behavioral Health Services are administered through state– wide Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO). (Page 265)

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 268)

The Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program is designed to provide a network of providers for Social Security beneficiaries to obtain employment outcome services. NMDVR is no longer an Employment Network, however the division continues to provide services and information to participants related to Social Security Benefits. This includes five field staff located throughout the state that specialize in benefits advisement. NMDVR and Behavioral Health Services: NMDVR is a member of New Mexico’s Behavioral Health Purchasing Collaborative. During the past four years, work continued toward intra–agency collaboration specifically dealing with behavioral health services among all 17 agencies/divisions of the BHPC. Under the terms of an agreement reached with the State Behavioral Health Services Division, NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 283)

Benefits advisement services are provided to enhance participation in VR by Social Security disability beneficiaries who tend to be underserved. Services aid to address concerns about the effect of employment on benefits as well as provide information regarding incentives and benefits of employment.

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 303)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Project Search programs across the state. DVR collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work. NM DVR employs Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each Project Search site. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address Social Security Disability and social Security disability Income benefits income and impact to employment.

The Division has established a replica of Project Search in New Mexico. Currently, UNM Hospital and Hilton Garden Inn Gallup are providing training and internship rotations for 19 students. Project Search allows for three (3) rotations to occur at in various departments. These rotations provide candidates with the opportunity to learn the skills and abilities needed to be successful in the community and subsequently in a career of their choice. Job coaches and teachers will be on site at all times teaching curriculum and job skills. The goal of Project Search is that each candidate will be employed following the completion of the year–long program. Collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, Gallup McKinley schools, UNM/CD, Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD), UNM Hospital, Hilton Garden Inn Gallup, and Best Buddies (Albuquerque Long term provider) and Empowerment ( Gallup Long term provider) have been established. (Page 308)

Enhance the number and quality of employment outcomes for consumers by providing enhanced benefits counseling and guidance to reduce concerns related to the loss or reduction of benefits. 

Council Recommendations: The Council discussed and decided to continue the Goal, noting the myriad benefits of working.

Agency Response: The agency continues to provide benefits counseling and guidance through a contract with the New Mexico Legal Aid Society. The agency also had staff from Legal Aid provide training on benefits to the vocational rehabilitation counselors. The agency has also provided seminars on benefits to clients. (Page 331)

The Commission regularly surveys consumers to make sure that consumers are participating in the Medicaid program, including and especially as it relates to work incentives that encourage employment. This includes counseling consumers to apply for the Section 1619(b) program when consumers may lose SSI due to work activity, and to encourage consumers to apply for the Working Disabled Individual Category 043 program when the consumer’s income is too high to qualify for the 1619(b) program. Of special note is that it was the Commission that came up with the idea of using the Working Disabled Individual category to address the problem of the 24-month Medicare waiting period. The Commission worked with the state Medical Assistance Division in the development of the Medi-Gap portion of Category 043, which provides Medicaid to persons who have lost SSI due to the start of SSDI, and who thereby lost Medicaid coverage. The Commission also works to make sure that consumers who lose SSI due to the start of Disabled Adult Child benefits maintain Medicaid under Public Law 99-643 and Section 1634(d). The Commission also works to make sure that low-income consumers who may be eligible for Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMB) Specified Low Income Medicare Beneficiaries (SLIMB) or Qualified Individual (QI) are receiving QMB, SLIMB, or QI. (Page 343)

The Commission has adopted a policy to support consumer attendance at the division/special interest group meetings held during national consumer organization conventions. In order to receive the support, the consumer’s vocational goal must be directly related to the particular division/special interest group meeting. The Commission, with the support of the SRC, believes that attendance at related division/special interest group meetings can enhance the consumer’s ability to achieve their vocational goal. Benefits would include learning about current developments in their field, meeting and networking with individuals who are successful in their fields, learning about the use and accessibility of career–specific technology, learning how blind and visually impaired individuals in the field use assistive technology successfully, and learning techniques that would enable them to succeed in their vocational training/education program and ultimately in their chosen field. The Commission also supports annual attendance at the state conventions of both consumer organizations. (Page 383-384)

The Commission regularly participates in the annual New Mexico Academy of Ophthalmology conference in Albuquerque. Counselors also visit ophthalmologists in their territories to ensure that the medical community is aware of the Commission and the services that are provided.

l. Enhance the number and quality of employment outcomes for consumers by providing enhanced benefits counseling and guidance, with the purpose being to reduce fears related to the loss or reduction of benefits.

Counselors received training during March 2013 designed to help them understand the myriad benefit programs. The training has increased the ability of each counselor to help consumers understand program requirements and thereby reduce the fear of losing benefits. In addition to the training, counselors also received a desk reference which contains valuable information regarding each program as well as sample letters that can be used to report earnings.

The agency continues to utilize a comparable benefits survey, designed to identify benefit program eligibility for eligible VR consumers. (Page 392)

Supported employment services may include a comprehensive assessment as provided under the basic vocational rehabilitation program, job site assessment, and other evaluations to determine possible benefits from supported employment to consumers with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities. Additional supported employment services include job development, placement and intensive job skills training, social skills training, regular observation and supervision of the individual, and regular contact with the employer, consumer, parent, family members, guardians, advocates or other authorized representatives of the individual and other suitable professionals. The utilization of natural support systems as well as the provision of appropriate services under the basic vocational rehabilitation program is available to supported employment consumers. (Page 396)

Career Pathways

Vocational Rehabilitation and the One-stop Delivery System. The one-stop delivery system in New Mexico offers assessment and development tools, strong relationships with business and specialized programs that benefit New Mexicans looking for work. Under the combined state plan, the VR agencies will work to strengthen their relationships with NMDWS and the Local Workforce Development Boards to make referral and coordination of service to participants as seamless as possible. WIOA places greater emphasis on providing work experiences to VR participants, especially students transitioning from school to work. DVR, in particular, can particularly benefit from the expertise and established business relationships that the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions offers to expand work experience opportunities for participants. As such, DVR staff will work with the workforce development centers to arrange for VR-focused presentations when needed and assist with special events such as job fairs and training workshops. Workforce centers will also assist with presentations and trainings at VR offices. DVR also plans to ramp up its efforts to support the transition of students and youth with disabilities from secondary education to postsecondary education and employment. 

The Division has developed and maintained interagency agreements with agencies that carry out activities and which do not carry out activities under the statewide workforce investment system. Some of the agencies not under the state workforce investment system are: The Veteran’s Affairs Administration, The New Mexico Commission on the Deaf and Hard of Hearing; The Developmental Disabilities Planning Council, The Department of Health, and the Developmental Disabilities Support Services Division, to provide supported employment services to individuals on the developmental disabilities waiver and Jackson Class members. The Department also has a Memorandum of Understanding with the Public Education Department to further effect school–to–work transition services throughout the state including Roswell Job Corp. Further contracts are in place with the Centers of Independent Living; in the state, services include job seeking skills training, job placement and Self–Advocacy and supportive services. (Page 254)

In FFY 2014, collaboration with New Mexico School for the Deaf through statewide outreach and Commission for Deaf and Hard of Hearing has led to improved outreach and coordination with multiple state school districts toward referral of deaf/hard of hearing transition students to NMDVR. Coordination of School–to–Work transition services that include having a team of specialists to collaborate with school transition specialists to conduct outreach, inform, instruct, and coordinate transition services for individuals covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. Coordination and training events have also begun at agency field staff meetings. While these efforts target a specific population, they have the added benefit of strengthening communications between transition specialists at NMSD as well as state wide school districts and NMDVR field staff. This can benefit all transitioning youth. (Page 257- 258)

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices. The Mentoring Diverse Abilities program funding has ended, however transition services continue to be provided by both NMDVR and the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Programs throughout the state. (Page 260)

Collaboration with Statewide Workforce Investment System: NMDVR has had representatives on the Youth Standing Committee, and School to Work Transitional Alliance. Representatives address the issues and interests of individuals with disabilities in the workforce investment system, both in developing policy and influencing service delivery.

The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment Although the Navigator program is completed, it did serve to increase awareness of vocational rehabilitation services and employment–related needs of people with disabilities at local One–stops. The result is that One–stop staff have established and continue to maintain contact with NMDVR counselors throughout the state. (Page 267-26)

The licensure rules for Rehabilitation Counselors in New Mexico are in agreement with the Public Education Department requirements and competencies applicable to both the school systems to effect school–to– work transition in the high schools and the Division. The Statewide Transition Coordinator provides routine Transition training to all field staff with emphasize on the staff directly providing transition services. IDEA, IEP’s, Diagnostic Data are all represented through Transition Services. The Transition Coordinator also provides up–to– date information to staff regarding IDEA and acts as the liaison between DVR and Public Education Department. The agency will continue to encourage Transition Coordinator to maintain a board seat on IDEA, School–to–work Transition Alliance and maintain relations to support Regional Education Cooperative Memberships, and NM Youth Committee. It is the intention of the agency to continue cooperation and coordination with the personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (Page 280)

In early FY14 DVR, was approached to partner with the University of New Mexico, Center for Development and Disability (UNM/CDD) to consider establishing a replica of Project Search in NM. Project Search is an internationally known program that originated at Cincinnati’s Children’s Hospital. It focuses on school–to–work transition age students who are diagnosed with a variety of disabling conditions. The DVR Interim Transition Coordinator had the opportunity to attend the Project Search conference in July. In collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, UNM/CDD and the NM University Hospital (UNMH) as well as the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD) and Best Buddies (a local provider agency), the Project Search founders have given approval to replicate this program in New Mexico. The site for Project Search has been selected and approved. Program space intended for training and internship rotations has been established at UNM Hospital (Page 313)

Work Incentives & Benefits
  • promoting the value of occupational learning through paid work experience on the job, such as through the development of apprenticeships, paid internships, incumbent worker or customized training, and transitional jobs;
  • encouraging public/private partnerships among business, education, community and civic organizations, and economic development to create work-based training opportunities that both feed career pathways for job seekers and satisfy job-driven strategies of employers and industries;
  • using skills assessments and credentialing to promote the value of job ready individuals to potential employers in developing work-based experiences; and
  • exploring the offerings of other related programs, outside of the state plan, that offer opportunities to help individuals gain increased skills and experience that can lead to potential future job opportunities and employment. (Page79)

Apprenticeship and Individuals with Disabilities. Under WIOA, VR programs must spend 15 percent of funding on students with disabilities. As such, some specific work is already being done in New Mexico to explore and expand the use of apprenticeships as a service strategy for improving outcomes for individuals with disabilities. For instance, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist has been working with a one-stop youth provider on finalizing an MOU to serve youth with disabilities. Additionally, a DVR Business Specialist has been working on the development of partnerships with the Workforce Training Center and Road Runner Food Bank to increase vocational readiness training programs which will be provided to students and youth with disabilities. 

Additionally, core partners have begun to have conversations about how the state can further expand opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including individuals who are blind or visually impaired. While individuals who are blind or visually impaired have often faced significant obstacles in participating in apprenticeship programs, the Commission for the Blind plans to increase efforts to consider and identify Registered Apprenticeships for consumers who might be appropriate candidates for such apprenticeship. Ultimately VR programs are optimistic about improved accessibility to the RA programs for the clients they serve. Examples of ideas of how this can be accomplished in New Mexico include pursuing: (Page 95)

As part of the professional development system, all eligible AEFLA providers will have available to them both hands–on and pedagogical training about the use of technology in the classroom. As part of the effort to make all appropriate Adult Education classes in New Mexico blended distance and face–to–face, the NMHED is providing an online platform aligned with College and Career Readiness Standards and career pathways, with mapping to KeyTrain and O–Net. As the State implements the platform all local providers are trained by the publisher and, pedagogically, by master teachers, both in the use of the technology and in developing and delivering classes using it. (Page 241)

  • NMDVR will make strides towards providing employment experiences or On the Job training activities in the community. Through this strategy, mutual customers can provide experience that may lead to permanent employment.
  • NMDVR will continue expand engagement of the business sector as a partner in developing career pathways for youth with disabilities in high–growth industries (Page 306)
Employer Engagement

The agency participates on the Ticket to Work Partners group, along with the Social Security Administration, the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, and a number of employment networks that serve ticket holders throughout New Mexico. The group regularly meets in the Commission’s Skills Center Lecture Hall. 2015 marked the third year in which the Commission participated in the annual Black Expo, sponsored by the New Mexico Office of African American Affairs. The expo has been growing each year and Commission attendance provides an opportunity to conduct outreach to the African American community and provide information regarding VR services available through the commission. (Page 333)

511

NMDWS administers a common management information system, called the Workforce Connection On-Line System, described earlier. The Workforce Connection Centers use the system not only for registering job applicants, housing resumes, and job postings for job matching purposes, but also for the purposes of data entry, case management, and state and federal performance reporting. The Workforce Connection On-Line System integrates data collection, participant demographics, case management, and performance reporting for not only Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Wagner-Peyser, but also Migrant Seasonal Farmworkers, Veterans, Trade programs. The system is also used for data collection and reporting for all partners located in comprehensive and affiliate centers. NMDWS has established both user access and data sharing agreements to support access to information and information sharing between the partners as allowed by authorizing law and regulation. The system also provides access to labor market information to support business and job seekers in need of training or employment assistance. (Page 110)

NMDWS administers a common management information system, called the Workforce Connection On-Line System, described earlier. The Workforce Connection Centers use the system not only for registering job applicants, housing resumes, and job postings for job matching purposes, but also for the purposes of data entry, case management, and state and federal performance reporting. The Workforce Connection On-Line System integrates data collection, participant demographics, case management, and performance reporting for not only Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Wagner-Peyser, but also Migrant Seasonal Farmworkers, Veterans, Trade programs. The system is also used for data collection and reporting for all partners located in comprehensive and affiliate centers. NMDWS has established both user access and data sharing agreements to support access to information and information sharing between the partners as allowed by authorizing law and regulation. The system also provides access to labor market information to support business and job seekers in need of training or employment assistance. (Page 112)

Mental Health

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 148)

Displaying 31 - 40 of 40

New Mexico Interagency Behavioral Health Service Requirements and Utilization Guidelines for Supported Employment - 07/20/2004

~~This document defines supported employment and provides program, provider, staffing, documentation, and other requirements of providers of supported employment services.“Supported  Employment  provides  on  the  job  supports  in  an integrated  work  setting  with  ongoing  support  services  for  individuals  in  need  of intensive supported employment services in order to perform work.  Activities are typically  performed  by  a  job  developer,  job  coach  and/or  job  specialist  (case manager) to achieve a successful employment outcome.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NM Seed Loan Program

"Seed" stands for "Self Employment for Entrepreneurs with Disabilities". The program  makes loans available to individuals with disabilities regardless of the type of disability, age, income level, or location of residence in the state, to purchase needed equipment and home-based business supplies. San Juan Center for Independence, in collaboration with Accion and New Mexico Technology Assistance Program, provides low interest loans on a case by case basis."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

The board member from the community colleges shall solicit input from the community college constituency and work with regional and statewide businesses and other partners and the economic development department to create career pathways and align curriculum and facilitate plans with the economic development department, human services department and labor department strategic plans

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico DD (0173.R05.00)

“Provides case management, community integrated employment, customized community supports, living supports, personal support, respite, nutritional counseling, OT for adults, PT for adults, speech and language therapy for adults, supplemental dental care, assistive technology, behavior support consultation, crisis support, customized in-home supports, environmental mods, independent living transition, intensive medical living supports, non-medical transportation, personal support technology/on-site response, preliminary risk screening and consultation related to inappropriate sexual behavior, private duty nursing for adults, socialization and sexuality education for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Senate Bill 155: AN ACT RELATING TO WORKERS' COMPENSATION; AMENDING SECTIONS OF THE WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT TO CLARIFY WHEN A WORKER IS ENTITLED TO CERTAIN BENEFITS - 07/01/2017

"52-1-25.1. TEMPORARY TOTAL DISABILITY--RETURN TO WORK.--

A. As used in the Workers' Compensation Act,

"temporary total disability" means the inability of a worker,

by reason of accidental injury arising out of and in the course

of the worker's employment, to perform the duties of that

employment prior to the date of the worker's maximum medical

improvement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Mexico ABLE Legislation (HB 61) - 03/03/2016

Relating to accounts for the support of persons with disabilities; creating the accounts for person with disabilities act; enacting enabling legislation required by the federal Achieving A Better Life Experience Act of 2014; requiring the office of the state treasurer to establish and maintain a qualified program for such accounts; declaring an emergency.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Mexico Senate Memorial 25 - 02/11/2016

A memorial requesting the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council and the University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability to convene a task force to conduct a needs assessment and report on ways to improve the system of school-to-work transition for students with disabilities in New Mexico.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Mexico House Joint Memorial 72 - 02/15/2005

“A joint memorial requesting that the Executive Task Force on Disability Employment develop policies, procedures and guidelines to increase the employment of persons with disabilities in state government.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

State Integrated Workforce Plan - Wagner-Peyser Act 2012-2017 - 09/13/2012

The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP):    The SCSEP has two goals:   1) Assisting income-eligible persons, age 55 or older, to obtain employment; and   2) Providing community service through paid, part-time, training positions.    Enrolled participants receive:  •Work experience, on-the-job training, and new or improved skills; and  •Empowerment to overcome barriers to employment, such as lack of self-confidence, lack of language fluency, or physical disabilities.   
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Manual of Operating Instructions (MOP) - 08/01/2012

“The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is a program that offers unique services to individuals with disabilities for the express purpose of assisting them in achieving an employment outcome. NMDVR is committed to providing quality and culturally sensitive services to all eligible New Mexicans, including typically underserved populations such as individuals in rural communities, tribal members and those with significant or multiple disabilities... VR services are provided with a focus on employment, and with an emphasis on quality services. Counseling and guidance are the primary services, with an emphasis on a partnership between the participant and the VR counselor, as well as the establishment of partnerships with community resources, tribal entities and employers. In order to serve as many individuals as possible, the NMDVR service delivery system also places an emphasis on utilizing its resources in an efficient manner.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Interagency Behavioral Health Service Requirements and Utilization Guidelines for Supported Employment - 07/20/2004

~~This document defines supported employment and provides program, provider, staffing, documentation, and other requirements of providers of supported employment services.“Supported  Employment  provides  on  the  job  supports  in  an integrated  work  setting  with  ongoing  support  services  for  individuals  in  need  of intensive supported employment services in order to perform work.  Activities are typically  performed  by  a  job  developer,  job  coach  and/or  job  specialist  (case manager) to achieve a successful employment outcome.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

NM Seed Loan Program

"Seed" stands for "Self Employment for Entrepreneurs with Disabilities". The program  makes loans available to individuals with disabilities regardless of the type of disability, age, income level, or location of residence in the state, to purchase needed equipment and home-based business supplies. San Juan Center for Independence, in collaboration with Accion and New Mexico Technology Assistance Program, provides low interest loans on a case by case basis."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

New Mexico Governor’s Commission on Disability 2014 Annual Report - 01/15/2015

Mission:

The New Mexico Governor’s Commission on disability is committed to improving the quality of life for all New Mexicans with disabilities by addressing social integration, economic self-sufficiency, political resolve, physical and program accessibility and full participation in the benefits of life and the rights of all individuals.

 

Objectives:

Increase awareness and knowledge of disability issues among policy-makers and the general public Promote access to physical, sensory, programmatic, attitudinal and communication barriers Increase opportunities for New Mexicans with disabilities to live successfully in the community, with services and supports as needed Increase collaboration and cooperation among disability related organizations in New Mexico
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

The board member from the community colleges shall solicit input from the community college constituency and work with regional and statewide businesses and other partners and the economic development department to create career pathways and align curriculum and facilitate plans with the economic development department, human services department and labor department strategic plans

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Quality of Life Grant - 07/01/2017

“The Governor's Commission on Disability has established a Quality of Life Small Grants Program for New Mexican non-profit organizations to provide enhanced programs or services that will improve the quality of life of New Mexicans with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Money Follows the Person - 10/15/2012

“The goals of the New Mexico MFP are to increase the use of home and community-based services (HCBS) and reduce the use of institutionally-based services, [e]liminate barriers in State law, State Medicaid plans, and State budgets that restrict the use of Medicaid funds to let people get long-term care in settings of their choice, strengthen the ability of the Medicaid programs to provide HCBS to people who choose to transition out of institutions put procedures in place to provide quality assurance and improvement of HCBS” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

New Mexico Partners for Employment Events and Training - 01/01/2019

This webpage lists upcoming training and capacity building events intended for providers, people with disabilities, and employers throughout New Mexico.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Partners for Employment 2019 Events and Trainings - 07/01/2017

~~This site has a list of training sessions for School to Work Transition teams and Supported Employment for Local Leaders

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employer Needs Analysis Tip Sheet - 03/17/2015

This tip sheet discusses Employer Needs Analyses in their utility, importance and relevance to Customized Employment. It goes though the steps of implementing Employer Needs Analyses, what to look for and what material to present to the employer.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

New Mexico Workforce Investment Act Title I Wagner-Peyser Act (2012-2017) - 09/13/2012

Long-term strategies to improve outcomes of individuals with disabilities include the support of Disability Coordinators in Workforce Connection Centers. The purpose of the Disability Coordinator is to promote a collaborative and coordinated approach to employment services for persons with disabilities. Disability Coordinators are trained in best practices for serving persons with disabilities and are able to assist them with assistive technology. In addition, they are charged with increasing employer awareness and making a business case for hiring people with disabilities. The Disability Coordinators are merit based state staff and funded partially with Wagner Peyser 10% funds.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Waiver Amendment Request - 02/28/2019

~~“Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB) Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan. Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LEGISLATING FOR RESULTS: POLICY AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS - 01/01/2019

~~“One of 14 states without institutions for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities, New Mexico serves this population through a system of home- and community-based services funded through two main Medicaid programs administered by the Human Services Department (HSD) and operated primarily through the Department of Health (DOH). A 2018 LFC evaluation of these programs found growth in per-client costs and a lengthening waiting list are outpacing the state’s ability to fund and provide services. In FY17, about 3,500 people received services through the traditional developmental disabilities (DD) waiver program, while another 1,400 received services through the self-directed Mi Via program. Both provide services not usually covered by Medicaid under federal waivers of existing rules. The list of eligible individuals waiting for services, meanwhile, totaled roughly 3,900. The evaluation found increased service utilization, client movement from the traditional DD waiver program to Mi Via, and changes to how client service plans and budgets are developed have all contributed to rising costs. The average cost of an individual enrolled in the DD waiver program grew by 17 percent, to $78,575, between FY14 and FY17, while total enrollment fell by 13 percent. Meanwhile, budgets for Mi Via clients are approaching their annual individual caps, and cost growth in both waivers is on pace to potentially violate federal cost neutrality requirements by FY27.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

"Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Medicaid Demonstration" Extension - 01/01/2019

~~“This approval is  effective January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2023. CMS' s approval is subject to the limitations specified in the attached waiver authorities, expenditure authorities, Special Terms and Conditions (STCs), and subsequent attachments. The state may deviate from the Medicaid state plan requirements only to the extent those requirements have been listed as waived or as not applicable to expenditures or individuals covered by expenditure authority….Employment Supports will be provided by staff at current or potential work sites. When supported employment services are provided at a work site where persons without disabilities are employed, payment is made only for the adaptations, supervision and training required by members receiving services as a result of their disabilities but does not include payment for the supervisory activities rendered as a normal part of the business setting.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico (Mi Via) State HCBS Transition Plan - 11/14/2014

The goal of Mi Via is to provide a community-based alternative that 1) facilitates greater participant choice and control over the types of services and supports that are purchased within an agreed upon budgetary amount; and 2) enables the State to serve the most people possible within available resources. Mi Via will be administered through a partnership between Department of Health and Human Services Department.   In 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published Final Rule 2249-F/2296-F which made changes to the 1915 (c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waiver program, including a requirement for states to submit HCBS waiver settings transition plans.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/15/2012

The New Mexico Public Education Department’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 15, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

New Mexico DD (0173.R05.00)

“Provides case management, community integrated employment, customized community supports, living supports, personal support, respite, nutritional counseling, OT for adults, PT for adults, speech and language therapy for adults, supplemental dental care, assistive technology, behavior support consultation, crisis support, customized in-home supports, environmental mods, independent living transition, intensive medical living supports, non-medical transportation, personal support technology/on-site response, preliminary risk screening and consultation related to inappropriate sexual behavior, private duty nursing for adults, socialization and sexuality education for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

In the Land of Enchantment, Employment First in New Mexico could "Grow as it goes!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Mexico’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2016 to 2017
2,088,070
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.21%
Change from
2016 to 2017
169,264
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
57,005
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.17%
Change from
2016 to 2017
33.68%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
71.45%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 2,085,109 2,081,015 2,088,070
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 156,118 153,667 169,264
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 48,139 49,084 57,005
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 771,842 767,544 751,217
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.84% 31.94% 33.68%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 72.13% 71.93% 71.45%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.60% 6.70% 6.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.80% 21.80% 24.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 19.70% 19.60% 18.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 153,260 152,374 164,508
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 153,746 156,357 157,848
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 229,605 227,405 249,066
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 8,543 5,326 5,551
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 131,181 138,305 147,519
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 27,226 28,096 30,655
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,526 1,475 2,111
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 9,540 12,297 8,640
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 30,453 33,628 26,067

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,876 1,901 1,809
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.30% 3.40% 3.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 65,167 64,822 64,863

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 978 852 912
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,795 2,173 2,067
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 3,988 3,195 3,254
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 24.50% 26.70% 28.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.40% 1.40% 1.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 2.70% 3.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.80% N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 130 100 82
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A 186 230
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 292 N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,574 4,564 4,782
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 7 16
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 2
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 86.00% 13.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.34 0.29 0.10

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,018
2,231
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 17 22 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 319 329 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 526 553 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 574 634 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 375 444 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 207 249 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 21.80% 21.30% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,303 2,435 2,437
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 100,060 100,897 101,334
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 57 69 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 46 48 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $7,288,000 $8,215,000 $7,888,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $12,807,000 $6,612,000 $5,896,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $25,673,000 $40,366,000 $34,916,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 32.00% 30.00% 24.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,565 2,607 3,135
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,684 452 500
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 51.50 51.60 55.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 50.61% 49.80% 49.82%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.64% 19.19% 18.62%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.91% 0.92% 0.87%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.36% 87.25% 93.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 43.26% 42.85% 41.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 76.10% 75.34% 76.39%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.71% 81.37% 80.94%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.84% 32.49% 35.26%
Source:
Office of Special Education Programs "OSEP Grads360"

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 711,613
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 877
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 392
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 392
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,148,725

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 4 5 3
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4 5 3
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 182 520 430
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 182 520 430

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Customized Employment

Term funding support from agencies providing supported employment. The Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health, provides long term funding for supported employment to provider agencies under the Developmental Disabilities Waiver and Mi Via Waivers. The Division works collaboratively with the Behavioral Health Services Division, Department of Health, New Mexico Department of Human Services, and the NM Behavioral Health Collaborative to assure ongoing support services for individuals with severe disabling mental illness served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment.

4. The Division continues to work with other state agencies under memoranda of understanding focusing on serving individuals with the most significant disabilities under supported employment plans.

5. Individual placements in integrated work settings at wages comparable to non–disabled peers performing similar work continue to be emphasized.

6. The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. One result of this collaboration in FFY 2014 was the training of 16 field staff in the Discovery process for non– traditional career development. Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 294)

Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 300)

In addition to expanding the number of personnel, NMDVR is planning customer service trainings to enhance quality and consistency of service. The agency is also providing specific Supported Employment training to current field staff. This will serve to increase staff expertise in identifying customized employment and individualized training strategies for participants. (Page 307)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found

DEI/DRC

No specific disability related information found

Competitive Integrated Employment

This regional program is set to begin its pilot in Albuquerque–area retail locations in 2016. The development of this program is the first of its’ kind for NMDVR with hopes of gaining statewide traction. Building on the success of the Skills to Work model, also called Place and Train. Dependent on it success, BSS will work with businesses throughout New Mexico to implement this model in their workplaces. Two initiatives were included in the New Mexico Blueprint for Prosperity that will allow DVR to expand place and train opportunities for job seekers with disabilities and New Mexico businesses to target job seekers with disabilities, including veterans with service– related disabilities, in their recruitment and hiring. (Page 267)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

In addition to a summer job in a competitive integrated setting, The Commission’s Students in Transition to Employment Program includes a significant workplace readiness training component. However, in order to expand workplace readiness training services, the Commission will begin offering additional workshops and seminars. The Commission has recently added staff to its Albuquerque Skills Center specifically for this purpose. The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year, during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and training on various assistive technology software and hardware; note–taking skills, Braille, math, college success, summer employment preparation, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy.

e. Instruction in self–advocacy, which may include peer mentoring. (Page 374)

The agency has also created the Skills Center, a training site to meet the needs of vocational rehabilitation consumers and potential vocational rehabilitation consumers. The agency is scheduling a variety of activities in the Skills Center. These activities include meetings, workshops, seminars, and other training events such as the summer Students in Transition to Employment Program. The Commission has recently added staff to its Albuquerque Skills Center specifically for this purpose. The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, adults, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year. To meet the particular needs of transition students, training will be scheduled during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and assistive technology hardware and software; Braille, math, note–taking skills, college success, STEP prep, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy. (Page 383)

School to Work Transition

The vocational rehabilitation programs use a case management system called Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment (AWARE) that is specifically designed for vocational rehabilitation programs. This system enables counselors to manage cases, managers to monitor cases, and the agency to prepare and submit required reports to RSA in a timely manner. All client data is captured and maintained in the AWARE case management system, such as information on client employment outcomes, including position title, employer, wages, hours, benefits, etc., and is provided to the Rehabilitation Services Administration, U. S. Department of Education through quarterly and annual reports. The company that programs the software will revise the system to produce any WIOA required data. Due to the especially strict confidentiality requirements imposed by the Rehabilitation Act and the sensitive nature of information about disabilities and medical conditions, the case management system is a closed system, accessible only by authorized employees. NMDWS has established a data sharing agreement to provide necessary wage data to support the programs’ activities. (Page 112)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Project Search programs across the state. DVR collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work. NM DVR employs a Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each Project Search site. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address Social Security Disability/ Social Security Income concerns and to address benefits income and impact to employment. The Division has established a replica of Project Search in New Mexico. Currently UNM Hospital and Hilton Garden Inn Gallup are providing training and internship rotations for 19 students. Project Search allows for three (3) rotations to occur at in various departments. These rotations provide candidates with the opportunity to learn the skills and abilities needed to be successful in the community and subsequently in a career of their choice. Job coaches and teachers will be on site at all times teaching curriculum and job skills. The goal of Project Search is to assure that each candidate will be employed following the completion of the year–long program. Collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, Gallup McKinley schools, UNM/CDD, Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD), UNM Hospital, Hilton Garden Inn Gallup, and Best Buddies (Albuquerque Long term provider) and Empowerment ( Gallup Long term provider) have been established. (Page 257)

The agreements with individual Local Education Agencies identify: 

  1. Policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated between the agencies, including definitions, eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services, policies and procedures for making referrals, procedures for outreach students receiving special education services and in need of transition service, practices and procedures also address time–frames for evaluation and follow–up with students;
  2. The roles of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
  3. Procedures for providing training, consultation, and technical assistance to assist staff of State and local educational agencies as to the availability, benefits of, and eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services;
  4. Available resources, including sources of funds for the development and expansion of services;
  5. The financial responsibility of each agency in providing services to students with disabilities who are receiving special education services consistent with State law;
  6. Procedures for resolving disputes between the agencies that are parties to the agreement; and
  7. All other components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation among agencies, including procedures to facilitate the development of local teams to coordinate the provision of services to students with disabilities, sharing data, and coordinating joint training of staff providing transition services. 

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices.

The Mentoring Diverse Abilities program funding has ended, however transition services continue to be provided by both NMDVR and the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Programs throughout the state. (Page 260)

The agreements with individual Local Education Agencies identify: 

  1. Policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated between the agencies, including definitions, eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services, policies and procedures for making referrals, procedures for outreach students receiving special education services and in need of transition service, practices and procedures also address time–frames for evaluation and follow–up with students;
  2. The roles of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
  3. Procedures for providing training, consultation, and technical assistance to assist staff of State and local educational agencies as to the availability, benefits of, and eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services;
  4. Available resources, including sources of funds for the development and expansion of services;
  5. The financial responsibility of each agency in providing services to students with disabilities who are receiving special education services consistent with State law;
  6. Procedures for resolving disputes between the agencies that are parties to the agreement; and
  7. All other components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation among agencies, including procedures to facilitate the development of local teams to coordinate the provision of services to students with disabilities, sharing data, and coordinating joint training of staff providing transition services. (Page 262)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Supported Employment programs across the state. Services that are provided at Center for Development and Disability include education, advocacy, and outreach in the field of Supported Employment. Services are available through Partners for Employment to participants and their families, community providers, job developers, job coaches, employers, as well as, educational facilities. DVR also collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work.

NM DVR employs Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each area of the state. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address SSD (I) to address benefits income and impact to employment.

The NM Department of Health is the state agency responsible for administering Developmental Disabilities Waiver funding under Title XIX of the Social Security Act. Behavioral Health Services are administered through state– wide Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO). (Page 265)

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 268)

The Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program is designed to provide a network of providers for Social Security beneficiaries to obtain employment outcome services. NMDVR is no longer an Employment Network, however the division continues to provide services and information to participants related to Social Security Benefits. This includes five field staff located throughout the state that specialize in benefits advisement. NMDVR and Behavioral Health Services: NMDVR is a member of New Mexico’s Behavioral Health Purchasing Collaborative. During the past four years, work continued toward intra–agency collaboration specifically dealing with behavioral health services among all 17 agencies/divisions of the BHPC. Under the terms of an agreement reached with the State Behavioral Health Services Division, NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 283)

Benefits advisement services are provided to enhance participation in VR by Social Security disability beneficiaries who tend to be underserved. Services aid to address concerns about the effect of employment on benefits as well as provide information regarding incentives and benefits of employment.

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 303)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Project Search programs across the state. DVR collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work. NM DVR employs Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each Project Search site. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address Social Security Disability and social Security disability Income benefits income and impact to employment.

The Division has established a replica of Project Search in New Mexico. Currently, UNM Hospital and Hilton Garden Inn Gallup are providing training and internship rotations for 19 students. Project Search allows for three (3) rotations to occur at in various departments. These rotations provide candidates with the opportunity to learn the skills and abilities needed to be successful in the community and subsequently in a career of their choice. Job coaches and teachers will be on site at all times teaching curriculum and job skills. The goal of Project Search is that each candidate will be employed following the completion of the year–long program. Collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, Gallup McKinley schools, UNM/CD, Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD), UNM Hospital, Hilton Garden Inn Gallup, and Best Buddies (Albuquerque Long term provider) and Empowerment ( Gallup Long term provider) have been established. (Page 308)

Enhance the number and quality of employment outcomes for consumers by providing enhanced benefits counseling and guidance to reduce concerns related to the loss or reduction of benefits. 

Council Recommendations: The Council discussed and decided to continue the Goal, noting the myriad benefits of working.

Agency Response: The agency continues to provide benefits counseling and guidance through a contract with the New Mexico Legal Aid Society. The agency also had staff from Legal Aid provide training on benefits to the vocational rehabilitation counselors. The agency has also provided seminars on benefits to clients. (Page 331)

The Commission regularly surveys consumers to make sure that consumers are participating in the Medicaid program, including and especially as it relates to work incentives that encourage employment. This includes counseling consumers to apply for the Section 1619(b) program when consumers may lose SSI due to work activity, and to encourage consumers to apply for the Working Disabled Individual Category 043 program when the consumer’s income is too high to qualify for the 1619(b) program. Of special note is that it was the Commission that came up with the idea of using the Working Disabled Individual category to address the problem of the 24-month Medicare waiting period. The Commission worked with the state Medical Assistance Division in the development of the Medi-Gap portion of Category 043, which provides Medicaid to persons who have lost SSI due to the start of SSDI, and who thereby lost Medicaid coverage. The Commission also works to make sure that consumers who lose SSI due to the start of Disabled Adult Child benefits maintain Medicaid under Public Law 99-643 and Section 1634(d). The Commission also works to make sure that low-income consumers who may be eligible for Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMB) Specified Low Income Medicare Beneficiaries (SLIMB) or Qualified Individual (QI) are receiving QMB, SLIMB, or QI. (Page 343)

The Commission has adopted a policy to support consumer attendance at the division/special interest group meetings held during national consumer organization conventions. In order to receive the support, the consumer’s vocational goal must be directly related to the particular division/special interest group meeting. The Commission, with the support of the SRC, believes that attendance at related division/special interest group meetings can enhance the consumer’s ability to achieve their vocational goal. Benefits would include learning about current developments in their field, meeting and networking with individuals who are successful in their fields, learning about the use and accessibility of career–specific technology, learning how blind and visually impaired individuals in the field use assistive technology successfully, and learning techniques that would enable them to succeed in their vocational training/education program and ultimately in their chosen field. The Commission also supports annual attendance at the state conventions of both consumer organizations. (Page 383-384)

The Commission regularly participates in the annual New Mexico Academy of Ophthalmology conference in Albuquerque. Counselors also visit ophthalmologists in their territories to ensure that the medical community is aware of the Commission and the services that are provided.

l. Enhance the number and quality of employment outcomes for consumers by providing enhanced benefits counseling and guidance, with the purpose being to reduce fears related to the loss or reduction of benefits.

Counselors received training during March 2013 designed to help them understand the myriad benefit programs. The training has increased the ability of each counselor to help consumers understand program requirements and thereby reduce the fear of losing benefits. In addition to the training, counselors also received a desk reference which contains valuable information regarding each program as well as sample letters that can be used to report earnings.

The agency continues to utilize a comparable benefits survey, designed to identify benefit program eligibility for eligible VR consumers. (Page 392)

Supported employment services may include a comprehensive assessment as provided under the basic vocational rehabilitation program, job site assessment, and other evaluations to determine possible benefits from supported employment to consumers with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities. Additional supported employment services include job development, placement and intensive job skills training, social skills training, regular observation and supervision of the individual, and regular contact with the employer, consumer, parent, family members, guardians, advocates or other authorized representatives of the individual and other suitable professionals. The utilization of natural support systems as well as the provision of appropriate services under the basic vocational rehabilitation program is available to supported employment consumers. (Page 396)

Career Pathways

Vocational Rehabilitation and the One-stop Delivery System. The one-stop delivery system in New Mexico offers assessment and development tools, strong relationships with business and specialized programs that benefit New Mexicans looking for work. Under the combined state plan, the VR agencies will work to strengthen their relationships with NMDWS and the Local Workforce Development Boards to make referral and coordination of service to participants as seamless as possible. WIOA places greater emphasis on providing work experiences to VR participants, especially students transitioning from school to work. DVR, in particular, can particularly benefit from the expertise and established business relationships that the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions offers to expand work experience opportunities for participants. As such, DVR staff will work with the workforce development centers to arrange for VR-focused presentations when needed and assist with special events such as job fairs and training workshops. Workforce centers will also assist with presentations and trainings at VR offices. DVR also plans to ramp up its efforts to support the transition of students and youth with disabilities from secondary education to postsecondary education and employment. 

The Division has developed and maintained interagency agreements with agencies that carry out activities and which do not carry out activities under the statewide workforce investment system. Some of the agencies not under the state workforce investment system are: The Veteran’s Affairs Administration, The New Mexico Commission on the Deaf and Hard of Hearing; The Developmental Disabilities Planning Council, The Department of Health, and the Developmental Disabilities Support Services Division, to provide supported employment services to individuals on the developmental disabilities waiver and Jackson Class members. The Department also has a Memorandum of Understanding with the Public Education Department to further effect school–to–work transition services throughout the state including Roswell Job Corp. Further contracts are in place with the Centers of Independent Living; in the state, services include job seeking skills training, job placement and Self–Advocacy and supportive services. (Page 254)

In FFY 2014, collaboration with New Mexico School for the Deaf through statewide outreach and Commission for Deaf and Hard of Hearing has led to improved outreach and coordination with multiple state school districts toward referral of deaf/hard of hearing transition students to NMDVR. Coordination of School–to–Work transition services that include having a team of specialists to collaborate with school transition specialists to conduct outreach, inform, instruct, and coordinate transition services for individuals covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. Coordination and training events have also begun at agency field staff meetings. While these efforts target a specific population, they have the added benefit of strengthening communications between transition specialists at NMSD as well as state wide school districts and NMDVR field staff. This can benefit all transitioning youth. (Page 257- 258)

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices. The Mentoring Diverse Abilities program funding has ended, however transition services continue to be provided by both NMDVR and the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Programs throughout the state. (Page 260)

Collaboration with Statewide Workforce Investment System: NMDVR has had representatives on the Youth Standing Committee, and School to Work Transitional Alliance. Representatives address the issues and interests of individuals with disabilities in the workforce investment system, both in developing policy and influencing service delivery.

The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment Although the Navigator program is completed, it did serve to increase awareness of vocational rehabilitation services and employment–related needs of people with disabilities at local One–stops. The result is that One–stop staff have established and continue to maintain contact with NMDVR counselors throughout the state. (Page 267-26)

The licensure rules for Rehabilitation Counselors in New Mexico are in agreement with the Public Education Department requirements and competencies applicable to both the school systems to effect school–to– work transition in the high schools and the Division. The Statewide Transition Coordinator provides routine Transition training to all field staff with emphasize on the staff directly providing transition services. IDEA, IEP’s, Diagnostic Data are all represented through Transition Services. The Transition Coordinator also provides up–to– date information to staff regarding IDEA and acts as the liaison between DVR and Public Education Department. The agency will continue to encourage Transition Coordinator to maintain a board seat on IDEA, School–to–work Transition Alliance and maintain relations to support Regional Education Cooperative Memberships, and NM Youth Committee. It is the intention of the agency to continue cooperation and coordination with the personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (Page 280)

In early FY14 DVR, was approached to partner with the University of New Mexico, Center for Development and Disability (UNM/CDD) to consider establishing a replica of Project Search in NM. Project Search is an internationally known program that originated at Cincinnati’s Children’s Hospital. It focuses on school–to–work transition age students who are diagnosed with a variety of disabling conditions. The DVR Interim Transition Coordinator had the opportunity to attend the Project Search conference in July. In collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, UNM/CDD and the NM University Hospital (UNMH) as well as the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD) and Best Buddies (a local provider agency), the Project Search founders have given approval to replicate this program in New Mexico. The site for Project Search has been selected and approved. Program space intended for training and internship rotations has been established at UNM Hospital (Page 313)

Work Incentives & Benefits
  • promoting the value of occupational learning through paid work experience on the job, such as through the development of apprenticeships, paid internships, incumbent worker or customized training, and transitional jobs;
  • encouraging public/private partnerships among business, education, community and civic organizations, and economic development to create work-based training opportunities that both feed career pathways for job seekers and satisfy job-driven strategies of employers and industries;
  • using skills assessments and credentialing to promote the value of job ready individuals to potential employers in developing work-based experiences; and
  • exploring the offerings of other related programs, outside of the state plan, that offer opportunities to help individuals gain increased skills and experience that can lead to potential future job opportunities and employment. (Page79)

Apprenticeship and Individuals with Disabilities. Under WIOA, VR programs must spend 15 percent of funding on students with disabilities. As such, some specific work is already being done in New Mexico to explore and expand the use of apprenticeships as a service strategy for improving outcomes for individuals with disabilities. For instance, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist has been working with a one-stop youth provider on finalizing an MOU to serve youth with disabilities. Additionally, a DVR Business Specialist has been working on the development of partnerships with the Workforce Training Center and Road Runner Food Bank to increase vocational readiness training programs which will be provided to students and youth with disabilities. 

Additionally, core partners have begun to have conversations about how the state can further expand opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including individuals who are blind or visually impaired. While individuals who are blind or visually impaired have often faced significant obstacles in participating in apprenticeship programs, the Commission for the Blind plans to increase efforts to consider and identify Registered Apprenticeships for consumers who might be appropriate candidates for such apprenticeship. Ultimately VR programs are optimistic about improved accessibility to the RA programs for the clients they serve. Examples of ideas of how this can be accomplished in New Mexico include pursuing: (Page 95)

As part of the professional development system, all eligible AEFLA providers will have available to them both hands–on and pedagogical training about the use of technology in the classroom. As part of the effort to make all appropriate Adult Education classes in New Mexico blended distance and face–to–face, the NMHED is providing an online platform aligned with College and Career Readiness Standards and career pathways, with mapping to KeyTrain and O–Net. As the State implements the platform all local providers are trained by the publisher and, pedagogically, by master teachers, both in the use of the technology and in developing and delivering classes using it. (Page 241)

  • NMDVR will make strides towards providing employment experiences or On the Job training activities in the community. Through this strategy, mutual customers can provide experience that may lead to permanent employment.
  • NMDVR will continue expand engagement of the business sector as a partner in developing career pathways for youth with disabilities in high–growth industries (Page 306)
Employer Engagement

The agency participates on the Ticket to Work Partners group, along with the Social Security Administration, the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, and a number of employment networks that serve ticket holders throughout New Mexico. The group regularly meets in the Commission’s Skills Center Lecture Hall. 2015 marked the third year in which the Commission participated in the annual Black Expo, sponsored by the New Mexico Office of African American Affairs. The expo has been growing each year and Commission attendance provides an opportunity to conduct outreach to the African American community and provide information regarding VR services available through the commission. (Page 333)

511

NMDWS administers a common management information system, called the Workforce Connection On-Line System, described earlier. The Workforce Connection Centers use the system not only for registering job applicants, housing resumes, and job postings for job matching purposes, but also for the purposes of data entry, case management, and state and federal performance reporting. The Workforce Connection On-Line System integrates data collection, participant demographics, case management, and performance reporting for not only Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Wagner-Peyser, but also Migrant Seasonal Farmworkers, Veterans, Trade programs. The system is also used for data collection and reporting for all partners located in comprehensive and affiliate centers. NMDWS has established both user access and data sharing agreements to support access to information and information sharing between the partners as allowed by authorizing law and regulation. The system also provides access to labor market information to support business and job seekers in need of training or employment assistance. (Page 110)

NMDWS administers a common management information system, called the Workforce Connection On-Line System, described earlier. The Workforce Connection Centers use the system not only for registering job applicants, housing resumes, and job postings for job matching purposes, but also for the purposes of data entry, case management, and state and federal performance reporting. The Workforce Connection On-Line System integrates data collection, participant demographics, case management, and performance reporting for not only Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Wagner-Peyser, but also Migrant Seasonal Farmworkers, Veterans, Trade programs. The system is also used for data collection and reporting for all partners located in comprehensive and affiliate centers. NMDWS has established both user access and data sharing agreements to support access to information and information sharing between the partners as allowed by authorizing law and regulation. The system also provides access to labor market information to support business and job seekers in need of training or employment assistance. (Page 112)

Mental Health

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 148)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 40

New Mexico Interagency Behavioral Health Service Requirements and Utilization Guidelines for Supported Employment - 07/20/2004

~~This document defines supported employment and provides program, provider, staffing, documentation, and other requirements of providers of supported employment services.“Supported  Employment  provides  on  the  job  supports  in  an integrated  work  setting  with  ongoing  support  services  for  individuals  in  need  of intensive supported employment services in order to perform work.  Activities are typically  performed  by  a  job  developer,  job  coach  and/or  job  specialist  (case manager) to achieve a successful employment outcome.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NM Seed Loan Program

"Seed" stands for "Self Employment for Entrepreneurs with Disabilities". The program  makes loans available to individuals with disabilities regardless of the type of disability, age, income level, or location of residence in the state, to purchase needed equipment and home-based business supplies. San Juan Center for Independence, in collaboration with Accion and New Mexico Technology Assistance Program, provides low interest loans on a case by case basis."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

The board member from the community colleges shall solicit input from the community college constituency and work with regional and statewide businesses and other partners and the economic development department to create career pathways and align curriculum and facilitate plans with the economic development department, human services department and labor department strategic plans

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico DD (0173.R05.00)

“Provides case management, community integrated employment, customized community supports, living supports, personal support, respite, nutritional counseling, OT for adults, PT for adults, speech and language therapy for adults, supplemental dental care, assistive technology, behavior support consultation, crisis support, customized in-home supports, environmental mods, independent living transition, intensive medical living supports, non-medical transportation, personal support technology/on-site response, preliminary risk screening and consultation related to inappropriate sexual behavior, private duty nursing for adults, socialization and sexuality education for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Senate Bill 155: AN ACT RELATING TO WORKERS' COMPENSATION; AMENDING SECTIONS OF THE WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT TO CLARIFY WHEN A WORKER IS ENTITLED TO CERTAIN BENEFITS - 07/01/2017

"52-1-25.1. TEMPORARY TOTAL DISABILITY--RETURN TO WORK.--

A. As used in the Workers' Compensation Act,

"temporary total disability" means the inability of a worker,

by reason of accidental injury arising out of and in the course

of the worker's employment, to perform the duties of that

employment prior to the date of the worker's maximum medical

improvement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Mexico ABLE Legislation (HB 61) - 03/03/2016

Relating to accounts for the support of persons with disabilities; creating the accounts for person with disabilities act; enacting enabling legislation required by the federal Achieving A Better Life Experience Act of 2014; requiring the office of the state treasurer to establish and maintain a qualified program for such accounts; declaring an emergency.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Mexico Senate Memorial 25 - 02/11/2016

A memorial requesting the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council and the University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability to convene a task force to conduct a needs assessment and report on ways to improve the system of school-to-work transition for students with disabilities in New Mexico.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Mexico House Joint Memorial 72 - 02/15/2005

“A joint memorial requesting that the Executive Task Force on Disability Employment develop policies, procedures and guidelines to increase the employment of persons with disabilities in state government.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

State Integrated Workforce Plan - Wagner-Peyser Act 2012-2017 - 09/13/2012

The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP):    The SCSEP has two goals:   1) Assisting income-eligible persons, age 55 or older, to obtain employment; and   2) Providing community service through paid, part-time, training positions.    Enrolled participants receive:  •Work experience, on-the-job training, and new or improved skills; and  •Empowerment to overcome barriers to employment, such as lack of self-confidence, lack of language fluency, or physical disabilities.   
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Manual of Operating Instructions (MOP) - 08/01/2012

“The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is a program that offers unique services to individuals with disabilities for the express purpose of assisting them in achieving an employment outcome. NMDVR is committed to providing quality and culturally sensitive services to all eligible New Mexicans, including typically underserved populations such as individuals in rural communities, tribal members and those with significant or multiple disabilities... VR services are provided with a focus on employment, and with an emphasis on quality services. Counseling and guidance are the primary services, with an emphasis on a partnership between the participant and the VR counselor, as well as the establishment of partnerships with community resources, tribal entities and employers. In order to serve as many individuals as possible, the NMDVR service delivery system also places an emphasis on utilizing its resources in an efficient manner.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Interagency Behavioral Health Service Requirements and Utilization Guidelines for Supported Employment - 07/20/2004

~~This document defines supported employment and provides program, provider, staffing, documentation, and other requirements of providers of supported employment services.“Supported  Employment  provides  on  the  job  supports  in  an integrated  work  setting  with  ongoing  support  services  for  individuals  in  need  of intensive supported employment services in order to perform work.  Activities are typically  performed  by  a  job  developer,  job  coach  and/or  job  specialist  (case manager) to achieve a successful employment outcome.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

NM Seed Loan Program

"Seed" stands for "Self Employment for Entrepreneurs with Disabilities". The program  makes loans available to individuals with disabilities regardless of the type of disability, age, income level, or location of residence in the state, to purchase needed equipment and home-based business supplies. San Juan Center for Independence, in collaboration with Accion and New Mexico Technology Assistance Program, provides low interest loans on a case by case basis."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

New Mexico Governor’s Commission on Disability 2014 Annual Report - 01/15/2015

Mission:

The New Mexico Governor’s Commission on disability is committed to improving the quality of life for all New Mexicans with disabilities by addressing social integration, economic self-sufficiency, political resolve, physical and program accessibility and full participation in the benefits of life and the rights of all individuals.

 

Objectives:

Increase awareness and knowledge of disability issues among policy-makers and the general public Promote access to physical, sensory, programmatic, attitudinal and communication barriers Increase opportunities for New Mexicans with disabilities to live successfully in the community, with services and supports as needed Increase collaboration and cooperation among disability related organizations in New Mexico
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

The board member from the community colleges shall solicit input from the community college constituency and work with regional and statewide businesses and other partners and the economic development department to create career pathways and align curriculum and facilitate plans with the economic development department, human services department and labor department strategic plans

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Quality of Life Grant - 07/01/2017

“The Governor's Commission on Disability has established a Quality of Life Small Grants Program for New Mexican non-profit organizations to provide enhanced programs or services that will improve the quality of life of New Mexicans with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Money Follows the Person - 10/15/2012

“The goals of the New Mexico MFP are to increase the use of home and community-based services (HCBS) and reduce the use of institutionally-based services, [e]liminate barriers in State law, State Medicaid plans, and State budgets that restrict the use of Medicaid funds to let people get long-term care in settings of their choice, strengthen the ability of the Medicaid programs to provide HCBS to people who choose to transition out of institutions put procedures in place to provide quality assurance and improvement of HCBS” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

New Mexico Partners for Employment Events and Training - 01/01/2019

This webpage lists upcoming training and capacity building events intended for providers, people with disabilities, and employers throughout New Mexico.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Partners for Employment 2019 Events and Trainings - 07/01/2017

~~This site has a list of training sessions for School to Work Transition teams and Supported Employment for Local Leaders

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employer Needs Analysis Tip Sheet - 03/17/2015

This tip sheet discusses Employer Needs Analyses in their utility, importance and relevance to Customized Employment. It goes though the steps of implementing Employer Needs Analyses, what to look for and what material to present to the employer.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

New Mexico Workforce Investment Act Title I Wagner-Peyser Act (2012-2017) - 09/13/2012

Long-term strategies to improve outcomes of individuals with disabilities include the support of Disability Coordinators in Workforce Connection Centers. The purpose of the Disability Coordinator is to promote a collaborative and coordinated approach to employment services for persons with disabilities. Disability Coordinators are trained in best practices for serving persons with disabilities and are able to assist them with assistive technology. In addition, they are charged with increasing employer awareness and making a business case for hiring people with disabilities. The Disability Coordinators are merit based state staff and funded partially with Wagner Peyser 10% funds.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Waiver Amendment Request - 02/28/2019

~~“Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB) Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan. Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LEGISLATING FOR RESULTS: POLICY AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS - 01/01/2019

~~“One of 14 states without institutions for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities, New Mexico serves this population through a system of home- and community-based services funded through two main Medicaid programs administered by the Human Services Department (HSD) and operated primarily through the Department of Health (DOH). A 2018 LFC evaluation of these programs found growth in per-client costs and a lengthening waiting list are outpacing the state’s ability to fund and provide services. In FY17, about 3,500 people received services through the traditional developmental disabilities (DD) waiver program, while another 1,400 received services through the self-directed Mi Via program. Both provide services not usually covered by Medicaid under federal waivers of existing rules. The list of eligible individuals waiting for services, meanwhile, totaled roughly 3,900. The evaluation found increased service utilization, client movement from the traditional DD waiver program to Mi Via, and changes to how client service plans and budgets are developed have all contributed to rising costs. The average cost of an individual enrolled in the DD waiver program grew by 17 percent, to $78,575, between FY14 and FY17, while total enrollment fell by 13 percent. Meanwhile, budgets for Mi Via clients are approaching their annual individual caps, and cost growth in both waivers is on pace to potentially violate federal cost neutrality requirements by FY27.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

"Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Medicaid Demonstration" Extension - 01/01/2019

~~“This approval is  effective January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2023. CMS' s approval is subject to the limitations specified in the attached waiver authorities, expenditure authorities, Special Terms and Conditions (STCs), and subsequent attachments. The state may deviate from the Medicaid state plan requirements only to the extent those requirements have been listed as waived or as not applicable to expenditures or individuals covered by expenditure authority….Employment Supports will be provided by staff at current or potential work sites. When supported employment services are provided at a work site where persons without disabilities are employed, payment is made only for the adaptations, supervision and training required by members receiving services as a result of their disabilities but does not include payment for the supervisory activities rendered as a normal part of the business setting.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico (Mi Via) State HCBS Transition Plan - 11/14/2014

The goal of Mi Via is to provide a community-based alternative that 1) facilitates greater participant choice and control over the types of services and supports that are purchased within an agreed upon budgetary amount; and 2) enables the State to serve the most people possible within available resources. Mi Via will be administered through a partnership between Department of Health and Human Services Department.   In 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published Final Rule 2249-F/2296-F which made changes to the 1915 (c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waiver program, including a requirement for states to submit HCBS waiver settings transition plans.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/15/2012

The New Mexico Public Education Department’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 15, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

New Mexico DD (0173.R05.00)

“Provides case management, community integrated employment, customized community supports, living supports, personal support, respite, nutritional counseling, OT for adults, PT for adults, speech and language therapy for adults, supplemental dental care, assistive technology, behavior support consultation, crisis support, customized in-home supports, environmental mods, independent living transition, intensive medical living supports, non-medical transportation, personal support technology/on-site response, preliminary risk screening and consultation related to inappropriate sexual behavior, private duty nursing for adults, socialization and sexuality education for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

In the Land of Enchantment, Employment First in New Mexico could "Grow as it goes!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Mexico’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2016 to 2017
2,088,070
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.21%
Change from
2016 to 2017
169,264
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
57,005
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.17%
Change from
2016 to 2017
33.68%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
71.45%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 2,085,109 2,081,015 2,088,070
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 156,118 153,667 169,264
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 48,139 49,084 57,005
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 771,842 767,544 751,217
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.84% 31.94% 33.68%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 72.13% 71.93% 71.45%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.60% 6.70% 6.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.80% 21.80% 24.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 19.70% 19.60% 18.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 153,260 152,374 164,508
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 153,746 156,357 157,848
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 229,605 227,405 249,066
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 8,543 5,326 5,551
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 131,181 138,305 147,519
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 27,226 28,096 30,655
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,526 1,475 2,111
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 9,540 12,297 8,640
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 30,453 33,628 26,067

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,876 1,901 1,809
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.30% 3.40% 3.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 65,167 64,822 64,863

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 978 852 912
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,795 2,173 2,067
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 3,988 3,195 3,254
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 24.50% 26.70% 28.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.40% 1.40% 1.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 2.70% 3.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.80% N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 130 100 82
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A 186 230
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 292 N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,574 4,564 4,782
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 12 7 16
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 7 6 2
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 58.00% 86.00% 13.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.34 0.29 0.10

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
2,018
2,231
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 17 22 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 319 329 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 526 553 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 574 634 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 375 444 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 207 249 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 21.80% 21.30% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,303 2,435 2,437
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 100,060 100,897 101,334
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 57 69 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 46 48 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $7,288,000 $8,215,000 $7,888,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $12,807,000 $6,612,000 $5,896,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $25,673,000 $40,366,000 $34,916,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 32.00% 30.00% 24.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,565 2,607 3,135
Number of people served in facility based work. 0 0 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 1,684 452 500
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 51.50 51.60 55.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 50.61% 49.80% 49.82%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 19.64% 19.19% 18.62%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.91% 0.92% 0.87%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.36% 87.25% 93.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 43.26% 42.85% 41.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 76.10% 75.34% 76.39%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.71% 81.37% 80.94%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 32.84% 32.49% 35.26%
Source:
Office of Special Education Programs "OSEP Grads360"

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 711,613
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 877
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 392
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 392
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,148,725

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 4 5 3
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4 5 3
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 182 520 430
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 182 520 430

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Customized Employment

Term funding support from agencies providing supported employment. The Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health, provides long term funding for supported employment to provider agencies under the Developmental Disabilities Waiver and Mi Via Waivers. The Division works collaboratively with the Behavioral Health Services Division, Department of Health, New Mexico Department of Human Services, and the NM Behavioral Health Collaborative to assure ongoing support services for individuals with severe disabling mental illness served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment.

4. The Division continues to work with other state agencies under memoranda of understanding focusing on serving individuals with the most significant disabilities under supported employment plans.

5. Individual placements in integrated work settings at wages comparable to non–disabled peers performing similar work continue to be emphasized.

6. The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. One result of this collaboration in FFY 2014 was the training of 16 field staff in the Discovery process for non– traditional career development. Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 294)

Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 300)

In addition to expanding the number of personnel, NMDVR is planning customer service trainings to enhance quality and consistency of service. The agency is also providing specific Supported Employment training to current field staff. This will serve to increase staff expertise in identifying customized employment and individualized training strategies for participants. (Page 307)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found

DEI/DRC

No specific disability related information found

Competitive Integrated Employment

This regional program is set to begin its pilot in Albuquerque–area retail locations in 2016. The development of this program is the first of its’ kind for NMDVR with hopes of gaining statewide traction. Building on the success of the Skills to Work model, also called Place and Train. Dependent on it success, BSS will work with businesses throughout New Mexico to implement this model in their workplaces. Two initiatives were included in the New Mexico Blueprint for Prosperity that will allow DVR to expand place and train opportunities for job seekers with disabilities and New Mexico businesses to target job seekers with disabilities, including veterans with service– related disabilities, in their recruitment and hiring. (Page 267)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

In addition to a summer job in a competitive integrated setting, The Commission’s Students in Transition to Employment Program includes a significant workplace readiness training component. However, in order to expand workplace readiness training services, the Commission will begin offering additional workshops and seminars. The Commission has recently added staff to its Albuquerque Skills Center specifically for this purpose. The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year, during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and training on various assistive technology software and hardware; note–taking skills, Braille, math, college success, summer employment preparation, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy.

e. Instruction in self–advocacy, which may include peer mentoring. (Page 374)

The agency has also created the Skills Center, a training site to meet the needs of vocational rehabilitation consumers and potential vocational rehabilitation consumers. The agency is scheduling a variety of activities in the Skills Center. These activities include meetings, workshops, seminars, and other training events such as the summer Students in Transition to Employment Program. The Commission has recently added staff to its Albuquerque Skills Center specifically for this purpose. The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, adults, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year. To meet the particular needs of transition students, training will be scheduled during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and assistive technology hardware and software; Braille, math, note–taking skills, college success, STEP prep, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy. (Page 383)

School to Work Transition

The vocational rehabilitation programs use a case management system called Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment (AWARE) that is specifically designed for vocational rehabilitation programs. This system enables counselors to manage cases, managers to monitor cases, and the agency to prepare and submit required reports to RSA in a timely manner. All client data is captured and maintained in the AWARE case management system, such as information on client employment outcomes, including position title, employer, wages, hours, benefits, etc., and is provided to the Rehabilitation Services Administration, U. S. Department of Education through quarterly and annual reports. The company that programs the software will revise the system to produce any WIOA required data. Due to the especially strict confidentiality requirements imposed by the Rehabilitation Act and the sensitive nature of information about disabilities and medical conditions, the case management system is a closed system, accessible only by authorized employees. NMDWS has established a data sharing agreement to provide necessary wage data to support the programs’ activities. (Page 112)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Project Search programs across the state. DVR collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work. NM DVR employs a Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each Project Search site. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address Social Security Disability/ Social Security Income concerns and to address benefits income and impact to employment. The Division has established a replica of Project Search in New Mexico. Currently UNM Hospital and Hilton Garden Inn Gallup are providing training and internship rotations for 19 students. Project Search allows for three (3) rotations to occur at in various departments. These rotations provide candidates with the opportunity to learn the skills and abilities needed to be successful in the community and subsequently in a career of their choice. Job coaches and teachers will be on site at all times teaching curriculum and job skills. The goal of Project Search is to assure that each candidate will be employed following the completion of the year–long program. Collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, Gallup McKinley schools, UNM/CDD, Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD), UNM Hospital, Hilton Garden Inn Gallup, and Best Buddies (Albuquerque Long term provider) and Empowerment ( Gallup Long term provider) have been established. (Page 257)

The agreements with individual Local Education Agencies identify: 

  1. Policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated between the agencies, including definitions, eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services, policies and procedures for making referrals, procedures for outreach students receiving special education services and in need of transition service, practices and procedures also address time–frames for evaluation and follow–up with students;
  2. The roles of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
  3. Procedures for providing training, consultation, and technical assistance to assist staff of State and local educational agencies as to the availability, benefits of, and eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services;
  4. Available resources, including sources of funds for the development and expansion of services;
  5. The financial responsibility of each agency in providing services to students with disabilities who are receiving special education services consistent with State law;
  6. Procedures for resolving disputes between the agencies that are parties to the agreement; and
  7. All other components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation among agencies, including procedures to facilitate the development of local teams to coordinate the provision of services to students with disabilities, sharing data, and coordinating joint training of staff providing transition services. 

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices.

The Mentoring Diverse Abilities program funding has ended, however transition services continue to be provided by both NMDVR and the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Programs throughout the state. (Page 260)

The agreements with individual Local Education Agencies identify: 

  1. Policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated between the agencies, including definitions, eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services, policies and procedures for making referrals, procedures for outreach students receiving special education services and in need of transition service, practices and procedures also address time–frames for evaluation and follow–up with students;
  2. The roles of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
  3. Procedures for providing training, consultation, and technical assistance to assist staff of State and local educational agencies as to the availability, benefits of, and eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services;
  4. Available resources, including sources of funds for the development and expansion of services;
  5. The financial responsibility of each agency in providing services to students with disabilities who are receiving special education services consistent with State law;
  6. Procedures for resolving disputes between the agencies that are parties to the agreement; and
  7. All other components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation among agencies, including procedures to facilitate the development of local teams to coordinate the provision of services to students with disabilities, sharing data, and coordinating joint training of staff providing transition services. (Page 262)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Supported Employment programs across the state. Services that are provided at Center for Development and Disability include education, advocacy, and outreach in the field of Supported Employment. Services are available through Partners for Employment to participants and their families, community providers, job developers, job coaches, employers, as well as, educational facilities. DVR also collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work.

NM DVR employs Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each area of the state. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address SSD (I) to address benefits income and impact to employment.

The NM Department of Health is the state agency responsible for administering Developmental Disabilities Waiver funding under Title XIX of the Social Security Act. Behavioral Health Services are administered through state– wide Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO). (Page 265)

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 268)

The Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program is designed to provide a network of providers for Social Security beneficiaries to obtain employment outcome services. NMDVR is no longer an Employment Network, however the division continues to provide services and information to participants related to Social Security Benefits. This includes five field staff located throughout the state that specialize in benefits advisement. NMDVR and Behavioral Health Services: NMDVR is a member of New Mexico’s Behavioral Health Purchasing Collaborative. During the past four years, work continued toward intra–agency collaboration specifically dealing with behavioral health services among all 17 agencies/divisions of the BHPC. Under the terms of an agreement reached with the State Behavioral Health Services Division, NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 283)

Benefits advisement services are provided to enhance participation in VR by Social Security disability beneficiaries who tend to be underserved. Services aid to address concerns about the effect of employment on benefits as well as provide information regarding incentives and benefits of employment.

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 303)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Project Search programs across the state. DVR collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work. NM DVR employs Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each Project Search site. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address Social Security Disability and social Security disability Income benefits income and impact to employment.

The Division has established a replica of Project Search in New Mexico. Currently, UNM Hospital and Hilton Garden Inn Gallup are providing training and internship rotations for 19 students. Project Search allows for three (3) rotations to occur at in various departments. These rotations provide candidates with the opportunity to learn the skills and abilities needed to be successful in the community and subsequently in a career of their choice. Job coaches and teachers will be on site at all times teaching curriculum and job skills. The goal of Project Search is that each candidate will be employed following the completion of the year–long program. Collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, Gallup McKinley schools, UNM/CD, Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD), UNM Hospital, Hilton Garden Inn Gallup, and Best Buddies (Albuquerque Long term provider) and Empowerment ( Gallup Long term provider) have been established. (Page 308)

Enhance the number and quality of employment outcomes for consumers by providing enhanced benefits counseling and guidance to reduce concerns related to the loss or reduction of benefits. 

Council Recommendations: The Council discussed and decided to continue the Goal, noting the myriad benefits of working.

Agency Response: The agency continues to provide benefits counseling and guidance through a contract with the New Mexico Legal Aid Society. The agency also had staff from Legal Aid provide training on benefits to the vocational rehabilitation counselors. The agency has also provided seminars on benefits to clients. (Page 331)

The Commission regularly surveys consumers to make sure that consumers are participating in the Medicaid program, including and especially as it relates to work incentives that encourage employment. This includes counseling consumers to apply for the Section 1619(b) program when consumers may lose SSI due to work activity, and to encourage consumers to apply for the Working Disabled Individual Category 043 program when the consumer’s income is too high to qualify for the 1619(b) program. Of special note is that it was the Commission that came up with the idea of using the Working Disabled Individual category to address the problem of the 24-month Medicare waiting period. The Commission worked with the state Medical Assistance Division in the development of the Medi-Gap portion of Category 043, which provides Medicaid to persons who have lost SSI due to the start of SSDI, and who thereby lost Medicaid coverage. The Commission also works to make sure that consumers who lose SSI due to the start of Disabled Adult Child benefits maintain Medicaid under Public Law 99-643 and Section 1634(d). The Commission also works to make sure that low-income consumers who may be eligible for Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMB) Specified Low Income Medicare Beneficiaries (SLIMB) or Qualified Individual (QI) are receiving QMB, SLIMB, or QI. (Page 343)

The Commission has adopted a policy to support consumer attendance at the division/special interest group meetings held during national consumer organization conventions. In order to receive the support, the consumer’s vocational goal must be directly related to the particular division/special interest group meeting. The Commission, with the support of the SRC, believes that attendance at related division/special interest group meetings can enhance the consumer’s ability to achieve their vocational goal. Benefits would include learning about current developments in their field, meeting and networking with individuals who are successful in their fields, learning about the use and accessibility of career–specific technology, learning how blind and visually impaired individuals in the field use assistive technology successfully, and learning techniques that would enable them to succeed in their vocational training/education program and ultimately in their chosen field. The Commission also supports annual attendance at the state conventions of both consumer organizations. (Page 383-384)

The Commission regularly participates in the annual New Mexico Academy of Ophthalmology conference in Albuquerque. Counselors also visit ophthalmologists in their territories to ensure that the medical community is aware of the Commission and the services that are provided.

l. Enhance the number and quality of employment outcomes for consumers by providing enhanced benefits counseling and guidance, with the purpose being to reduce fears related to the loss or reduction of benefits.

Counselors received training during March 2013 designed to help them understand the myriad benefit programs. The training has increased the ability of each counselor to help consumers understand program requirements and thereby reduce the fear of losing benefits. In addition to the training, counselors also received a desk reference which contains valuable information regarding each program as well as sample letters that can be used to report earnings.

The agency continues to utilize a comparable benefits survey, designed to identify benefit program eligibility for eligible VR consumers. (Page 392)

Supported employment services may include a comprehensive assessment as provided under the basic vocational rehabilitation program, job site assessment, and other evaluations to determine possible benefits from supported employment to consumers with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities. Additional supported employment services include job development, placement and intensive job skills training, social skills training, regular observation and supervision of the individual, and regular contact with the employer, consumer, parent, family members, guardians, advocates or other authorized representatives of the individual and other suitable professionals. The utilization of natural support systems as well as the provision of appropriate services under the basic vocational rehabilitation program is available to supported employment consumers. (Page 396)

Career Pathways

Vocational Rehabilitation and the One-stop Delivery System. The one-stop delivery system in New Mexico offers assessment and development tools, strong relationships with business and specialized programs that benefit New Mexicans looking for work. Under the combined state plan, the VR agencies will work to strengthen their relationships with NMDWS and the Local Workforce Development Boards to make referral and coordination of service to participants as seamless as possible. WIOA places greater emphasis on providing work experiences to VR participants, especially students transitioning from school to work. DVR, in particular, can particularly benefit from the expertise and established business relationships that the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions offers to expand work experience opportunities for participants. As such, DVR staff will work with the workforce development centers to arrange for VR-focused presentations when needed and assist with special events such as job fairs and training workshops. Workforce centers will also assist with presentations and trainings at VR offices. DVR also plans to ramp up its efforts to support the transition of students and youth with disabilities from secondary education to postsecondary education and employment. 

The Division has developed and maintained interagency agreements with agencies that carry out activities and which do not carry out activities under the statewide workforce investment system. Some of the agencies not under the state workforce investment system are: The Veteran’s Affairs Administration, The New Mexico Commission on the Deaf and Hard of Hearing; The Developmental Disabilities Planning Council, The Department of Health, and the Developmental Disabilities Support Services Division, to provide supported employment services to individuals on the developmental disabilities waiver and Jackson Class members. The Department also has a Memorandum of Understanding with the Public Education Department to further effect school–to–work transition services throughout the state including Roswell Job Corp. Further contracts are in place with the Centers of Independent Living; in the state, services include job seeking skills training, job placement and Self–Advocacy and supportive services. (Page 254)

In FFY 2014, collaboration with New Mexico School for the Deaf through statewide outreach and Commission for Deaf and Hard of Hearing has led to improved outreach and coordination with multiple state school districts toward referral of deaf/hard of hearing transition students to NMDVR. Coordination of School–to–Work transition services that include having a team of specialists to collaborate with school transition specialists to conduct outreach, inform, instruct, and coordinate transition services for individuals covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. Coordination and training events have also begun at agency field staff meetings. While these efforts target a specific population, they have the added benefit of strengthening communications between transition specialists at NMSD as well as state wide school districts and NMDVR field staff. This can benefit all transitioning youth. (Page 257- 258)

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices. The Mentoring Diverse Abilities program funding has ended, however transition services continue to be provided by both NMDVR and the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Programs throughout the state. (Page 260)

Collaboration with Statewide Workforce Investment System: NMDVR has had representatives on the Youth Standing Committee, and School to Work Transitional Alliance. Representatives address the issues and interests of individuals with disabilities in the workforce investment system, both in developing policy and influencing service delivery.

The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment Although the Navigator program is completed, it did serve to increase awareness of vocational rehabilitation services and employment–related needs of people with disabilities at local One–stops. The result is that One–stop staff have established and continue to maintain contact with NMDVR counselors throughout the state. (Page 267-26)

The licensure rules for Rehabilitation Counselors in New Mexico are in agreement with the Public Education Department requirements and competencies applicable to both the school systems to effect school–to– work transition in the high schools and the Division. The Statewide Transition Coordinator provides routine Transition training to all field staff with emphasize on the staff directly providing transition services. IDEA, IEP’s, Diagnostic Data are all represented through Transition Services. The Transition Coordinator also provides up–to– date information to staff regarding IDEA and acts as the liaison between DVR and Public Education Department. The agency will continue to encourage Transition Coordinator to maintain a board seat on IDEA, School–to–work Transition Alliance and maintain relations to support Regional Education Cooperative Memberships, and NM Youth Committee. It is the intention of the agency to continue cooperation and coordination with the personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (Page 280)

In early FY14 DVR, was approached to partner with the University of New Mexico, Center for Development and Disability (UNM/CDD) to consider establishing a replica of Project Search in NM. Project Search is an internationally known program that originated at Cincinnati’s Children’s Hospital. It focuses on school–to–work transition age students who are diagnosed with a variety of disabling conditions. The DVR Interim Transition Coordinator had the opportunity to attend the Project Search conference in July. In collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, UNM/CDD and the NM University Hospital (UNMH) as well as the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD) and Best Buddies (a local provider agency), the Project Search founders have given approval to replicate this program in New Mexico. The site for Project Search has been selected and approved. Program space intended for training and internship rotations has been established at UNM Hospital (Page 313)

Work Incentives & Benefits
  • promoting the value of occupational learning through paid work experience on the job, such as through the development of apprenticeships, paid internships, incumbent worker or customized training, and transitional jobs;
  • encouraging public/private partnerships among business, education, community and civic organizations, and economic development to create work-based training opportunities that both feed career pathways for job seekers and satisfy job-driven strategies of employers and industries;
  • using skills assessments and credentialing to promote the value of job ready individuals to potential employers in developing work-based experiences; and
  • exploring the offerings of other related programs, outside of the state plan, that offer opportunities to help individuals gain increased skills and experience that can lead to potential future job opportunities and employment. (Page79)

Apprenticeship and Individuals with Disabilities. Under WIOA, VR programs must spend 15 percent of funding on students with disabilities. As such, some specific work is already being done in New Mexico to explore and expand the use of apprenticeships as a service strategy for improving outcomes for individuals with disabilities. For instance, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist has been working with a one-stop youth provider on finalizing an MOU to serve youth with disabilities. Additionally, a DVR Business Specialist has been working on the development of partnerships with the Workforce Training Center and Road Runner Food Bank to increase vocational readiness training programs which will be provided to students and youth with disabilities. 

Additionally, core partners have begun to have conversations about how the state can further expand opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including individuals who are blind or visually impaired. While individuals who are blind or visually impaired have often faced significant obstacles in participating in apprenticeship programs, the Commission for the Blind plans to increase efforts to consider and identify Registered Apprenticeships for consumers who might be appropriate candidates for such apprenticeship. Ultimately VR programs are optimistic about improved accessibility to the RA programs for the clients they serve. Examples of ideas of how this can be accomplished in New Mexico include pursuing: (Page 95)

As part of the professional development system, all eligible AEFLA providers will have available to them both hands–on and pedagogical training about the use of technology in the classroom. As part of the effort to make all appropriate Adult Education classes in New Mexico blended distance and face–to–face, the NMHED is providing an online platform aligned with College and Career Readiness Standards and career pathways, with mapping to KeyTrain and O–Net. As the State implements the platform all local providers are trained by the publisher and, pedagogically, by master teachers, both in the use of the technology and in developing and delivering classes using it. (Page 241)

  • NMDVR will make strides towards providing employment experiences or On the Job training activities in the community. Through this strategy, mutual customers can provide experience that may lead to permanent employment.
  • NMDVR will continue expand engagement of the business sector as a partner in developing career pathways for youth with disabilities in high–growth industries (Page 306)
Employer Engagement

The agency participates on the Ticket to Work Partners group, along with the Social Security Administration, the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, and a number of employment networks that serve ticket holders throughout New Mexico. The group regularly meets in the Commission’s Skills Center Lecture Hall. 2015 marked the third year in which the Commission participated in the annual Black Expo, sponsored by the New Mexico Office of African American Affairs. The expo has been growing each year and Commission attendance provides an opportunity to conduct outreach to the African American community and provide information regarding VR services available through the commission. (Page 333)

511

NMDWS administers a common management information system, called the Workforce Connection On-Line System, described earlier. The Workforce Connection Centers use the system not only for registering job applicants, housing resumes, and job postings for job matching purposes, but also for the purposes of data entry, case management, and state and federal performance reporting. The Workforce Connection On-Line System integrates data collection, participant demographics, case management, and performance reporting for not only Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Wagner-Peyser, but also Migrant Seasonal Farmworkers, Veterans, Trade programs. The system is also used for data collection and reporting for all partners located in comprehensive and affiliate centers. NMDWS has established both user access and data sharing agreements to support access to information and information sharing between the partners as allowed by authorizing law and regulation. The system also provides access to labor market information to support business and job seekers in need of training or employment assistance. (Page 110)

NMDWS administers a common management information system, called the Workforce Connection On-Line System, described earlier. The Workforce Connection Centers use the system not only for registering job applicants, housing resumes, and job postings for job matching purposes, but also for the purposes of data entry, case management, and state and federal performance reporting. The Workforce Connection On-Line System integrates data collection, participant demographics, case management, and performance reporting for not only Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Wagner-Peyser, but also Migrant Seasonal Farmworkers, Veterans, Trade programs. The system is also used for data collection and reporting for all partners located in comprehensive and affiliate centers. NMDWS has established both user access and data sharing agreements to support access to information and information sharing between the partners as allowed by authorizing law and regulation. The system also provides access to labor market information to support business and job seekers in need of training or employment assistance. (Page 112)

Mental Health

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 148)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 40

New Mexico Interagency Behavioral Health Service Requirements and Utilization Guidelines for Supported Employment - 07/20/2004

~~This document defines supported employment and provides program, provider, staffing, documentation, and other requirements of providers of supported employment services.“Supported  Employment  provides  on  the  job  supports  in  an integrated  work  setting  with  ongoing  support  services  for  individuals  in  need  of intensive supported employment services in order to perform work.  Activities are typically  performed  by  a  job  developer,  job  coach  and/or  job  specialist  (case manager) to achieve a successful employment outcome.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NM Seed Loan Program

"Seed" stands for "Self Employment for Entrepreneurs with Disabilities". The program  makes loans available to individuals with disabilities regardless of the type of disability, age, income level, or location of residence in the state, to purchase needed equipment and home-based business supplies. San Juan Center for Independence, in collaboration with Accion and New Mexico Technology Assistance Program, provides low interest loans on a case by case basis."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

The board member from the community colleges shall solicit input from the community college constituency and work with regional and statewide businesses and other partners and the economic development department to create career pathways and align curriculum and facilitate plans with the economic development department, human services department and labor department strategic plans

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico DD (0173.R05.00)

“Provides case management, community integrated employment, customized community supports, living supports, personal support, respite, nutritional counseling, OT for adults, PT for adults, speech and language therapy for adults, supplemental dental care, assistive technology, behavior support consultation, crisis support, customized in-home supports, environmental mods, independent living transition, intensive medical living supports, non-medical transportation, personal support technology/on-site response, preliminary risk screening and consultation related to inappropriate sexual behavior, private duty nursing for adults, socialization and sexuality education for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Senate Bill 155: AN ACT RELATING TO WORKERS' COMPENSATION; AMENDING SECTIONS OF THE WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT TO CLARIFY WHEN A WORKER IS ENTITLED TO CERTAIN BENEFITS - 07/01/2017

"52-1-25.1. TEMPORARY TOTAL DISABILITY--RETURN TO WORK.--

A. As used in the Workers' Compensation Act,

"temporary total disability" means the inability of a worker,

by reason of accidental injury arising out of and in the course

of the worker's employment, to perform the duties of that

employment prior to the date of the worker's maximum medical

improvement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Mexico ABLE Legislation (HB 61) - 03/03/2016

Relating to accounts for the support of persons with disabilities; creating the accounts for person with disabilities act; enacting enabling legislation required by the federal Achieving A Better Life Experience Act of 2014; requiring the office of the state treasurer to establish and maintain a qualified program for such accounts; declaring an emergency.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Mexico Senate Memorial 25 - 02/11/2016

A memorial requesting the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council and the University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability to convene a task force to conduct a needs assessment and report on ways to improve the system of school-to-work transition for students with disabilities in New Mexico.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Mexico House Joint Memorial 72 - 02/15/2005

“A joint memorial requesting that the Executive Task Force on Disability Employment develop policies, procedures and guidelines to increase the employment of persons with disabilities in state government.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

State Integrated Workforce Plan - Wagner-Peyser Act 2012-2017 - 09/13/2012

The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP):    The SCSEP has two goals:   1) Assisting income-eligible persons, age 55 or older, to obtain employment; and   2) Providing community service through paid, part-time, training positions.    Enrolled participants receive:  •Work experience, on-the-job training, and new or improved skills; and  •Empowerment to overcome barriers to employment, such as lack of self-confidence, lack of language fluency, or physical disabilities.   
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Manual of Operating Instructions (MOP) - 08/01/2012

“The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is a program that offers unique services to individuals with disabilities for the express purpose of assisting them in achieving an employment outcome. NMDVR is committed to providing quality and culturally sensitive services to all eligible New Mexicans, including typically underserved populations such as individuals in rural communities, tribal members and those with significant or multiple disabilities... VR services are provided with a focus on employment, and with an emphasis on quality services. Counseling and guidance are the primary services, with an emphasis on a partnership between the participant and the VR counselor, as well as the establishment of partnerships with community resources, tribal entities and employers. In order to serve as many individuals as possible, the NMDVR service delivery system also places an emphasis on utilizing its resources in an efficient manner.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Interagency Behavioral Health Service Requirements and Utilization Guidelines for Supported Employment - 07/20/2004

~~This document defines supported employment and provides program, provider, staffing, documentation, and other requirements of providers of supported employment services.“Supported  Employment  provides  on  the  job  supports  in  an integrated  work  setting  with  ongoing  support  services  for  individuals  in  need  of intensive supported employment services in order to perform work.  Activities are typically  performed  by  a  job  developer,  job  coach  and/or  job  specialist  (case manager) to achieve a successful employment outcome.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

NM Seed Loan Program

"Seed" stands for "Self Employment for Entrepreneurs with Disabilities". The program  makes loans available to individuals with disabilities regardless of the type of disability, age, income level, or location of residence in the state, to purchase needed equipment and home-based business supplies. San Juan Center for Independence, in collaboration with Accion and New Mexico Technology Assistance Program, provides low interest loans on a case by case basis."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

New Mexico Governor’s Commission on Disability 2014 Annual Report - 01/15/2015

Mission:

The New Mexico Governor’s Commission on disability is committed to improving the quality of life for all New Mexicans with disabilities by addressing social integration, economic self-sufficiency, political resolve, physical and program accessibility and full participation in the benefits of life and the rights of all individuals.

 

Objectives:

Increase awareness and knowledge of disability issues among policy-makers and the general public Promote access to physical, sensory, programmatic, attitudinal and communication barriers Increase opportunities for New Mexicans with disabilities to live successfully in the community, with services and supports as needed Increase collaboration and cooperation among disability related organizations in New Mexico
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

The board member from the community colleges shall solicit input from the community college constituency and work with regional and statewide businesses and other partners and the economic development department to create career pathways and align curriculum and facilitate plans with the economic development department, human services department and labor department strategic plans

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Quality of Life Grant - 07/01/2017

“The Governor's Commission on Disability has established a Quality of Life Small Grants Program for New Mexican non-profit organizations to provide enhanced programs or services that will improve the quality of life of New Mexicans with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Money Follows the Person - 10/15/2012

“The goals of the New Mexico MFP are to increase the use of home and community-based services (HCBS) and reduce the use of institutionally-based services, [e]liminate barriers in State law, State Medicaid plans, and State budgets that restrict the use of Medicaid funds to let people get long-term care in settings of their choice, strengthen the ability of the Medicaid programs to provide HCBS to people who choose to transition out of institutions put procedures in place to provide quality assurance and improvement of HCBS” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

New Mexico Partners for Employment Events and Training - 01/01/2019

This webpage lists upcoming training and capacity building events intended for providers, people with disabilities, and employers throughout New Mexico.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Partners for Employment 2019 Events and Trainings - 07/01/2017

~~This site has a list of training sessions for School to Work Transition teams and Supported Employment for Local Leaders

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employer Needs Analysis Tip Sheet - 03/17/2015

This tip sheet discusses Employer Needs Analyses in their utility, importance and relevance to Customized Employment. It goes though the steps of implementing Employer Needs Analyses, what to look for and what material to present to the employer.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

New Mexico Workforce Investment Act Title I Wagner-Peyser Act (2012-2017) - 09/13/2012

Long-term strategies to improve outcomes of individuals with disabilities include the support of Disability Coordinators in Workforce Connection Centers. The purpose of the Disability Coordinator is to promote a collaborative and coordinated approach to employment services for persons with disabilities. Disability Coordinators are trained in best practices for serving persons with disabilities and are able to assist them with assistive technology. In addition, they are charged with increasing employer awareness and making a business case for hiring people with disabilities. The Disability Coordinators are merit based state staff and funded partially with Wagner Peyser 10% funds.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Waiver Amendment Request - 02/28/2019

~~“Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB) Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan. Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LEGISLATING FOR RESULTS: POLICY AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS - 01/01/2019

~~“One of 14 states without institutions for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities, New Mexico serves this population through a system of home- and community-based services funded through two main Medicaid programs administered by the Human Services Department (HSD) and operated primarily through the Department of Health (DOH). A 2018 LFC evaluation of these programs found growth in per-client costs and a lengthening waiting list are outpacing the state’s ability to fund and provide services. In FY17, about 3,500 people received services through the traditional developmental disabilities (DD) waiver program, while another 1,400 received services through the self-directed Mi Via program. Both provide services not usually covered by Medicaid under federal waivers of existing rules. The list of eligible individuals waiting for services, meanwhile, totaled roughly 3,900. The evaluation found increased service utilization, client movement from the traditional DD waiver program to Mi Via, and changes to how client service plans and budgets are developed have all contributed to rising costs. The average cost of an individual enrolled in the DD waiver program grew by 17 percent, to $78,575, between FY14 and FY17, while total enrollment fell by 13 percent. Meanwhile, budgets for Mi Via clients are approaching their annual individual caps, and cost growth in both waivers is on pace to potentially violate federal cost neutrality requirements by FY27.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

"Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Medicaid Demonstration" Extension - 01/01/2019

~~“This approval is  effective January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2023. CMS' s approval is subject to the limitations specified in the attached waiver authorities, expenditure authorities, Special Terms and Conditions (STCs), and subsequent attachments. The state may deviate from the Medicaid state plan requirements only to the extent those requirements have been listed as waived or as not applicable to expenditures or individuals covered by expenditure authority….Employment Supports will be provided by staff at current or potential work sites. When supported employment services are provided at a work site where persons without disabilities are employed, payment is made only for the adaptations, supervision and training required by members receiving services as a result of their disabilities but does not include payment for the supervisory activities rendered as a normal part of the business setting.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico (Mi Via) State HCBS Transition Plan - 11/14/2014

The goal of Mi Via is to provide a community-based alternative that 1) facilitates greater participant choice and control over the types of services and supports that are purchased within an agreed upon budgetary amount; and 2) enables the State to serve the most people possible within available resources. Mi Via will be administered through a partnership between Department of Health and Human Services Department.   In 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published Final Rule 2249-F/2296-F which made changes to the 1915 (c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waiver program, including a requirement for states to submit HCBS waiver settings transition plans.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/15/2012

The New Mexico Public Education Department’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 15, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

New Mexico DD (0173.R05.00)

“Provides case management, community integrated employment, customized community supports, living supports, personal support, respite, nutritional counseling, OT for adults, PT for adults, speech and language therapy for adults, supplemental dental care, assistive technology, behavior support consultation, crisis support, customized in-home supports, environmental mods, independent living transition, intensive medical living supports, non-medical transportation, personal support technology/on-site response, preliminary risk screening and consultation related to inappropriate sexual behavior, private duty nursing for adults, socialization and sexuality education for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

In the Land of Enchantment, Employment First in New Mexico could "Grow as it goes!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Mexico’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2016 to 2017
2,088,070
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.21%
Change from
2016 to 2017
169,264
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
57,005
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.17%
Change from
2016 to 2017
33.68%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
71.45%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 2,088,070
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 169,264
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 57,005
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 751,217
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.68%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 71.45%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 18.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 164,508
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 157,848
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 249,066
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 5,551
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 147,519
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 30,655
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,111
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 8,640
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 26,067

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,809
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 64,863

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 912
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,067
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 3,254
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 28.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 82
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 230
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,782
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 16
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 13.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.10

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,437
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 101,334
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $7,888,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $5,896,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $34,916,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,135
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 500
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 55.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 49.82%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 18.62%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.87%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 93.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 41.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 76.39%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.94%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.26%
Source:
Office of Special Education Programs "OSEP Grads360"

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 711,613
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 877
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 392
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 392
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,148,725

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 430
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 430

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Customized Employment

Term funding support from agencies providing supported employment. The Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health, provides long term funding for supported employment to provider agencies under the Developmental Disabilities Waiver and Mi Via Waivers. The Division works collaboratively with the Behavioral Health Services Division, Department of Health, New Mexico Department of Human Services, and the NM Behavioral Health Collaborative to assure ongoing support services for individuals with severe disabling mental illness served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment.

4. The Division continues to work with other state agencies under memoranda of understanding focusing on serving individuals with the most significant disabilities under supported employment plans.

5. Individual placements in integrated work settings at wages comparable to non–disabled peers performing similar work continue to be emphasized.

6. The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. One result of this collaboration in FFY 2014 was the training of 16 field staff in the Discovery process for non– traditional career development. Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 294)

Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 300)

In addition to expanding the number of personnel, NMDVR is planning customer service trainings to enhance quality and consistency of service. The agency is also providing specific Supported Employment training to current field staff. This will serve to increase staff expertise in identifying customized employment and individualized training strategies for participants. (Page 307)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found

DEI/DRC

No specific disability related information found

Competitive Integrated Employment

This regional program is set to begin its pilot in Albuquerque–area retail locations in 2016. The development of this program is the first of its’ kind for NMDVR with hopes of gaining statewide traction. Building on the success of the Skills to Work model, also called Place and Train. Dependent on it success, BSS will work with businesses throughout New Mexico to implement this model in their workplaces. Two initiatives were included in the New Mexico Blueprint for Prosperity that will allow DVR to expand place and train opportunities for job seekers with disabilities and New Mexico businesses to target job seekers with disabilities, including veterans with service– related disabilities, in their recruitment and hiring. (Page 267)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

In addition to a summer job in a competitive integrated setting, The Commission’s Students in Transition to Employment Program includes a significant workplace readiness training component. However, in order to expand workplace readiness training services, the Commission will begin offering additional workshops and seminars. The Commission has recently added staff to its Albuquerque Skills Center specifically for this purpose. The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year, during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and training on various assistive technology software and hardware; note–taking skills, Braille, math, college success, summer employment preparation, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy.

e. Instruction in self–advocacy, which may include peer mentoring. (Page 374)

The agency has also created the Skills Center, a training site to meet the needs of vocational rehabilitation consumers and potential vocational rehabilitation consumers. The agency is scheduling a variety of activities in the Skills Center. These activities include meetings, workshops, seminars, and other training events such as the summer Students in Transition to Employment Program. The Commission has recently added staff to its Albuquerque Skills Center specifically for this purpose. The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, adults, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year. To meet the particular needs of transition students, training will be scheduled during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and assistive technology hardware and software; Braille, math, note–taking skills, college success, STEP prep, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy. (Page 383)

School to Work Transition

The vocational rehabilitation programs use a case management system called Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment (AWARE) that is specifically designed for vocational rehabilitation programs. This system enables counselors to manage cases, managers to monitor cases, and the agency to prepare and submit required reports to RSA in a timely manner. All client data is captured and maintained in the AWARE case management system, such as information on client employment outcomes, including position title, employer, wages, hours, benefits, etc., and is provided to the Rehabilitation Services Administration, U. S. Department of Education through quarterly and annual reports. The company that programs the software will revise the system to produce any WIOA required data. Due to the especially strict confidentiality requirements imposed by the Rehabilitation Act and the sensitive nature of information about disabilities and medical conditions, the case management system is a closed system, accessible only by authorized employees. NMDWS has established a data sharing agreement to provide necessary wage data to support the programs’ activities. (Page 112)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Project Search programs across the state. DVR collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work. NM DVR employs a Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each Project Search site. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address Social Security Disability/ Social Security Income concerns and to address benefits income and impact to employment. The Division has established a replica of Project Search in New Mexico. Currently UNM Hospital and Hilton Garden Inn Gallup are providing training and internship rotations for 19 students. Project Search allows for three (3) rotations to occur at in various departments. These rotations provide candidates with the opportunity to learn the skills and abilities needed to be successful in the community and subsequently in a career of their choice. Job coaches and teachers will be on site at all times teaching curriculum and job skills. The goal of Project Search is to assure that each candidate will be employed following the completion of the year–long program. Collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, Gallup McKinley schools, UNM/CDD, Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD), UNM Hospital, Hilton Garden Inn Gallup, and Best Buddies (Albuquerque Long term provider) and Empowerment ( Gallup Long term provider) have been established. (Page 257)

The agreements with individual Local Education Agencies identify: 

  1. Policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated between the agencies, including definitions, eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services, policies and procedures for making referrals, procedures for outreach students receiving special education services and in need of transition service, practices and procedures also address time–frames for evaluation and follow–up with students;
  2. The roles of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
  3. Procedures for providing training, consultation, and technical assistance to assist staff of State and local educational agencies as to the availability, benefits of, and eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services;
  4. Available resources, including sources of funds for the development and expansion of services;
  5. The financial responsibility of each agency in providing services to students with disabilities who are receiving special education services consistent with State law;
  6. Procedures for resolving disputes between the agencies that are parties to the agreement; and
  7. All other components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation among agencies, including procedures to facilitate the development of local teams to coordinate the provision of services to students with disabilities, sharing data, and coordinating joint training of staff providing transition services. 

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices.

The Mentoring Diverse Abilities program funding has ended, however transition services continue to be provided by both NMDVR and the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Programs throughout the state. (Page 260)

The agreements with individual Local Education Agencies identify: 

  1. Policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated between the agencies, including definitions, eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services, policies and procedures for making referrals, procedures for outreach students receiving special education services and in need of transition service, practices and procedures also address time–frames for evaluation and follow–up with students;
  2. The roles of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
  3. Procedures for providing training, consultation, and technical assistance to assist staff of State and local educational agencies as to the availability, benefits of, and eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services;
  4. Available resources, including sources of funds for the development and expansion of services;
  5. The financial responsibility of each agency in providing services to students with disabilities who are receiving special education services consistent with State law;
  6. Procedures for resolving disputes between the agencies that are parties to the agreement; and
  7. All other components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation among agencies, including procedures to facilitate the development of local teams to coordinate the provision of services to students with disabilities, sharing data, and coordinating joint training of staff providing transition services. (Page 262)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Supported Employment programs across the state. Services that are provided at Center for Development and Disability include education, advocacy, and outreach in the field of Supported Employment. Services are available through Partners for Employment to participants and their families, community providers, job developers, job coaches, employers, as well as, educational facilities. DVR also collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work.

NM DVR employs Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each area of the state. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address SSD (I) to address benefits income and impact to employment.

The NM Department of Health is the state agency responsible for administering Developmental Disabilities Waiver funding under Title XIX of the Social Security Act. Behavioral Health Services are administered through state– wide Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO). (Page 265)

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 268)

The Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program is designed to provide a network of providers for Social Security beneficiaries to obtain employment outcome services. NMDVR is no longer an Employment Network, however the division continues to provide services and information to participants related to Social Security Benefits. This includes five field staff located throughout the state that specialize in benefits advisement. NMDVR and Behavioral Health Services: NMDVR is a member of New Mexico’s Behavioral Health Purchasing Collaborative. During the past four years, work continued toward intra–agency collaboration specifically dealing with behavioral health services among all 17 agencies/divisions of the BHPC. Under the terms of an agreement reached with the State Behavioral Health Services Division, NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 283)

Benefits advisement services are provided to enhance participation in VR by Social Security disability beneficiaries who tend to be underserved. Services aid to address concerns about the effect of employment on benefits as well as provide information regarding incentives and benefits of employment.

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 303)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Project Search programs across the state. DVR collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work. NM DVR employs Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each Project Search site. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address Social Security Disability and social Security disability Income benefits income and impact to employment.

The Division has established a replica of Project Search in New Mexico. Currently, UNM Hospital and Hilton Garden Inn Gallup are providing training and internship rotations for 19 students. Project Search allows for three (3) rotations to occur at in various departments. These rotations provide candidates with the opportunity to learn the skills and abilities needed to be successful in the community and subsequently in a career of their choice. Job coaches and teachers will be on site at all times teaching curriculum and job skills. The goal of Project Search is that each candidate will be employed following the completion of the year–long program. Collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, Gallup McKinley schools, UNM/CD, Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD), UNM Hospital, Hilton Garden Inn Gallup, and Best Buddies (Albuquerque Long term provider) and Empowerment ( Gallup Long term provider) have been established. (Page 308)

Enhance the number and quality of employment outcomes for consumers by providing enhanced benefits counseling and guidance to reduce concerns related to the loss or reduction of benefits. 

Council Recommendations: The Council discussed and decided to continue the Goal, noting the myriad benefits of working.

Agency Response: The agency continues to provide benefits counseling and guidance through a contract with the New Mexico Legal Aid Society. The agency also had staff from Legal Aid provide training on benefits to the vocational rehabilitation counselors. The agency has also provided seminars on benefits to clients. (Page 331)

The Commission regularly surveys consumers to make sure that consumers are participating in the Medicaid program, including and especially as it relates to work incentives that encourage employment. This includes counseling consumers to apply for the Section 1619(b) program when consumers may lose SSI due to work activity, and to encourage consumers to apply for the Working Disabled Individual Category 043 program when the consumer’s income is too high to qualify for the 1619(b) program. Of special note is that it was the Commission that came up with the idea of using the Working Disabled Individual category to address the problem of the 24-month Medicare waiting period. The Commission worked with the state Medical Assistance Division in the development of the Medi-Gap portion of Category 043, which provides Medicaid to persons who have lost SSI due to the start of SSDI, and who thereby lost Medicaid coverage. The Commission also works to make sure that consumers who lose SSI due to the start of Disabled Adult Child benefits maintain Medicaid under Public Law 99-643 and Section 1634(d). The Commission also works to make sure that low-income consumers who may be eligible for Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMB) Specified Low Income Medicare Beneficiaries (SLIMB) or Qualified Individual (QI) are receiving QMB, SLIMB, or QI. (Page 343)

The Commission has adopted a policy to support consumer attendance at the division/special interest group meetings held during national consumer organization conventions. In order to receive the support, the consumer’s vocational goal must be directly related to the particular division/special interest group meeting. The Commission, with the support of the SRC, believes that attendance at related division/special interest group meetings can enhance the consumer’s ability to achieve their vocational goal. Benefits would include learning about current developments in their field, meeting and networking with individuals who are successful in their fields, learning about the use and accessibility of career–specific technology, learning how blind and visually impaired individuals in the field use assistive technology successfully, and learning techniques that would enable them to succeed in their vocational training/education program and ultimately in their chosen field. The Commission also supports annual attendance at the state conventions of both consumer organizations. (Page 383-384)

The Commission regularly participates in the annual New Mexico Academy of Ophthalmology conference in Albuquerque. Counselors also visit ophthalmologists in their territories to ensure that the medical community is aware of the Commission and the services that are provided.

l. Enhance the number and quality of employment outcomes for consumers by providing enhanced benefits counseling and guidance, with the purpose being to reduce fears related to the loss or reduction of benefits.

Counselors received training during March 2013 designed to help them understand the myriad benefit programs. The training has increased the ability of each counselor to help consumers understand program requirements and thereby reduce the fear of losing benefits. In addition to the training, counselors also received a desk reference which contains valuable information regarding each program as well as sample letters that can be used to report earnings.

The agency continues to utilize a comparable benefits survey, designed to identify benefit program eligibility for eligible VR consumers. (Page 392)

Supported employment services may include a comprehensive assessment as provided under the basic vocational rehabilitation program, job site assessment, and other evaluations to determine possible benefits from supported employment to consumers with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities. Additional supported employment services include job development, placement and intensive job skills training, social skills training, regular observation and supervision of the individual, and regular contact with the employer, consumer, parent, family members, guardians, advocates or other authorized representatives of the individual and other suitable professionals. The utilization of natural support systems as well as the provision of appropriate services under the basic vocational rehabilitation program is available to supported employment consumers. (Page 396)

Career Pathways

Vocational Rehabilitation and the One-stop Delivery System. The one-stop delivery system in New Mexico offers assessment and development tools, strong relationships with business and specialized programs that benefit New Mexicans looking for work. Under the combined state plan, the VR agencies will work to strengthen their relationships with NMDWS and the Local Workforce Development Boards to make referral and coordination of service to participants as seamless as possible. WIOA places greater emphasis on providing work experiences to VR participants, especially students transitioning from school to work. DVR, in particular, can particularly benefit from the expertise and established business relationships that the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions offers to expand work experience opportunities for participants. As such, DVR staff will work with the workforce development centers to arrange for VR-focused presentations when needed and assist with special events such as job fairs and training workshops. Workforce centers will also assist with presentations and trainings at VR offices. DVR also plans to ramp up its efforts to support the transition of students and youth with disabilities from secondary education to postsecondary education and employment. 

The Division has developed and maintained interagency agreements with agencies that carry out activities and which do not carry out activities under the statewide workforce investment system. Some of the agencies not under the state workforce investment system are: The Veteran’s Affairs Administration, The New Mexico Commission on the Deaf and Hard of Hearing; The Developmental Disabilities Planning Council, The Department of Health, and the Developmental Disabilities Support Services Division, to provide supported employment services to individuals on the developmental disabilities waiver and Jackson Class members. The Department also has a Memorandum of Understanding with the Public Education Department to further effect school–to–work transition services throughout the state including Roswell Job Corp. Further contracts are in place with the Centers of Independent Living; in the state, services include job seeking skills training, job placement and Self–Advocacy and supportive services. (Page 254)

In FFY 2014, collaboration with New Mexico School for the Deaf through statewide outreach and Commission for Deaf and Hard of Hearing has led to improved outreach and coordination with multiple state school districts toward referral of deaf/hard of hearing transition students to NMDVR. Coordination of School–to–Work transition services that include having a team of specialists to collaborate with school transition specialists to conduct outreach, inform, instruct, and coordinate transition services for individuals covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. Coordination and training events have also begun at agency field staff meetings. While these efforts target a specific population, they have the added benefit of strengthening communications between transition specialists at NMSD as well as state wide school districts and NMDVR field staff. This can benefit all transitioning youth. (Page 257- 258)

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices. The Mentoring Diverse Abilities program funding has ended, however transition services continue to be provided by both NMDVR and the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Programs throughout the state. (Page 260)

Collaboration with Statewide Workforce Investment System: NMDVR has had representatives on the Youth Standing Committee, and School to Work Transitional Alliance. Representatives address the issues and interests of individuals with disabilities in the workforce investment system, both in developing policy and influencing service delivery.

The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment Although the Navigator program is completed, it did serve to increase awareness of vocational rehabilitation services and employment–related needs of people with disabilities at local One–stops. The result is that One–stop staff have established and continue to maintain contact with NMDVR counselors throughout the state. (Page 267-26)

The licensure rules for Rehabilitation Counselors in New Mexico are in agreement with the Public Education Department requirements and competencies applicable to both the school systems to effect school–to– work transition in the high schools and the Division. The Statewide Transition Coordinator provides routine Transition training to all field staff with emphasize on the staff directly providing transition services. IDEA, IEP’s, Diagnostic Data are all represented through Transition Services. The Transition Coordinator also provides up–to– date information to staff regarding IDEA and acts as the liaison between DVR and Public Education Department. The agency will continue to encourage Transition Coordinator to maintain a board seat on IDEA, School–to–work Transition Alliance and maintain relations to support Regional Education Cooperative Memberships, and NM Youth Committee. It is the intention of the agency to continue cooperation and coordination with the personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (Page 280)

In early FY14 DVR, was approached to partner with the University of New Mexico, Center for Development and Disability (UNM/CDD) to consider establishing a replica of Project Search in NM. Project Search is an internationally known program that originated at Cincinnati’s Children’s Hospital. It focuses on school–to–work transition age students who are diagnosed with a variety of disabling conditions. The DVR Interim Transition Coordinator had the opportunity to attend the Project Search conference in July. In collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, UNM/CDD and the NM University Hospital (UNMH) as well as the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD) and Best Buddies (a local provider agency), the Project Search founders have given approval to replicate this program in New Mexico. The site for Project Search has been selected and approved. Program space intended for training and internship rotations has been established at UNM Hospital (Page 313)

Work Incentives & Benefits
  • promoting the value of occupational learning through paid work experience on the job, such as through the development of apprenticeships, paid internships, incumbent worker or customized training, and transitional jobs;
  • encouraging public/private partnerships among business, education, community and civic organizations, and economic development to create work-based training opportunities that both feed career pathways for job seekers and satisfy job-driven strategies of employers and industries;
  • using skills assessments and credentialing to promote the value of job ready individuals to potential employers in developing work-based experiences; and
  • exploring the offerings of other related programs, outside of the state plan, that offer opportunities to help individuals gain increased skills and experience that can lead to potential future job opportunities and employment. (Page79)

Apprenticeship and Individuals with Disabilities. Under WIOA, VR programs must spend 15 percent of funding on students with disabilities. As such, some specific work is already being done in New Mexico to explore and expand the use of apprenticeships as a service strategy for improving outcomes for individuals with disabilities. For instance, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist has been working with a one-stop youth provider on finalizing an MOU to serve youth with disabilities. Additionally, a DVR Business Specialist has been working on the development of partnerships with the Workforce Training Center and Road Runner Food Bank to increase vocational readiness training programs which will be provided to students and youth with disabilities. 

Additionally, core partners have begun to have conversations about how the state can further expand opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including individuals who are blind or visually impaired. While individuals who are blind or visually impaired have often faced significant obstacles in participating in apprenticeship programs, the Commission for the Blind plans to increase efforts to consider and identify Registered Apprenticeships for consumers who might be appropriate candidates for such apprenticeship. Ultimately VR programs are optimistic about improved accessibility to the RA programs for the clients they serve. Examples of ideas of how this can be accomplished in New Mexico include pursuing: (Page 95)

As part of the professional development system, all eligible AEFLA providers will have available to them both hands–on and pedagogical training about the use of technology in the classroom. As part of the effort to make all appropriate Adult Education classes in New Mexico blended distance and face–to–face, the NMHED is providing an online platform aligned with College and Career Readiness Standards and career pathways, with mapping to KeyTrain and O–Net. As the State implements the platform all local providers are trained by the publisher and, pedagogically, by master teachers, both in the use of the technology and in developing and delivering classes using it. (Page 241)

  • NMDVR will make strides towards providing employment experiences or On the Job training activities in the community. Through this strategy, mutual customers can provide experience that may lead to permanent employment.
  • NMDVR will continue expand engagement of the business sector as a partner in developing career pathways for youth with disabilities in high–growth industries (Page 306)
Employer Engagement

The agency participates on the Ticket to Work Partners group, along with the Social Security Administration, the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, and a number of employment networks that serve ticket holders throughout New Mexico. The group regularly meets in the Commission’s Skills Center Lecture Hall. 2015 marked the third year in which the Commission participated in the annual Black Expo, sponsored by the New Mexico Office of African American Affairs. The expo has been growing each year and Commission attendance provides an opportunity to conduct outreach to the African American community and provide information regarding VR services available through the commission. (Page 333)

511

NMDWS administers a common management information system, called the Workforce Connection On-Line System, described earlier. The Workforce Connection Centers use the system not only for registering job applicants, housing resumes, and job postings for job matching purposes, but also for the purposes of data entry, case management, and state and federal performance reporting. The Workforce Connection On-Line System integrates data collection, participant demographics, case management, and performance reporting for not only Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Wagner-Peyser, but also Migrant Seasonal Farmworkers, Veterans, Trade programs. The system is also used for data collection and reporting for all partners located in comprehensive and affiliate centers. NMDWS has established both user access and data sharing agreements to support access to information and information sharing between the partners as allowed by authorizing law and regulation. The system also provides access to labor market information to support business and job seekers in need of training or employment assistance. (Page 110)

NMDWS administers a common management information system, called the Workforce Connection On-Line System, described earlier. The Workforce Connection Centers use the system not only for registering job applicants, housing resumes, and job postings for job matching purposes, but also for the purposes of data entry, case management, and state and federal performance reporting. The Workforce Connection On-Line System integrates data collection, participant demographics, case management, and performance reporting for not only Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Wagner-Peyser, but also Migrant Seasonal Farmworkers, Veterans, Trade programs. The system is also used for data collection and reporting for all partners located in comprehensive and affiliate centers. NMDWS has established both user access and data sharing agreements to support access to information and information sharing between the partners as allowed by authorizing law and regulation. The system also provides access to labor market information to support business and job seekers in need of training or employment assistance. (Page 112)

Mental Health

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 148)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 40

New Mexico Interagency Behavioral Health Service Requirements and Utilization Guidelines for Supported Employment - 07/20/2004

~~This document defines supported employment and provides program, provider, staffing, documentation, and other requirements of providers of supported employment services.“Supported  Employment  provides  on  the  job  supports  in  an integrated  work  setting  with  ongoing  support  services  for  individuals  in  need  of intensive supported employment services in order to perform work.  Activities are typically  performed  by  a  job  developer,  job  coach  and/or  job  specialist  (case manager) to achieve a successful employment outcome.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NM Seed Loan Program

"Seed" stands for "Self Employment for Entrepreneurs with Disabilities". The program  makes loans available to individuals with disabilities regardless of the type of disability, age, income level, or location of residence in the state, to purchase needed equipment and home-based business supplies. San Juan Center for Independence, in collaboration with Accion and New Mexico Technology Assistance Program, provides low interest loans on a case by case basis."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

The board member from the community colleges shall solicit input from the community college constituency and work with regional and statewide businesses and other partners and the economic development department to create career pathways and align curriculum and facilitate plans with the economic development department, human services department and labor department strategic plans

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico DD (0173.R05.00)

“Provides case management, community integrated employment, customized community supports, living supports, personal support, respite, nutritional counseling, OT for adults, PT for adults, speech and language therapy for adults, supplemental dental care, assistive technology, behavior support consultation, crisis support, customized in-home supports, environmental mods, independent living transition, intensive medical living supports, non-medical transportation, personal support technology/on-site response, preliminary risk screening and consultation related to inappropriate sexual behavior, private duty nursing for adults, socialization and sexuality education for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Senate Bill 155: AN ACT RELATING TO WORKERS' COMPENSATION; AMENDING SECTIONS OF THE WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT TO CLARIFY WHEN A WORKER IS ENTITLED TO CERTAIN BENEFITS - 07/01/2017

"52-1-25.1. TEMPORARY TOTAL DISABILITY--RETURN TO WORK.--

A. As used in the Workers' Compensation Act,

"temporary total disability" means the inability of a worker,

by reason of accidental injury arising out of and in the course

of the worker's employment, to perform the duties of that

employment prior to the date of the worker's maximum medical

improvement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Mexico ABLE Legislation (HB 61) - 03/03/2016

Relating to accounts for the support of persons with disabilities; creating the accounts for person with disabilities act; enacting enabling legislation required by the federal Achieving A Better Life Experience Act of 2014; requiring the office of the state treasurer to establish and maintain a qualified program for such accounts; declaring an emergency.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Mexico Senate Memorial 25 - 02/11/2016

A memorial requesting the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council and the University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability to convene a task force to conduct a needs assessment and report on ways to improve the system of school-to-work transition for students with disabilities in New Mexico.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Mexico House Joint Memorial 72 - 02/15/2005

“A joint memorial requesting that the Executive Task Force on Disability Employment develop policies, procedures and guidelines to increase the employment of persons with disabilities in state government.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

State Integrated Workforce Plan - Wagner-Peyser Act 2012-2017 - 09/13/2012

The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP):    The SCSEP has two goals:   1) Assisting income-eligible persons, age 55 or older, to obtain employment; and   2) Providing community service through paid, part-time, training positions.    Enrolled participants receive:  •Work experience, on-the-job training, and new or improved skills; and  •Empowerment to overcome barriers to employment, such as lack of self-confidence, lack of language fluency, or physical disabilities.   
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Manual of Operating Instructions (MOP) - 08/01/2012

“The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is a program that offers unique services to individuals with disabilities for the express purpose of assisting them in achieving an employment outcome. NMDVR is committed to providing quality and culturally sensitive services to all eligible New Mexicans, including typically underserved populations such as individuals in rural communities, tribal members and those with significant or multiple disabilities... VR services are provided with a focus on employment, and with an emphasis on quality services. Counseling and guidance are the primary services, with an emphasis on a partnership between the participant and the VR counselor, as well as the establishment of partnerships with community resources, tribal entities and employers. In order to serve as many individuals as possible, the NMDVR service delivery system also places an emphasis on utilizing its resources in an efficient manner.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Interagency Behavioral Health Service Requirements and Utilization Guidelines for Supported Employment - 07/20/2004

~~This document defines supported employment and provides program, provider, staffing, documentation, and other requirements of providers of supported employment services.“Supported  Employment  provides  on  the  job  supports  in  an integrated  work  setting  with  ongoing  support  services  for  individuals  in  need  of intensive supported employment services in order to perform work.  Activities are typically  performed  by  a  job  developer,  job  coach  and/or  job  specialist  (case manager) to achieve a successful employment outcome.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

NM Seed Loan Program

"Seed" stands for "Self Employment for Entrepreneurs with Disabilities". The program  makes loans available to individuals with disabilities regardless of the type of disability, age, income level, or location of residence in the state, to purchase needed equipment and home-based business supplies. San Juan Center for Independence, in collaboration with Accion and New Mexico Technology Assistance Program, provides low interest loans on a case by case basis."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

New Mexico Governor’s Commission on Disability 2014 Annual Report - 01/15/2015

Mission:

The New Mexico Governor’s Commission on disability is committed to improving the quality of life for all New Mexicans with disabilities by addressing social integration, economic self-sufficiency, political resolve, physical and program accessibility and full participation in the benefits of life and the rights of all individuals.

 

Objectives:

Increase awareness and knowledge of disability issues among policy-makers and the general public Promote access to physical, sensory, programmatic, attitudinal and communication barriers Increase opportunities for New Mexicans with disabilities to live successfully in the community, with services and supports as needed Increase collaboration and cooperation among disability related organizations in New Mexico
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

The board member from the community colleges shall solicit input from the community college constituency and work with regional and statewide businesses and other partners and the economic development department to create career pathways and align curriculum and facilitate plans with the economic development department, human services department and labor department strategic plans

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Quality of Life Grant - 07/01/2017

“The Governor's Commission on Disability has established a Quality of Life Small Grants Program for New Mexican non-profit organizations to provide enhanced programs or services that will improve the quality of life of New Mexicans with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Money Follows the Person - 10/15/2012

“The goals of the New Mexico MFP are to increase the use of home and community-based services (HCBS) and reduce the use of institutionally-based services, [e]liminate barriers in State law, State Medicaid plans, and State budgets that restrict the use of Medicaid funds to let people get long-term care in settings of their choice, strengthen the ability of the Medicaid programs to provide HCBS to people who choose to transition out of institutions put procedures in place to provide quality assurance and improvement of HCBS” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

New Mexico Partners for Employment Events and Training - 01/01/2019

This webpage lists upcoming training and capacity building events intended for providers, people with disabilities, and employers throughout New Mexico.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Partners for Employment 2019 Events and Trainings - 07/01/2017

~~This site has a list of training sessions for School to Work Transition teams and Supported Employment for Local Leaders

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employer Needs Analysis Tip Sheet - 03/17/2015

This tip sheet discusses Employer Needs Analyses in their utility, importance and relevance to Customized Employment. It goes though the steps of implementing Employer Needs Analyses, what to look for and what material to present to the employer.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

New Mexico Workforce Investment Act Title I Wagner-Peyser Act (2012-2017) - 09/13/2012

Long-term strategies to improve outcomes of individuals with disabilities include the support of Disability Coordinators in Workforce Connection Centers. The purpose of the Disability Coordinator is to promote a collaborative and coordinated approach to employment services for persons with disabilities. Disability Coordinators are trained in best practices for serving persons with disabilities and are able to assist them with assistive technology. In addition, they are charged with increasing employer awareness and making a business case for hiring people with disabilities. The Disability Coordinators are merit based state staff and funded partially with Wagner Peyser 10% funds.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Waiver Amendment Request - 02/28/2019

~~“Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB) Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan. Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LEGISLATING FOR RESULTS: POLICY AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS - 01/01/2019

~~“One of 14 states without institutions for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities, New Mexico serves this population through a system of home- and community-based services funded through two main Medicaid programs administered by the Human Services Department (HSD) and operated primarily through the Department of Health (DOH). A 2018 LFC evaluation of these programs found growth in per-client costs and a lengthening waiting list are outpacing the state’s ability to fund and provide services. In FY17, about 3,500 people received services through the traditional developmental disabilities (DD) waiver program, while another 1,400 received services through the self-directed Mi Via program. Both provide services not usually covered by Medicaid under federal waivers of existing rules. The list of eligible individuals waiting for services, meanwhile, totaled roughly 3,900. The evaluation found increased service utilization, client movement from the traditional DD waiver program to Mi Via, and changes to how client service plans and budgets are developed have all contributed to rising costs. The average cost of an individual enrolled in the DD waiver program grew by 17 percent, to $78,575, between FY14 and FY17, while total enrollment fell by 13 percent. Meanwhile, budgets for Mi Via clients are approaching their annual individual caps, and cost growth in both waivers is on pace to potentially violate federal cost neutrality requirements by FY27.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

"Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Medicaid Demonstration" Extension - 01/01/2019

~~“This approval is  effective January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2023. CMS' s approval is subject to the limitations specified in the attached waiver authorities, expenditure authorities, Special Terms and Conditions (STCs), and subsequent attachments. The state may deviate from the Medicaid state plan requirements only to the extent those requirements have been listed as waived or as not applicable to expenditures or individuals covered by expenditure authority….Employment Supports will be provided by staff at current or potential work sites. When supported employment services are provided at a work site where persons without disabilities are employed, payment is made only for the adaptations, supervision and training required by members receiving services as a result of their disabilities but does not include payment for the supervisory activities rendered as a normal part of the business setting.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico (Mi Via) State HCBS Transition Plan - 11/14/2014

The goal of Mi Via is to provide a community-based alternative that 1) facilitates greater participant choice and control over the types of services and supports that are purchased within an agreed upon budgetary amount; and 2) enables the State to serve the most people possible within available resources. Mi Via will be administered through a partnership between Department of Health and Human Services Department.   In 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published Final Rule 2249-F/2296-F which made changes to the 1915 (c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waiver program, including a requirement for states to submit HCBS waiver settings transition plans.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/15/2012

The New Mexico Public Education Department’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 15, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

New Mexico DD (0173.R05.00)

“Provides case management, community integrated employment, customized community supports, living supports, personal support, respite, nutritional counseling, OT for adults, PT for adults, speech and language therapy for adults, supplemental dental care, assistive technology, behavior support consultation, crisis support, customized in-home supports, environmental mods, independent living transition, intensive medical living supports, non-medical transportation, personal support technology/on-site response, preliminary risk screening and consultation related to inappropriate sexual behavior, private duty nursing for adults, socialization and sexuality education for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

In the Land of Enchantment, Employment First in New Mexico could "Grow as it goes!"

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon New Mexico’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.34%
Change from
2016 to 2017
2,088,070
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
9.21%
Change from
2016 to 2017
169,264
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
13.9%
Change from
2016 to 2017
57,005
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
5.17%
Change from
2016 to 2017
33.68%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
-0.67%
Change from
2016 to 2017
71.45%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 2,088,070
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 169,264
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 57,005
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 751,217
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 33.68%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 71.45%
State/National unemployment rate. 6.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 18.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 164,508
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 157,848
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 249,066
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 5,551
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 147,519
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 30,655
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 2,111
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 8,640
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 26,067

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 1,809
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 64,863

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 912
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 2,067
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 3,254
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 28.00%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 82
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 230
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 4,782
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 16
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 13.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.10

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,437
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 101,334
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $7,888,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $5,896,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $34,916,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,135
Number of people served in facility based work. 0
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 500
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 55.30

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 49.82%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 18.62%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.87%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 93.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 41.13%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 76.39%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 80.94%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.26%
Source:
Office of Special Education Programs "OSEP Grads360"

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 711,613
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 877
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 400,278
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 0
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 392
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 392
AbilityOne wages (products). $0
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,148,725

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 3
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 430
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 430

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Customized Employment

Term funding support from agencies providing supported employment. The Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health, provides long term funding for supported employment to provider agencies under the Developmental Disabilities Waiver and Mi Via Waivers. The Division works collaboratively with the Behavioral Health Services Division, Department of Health, New Mexico Department of Human Services, and the NM Behavioral Health Collaborative to assure ongoing support services for individuals with severe disabling mental illness served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment.

4. The Division continues to work with other state agencies under memoranda of understanding focusing on serving individuals with the most significant disabilities under supported employment plans.

5. Individual placements in integrated work settings at wages comparable to non–disabled peers performing similar work continue to be emphasized.

6. The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. One result of this collaboration in FFY 2014 was the training of 16 field staff in the Discovery process for non– traditional career development. Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 294)

Discovery is a customized employment process that gathers information through activities of daily living that can be translated into possibilities for meaningful and purposeful job placement. The goal of this activity is successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible for Supported Employment. (Page 300)

In addition to expanding the number of personnel, NMDVR is planning customer service trainings to enhance quality and consistency of service. The agency is also providing specific Supported Employment training to current field staff. This will serve to increase staff expertise in identifying customized employment and individualized training strategies for participants. (Page 307)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found

DEI/DRC

No specific disability related information found

Competitive Integrated Employment

This regional program is set to begin its pilot in Albuquerque–area retail locations in 2016. The development of this program is the first of its’ kind for NMDVR with hopes of gaining statewide traction. Building on the success of the Skills to Work model, also called Place and Train. Dependent on it success, BSS will work with businesses throughout New Mexico to implement this model in their workplaces. Two initiatives were included in the New Mexico Blueprint for Prosperity that will allow DVR to expand place and train opportunities for job seekers with disabilities and New Mexico businesses to target job seekers with disabilities, including veterans with service– related disabilities, in their recruitment and hiring. (Page 267)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

In addition to a summer job in a competitive integrated setting, The Commission’s Students in Transition to Employment Program includes a significant workplace readiness training component. However, in order to expand workplace readiness training services, the Commission will begin offering additional workshops and seminars. The Commission has recently added staff to its Albuquerque Skills Center specifically for this purpose. The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year, during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and training on various assistive technology software and hardware; note–taking skills, Braille, math, college success, summer employment preparation, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy.

e. Instruction in self–advocacy, which may include peer mentoring. (Page 374)

The agency has also created the Skills Center, a training site to meet the needs of vocational rehabilitation consumers and potential vocational rehabilitation consumers. The agency is scheduling a variety of activities in the Skills Center. These activities include meetings, workshops, seminars, and other training events such as the summer Students in Transition to Employment Program. The Commission has recently added staff to its Albuquerque Skills Center specifically for this purpose. The Skills Center will offer seminars and workshops for high school students, college students, adults, and parents. Training will be delivered throughout the year. To meet the particular needs of transition students, training will be scheduled during summers, school breaks, after school, and through distance delivery methods. Topics cover the landscape, including parent participation, MS Windows, Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Outlook, mobile technology, computer operator maintenance, and assistive technology hardware and software; Braille, math, note–taking skills, college success, STEP prep, Hadley support days, job readiness, professional dress and appearance, resume writing, job search strategies, mock interviews, Newsline resources (newspapers, magazines, research capabilities, and job search functions); transportation options, and financial literacy. (Page 383)

School to Work Transition

The vocational rehabilitation programs use a case management system called Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment (AWARE) that is specifically designed for vocational rehabilitation programs. This system enables counselors to manage cases, managers to monitor cases, and the agency to prepare and submit required reports to RSA in a timely manner. All client data is captured and maintained in the AWARE case management system, such as information on client employment outcomes, including position title, employer, wages, hours, benefits, etc., and is provided to the Rehabilitation Services Administration, U. S. Department of Education through quarterly and annual reports. The company that programs the software will revise the system to produce any WIOA required data. Due to the especially strict confidentiality requirements imposed by the Rehabilitation Act and the sensitive nature of information about disabilities and medical conditions, the case management system is a closed system, accessible only by authorized employees. NMDWS has established a data sharing agreement to provide necessary wage data to support the programs’ activities. (Page 112)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Project Search programs across the state. DVR collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work. NM DVR employs a Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each Project Search site. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address Social Security Disability/ Social Security Income concerns and to address benefits income and impact to employment. The Division has established a replica of Project Search in New Mexico. Currently UNM Hospital and Hilton Garden Inn Gallup are providing training and internship rotations for 19 students. Project Search allows for three (3) rotations to occur at in various departments. These rotations provide candidates with the opportunity to learn the skills and abilities needed to be successful in the community and subsequently in a career of their choice. Job coaches and teachers will be on site at all times teaching curriculum and job skills. The goal of Project Search is to assure that each candidate will be employed following the completion of the year–long program. Collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, Gallup McKinley schools, UNM/CDD, Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD), UNM Hospital, Hilton Garden Inn Gallup, and Best Buddies (Albuquerque Long term provider) and Empowerment ( Gallup Long term provider) have been established. (Page 257)

The agreements with individual Local Education Agencies identify: 

  1. Policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated between the agencies, including definitions, eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services, policies and procedures for making referrals, procedures for outreach students receiving special education services and in need of transition service, practices and procedures also address time–frames for evaluation and follow–up with students;
  2. The roles of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
  3. Procedures for providing training, consultation, and technical assistance to assist staff of State and local educational agencies as to the availability, benefits of, and eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services;
  4. Available resources, including sources of funds for the development and expansion of services;
  5. The financial responsibility of each agency in providing services to students with disabilities who are receiving special education services consistent with State law;
  6. Procedures for resolving disputes between the agencies that are parties to the agreement; and
  7. All other components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation among agencies, including procedures to facilitate the development of local teams to coordinate the provision of services to students with disabilities, sharing data, and coordinating joint training of staff providing transition services. 

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices.

The Mentoring Diverse Abilities program funding has ended, however transition services continue to be provided by both NMDVR and the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Programs throughout the state. (Page 260)

The agreements with individual Local Education Agencies identify: 

  1. Policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated between the agencies, including definitions, eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services, policies and procedures for making referrals, procedures for outreach students receiving special education services and in need of transition service, practices and procedures also address time–frames for evaluation and follow–up with students;
  2. The roles of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
  3. Procedures for providing training, consultation, and technical assistance to assist staff of State and local educational agencies as to the availability, benefits of, and eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services;
  4. Available resources, including sources of funds for the development and expansion of services;
  5. The financial responsibility of each agency in providing services to students with disabilities who are receiving special education services consistent with State law;
  6. Procedures for resolving disputes between the agencies that are parties to the agreement; and
  7. All other components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation among agencies, including procedures to facilitate the development of local teams to coordinate the provision of services to students with disabilities, sharing data, and coordinating joint training of staff providing transition services. (Page 262)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Supported Employment programs across the state. Services that are provided at Center for Development and Disability include education, advocacy, and outreach in the field of Supported Employment. Services are available through Partners for Employment to participants and their families, community providers, job developers, job coaches, employers, as well as, educational facilities. DVR also collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work.

NM DVR employs Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each area of the state. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address SSD (I) to address benefits income and impact to employment.

The NM Department of Health is the state agency responsible for administering Developmental Disabilities Waiver funding under Title XIX of the Social Security Act. Behavioral Health Services are administered through state– wide Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO). (Page 265)

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 268)

The Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program is designed to provide a network of providers for Social Security beneficiaries to obtain employment outcome services. NMDVR is no longer an Employment Network, however the division continues to provide services and information to participants related to Social Security Benefits. This includes five field staff located throughout the state that specialize in benefits advisement. NMDVR and Behavioral Health Services: NMDVR is a member of New Mexico’s Behavioral Health Purchasing Collaborative. During the past four years, work continued toward intra–agency collaboration specifically dealing with behavioral health services among all 17 agencies/divisions of the BHPC. Under the terms of an agreement reached with the State Behavioral Health Services Division, NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 283)

Benefits advisement services are provided to enhance participation in VR by Social Security disability beneficiaries who tend to be underserved. Services aid to address concerns about the effect of employment on benefits as well as provide information regarding incentives and benefits of employment.

The NMDVR Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator attends the Medicaid Advisory Council meeting quarterly to remind and update all council members about employment issues and Medicaid. The Benefits Advisement Services Coordinator also has a strong relationship with the Medicaid eligibility trainers and supervisors. In addition, NMDVR maintains a strong relationship with University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability (UNM CDD). NMDVR staff have developed short training videos on different working issues and have teamed with UNM CDD units to provide statewide trainings in addition to an annual Ticket to Work Job Fair. (Page 303)

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation continues to work in collaboration with the Center for Development and Disability toward the implementation and sustainability of Project Search programs across the state. DVR collaborates with the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide information on SSA benefits and Ticket to Work. NM DVR employs Certified Benefits Advisors throughout each Project Search site. Services available to DVR participants include Benefits Advisement Counseling to address Social Security Disability and social Security disability Income benefits income and impact to employment.

The Division has established a replica of Project Search in New Mexico. Currently, UNM Hospital and Hilton Garden Inn Gallup are providing training and internship rotations for 19 students. Project Search allows for three (3) rotations to occur at in various departments. These rotations provide candidates with the opportunity to learn the skills and abilities needed to be successful in the community and subsequently in a career of their choice. Job coaches and teachers will be on site at all times teaching curriculum and job skills. The goal of Project Search is that each candidate will be employed following the completion of the year–long program. Collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, Gallup McKinley schools, UNM/CD, Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD), UNM Hospital, Hilton Garden Inn Gallup, and Best Buddies (Albuquerque Long term provider) and Empowerment ( Gallup Long term provider) have been established. (Page 308)

Enhance the number and quality of employment outcomes for consumers by providing enhanced benefits counseling and guidance to reduce concerns related to the loss or reduction of benefits. 

Council Recommendations: The Council discussed and decided to continue the Goal, noting the myriad benefits of working.

Agency Response: The agency continues to provide benefits counseling and guidance through a contract with the New Mexico Legal Aid Society. The agency also had staff from Legal Aid provide training on benefits to the vocational rehabilitation counselors. The agency has also provided seminars on benefits to clients. (Page 331)

The Commission regularly surveys consumers to make sure that consumers are participating in the Medicaid program, including and especially as it relates to work incentives that encourage employment. This includes counseling consumers to apply for the Section 1619(b) program when consumers may lose SSI due to work activity, and to encourage consumers to apply for the Working Disabled Individual Category 043 program when the consumer’s income is too high to qualify for the 1619(b) program. Of special note is that it was the Commission that came up with the idea of using the Working Disabled Individual category to address the problem of the 24-month Medicare waiting period. The Commission worked with the state Medical Assistance Division in the development of the Medi-Gap portion of Category 043, which provides Medicaid to persons who have lost SSI due to the start of SSDI, and who thereby lost Medicaid coverage. The Commission also works to make sure that consumers who lose SSI due to the start of Disabled Adult Child benefits maintain Medicaid under Public Law 99-643 and Section 1634(d). The Commission also works to make sure that low-income consumers who may be eligible for Qualified Medicare Beneficiaries (QMB) Specified Low Income Medicare Beneficiaries (SLIMB) or Qualified Individual (QI) are receiving QMB, SLIMB, or QI. (Page 343)

The Commission has adopted a policy to support consumer attendance at the division/special interest group meetings held during national consumer organization conventions. In order to receive the support, the consumer’s vocational goal must be directly related to the particular division/special interest group meeting. The Commission, with the support of the SRC, believes that attendance at related division/special interest group meetings can enhance the consumer’s ability to achieve their vocational goal. Benefits would include learning about current developments in their field, meeting and networking with individuals who are successful in their fields, learning about the use and accessibility of career–specific technology, learning how blind and visually impaired individuals in the field use assistive technology successfully, and learning techniques that would enable them to succeed in their vocational training/education program and ultimately in their chosen field. The Commission also supports annual attendance at the state conventions of both consumer organizations. (Page 383-384)

The Commission regularly participates in the annual New Mexico Academy of Ophthalmology conference in Albuquerque. Counselors also visit ophthalmologists in their territories to ensure that the medical community is aware of the Commission and the services that are provided.

l. Enhance the number and quality of employment outcomes for consumers by providing enhanced benefits counseling and guidance, with the purpose being to reduce fears related to the loss or reduction of benefits.

Counselors received training during March 2013 designed to help them understand the myriad benefit programs. The training has increased the ability of each counselor to help consumers understand program requirements and thereby reduce the fear of losing benefits. In addition to the training, counselors also received a desk reference which contains valuable information regarding each program as well as sample letters that can be used to report earnings.

The agency continues to utilize a comparable benefits survey, designed to identify benefit program eligibility for eligible VR consumers. (Page 392)

Supported employment services may include a comprehensive assessment as provided under the basic vocational rehabilitation program, job site assessment, and other evaluations to determine possible benefits from supported employment to consumers with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities. Additional supported employment services include job development, placement and intensive job skills training, social skills training, regular observation and supervision of the individual, and regular contact with the employer, consumer, parent, family members, guardians, advocates or other authorized representatives of the individual and other suitable professionals. The utilization of natural support systems as well as the provision of appropriate services under the basic vocational rehabilitation program is available to supported employment consumers. (Page 396)

Career Pathways

Vocational Rehabilitation and the One-stop Delivery System. The one-stop delivery system in New Mexico offers assessment and development tools, strong relationships with business and specialized programs that benefit New Mexicans looking for work. Under the combined state plan, the VR agencies will work to strengthen their relationships with NMDWS and the Local Workforce Development Boards to make referral and coordination of service to participants as seamless as possible. WIOA places greater emphasis on providing work experiences to VR participants, especially students transitioning from school to work. DVR, in particular, can particularly benefit from the expertise and established business relationships that the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions offers to expand work experience opportunities for participants. As such, DVR staff will work with the workforce development centers to arrange for VR-focused presentations when needed and assist with special events such as job fairs and training workshops. Workforce centers will also assist with presentations and trainings at VR offices. DVR also plans to ramp up its efforts to support the transition of students and youth with disabilities from secondary education to postsecondary education and employment. 

The Division has developed and maintained interagency agreements with agencies that carry out activities and which do not carry out activities under the statewide workforce investment system. Some of the agencies not under the state workforce investment system are: The Veteran’s Affairs Administration, The New Mexico Commission on the Deaf and Hard of Hearing; The Developmental Disabilities Planning Council, The Department of Health, and the Developmental Disabilities Support Services Division, to provide supported employment services to individuals on the developmental disabilities waiver and Jackson Class members. The Department also has a Memorandum of Understanding with the Public Education Department to further effect school–to–work transition services throughout the state including Roswell Job Corp. Further contracts are in place with the Centers of Independent Living; in the state, services include job seeking skills training, job placement and Self–Advocacy and supportive services. (Page 254)

In FFY 2014, collaboration with New Mexico School for the Deaf through statewide outreach and Commission for Deaf and Hard of Hearing has led to improved outreach and coordination with multiple state school districts toward referral of deaf/hard of hearing transition students to NMDVR. Coordination of School–to–Work transition services that include having a team of specialists to collaborate with school transition specialists to conduct outreach, inform, instruct, and coordinate transition services for individuals covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Additionally, creating access to transition services for students 14 years of age and utilizing staff (transition coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition, and VR counselors serving transition students) to collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to develop comprehensive transition plans. Coordination and training events have also begun at agency field staff meetings. While these efforts target a specific population, they have the added benefit of strengthening communications between transition specialists at NMSD as well as state wide school districts and NMDVR field staff. This can benefit all transitioning youth. (Page 257- 258)

The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school–to–work transition. Rehabilitation counselors are assigned to all public high schools throughout the state. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices. The Mentoring Diverse Abilities program funding has ended, however transition services continue to be provided by both NMDVR and the American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Programs throughout the state. (Page 260)

Collaboration with Statewide Workforce Investment System: NMDVR has had representatives on the Youth Standing Committee, and School to Work Transitional Alliance. Representatives address the issues and interests of individuals with disabilities in the workforce investment system, both in developing policy and influencing service delivery.

The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment Although the Navigator program is completed, it did serve to increase awareness of vocational rehabilitation services and employment–related needs of people with disabilities at local One–stops. The result is that One–stop staff have established and continue to maintain contact with NMDVR counselors throughout the state. (Page 267-26)

The licensure rules for Rehabilitation Counselors in New Mexico are in agreement with the Public Education Department requirements and competencies applicable to both the school systems to effect school–to– work transition in the high schools and the Division. The Statewide Transition Coordinator provides routine Transition training to all field staff with emphasize on the staff directly providing transition services. IDEA, IEP’s, Diagnostic Data are all represented through Transition Services. The Transition Coordinator also provides up–to– date information to staff regarding IDEA and acts as the liaison between DVR and Public Education Department. The agency will continue to encourage Transition Coordinator to maintain a board seat on IDEA, School–to–work Transition Alliance and maintain relations to support Regional Education Cooperative Memberships, and NM Youth Committee. It is the intention of the agency to continue cooperation and coordination with the personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (Page 280)

In early FY14 DVR, was approached to partner with the University of New Mexico, Center for Development and Disability (UNM/CDD) to consider establishing a replica of Project Search in NM. Project Search is an internationally known program that originated at Cincinnati’s Children’s Hospital. It focuses on school–to–work transition age students who are diagnosed with a variety of disabling conditions. The DVR Interim Transition Coordinator had the opportunity to attend the Project Search conference in July. In collaboration with several state partners, including the NM Albuquerque Public School (APS) district, UNM/CDD and the NM University Hospital (UNMH) as well as the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division (DOH/DDSD) and Best Buddies (a local provider agency), the Project Search founders have given approval to replicate this program in New Mexico. The site for Project Search has been selected and approved. Program space intended for training and internship rotations has been established at UNM Hospital (Page 313)

Work Incentives & Benefits
  • promoting the value of occupational learning through paid work experience on the job, such as through the development of apprenticeships, paid internships, incumbent worker or customized training, and transitional jobs;
  • encouraging public/private partnerships among business, education, community and civic organizations, and economic development to create work-based training opportunities that both feed career pathways for job seekers and satisfy job-driven strategies of employers and industries;
  • using skills assessments and credentialing to promote the value of job ready individuals to potential employers in developing work-based experiences; and
  • exploring the offerings of other related programs, outside of the state plan, that offer opportunities to help individuals gain increased skills and experience that can lead to potential future job opportunities and employment. (Page79)

Apprenticeship and Individuals with Disabilities. Under WIOA, VR programs must spend 15 percent of funding on students with disabilities. As such, some specific work is already being done in New Mexico to explore and expand the use of apprenticeships as a service strategy for improving outcomes for individuals with disabilities. For instance, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist has been working with a one-stop youth provider on finalizing an MOU to serve youth with disabilities. Additionally, a DVR Business Specialist has been working on the development of partnerships with the Workforce Training Center and Road Runner Food Bank to increase vocational readiness training programs which will be provided to students and youth with disabilities. 

Additionally, core partners have begun to have conversations about how the state can further expand opportunities for individuals with disabilities, including individuals who are blind or visually impaired. While individuals who are blind or visually impaired have often faced significant obstacles in participating in apprenticeship programs, the Commission for the Blind plans to increase efforts to consider and identify Registered Apprenticeships for consumers who might be appropriate candidates for such apprenticeship. Ultimately VR programs are optimistic about improved accessibility to the RA programs for the clients they serve. Examples of ideas of how this can be accomplished in New Mexico include pursuing: (Page 95)

As part of the professional development system, all eligible AEFLA providers will have available to them both hands–on and pedagogical training about the use of technology in the classroom. As part of the effort to make all appropriate Adult Education classes in New Mexico blended distance and face–to–face, the NMHED is providing an online platform aligned with College and Career Readiness Standards and career pathways, with mapping to KeyTrain and O–Net. As the State implements the platform all local providers are trained by the publisher and, pedagogically, by master teachers, both in the use of the technology and in developing and delivering classes using it. (Page 241)

  • NMDVR will make strides towards providing employment experiences or On the Job training activities in the community. Through this strategy, mutual customers can provide experience that may lead to permanent employment.
  • NMDVR will continue expand engagement of the business sector as a partner in developing career pathways for youth with disabilities in high–growth industries (Page 306)
Employer Engagement

The agency participates on the Ticket to Work Partners group, along with the Social Security Administration, the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, and a number of employment networks that serve ticket holders throughout New Mexico. The group regularly meets in the Commission’s Skills Center Lecture Hall. 2015 marked the third year in which the Commission participated in the annual Black Expo, sponsored by the New Mexico Office of African American Affairs. The expo has been growing each year and Commission attendance provides an opportunity to conduct outreach to the African American community and provide information regarding VR services available through the commission. (Page 333)

511

NMDWS administers a common management information system, called the Workforce Connection On-Line System, described earlier. The Workforce Connection Centers use the system not only for registering job applicants, housing resumes, and job postings for job matching purposes, but also for the purposes of data entry, case management, and state and federal performance reporting. The Workforce Connection On-Line System integrates data collection, participant demographics, case management, and performance reporting for not only Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Wagner-Peyser, but also Migrant Seasonal Farmworkers, Veterans, Trade programs. The system is also used for data collection and reporting for all partners located in comprehensive and affiliate centers. NMDWS has established both user access and data sharing agreements to support access to information and information sharing between the partners as allowed by authorizing law and regulation. The system also provides access to labor market information to support business and job seekers in need of training or employment assistance. (Page 110)

NMDWS administers a common management information system, called the Workforce Connection On-Line System, described earlier. The Workforce Connection Centers use the system not only for registering job applicants, housing resumes, and job postings for job matching purposes, but also for the purposes of data entry, case management, and state and federal performance reporting. The Workforce Connection On-Line System integrates data collection, participant demographics, case management, and performance reporting for not only Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Wagner-Peyser, but also Migrant Seasonal Farmworkers, Veterans, Trade programs. The system is also used for data collection and reporting for all partners located in comprehensive and affiliate centers. NMDWS has established both user access and data sharing agreements to support access to information and information sharing between the partners as allowed by authorizing law and regulation. The system also provides access to labor market information to support business and job seekers in need of training or employment assistance. (Page 112)

Mental Health

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability focused implementation. (Page 148)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 40

New Mexico Interagency Behavioral Health Service Requirements and Utilization Guidelines for Supported Employment - 07/20/2004

~~This document defines supported employment and provides program, provider, staffing, documentation, and other requirements of providers of supported employment services.“Supported  Employment  provides  on  the  job  supports  in  an integrated  work  setting  with  ongoing  support  services  for  individuals  in  need  of intensive supported employment services in order to perform work.  Activities are typically  performed  by  a  job  developer,  job  coach  and/or  job  specialist  (case manager) to achieve a successful employment outcome.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

NM Seed Loan Program

"Seed" stands for "Self Employment for Entrepreneurs with Disabilities". The program  makes loans available to individuals with disabilities regardless of the type of disability, age, income level, or location of residence in the state, to purchase needed equipment and home-based business supplies. San Juan Center for Independence, in collaboration with Accion and New Mexico Technology Assistance Program, provides low interest loans on a case by case basis."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

The board member from the community colleges shall solicit input from the community college constituency and work with regional and statewide businesses and other partners and the economic development department to create career pathways and align curriculum and facilitate plans with the economic development department, human services department and labor department strategic plans

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico DD (0173.R05.00)

“Provides case management, community integrated employment, customized community supports, living supports, personal support, respite, nutritional counseling, OT for adults, PT for adults, speech and language therapy for adults, supplemental dental care, assistive technology, behavior support consultation, crisis support, customized in-home supports, environmental mods, independent living transition, intensive medical living supports, non-medical transportation, personal support technology/on-site response, preliminary risk screening and consultation related to inappropriate sexual behavior, private duty nursing for adults, socialization and sexuality education for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Senate Bill 155: AN ACT RELATING TO WORKERS' COMPENSATION; AMENDING SECTIONS OF THE WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT TO CLARIFY WHEN A WORKER IS ENTITLED TO CERTAIN BENEFITS - 07/01/2017

"52-1-25.1. TEMPORARY TOTAL DISABILITY--RETURN TO WORK.--

A. As used in the Workers' Compensation Act,

"temporary total disability" means the inability of a worker,

by reason of accidental injury arising out of and in the course

of the worker's employment, to perform the duties of that

employment prior to the date of the worker's maximum medical

improvement.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

New Mexico ABLE Legislation (HB 61) - 03/03/2016

Relating to accounts for the support of persons with disabilities; creating the accounts for person with disabilities act; enacting enabling legislation required by the federal Achieving A Better Life Experience Act of 2014; requiring the office of the state treasurer to establish and maintain a qualified program for such accounts; declaring an emergency.  

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

New Mexico Senate Memorial 25 - 02/11/2016

A memorial requesting the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council and the University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability to convene a task force to conduct a needs assessment and report on ways to improve the system of school-to-work transition for students with disabilities in New Mexico.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

New Mexico House Joint Memorial 72 - 02/15/2005

“A joint memorial requesting that the Executive Task Force on Disability Employment develop policies, procedures and guidelines to increase the employment of persons with disabilities in state government.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

State Integrated Workforce Plan - Wagner-Peyser Act 2012-2017 - 09/13/2012

The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP):    The SCSEP has two goals:   1) Assisting income-eligible persons, age 55 or older, to obtain employment; and   2) Providing community service through paid, part-time, training positions.    Enrolled participants receive:  •Work experience, on-the-job training, and new or improved skills; and  •Empowerment to overcome barriers to employment, such as lack of self-confidence, lack of language fluency, or physical disabilities.   
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Manual of Operating Instructions (MOP) - 08/01/2012

“The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is a program that offers unique services to individuals with disabilities for the express purpose of assisting them in achieving an employment outcome. NMDVR is committed to providing quality and culturally sensitive services to all eligible New Mexicans, including typically underserved populations such as individuals in rural communities, tribal members and those with significant or multiple disabilities... VR services are provided with a focus on employment, and with an emphasis on quality services. Counseling and guidance are the primary services, with an emphasis on a partnership between the participant and the VR counselor, as well as the establishment of partnerships with community resources, tribal entities and employers. In order to serve as many individuals as possible, the NMDVR service delivery system also places an emphasis on utilizing its resources in an efficient manner.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

New Mexico Interagency Behavioral Health Service Requirements and Utilization Guidelines for Supported Employment - 07/20/2004

~~This document defines supported employment and provides program, provider, staffing, documentation, and other requirements of providers of supported employment services.“Supported  Employment  provides  on  the  job  supports  in  an integrated  work  setting  with  ongoing  support  services  for  individuals  in  need  of intensive supported employment services in order to perform work.  Activities are typically  performed  by  a  job  developer,  job  coach  and/or  job  specialist  (case manager) to achieve a successful employment outcome.” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

NM Seed Loan Program

"Seed" stands for "Self Employment for Entrepreneurs with Disabilities". The program  makes loans available to individuals with disabilities regardless of the type of disability, age, income level, or location of residence in the state, to purchase needed equipment and home-based business supplies. San Juan Center for Independence, in collaboration with Accion and New Mexico Technology Assistance Program, provides low interest loans on a case by case basis."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

New Mexico Governor’s Commission on Disability 2014 Annual Report - 01/15/2015

Mission:

The New Mexico Governor’s Commission on disability is committed to improving the quality of life for all New Mexicans with disabilities by addressing social integration, economic self-sufficiency, political resolve, physical and program accessibility and full participation in the benefits of life and the rights of all individuals.

 

Objectives:

Increase awareness and knowledge of disability issues among policy-makers and the general public Promote access to physical, sensory, programmatic, attitudinal and communication barriers Increase opportunities for New Mexicans with disabilities to live successfully in the community, with services and supports as needed Increase collaboration and cooperation among disability related organizations in New Mexico
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Behavioral Health Collaborative - 06/01/2004

~~“This Web site is a resource for individuals, families and agencies concerned with behavioral health. It provides information about behavioral health services, laws, and related news, as well as communication tools and other features. Regardless of where you begin your search for assistance  with behavioral health issues, the Network of Care helps you find what you need - it helps ensure that there is "No Wrong Door" for those who need services. This Web site can greatly assist in our efforts to protect our greatest human asset - our beautiful minds’

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Partners for Employment

Partners for Employment is a collaborative approach to increasing employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. Our partners include the University of New Mexico, the Department of Health Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation.

The primary goal for Partners for Employment is to build capacity within the state of New Mexico among state agencies personnel, service providers, family members, self-advocates, employers and other supports.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Workforce Development Board

The board member from the community colleges shall solicit input from the community college constituency and work with regional and statewide businesses and other partners and the economic development department to create career pathways and align curriculum and facilitate plans with the economic development department, human services department and labor department strategic plans

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Department of Health Action Steps

The New Mexico Department of Health will, "continue to utilize the New Mexico Employment Institute (NMEI) in areas of job development and technical assistance to train and assist providers.

DDSD hopes to achieve the 38% FY13 target, through continued technical assistance to supported employment providers; trainings from national speakers; utilization of NMEI and other consultants; and continue an emphasis on Employment First by DDSD staff.

Continue to schedule and conduct local Employment Leadership Network meetings to support employment efforts among providers, employers and individuals served.

Continue to work closely with the National Supported Employment Network of which we are a mentor state. Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding has been secured to facilitate training of providers"

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Quality of Life Grant - 07/01/2017

“The Governor's Commission on Disability has established a Quality of Life Small Grants Program for New Mexican non-profit organizations to provide enhanced programs or services that will improve the quality of life of New Mexicans with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

New Mexico Money Follows the Person - 10/15/2012

“The goals of the New Mexico MFP are to increase the use of home and community-based services (HCBS) and reduce the use of institutionally-based services, [e]liminate barriers in State law, State Medicaid plans, and State budgets that restrict the use of Medicaid funds to let people get long-term care in settings of their choice, strengthen the ability of the Medicaid programs to provide HCBS to people who choose to transition out of institutions put procedures in place to provide quality assurance and improvement of HCBS” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events. 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

New Mexico Partners for Employment Events and Training - 01/01/2019

This webpage lists upcoming training and capacity building events intended for providers, people with disabilities, and employers throughout New Mexico.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Partners for Employment 2019 Events and Trainings - 07/01/2017

~~This site has a list of training sessions for School to Work Transition teams and Supported Employment for Local Leaders

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Employer Needs Analysis Tip Sheet - 03/17/2015

This tip sheet discusses Employer Needs Analyses in their utility, importance and relevance to Customized Employment. It goes though the steps of implementing Employer Needs Analyses, what to look for and what material to present to the employer.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

New Mexico Workforce Investment Act Title I Wagner-Peyser Act (2012-2017) - 09/13/2012

Long-term strategies to improve outcomes of individuals with disabilities include the support of Disability Coordinators in Workforce Connection Centers. The purpose of the Disability Coordinator is to promote a collaborative and coordinated approach to employment services for persons with disabilities. Disability Coordinators are trained in best practices for serving persons with disabilities and are able to assist them with assistive technology. In addition, they are charged with increasing employer awareness and making a business case for hiring people with disabilities. The Disability Coordinators are merit based state staff and funded partially with Wagner Peyser 10% funds.

 

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Best Practice Guide - 11/30/2002

This guide provides anecdotal examples of people with disabilities who have obtained jobs through methods such as Job Carving, Job Development, Competitive Employment, and others both in and outside of the state of New Mexico. It also addresses different approaches to Job Tailoring, such as Job Tailoring Costs, Job Carving and Restructuring, Job Sharing, Mentoring and Home Work Station/Ergonomic/ Accommodation Support.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

A Business Perspective on Customized Employment Tip Sheet

This tip sheet describes Customized Employment as replacing the "one size fits all" philosophy of hiring. Explains how it aligns with HR "made to order employment relationship" trends. Provides instructions on how to implement the steps of CE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Waiver Amendment Request - 02/28/2019

~~“Employment Supports (ABCB and SDCB) Employment Supports include job development, job seeking and job coaching supports after available vocational rehabilitation supports have been exhausted. The job coach provides training, skill development, and employer consultation that a member may require while learning to perform specific work tasks on the job; co-worker training; job site analysis; situational and/or vocational assessments and profiles; education of the member and co-workers on rights and responsibilities; and benefits counseling. The service must be tied to a specific goal specified in the member’s care plan. Job development is a service provided to members by skilled staff. The service has five components: 1) job identification and development activities; 2) employer negotiations; 3) job restructuring; 4) job sampling; and 5) job placement.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

LEGISLATING FOR RESULTS: POLICY AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS - 01/01/2019

~~“One of 14 states without institutions for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities, New Mexico serves this population through a system of home- and community-based services funded through two main Medicaid programs administered by the Human Services Department (HSD) and operated primarily through the Department of Health (DOH). A 2018 LFC evaluation of these programs found growth in per-client costs and a lengthening waiting list are outpacing the state’s ability to fund and provide services. In FY17, about 3,500 people received services through the traditional developmental disabilities (DD) waiver program, while another 1,400 received services through the self-directed Mi Via program. Both provide services not usually covered by Medicaid under federal waivers of existing rules. The list of eligible individuals waiting for services, meanwhile, totaled roughly 3,900. The evaluation found increased service utilization, client movement from the traditional DD waiver program to Mi Via, and changes to how client service plans and budgets are developed have all contributed to rising costs. The average cost of an individual enrolled in the DD waiver program grew by 17 percent, to $78,575, between FY14 and FY17, while total enrollment fell by 13 percent. Meanwhile, budgets for Mi Via clients are approaching their annual individual caps, and cost growth in both waivers is on pace to potentially violate federal cost neutrality requirements by FY27.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

"Centennial Care 2.0 1115 Medicaid Demonstration" Extension - 01/01/2019

~~“This approval is  effective January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2023. CMS' s approval is subject to the limitations specified in the attached waiver authorities, expenditure authorities, Special Terms and Conditions (STCs), and subsequent attachments. The state may deviate from the Medicaid state plan requirements only to the extent those requirements have been listed as waived or as not applicable to expenditures or individuals covered by expenditure authority….Employment Supports will be provided by staff at current or potential work sites. When supported employment services are provided at a work site where persons without disabilities are employed, payment is made only for the adaptations, supervision and training required by members receiving services as a result of their disabilities but does not include payment for the supervisory activities rendered as a normal part of the business setting.” 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico (Mi Via) State HCBS Transition Plan - 11/14/2014

The goal of Mi Via is to provide a community-based alternative that 1) facilitates greater participant choice and control over the types of services and supports that are purchased within an agreed upon budgetary amount; and 2) enables the State to serve the most people possible within available resources. Mi Via will be administered through a partnership between Department of Health and Human Services Department.   In 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published Final Rule 2249-F/2296-F which made changes to the 1915 (c) Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waiver program, including a requirement for states to submit HCBS waiver settings transition plans.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/15/2012

The New Mexico Public Education Department’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on February 15, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

New Mexico Medicaid State Plan

A State Plan is a contract between a state and the Federal Government describing how that state administers its Medicaid program. It gives an assurance that a state abides by Federal rules and may claim Federal matching funds for its Medicaid program activities. The state plan sets out groups of individuals to be covered, services to be provided, methodologies for providers to be reimbursed and the administrative requirements that States must meet to participate.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

New Mexico DD (0173.R05.00)

“Provides case management, community integrated employment, customized community supports, living supports, personal support, respite, nutritional counseling, OT for adults, PT for adults, speech and language therapy for adults, supplemental dental care, assistive technology, behavior support consultation, crisis support, customized in-home supports, environmental mods, independent living transition, intensive medical living supports, non-medical transportation, personal support technology/on-site response, preliminary risk screening and consultation related to inappropriate sexual behavior, private duty nursing for adults, socialization and sexuality education for individuals with autism, ID, DD ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)