Oklahoma

States - Big Screen

With the motto "Labor Conquers All Things," it's clear that Oklahoma values the contributions of all workers, including workers with disabilities, and has plenty to offer when it comes to career development.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oklahoma’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,943,079
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.87%
Change from
2017 to 2018
327,111
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.21%
Change from
2017 to 2018
129,170
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.89%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39.49%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.86%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.00%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 3,923,561 3,930,864 3,943,079
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 334,056 339,773 327,111
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 123,568 127,608 129,170
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,495,651 1,502,073 1,523,986
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 36.99% 37.56% 39.49%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.44% 76.34% 77.00%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90% 4.30% 3.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.60% 21.90% 20.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.30% 14.70% 14.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 303,865 316,907 316,459
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 316,387 318,169 312,061
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 468,477 477,134 475,522
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 45,965 45,378 43,570
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 32,172 37,678 33,908
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 48,113 50,277 50,351
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,685 6,697 5,198
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 484 N/A 1,118
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 44,725 45,511 44,029
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,803 9,608 8,732

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,992 3,949 3,967
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.40% 4.30% 4.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 126,364 125,634 124,606

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 11,622 10,635 12,316
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 30,820 30,587 34,830
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 55,803 53,035 55,687
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.80% 20.00% 22.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 0.30% 20.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.80% 0.80% 60.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.70% 1.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 105 167 111
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 370 411 343
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 663 858 769
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,387 7,021 7,102
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,291 1,100 599
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 981 447 285
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 43.00% 41.00% 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 25.48 11.43 7.29

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,947
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 346 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 439 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,041 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 952 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 694 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 475 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.70% 28.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,023 4,316 4,341
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 193,085 192,660 192,540
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 174 158 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 196 142 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $20,163,000 $20,371,000 $20,762,029
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $10,908,000 $10,539,000 $9,666,645
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,866,000 $5,602,000 $5,491,343
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 60.00% 61.00% 64.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,175 1,182 1,222
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,314 2,284 2,133
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 63.30 63.10 63.49

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.76% 70.87% 67.98%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.44% 8.26% 9.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.23% 0.79% 0.64%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.72% 99.57% 99.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.27% 22.32% 24.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 60.19% 62.74% 60.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.28% 74.74% 76.60%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.92% 40.42% 36.02%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 693,919
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 736
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 45,014
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 459,485
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 504,499
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 43
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 387
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 430
AbilityOne wages (products). $401,419
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,994,972

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 2 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 51 62 47
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 7 7 6
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 60 71 55
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 7
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,116 2,411 1,776
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 243 218 113
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,359 2,629 1,896

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~DSA Programs Field Representatives serve on the Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council. DSA Employment Support Services (ESS) staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the Employment First Alliance, which has a national goal of increased competitive integrated employment by 50% in the states. As a result of the Employment First Alliance, the Oklahoma operates under the Employment First Law.

DSA ESS staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) -DSA ESS staff represents DSA on the Oklahoma Developmental Disabilities Council. (Page 260) Title IV
 

Customized Employment

~~The initiative’s full array of workforce partners must align their efforts and take active roles in ensuring resources are used in ways that maximize, strengthen, and support the education to workforce pipeline for all Oklahomans.

According to a 2018 Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis conducted with WIOA Core Partners, accomplishments since 2016, include but are not limited to:

ALIGNMENT:
• Further development of the Oklahoma Works Strategic Plan with additional strategies to strengthen broadband access, and facilitate entrepreneurship.
• Creation and distribution of a transportation asset map to identify gaps and duplication impacting access to school and work.
• Development of “Oklahoma Works for All,” a pilot project across WIOA Core Partners and private partners for customized employment supports for businesses and potential employees with intellectual and developmental disabilities to be tested in the South Central Workforce Development Area.
• Development of “My Reemployment Plan,” a project across WIOA Core Partners to align case-management with readiness and transition services
• Joint WIOA policy development and release to reflect WIOA administration change and WIA to WIOA transition, including: local and regional planning guidance and approval, competitive procurement of one-stop operators, and Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Center certification of American Job Centers, among others. (Page 34) Title I

DSA has contracts with private non-profit, for-profit, and government Community Rehabilitation Service Providers (CRPs) of Supported Employment and other employment programs for individuals with significant barriers to employment. CRPs request the opportunity to provide Supported Employment, employment and retention (i.e. short term job coaching), job placement, JOBS (short-term placement), work-adjustment training, employment support and transitional employment services for DSA job seekers. DSA approves contracts based on pre-established criteria, including acceptable levels of payment for outcomes achieved.

DSA will continue to increase employment CRPs to meet the needs statewide focusing in rural areas, by initiating a customized employment contract within designated areas across the state. The Employment Support Services Unit (ESS) educates potential CRPs and DSA field staff of available contracts. The list of contracts and CRPs is available on the DSA intranet. (Page 255-256) Title IV

The Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) serves as the Medicaid Agency for provisions of title XIX of the Social Security Act. The OHCA and Department of Human Services (DHS) maintain an MOA for provision of services. The DHS administers waiver programs which include extended services as a part of the waiver. Each Medicaid waiver individual plan includes outcomes which would create a pathway to achieve competitive integrated employment. DRS has implemented a new customized employment contract which can be utilized by individuals to achieve employment. Increased education and in-service with contractors has occurred to encourage contracts with both the DSA and DDS to ensure a more streamlined access to competitive integrated employment opportunities. The DHS and DSA utilizes an MOA to outline the provisions and responsibilities for extended services utilized in Medicaid funded programs. (Pages 259- 260) Title IV

Research determined that there are not minority groups disproportionately underserved in Oklahoma, but the DSA with the SRC held focus groups to obtain further qualitative information. Based on the last assessment, research was focused on rural counties that were identified as being underserved. Despite active DSA programs to serve SSI/SSDI recipients, focus group attendees reported there is a family disconnect and fear regarding the loss of benefits. This fear results in the parents of youth with disabilities being resistant to services that are employment oriented.

Those in need of supported or customized employment in some rural areas of the state also face a lack of CRP vendors in remote areas, including southeastern Oklahoma. Needs were identified for more employer outreach to address accessibility issues with employer application methods, additional cooperation between schools and DSA counselors in the setting of appropriate career goals for youth with disabilities and making sure IPE and IEP goals are in-line prior to graduation.

In rural areas, there is a gap in service when serving the homeless populations and those that lack transportation. This is a result of missing auxiliary services that are available through other agencies and/or programs in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. In addition, transportation is a service gap that affects individuals with disabilities not just in rural areas, but across the state. (Page 272) Title IV

DSA will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSA is initiating a customized employment program. The DSA is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 281) Title IV

Customized Employment Services Project
Memorandum of Understanding: The DSA entered into a contracted agreement with 24 vendors, known as the Contractor.

Scope of Work: This is a project to provide Customized Employment Services and/or other employment services to individuals in Priority Group 1 with the most significant disabilities. Some of the other employment services are available to individuals in Priority Group 2 with significant disabilities. This contract is intended to meet the requirements of WIOA. Career Exploration and Internship services are optional and can be used with individuals in Priority Group 1 or 2, receiving CE, SE or ER contract services. Onsite Supports and Training and Extended Services for Transition (EST) can be used with individuals in Priority Group 1 only, receiving CE or SE contract services. The DSA Counselor, working with the individual and the Contractor, will designate the services to be used. The Discovery and Profile and Career Exploration services only, can be used with transition aged youth, age 16 or above, on a Trial Work Plan or Individualized Plan of Employment, to gather assessment information related to employment, and to help identify additional employment related transition services and/or a career path. (Page 281) Title IV

Partner Responsibilities: The Contractor will:

1. The Contractor has completed discovery activities that utilize a person centered approach to describe “who the individual is”. and guides the planning process to develop a customized job. The Contractor will summarize the Discovery findings on the individual’s profile. The Contractor has provided benefits planning information to any individual who is receiving Social Security Administration (SSA) benefits, and has referred the individual to a DSA Benefits Planning Specialist if the individual, payee, or family member has requested the service.

2.The Contractor will provide opportunities for the individual to explore potential occupations, job conditions, interests and job tasks in order to enhance their vocational goal and prepare the individual for a successful job match. Exploration activities could include but are not limited to: job shadowing, work-site tour, job sampling, trial work experiences, volunteer experiences and situational assessments.

3.The Contractor will schedule and conduct a Team Meeting with the individual, DRS Counselor and all other relevant team members to create a CE Employer Development Plan.

4.The Contractor has created the Visual Résumé with the individual. This résumé was used in the job development process to highlight the individual’s potential contributions and the types of tasks the individual is interested and capable of performing. The Contractor has explained Customized Employment and outlined what the employer can expect from the individual and the Contractor during the job development process. The Contractor has developed a successful job match that meets the individual’s contributions, conditions and interests and the employer’s unmet needs. A job can be developed within an individual’s family’s business as long as the job meets the definition of competitive integrated employment. (Page 282) Title IV

5. The individual has worked successfully for a minimum of eight (8) weeks beginning with the first (1st) day of employment and has received all appropriate onsite supports and training. At the completion of this service, individuals can be moved to CE Maintenance if they meet the following criteria: individual is working at least sixty percent (60%) of their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE, and on-site support needs cannot be more than twenty-five percent (25%) of their total work hours per month.

6. The individual has worked successfully for a minimum four of (4) and a maximum of eight (8) additional weeks beyond the CE Job Coaching I and has received all appropriate onsite supports and training. The Contractor can move the individual to CE Maintenance after the maintenance criteria is met. To move to CE Maintenance, the individual must be working at sixty percent (60%) of their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE, and their on-site support needs cannot be more than twenty-five percent (25%) of their total work hours per month. If the maintenance criteria is not met at the end of six (6) weeks, then a team meeting is required to determine if the individual needs to be moved to Onsite Supports and Training at the completion of CE Job Coaching II. (Page 282) Title II

8. The individual can be moved to CE Maintenance at the end of any four (4) week increment if they meet the maintenance criteria. The maintenance criteria specifies the individual must be working at sixty (60%) of their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE, and on-site support needs cannot be more than twenty-five (25%) of their total work hours per month.

9. If the individual remains in this service at the end of the initial three and a half (3½) months and has not been moved to CE Maintenance, a team meeting is required. Additional Onsite Supports and Training can be authorized and provided if the team determines it is needed to assist the individual with meeting the maintenance criteria.

10. The individual has worked successfully for at least four (4) weeks, and received all appropriate onsite supports and training. To achieve maintenance, the individual must work at least one entire work week without EC support, must work at their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE for the four (4) weeks of maintenance, their onsite/offsite support and training needs must be less than or equal to twenty percent (20%) of their total work hours per month, the employer is satisfied with the individual’s job performance, and the individual is satisfied with their job. At the completion of CE Maintenance, if the individual has met all of the requirements, they can be moved to the CE Employment Outcome Service. (Page 283) Title IV

Referral Process: At the time of referral, the DSA Counselor will provide the Contractor with a copy of the Eligibility Determination Form, Individualized Plan of Employment (IPE) or Trial Work Plan, and Personal Information Form. Once the intake is scheduled, the Contractor will send a CE Authorization Request Form to the DSA Counselor, Rehabilitation Technician and Program Manager. The DSA Counselor authorizes for the first two services to be used (i.e. CE Discovery and Profile and Career Exploration, etc.) within five (5) business days.

The Contractor should contact the DSA Counselor and ask for the authorization to be sent if not received within five (5) business days. The Contractor will only provide services that have been pre-authorized by the DSA Counselor. The only services that can be provided under a trial work plan include the CE Discovery and Profile service and the Career Exploration service. (Page 284) Title IV

The DSA conducted an Employment Support Services 360 analysis resulting in the need for supported or customized employment in some rural areas of the state, also a lack of CRP vendors in remote areas, including southeastern Oklahoma. (Page 290) Title IV

Online Introduction to Positive Behavior Supports in the Workplace (prerequisite for positive behavior supports and instructional supports); Positive Behavior in the Workplace, customized employment and instructional supports. Following completion of the required training listed above, six hours of continuing education is required each year. The DSA staff also provides quarterly training and two additional advanced trainings annually to CRPs to keep them up-to-date on current best practices.

DSA monitors contract compliance, provides an outcomes based report on data drawn from the AWARE case management program. DSA reports to CRPs on minimum contract standards and whether those standards have been met or will require a plan for improvement. Every CRP has a TA who helps resolve service delivery problems and monitors for contract compliance on an annual basis. (Page 306) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Oklahoma is encouraging the braiding of funding and leveraging of resources through the state’s new resource leveraging tool to be released in the fall of 2016. In this online tool, state agencies, including the core partners, can identify existing workforce development activities and send requests to partner. These requests are then supported and facilitated with the assistance of the Office of the Governor, if needed. Similarly, with the release of this tool, the Office of the Governor, under Oklahoma Works, in July of 2016, challenged each state agency and each Workforce Development Board, to identify one new partner (private or public) to engage.

With stagnant or declining funding from state and federal funding streams, the State is continually seeking more efficient ways to provide services to Oklahomans. Resources continue to be one of the largest threats to achieving the goals set forth in this plan, according to a 2018 Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats analysis with WIOA Core Partners. Despite other potential threats to success, including the complexity and isolation of the state’s data systems, the culture shift required for systems thinking as opposed to programs thinking under WIOA, and the culture shift required by today’s global economy for skills--and the workforce-- to be flexible, adaptable, and stackable, opportunities exist to utilize the capacity in place, or to enhance capacity, for the sake of our talent pipeline. Optimizing capacity to focus on opportunities, such as a 2018 Gubernatorial election to strengthen workforce advocacy, system-building and cross-training to support systems thinking and customer-centered, or human-centered, design of the workforce development system, will allow the system to adapt to changing resources in the form of funds and/or human capital. (Page 45) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~7. implement a series of surveys developed by the national LEAD Center to assess the experience of:

• Job seekers
• Employers
• American Job Center staff

to determine their readiness and satisfaction with employers and the Oklahoma Works Workforce Development System;

*The LEAD Center is a collaborative of disability, workforce and economic empowerment organization dedicated to improving employment and economic advancement outcomes for all people with disabilities — funded by the Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor.

8. continue to work collaboratively with DSA to provide technical assistance and support to ACT regarding the accessibility of web-based versions of the ACT test and WorkKeys assessments in an effort to remove technological barriers for both students and job seekers with disabilities; Accessibility standards have been defined by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI). The ultimate goal is to allow students and job seekers to participate independently and in the most integrated setting possible in compliance with non-discrimination provisions. (Page 247) Title IV
.

School to Work Transition

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.

The DSA will maintain a formal interagency agreement with the State Educational Agency (SEA) as well as relationships at the local level with LEAs. The focus of our work will be to forage those relationships and partner with stakeholders to provide services to youth and students with disabilities to help them prepare for life after high school, including, but not limited to, further education/training, competitive integrated employment, independent living and social skills, self-determination, and self-advocacy. It is our intent to perform outreach to underrepresented groups, such as those on Section 504 Plans, youth in foster care, adjudicated youth, out-of-school youth, and those with other disabilities not documented on a 504 or IEP. The DSA does not have any updated transition and pre-employment transition policies but intend to complete the revisions by October 1, 2019. (Page 250) Title IV

The DSA will coordinate services with local educational agency staff to help prepare youth and students with disabilities for competitive integrated employment. DSA staff will share results of the vocational evaluation and other assessments, as well as progress reports for various work experiences with school personnel for the purpose of including information in the IEP and transition planning process. The DSA will work with school personnel to not only have input into the IEP process but also to access a copy of the IEP for assistance with coordination with the VR IPE.

The DSA and educational officials will provide the following types of services:

o Consultation and technical assistance services to assist State educational agencies and local educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postsecondary life, including employment.

o Transition services to youth with disabilities and students with disabilities, for which a vocational rehabilitation counselor works in concert with educational agencies, providers of job training programs, providers of services under the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1396 et seq.), entities designated by the State to provide services for individuals with developmental disabilities, centers for independent living (as defined in section 796a of this title), housing and transportation authorities, workforce development systems, and businesses and employers. (Page 251) Title IV

The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on working with VR staff and LEA staff to facilitate completion of a comprehensive and quality Individualized Education Program (IEP) and Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that appropriately includes transition planning and coordination of services.

The OSDE will continue to enforce the IDEA requirements regarding inviting those agencies responsible for providing or paying for transition services, including referral to VR at the age of 15 so services can be in place by the age of 16.

The OSDE will:
(1) provide to the LEAs a referral form to VR through the state IEP development system; (2) educate LEAs on the best practices for inviting VR and other transition providers to participate in the development of the IEP and participate through multiple means (e.g., in person, by phone, virtually, by providing documents in advance) in IEP and other meetings; and (3) continue to monitor the involvement of, invitations to, and referrals to VR through the state monitoring system, Indicator 13 checklist, and other means as decided. 3. The ODRS will continue to enforce the WIOA requirements regarding attending IEP and other meetings (when invited) as well as the process for receiving and responding to referrals, including referral to VR at the age of 15 1/2 so services can be in place by the age of 16.

The DSA will:
o Provide to the OSDE the content to be included in the referral to VR form
o Train its staff on the requirements of receiving the referral form along with the release of confidential information from LEAs and other referral sources
o Train its staff to develop internal procedures with each school for how referrals will be submitted to the local VR counselor
o Train its staff on best practices for engaging with schools and teams, planning and attending IEP and other meetings, to participate in the development of the IEP and participate through multiple means (e.g., in person, by phone, virtually, by providing documents in advance)
o Train its staff on providing regular updates to the referring source on the status of that referral, if the student/family applied for services, if a plan for employment is in place, what services may be implemented at school, etc
o Encourage its staff and schools to take advantage of the online VR application to streamline the application process, possibly in lieu of even a referral
o Continue to educate and encourage its staff to actively contribute to the development of annual goals and coordinated services to be included in the IEP to help the student reach his or her postsecondary goals
o Train its staff to assist schools in developing annual IEP goals around the VR services provided to support the achievement of the IEP and IPE goals; and work with the OSDE and LEAs to improve documentation of the collaborative transition service delivery occurring for a student by encouraging wording in the IEP. (Page 252) Title IV

The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on performing outreach statewide to identify students with disabilities in need of transition services under IDEA and pre-employment transition services under WIOA, those residing in rural areas, and those low-incidence populations, such as blindness and hearing impairments. The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on joint community and professional presentations to educate and inform LEAs, parents, and others about reaching the needs of youth and students on Section 504 Plans and those with documented disabilities not being served through an IEP or Section 504 Plan. The DSA will work with the Oklahoma Rehabilitation Council's Transition Committee, Oklahoma School for the Blind, and Oklahoma School for the Deaf to conduct outreach activities. This may include, but is not limited to, developing and disseminating public service announcements, making presentations within these schools and LEAs, hosting events for groups of students with disabilities (e.g., advocacy, STEM). (Page 253) Title IV

Because the definition of a "student with a disability," for the VR program includes an individual with a disability for purposes of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, it is broader than the definition under IDEA, VR is authorized to provide transition services to this broader population of students with disabilities than LEAs under IDEA. Since the VR program may serve students with disabilities, including those individuals with a disability for purposes of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, these students may not have an IEP under IDEA, and, therefore, would not be eligible for or receiving special education and related services under IDEA.

The OSDE will continue to educate LEAs on the availability of VR services for students with disabilities on section 504 plans and encourage the referral of such students to the VR counselors. In addition, the Rehabilitation Act also allows the VR agency to provide pre-employment transition services to "potentially" eligible students with disabilities. This may include those students who are not receiving special education and related services under an IEP, students who are not receiving services or accommodations under a section 504 plan, and who have documented disabilities (e.g., a student may wear a hearing aid, have chronic health issues, such as asthma, leukemia, diabetes, suffer from depression, bipolar, and anxiety. (Page 255) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Make recommendations, inform, coordinate and facilitate statewide efforts to improve Oklahomans’ exposure to high-demand career and entrepreneurship opportunities, along with the education and training required for entry into and advancement within a chosen career. Develop industry sector strategies in state and regional ecosystems to ensure that the education and training system is delivering the skills needed by employers.

Goals/Objectives
o Create a plan for Career Pathways efforts to be based on industry sectors within Oklahoma’s state and regional ecosystems.
o Establish strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.
o Create and use Career Pathways approaches to increase the proportion of low-skill learners who ultimately earn a degree or certificate.
o Increase high school graduation rates - decrease high school dropout rates.
o Increase the percentage of Oklahoma workers with a recognized postsecondary credential. (A credential consisting of an industry-recognized certificate or certification, a certificate of completion of an apprenticeship, a license recognized by the State or Federal government, or an associate or baccalaureate degree.
o Reinforce the alignment with Registered Apprenticeship for earn-and-learn opportunities.
o Use performance data to demonstrate progress and impact, thereby supporting partner buy-in and reinforcing continued engagement over time.
o Make Career Pathways part of the Board certification process.
o Introduce employers and educators to the value of partnering by describing best practices and success stories.
o Develop or research pilots and models. (Page 120-121) Title I

Apprenticeship

During annual monitoring the state will require the local areas to submit documentation describing how the 14 program elements are being implemented. The state will also include a sample of youth RFP’s and contracts in their annual monitoring to assure that the 14 elements were included in the program design and framework and are available to all youth in the WIOA program. There is a section in our youth program monitoring tool that specifically asks our local boards for a description of how the following program elements are being implemented and we request a list of the entities providing the elements and the services available at least annual in accordance with monitoring requirements:

o Tutoring, study skills training, instruction and evidence-based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent (including a recognized certificate of attendance or similar document for individuals with disabilities) or for a recognized postsecondary credential:

o Alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate:

o Paid and unpaid work experiences that have academic and occupational education as a component of the work experience:

o Occupational skill training, which includes priority consideration for training programs that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials that align with in-demand industry sectors or occupations in the local area involved, if the Local WDB determines that the programs meet the quality criteria described in WIOA sec. 123:

o Education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster:

o Leadership development opportunities, including community service and peer-centered activities encouraging responsibility and other positive social and civic behaviors: o Supportive services, including the services listed in § 681.570: o Adult mentoring for a duration of at least 12 months that may occur both during and after program participation: o Follow-up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as provided in § 681.580: o Comprehensive guidance and counseling, which may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the individual youth: o Financial literacy education: o Entrepreneurial skills training: o Services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area, such as career awareness, career counseling, and career exploration services: o Activities that help youth prepare for and transition to postsecondary education and training: (Page 191) Title I

Prepare and distribute “Tool Kit of Solutions”— a checklist of the physical elements reviewed during 2015 site visits, current status, meets/does not meet guideline, ADA guideline, remedy, resources, timeframe for completion, date of completion o Landlord responsibilities fact sheet: new construction and leases o Certificate of completion for remediation of items o Sites will self—assess every two years using Tool Kit of Solutions listed above o Site point of contact will send an updated checklist to the DSA ADA Coordinator o Implement site review prior to renovations and new construction, DSA ADA Coordinator will provide technical assistance (Page 294) Title IV

Accessibility work with private sector companies  ACT WorkKeys Continue working with DRS outreach efforts to improve the accessibility of the Career Readiness Certificate (CRC) product for individuals with hearing loss and/or blind and visually impaired. (Page 295) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Research determined that there are not minority groups disproportionately underserved in Oklahoma, but the DSA with the SRC held focus groups to obtain further qualitative information. Based on the last assessment, research was focused on rural counties that were identified as being underserved. Despite active DSA programs to serve SSI/SSDI recipients, focus group attendees reported there is a family disconnect and fear regarding the loss of benefits. This fear results in the parents of youth with disabilities being resistant to services that are employment oriented.
Those in need of supported or customized employment in some rural areas of the state also face a lack of CRP vendors in remote areas, including southeastern Oklahoma. Needs were identified for more employer outreach to address accessibility issues with employer application methods, additional cooperation between schools and DSA counselors in the setting of appropriate career goals for youth with disabilities and making sure IPE and IEP goals are in-line prior to graduation.

In rural areas, there is a gap in service when serving the homeless populations and those that lack transportation. This is a result of missing auxiliary services that are available through other agencies and/or programs in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. In addition, transportation is a service gap that affects individuals with disabilities not just in rural areas, but across the state. (Page 272) Title IV

The DSA conducted the Employment Support Services 360 analysis that surveyed the CRP providers, the DSA staff who work with CRP providers, and the DSA consumers that were served through CRPs. As a result of the analysis, DSA needs were identified for improvement in the areas of collaboration with CRP vendors to ensure vocational goals match the skill levels of clients to place job seekers in positions that match their vocation goal, additional vendor training regarding disability types and billing and/or paperwork and the need for CRPs to have more employer contacts and providers in rural areas. CRPs requested more training opportunities from the DSA, including benefits training regarding SSI/SSDI. Consumers who were served by the CRPs reported a need for ADA and sensitivity training for some CRP employees, but expressed an overall appreciation for the patience of the job coaches and reported that the services boosted the client’s confidence in their ability to work. The majority of clients served by CRPs reported their job was a good fit (80.5%) and 77.8% reported they were happy with the job with a median wage reported of $9.00. (Page 273) Title IV

Ticket to Work Program
Coordinated activities under Ticket to Work are delivered by a statewide Ticket to Work Coordinator. The coordinator will organize activities within the DSA and with partnership employment networks (EN’s) to ensure the needs of ticket holders are met at a maximum level. Ongoing outreach efforts will be conducted to recruit new partnership employment networks in order to provide more opportunities to assist ticket holders in reaching Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level employment outcomes. The coordinator will continue to oversee the ticket to work hotline and will provide ticket holders with information and referral for state VR, partnership EN’s, and external EN’s. (Page 285) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~Under the new section 511, the determination of individuals who may benefit from employment services, the DSA has developed contracts with CRP to provide Trial Work Services to establish the ability to benefit from employment services.

DSA maintains an MOA with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) describing collaboration on delivery of Supported Employment services and transitional employment services.

The DSA has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five-community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness.

DSA maintains an MOA with the DDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual disabilities. The MOA outlines the coordination of services and identifies the DSA as first dollar funding source for competitive integrated employment. DDS continues to provide extended services for individuals with intellectual disabilities in Supported Employment services by utilizing the DDS Home and Community Based Waiver (HCBW) and DDS state dollars. The HCBW is utilized to provide the long-term ongoing supports. DSA has maintained an MOA with DDS since 1989. Under the MOA, the HCBW is also utilized to provide pre-vocational services. (Page 257) Title IV

DSA ESS staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) -DSA ESS staff represents DSA on the Oklahoma Developmental Disabilities Council.

DDS Staff serves on the Oklahoma Transition Council (OTC) resulting in statewide conferences, resources, technical assistance, and additional professional development opportunities. Many issues and challenges are brought forth with a wide range of experts to assist the DSA and DDS in resolving and achieving their goals.

The DSA Statewide Transition Coordinator will work with DDS staff to ensure staff from each agency, schools, families, and CRPs understand the changes in WIOA regarding sub-minimum wage, are well-trained, and that Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) are provided to students with disabilities accessing vocational rehabilitation services through the DSA.

The DSA ESS staff will work with DDS staff to ensure CRPs and staff at each agency is provided ongoing training and consultation required by WIOA for any youth with a significant disability hired at subminimum wage. The partners will also ensure the required reviews take place according to WIOA to ensure every opportunity for achieving full competitive integrated employment. (Page 260) Title IV

DSA conducts annual outreach and review services for individuals earning subminimum wage under a 14c certificate. Individuals will receive information about career counseling and information and referral services, as well as other components to the Vocational Rehabilitation program. The intent is to inform all individuals of the VR process in relation to seeking and obtaining competitive integrated employment. All individuals newly hired have to receive the career counseling and information and referral services two times the first year of employment and annually afterwards. In 2016-2017 the DSA reached approximately 4000 individuals through this outreach effort. The DSA also worked with the Department of Labor to provide information and training services to employers who hold the 14c certificate. All newly hired individuals have to receive the career counseling and information and referral services two times the first year of employment and annually afterwards. The DSA provides documentation in collaboration with the local school district of specific services to youth 24 and younger, if those individuals are known by the DSA to be seeking subminimum wage work.

Other DSA program areas that are utilized to expand and improve services include:
• Visual Services Center in Tulsa and Oklahoma City
• DVS Technology Lab and Training Lab in Tulsa and Oklahoma City
• DVS Adult Blind Living Evaluation (ABLE)
• DVS Training Adult Program (TAP)
• DVR Technology Lab and Training Lab in Oklahoma City
• Oklahoma School for the Blind (OSB) transition work adjustment program
• Partnering with OSB for Vocational Evaluations
• Project Search
• Business Enterprise Program
• Office of Juvenile Affairs collaborations
• Department of Veterans Affairs collaborations
• On-line applications
• Customized Employment
• JOBS Contract
• Wellness Recovery Action Plan Training (WRAP) (Page 285-286) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity, which provides guidance to communicate Oklahoma’s process and procedures regarding nondiscrimination and equal opportunity procedures that apply to all Local Workforce Development Areas (LWDBs); WIOA Section 188 Discrimination Complaint Procedures Governing WIOA Activities and Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Center Activities, which provides guidance on the WIOA Section 188 Discrimination Complaint Procedures; Supplemental Wage Information Collection, which provides guidance for the use of supplemental wage information, when appropriate, to assist in carrying out the performance accountability requirements under section 116 for the WIOA Title I Programs and the Wagner-Peyser Employment Services as amended by Title III; WIOA Roles and Responsibilities, which provides guidance to communicate the roles and responsibilities of various entities created as a result of WIOA; WIOA Worksite Agreement, which provides guidance on the utilization of the standardized Worksite Agreement for all participants in Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth work experience programs, including transitional jobs for Adult or Dislocated Worker program participants; and, Grievance and Complaint Process, which provides guidance to communicate Oklahoma’s instructions for the grievance and complaint process under WIOA. (Page 118) Title I

Oklahoma is focused on accessibility for all job seekers and businesses and employer’s work sites throughout all levels of Oklahoma Works. Working with the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development (GCWED), system partners bring sharper focus on developing and employing more Oklahomans with disabilities. The objective is to provide equitable services to individuals with disabilities and to ensure that all Workforce System partners comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Access for All Initiative The Access for All initiative within Oklahoma Works places a focus on recruitment, hiring, and promotion of individuals with disabilities in the state of Oklahoma’s workforce system. Access for All focuses on the Oklahoma Works system partners as well as employers in the state. This initiative provides training, consulting, and resources to ensure that individuals with disabilities are intentionally included in efforts to achieve greater household wealth for Oklahomans. Access for All equips Oklahoma’s Workforce System with knowledge and resources to make it more accessible to individuals with disabilities that utilize one-stop system programs in person, on the phone, or through the web. Access for All is brought to Oklahoma Works through a partnership between the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services (Oklahoma’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program) and Oklahoma ABLE Tech (Oklahoma’s Assistive Technology Act Program). To help build a foundation for the Access for All initiative, the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services (OKDRS) and Oklahoma ABLE Tech (OKABT), partner to provide regional Access for All technical assistance in the form of, academies, webinars, newsletters, and weekly tips statewide. (Page 148-149) Title I

Oklahoma’s Workforce System commitment to enhanced accessibility continues by incorporating accessibility seamlessly into the everyday business practices of the local areas. Access for All within the Oklahoma Works system, is a standard that has been set to springboard success for Oklahoma’s business and employers and job seekers in reaching Oklahoma’s Goal of Wealth Generation. The one-stop system standards and certification criteria policy are designed to integrate physical and programmatic accessibility by incorporating the Access for All Certification process into the benchmark criteria for center certification. The Access for All Certification process includes two parts—physical and technology. The full Access for All Certification Process details the requirements necessary, and provides tools, to receive certification under the Oklahoma Works Workforce System Access for All initiative. Prior to center certification approval, physical and technology accessibility is reviewed at each Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) center by Certification Teams. The Certification Teams are selected by the LWDBs and are responsible for conducting independent and objective evaluations of one-stop sites and making center certification recommendations to LWDBs. When issues related to physical and programmatic accessibility are identified, an Equally Effective Alternative Access Plan (EEAAP) is created. These plans are designed to function as corrective action plans, which are designed to be monitored regularly and updated by local Equal Opportunity Officers and/or relevant program staff. (Page 150-151) Title I

In January 2018, OOWD issued WIOA Section 188 Discrimination Complaint Procedures Governing WIOA Activities and Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Center Activities (OWDI 01-2018). The policy was developed to centralize complaint processing procedures for equal opportunity and nondiscrimination issues arising in the Oklahoma Works (one-stop) Centers. OOWD partnered with OKDRS to conduct ADA Physical Accessibility Site Reviews, as a part of the center certification process, for every Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Centers and create corrective action plans (Equally Effective Alternative Access Plans) for all centers with barriers to accessibility. Access for All trainings were delivered in 2018. Access for All trainings covered disability etiquette, review of and how to use available assistive devices. (Page 151) Title I

OOWD complies with Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) [29 CFR 38]. National origin discrimination includes Limited English Proficient individuals under 29 CFR Section 38.9 and specifically states that in providing any aid, benefit, service, or training under a WIOA title I-financially assisted program or activity, a recipient must not, directly or through contractual, licensing, or other arrangements, discriminate on the basis of national origin, including LEP which includes English Language Learners (ELL). Additionally, 29 CFR Section 38.41 added “LEP and preferred language” to the list of categories of information that each recipient must record about each applicant, registrant, eligible applicant/registrant, participant, and terminee. It is the policy of the State to provide services and information in a language other than English for customers with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) in order to effectively inform or enable those customers to participate in departmental programs or activities. LWDBs must ensure that above all, these services are free of charge and provided in a timely manner. An LEP individual must be given adequate notice about the existence of interpretation and translation services and that they are available free of charge. (Page 152) Title I

As the federally funded Assistive Technology Act Program for the State of Oklahoma, the mission of Oklahoma ABLE Tech is to get assistive technology ‘AT’ into the hands of Oklahomans with disabilities through activities that provide increased access and acquisition. The DSA has a long standing history of working closely with Oklahoma ABLE Tech to enhance the provision of assistive technology services across the state. Memorandum of Understanding: The DSA and Oklahoma Able Tech, Oklahoma’s AT Act Program have an agreement to provide programmatic technology accessibility details regarding the DSA Access for All initiative under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). Scope of Work: The DSA is leading the Oklahoma Workforce System towards enhanced accessibility. The DSA initiative of Access for All was adopted by the workforce system statewide. This initiative is in partnership with Oklahoma Able Tech within programmatic accessibility, with a goal of creating fully accessible workforce services for Oklahoma job seekers. (Page 246) Title IV

Through the Oklahoma Works American Job centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the centers or through referrals to partner facilities. OESC began a two-phase project focusing upon physical and programmatic accessibility entitled “Thinking Accessibility” within the Workforce Centers, UI Service Centers, UI Adjudication Centers and the Appeal Tribunal. This partnership brings OKDRS and OKABT together to provide the resources and tools to assist OESC on continuing their commitment in serving individuals with disabilities. (Page 299) Title IV

Veterans

Provide an analysis of the State’s workforce development activities, including education and training activities of the core programs, Combined State Plan partner programs included in this plan, and required and optional one-stop delivery system partners.* __________ * Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 30) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Oklahoma Works System Partners: 17 state agency leadership stakeholders who have investment in the workforce development system. Partners include: Office of the Governor, Office of Management and Enterprise Services, Oklahoma Achieves (State Chamber), Oklahoma Board of Private and Vocational Schools, Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, Oklahoma Department of Human Services, Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs, Oklahoma Department of Commerce, Oklahoma Department of Corrections, Oklahoma Employment Security Commission, Oklahoma Health Care Authority, Oklahoma Office of Educational Quality and Accountability, Oklahoma State Department of Education, Oklahoma State Department of Health, and Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. (Page 8) Title I

The strategic planning effort involved the WIOA Core Partners (Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services, the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission, Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, and Office of Workforce Development) as well as other state agency partners who are a part of the state’s workforce development system (Oklahoma Board of Private Vocational Schools, Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology Education, Department of Commerce, Department of Health, Department of Human Services, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Department of Veterans Affairs, Health Care Authority, Office of Educational Quality and Accountability, Office of Management and Enterprise Services, State Department of Education, and State Regents for Higher Education). In addition to these workforce system partners, the Oklahoma State Chamber’s Oklahoma Achieves (formerly the Oklahoma Educated Workforce Initiative), business leaders from all regions of the state, members of our Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development, members of the Workforce Development Boards, and our state leaders were involved in the planning process. The resulting Oklahoma Works Strategic Delivery Plan was approved by Governor Fallin and key state leaders on December 8, 2015 and has subsequently been update twice to improve alignment and incorporate new strategies. This Plan is the overarching workforce development strategy to guide workforce development activities in the state. (Page 32) Title I

The Oklahoma Works System Oversight Subcommittee, established in 2012, is composed of Oklahoma workforce development system partners, led and established by the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development Workforce Systems Oversight Committee. A business member of the GCWED System Oversight Committee is the leader of the subcommittee. System partners include: the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education—Adult Basic Education, the Department of Rehabilitation Services - Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Human Services, the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission--Wagner-Peyser, the State Regents for Higher Education, the Oklahoma Department of Commerce, and Title I programs representing Adults, Dislocated Workers and Youth. It is hoped that other entities, such as the Department of Corrections, and the Departments of Health and Mental Health will eventually be added to establish a more comprehensive approach for creating solutions.

The team has been a cohesive unit since Governor Fallin recognized the necessity to build a new, more responsive, workforce development system to meet the needs of Oklahoma’s businesses and create wealth for the state. This subcommittee was designed to carry out the strategic mission of GCWED and reports to the Workforce System Oversight Committee of that body. (Page 78) Title I

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services (OKDRS), Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding.

OOWD works to develop and support increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Oklahoma Works Center staff routinely refer individuals with disabilities to the OKDRS for more intensive training and job placement opportunities. OKDRS has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Workforce Centers and OKDRS offices. (Page 149) Title I

Memorandum of Understanding:
The DSA and the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMSAS) agreement is for the purpose of the Mental Health Individualized Career Planning Model Project. The focus is on helping youth adults with mental illness and coordinating connections, resources, and referrals for services in the areas of education, employment, housing, maintaining mental/emotional health, and legal/system related needs.

Scope of Work:
The two agencies will work together to address barriers through a program that will provide needed training and technical assistance to providers in the individualized career planning model specific to persons with serious mental illness (SMI). This program will continue training that will result in individualized career planning that will increase the likelihood that persons with SMI will find, obtain, and keep a job in the career field of their choice. (Page 248-249) Title IV

The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on ensuring education officials, school personnel, and VR personnel are cross-trained, have opportunities for networking and collaboration, and receive consistent messages and guidance from the DSA and OSDE.

The DSA will continue to coordinate with non-educational agencies to reach out-of-school youth to support them in their employment efforts. This includes collaboration with subminimum wage employers, workforce development boards, Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, mental health providers, community rehabilitation providers, Oklahoma Department of Human Services, Office of Juvenile Affairs, Oklahoma Parents Center, Oklahoma Family Network, Oklahoma Autism Network, Down Syndrome Association of Oklahoma, and other stakeholders.
The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on performing outreach statewide to identify students with disabilities in need of transition services under IDEA and pre-employment transition services under WIOA, those residing in rural areas, and those low-incidence populations, such as blindness and hearing impairments. The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on joint community and professional presentations to educate and inform LEAs, parents, and others about reaching the needs of youth and students on Section 504 Plans and those with documented disabilities not being served through an IEP or Section 504 Plan. The DSA will work with the Oklahoma Rehabilitation Council's Transition Committee, Oklahoma School for the Blind, and Oklahoma School for the Deaf to conduct outreach activities. This may include, but is not limited to, developing and disseminating public service announcements, making presentations within these schools and LEAs, hosting events for groups of students with disabilities (e.g., advocacy, STEM). (Page 253) Title IV

There are no restrictions on the types of disabilities served through the contracts, although the majority of individuals served continue to be those with intellectual disabilities or serious mental illness as a primary diagnosis. Although most CRPs serve a diverse population of individuals with the most significant barriers to employment, mental health CRPs continue to serve exclusively individuals with serious mental illness.

Mental Health CRPs have the option of providing Supported Employment. DSA, the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services are collaboratively seeking strategies for improving services and enhancing service capacity for individuals with serious mental illness.

DSA will provide outreach to increase the number of community mental health CRPs contracting to provide employment services in an effort to improve the employment outcomes of individuals with serious mental illness. The DSA has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16—25 with serious mental illness. (Page 280) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

In addition to other career services in the Oklahoma Works centers, Oklahoma provides two reemployment services tracks to help Unemployment Insurance (UI) claimants and/or unemployed individuals return to work more quickly: Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment and 50% Eligibility Review Interview.

Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA)

RESEA is an individualized process consisting of an orientation to the Center and all available workforce system resources, a UI eligibility review, an assessment of a claimant’s skills and career goals including any necessary transferable skills discussions, a discussion of job search strategies, establishment of an individual reemployment plan, provision of job referrals, and follow-up appointments. This program addresses the “harder to serve/need intensive” category i.e. those with multiple barriers to employment needing a variety of assistive services to return to work. RESEA claimants have been identified as likely to exhaust UI benefits and unlikely to return to their previous occupation; therefore, they must be scheduled before receiving the 5th week of UI benefits. Additionally, RESEA also serves Unemployment Compensation for ex-service members (UCX) claimants. These reemployment services are provided in an effort to reduce the time a claimant will be paid UI benefits and increase the likelihood the claimant will attain self-sufficient employment. (Page 199) Title I

50% Eligibility Review Interview (ERI) The 50% Eligibility Review Interview (ERI) is delivered in a group process consisting of information on available services, work search review, expansion of work search efforts, and the provision of job referrals. This group is intended to be a triage type, informational session designed to serve the masses; taking far less time than its Reemployment Services counterpart, RESEA. The ERI is conducted with claimants in demand occupations who possess the skills and experience to return to work, often in the same or similar occupation. These claimants are equipped with additional reemployment strategies and tools, and are expected to return to work more quickly. (Page 199) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 42

Occupational Skills Training Service Status Definitions and Reporting Accuracy - 07/06/2020

“The Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD), as the Governor’s chosen Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) administrative entity, provides this technical assistance to the local workforce development areas to ensure appropriate Service Status entries for individuals determined eligible to participant in Occupational Skills Training (OST) under the Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Out-of-School Youth (OSY) programs.

 

Under WIOA, occupational skills training may be provided to individuals in need of training services to obtain or retain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Revised Procedures for Title I Enrollments due to AJC Closures - 03/20/2020

“In light of the recent closures of all Oklahoma American Job Centers (AJCs) due to the COVID-19 pandemic, procedures have been put into place to ensure the ability to serve new clients and enroll eligible individuals into Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs without undue delays.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

OKLAHOMA STATUTES TITLE 40. LABOR - 12/19/2019

“§40-360.  Short title - Oklahoma Employment First Act - Definitions.

 

A.  This act shall be known and may be cited as the "Oklahoma Employment First Act".

 

B.  All state agencies shall coordinate efforts and shall collaborate within and among such agencies to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures and funding support competitive integrated employment of individuals with disabilities.  All state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems in order to track progress toward full implementation of this act….

 

D. As used in this act:

1. "Competitive employment" means work in the competitive labor market, or self-employment, that is performed on a full-time or part-time basis in an integrated setting with the opportunity for advancement and for which a person with a disability is compensated at or above the minimum wage but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by persons without disabilities;

 

2. "Disability" means, with respect to an individual:

a. a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities of such individual,

b. a record of such an impairment, or

c. being regarded as having such an impairment as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended;

 

3. "Integrated setting" means, with respect to an employment outcome, a setting typically found in the community in which applicants or eligible individuals interact with persons without disabilities, other than those who are providing services to those applicants or eligible individuals, to the same extent that individuals without disabilities in comparable positions interact with other persons…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“Riata Center for Entrepreneurship, Spears School of Business at Oklahoma State University (Stillwater, Oklahoma): Veterans Entrepreneurship Program (VEP) ...VEP opens the door to small business ownership by developing skills needed to create and sustaining a business, while coordinating the offering of additional programs and services for service-disabled veterans….

The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of Oklahoma, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—working poor; lower income residents with life changing events such as divorce or new custody actions; hourly wage workers in retail and food service; and independent contractors.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Chambers of commerce, Small business and trade associations, Faith-based organizations, Community-based primary care and pediatric providers, Local Social Security offices, OK State Department of Health,  and Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) locations across the state.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Gayla MachellPhone: (405) 557-0049Email: gayla.machell@laok.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WIOA Policy Center - 06/15/2019

~~This page has documents related to WIOA. Visitors are able to browse through them.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

DRS offers free summer training for young jobseekers with disabilities - 06/03/2019

~~“OKLAHOMA CITY – Career planning and on-the-job training will continue for Oklahoma students with disabilities when school ends, thanks to Transition School to Work.

Students from across the state are signing up for innovative job training programs offered free of charge by Vocational Rehabilitation and Visual services.

VR and VS are divisions of the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services.

“We match up students in our Summer Transition Employment Programs – STEP for short – with paid, part-time employment in a career area they’re interested in,” Transition Coordinator Renee Sansom said. “Then our instructors and VR and VS counselors boost their confidence and develop the personal skills like problem-solving and teamwork that employers value most.”

STEP was previously known as iJobs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Provider List - 05/13/2019

~~This page lists the types of services offered by the current contracted providers

“Provider Agencies contracting for Community Services through Developmental Disabilities Services Division (DDSD). The following is a list of current contracted providers”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Oklahoma Data Validation and Source Documentation Requirements - 05/01/2019

~~“The  Oklahoma  Office  of  Workforce  Development  (OOWD)  as  the  Governor’s  chosen Workforce  Innovation  and  Opportunity  Act  (WIOA)  administrative  entity,  provides  this  issuance as guidance to the workforce system on the State of Oklahoma’s Data Validation and Source  Documentation  Requirements  for  the WIOA  Title  I  Programs  and  the  Wagner-Peyser Employment Services as amended by Title III.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Oklahoma Works Conference - 05/01/2019

~~“The Oklahoma Works Conference is the educational training event of the year for partners working in workforce development. The Conference will take place May 1-3, 2019, and include important content for all partners with workshops including:• Case Management• Customer Service• EEO/Accessibility• Apprenticeships• Financial/Infrastructure• HSE Testing Vendors• Adult Basic Education Program Strategies• ABE/Workforce Co-enrollment Strategies• Career Pathways• Expunging Records• Performance” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

OKLAHOMA STATUTES TITLE 40. LABOR - 12/19/2019

“§40-360.  Short title - Oklahoma Employment First Act - Definitions.

 

A.  This act shall be known and may be cited as the "Oklahoma Employment First Act".

 

B.  All state agencies shall coordinate efforts and shall collaborate within and among such agencies to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures and funding support competitive integrated employment of individuals with disabilities.  All state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems in order to track progress toward full implementation of this act….

 

D. As used in this act:

1. "Competitive employment" means work in the competitive labor market, or self-employment, that is performed on a full-time or part-time basis in an integrated setting with the opportunity for advancement and for which a person with a disability is compensated at or above the minimum wage but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by persons without disabilities;

 

2. "Disability" means, with respect to an individual:

a. a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities of such individual,

b. a record of such an impairment, or

c. being regarded as having such an impairment as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended;

 

3. "Integrated setting" means, with respect to an employment outcome, a setting typically found in the community in which applicants or eligible individuals interact with persons without disabilities, other than those who are providing services to those applicants or eligible individuals, to the same extent that individuals without disabilities in comparable positions interact with other persons…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

Occupational Skills Training Service Status Definitions and Reporting Accuracy - 07/06/2020

“The Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD), as the Governor’s chosen Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) administrative entity, provides this technical assistance to the local workforce development areas to ensure appropriate Service Status entries for individuals determined eligible to participant in Occupational Skills Training (OST) under the Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Out-of-School Youth (OSY) programs.

 

Under WIOA, occupational skills training may be provided to individuals in need of training services to obtain or retain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Revised Procedures for Title I Enrollments due to AJC Closures - 03/20/2020

“In light of the recent closures of all Oklahoma American Job Centers (AJCs) due to the COVID-19 pandemic, procedures have been put into place to ensure the ability to serve new clients and enroll eligible individuals into Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs without undue delays.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

WIOA Policy Center - 06/15/2019

~~This page has documents related to WIOA. Visitors are able to browse through them.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Oklahoma Data Validation and Source Documentation Requirements - 05/01/2019

~~“The  Oklahoma  Office  of  Workforce  Development  (OOWD)  as  the  Governor’s  chosen Workforce  Innovation  and  Opportunity  Act  (WIOA)  administrative  entity,  provides  this  issuance as guidance to the workforce system on the State of Oklahoma’s Data Validation and Source  Documentation  Requirements  for  the WIOA  Title  I  Programs  and  the  Wagner-Peyser Employment Services as amended by Title III.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Developmental Disabilities Services - 04/04/2019

~~“Our mission is to help individuals with developmental disabilities and their families help themselves to lead safer, healthier, more independent and productive lives.

Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS) serves persons ages 3 and up who have a primary diagnosis of intellectual disabilities.  Persons served may also have other developmental disabilities in addition to intellectual disabilities such as autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, etc.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Special Education - 03/15/2019

~~“The Oklahoma State Department of Education, Special Education Services (OSDE-SES) is committed to providing guidance and support in order to promote excellence in education from infancy to adulthood for children with disabilities as outlined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA).

This mission is accomplished by disseminating information to families, schools, communities, and agencies through meaningful resources, fostering collaborative partnerships and providing timely and accurate technical assistance.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment - 01/01/2019

“A VA Veteran who is eligible for an evaluation under Chapter 31 must first apply for services and receive an appointment with a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC). The VRC will work with the Veteran to determine if an employment handicap exists as a result of his or her service- connected disability. If an employment handicap is established and the Veteran is found entitled to services. The VRC and the Veteran will continue counseling to select a track of services and jointly develop a plan to address the Veteran's rehabilitation and employment needs. For additional information, please visit the Federal VA site at Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment.

The rehabilitation plan will specify an employment or independent living goal, identify intermediate goals, and outline services and resources that VA will provide to assist the Veteran to achieve his / her goals. The VRC and the Veteran will work together to implement the plan to assist the Veteran to achieve his or her employment and / or independent living goals.“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

Veterans Preference (State Employment) - 01/01/2019

~~“In establishing employment lists of eligible persons for competitive and noncompetitive appointment, certain preferences shall be allowed for veterans honorably discharged from the Armed Forces of the United State[74:840-4.14(A)]. A description of the categories of preference can be found by accessing the web-link.”

Systems
  • Other

Vet Centers - 12/25/2018

~~“Vet Center Call Center 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)Life isn't always easy after a deployment. That's where Vet Centers can help.We are the people in VA who welcome home war veterans with honor by providing quality readjustment counseling in a caring manner. Vet Centers understand and appreciate Veterans’ war experiences while assisting them and their family members toward a successful post-war adjustment in or near their community. All services are free of cost and are strictly confidential.Readjustment counseling is a wide range of psycho social services offered to eligible Veterans, Service members, and their families in the effort to make a successful transition from military to civilian life.  They include:• Individual and group counseling for Veterans, Service members, and their families• Family counseling for military related issues• Bereavement counseling for families who experience an active duty death• Military sexual trauma counseling and referral• Outreach and education including PDHRA, community events, etc.• Substance abuse assessment and referral• Employment assessment & referral• VBA benefits explanation and referral• Screening & referral for medical issues including TBI, depression, etc.” 

Systems
  • Other

13th Annual Oklahoma Transition Institute “Strategies for Success: Creating Connections” - 10/15/2018

~~“The Department of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) offers a summer work experience program, iJobs, for students with disabilities in, Tulsa, Owasso, and Collinsville. iJobs  is  a  summer  work  training  and  experience  program for high school students with disabilities. DRS clients apply and interview to participate in this summer program. It begins the first week of June with a week  of  classroom employability  instruction,  independent  living  skills,  and  practice  navigating  public  transportation.  Students spend  the  remainder  of  summer  working  on  part-time jobs in their areas of interest within their home communities, while spending one day each  week  obtaining  additional  instruction,  volunteering,  or  accessing  resources  in  the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment at the University of Oklahoma

“The Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment facilitates successful secondary and postsecondary educational, vocational and personal outcomes for students and adults with disabilities. ZC faculty, staff, and students do this through self-determination oriented evaluation, research, development, transition education instruction, and dissemination of best educational and support practices. The ZC also prepares undergraduate and graduate students to assume leadership roles in schools, universities, and support organizations.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Cherokee Nation DEI Grant - 10/01/2017

“Cherokee Nation (CN DEI), is a self-governance tribal government. CN DEI will fund two Disability Resource Coordinators and implement activities that will increase access to and the participation of individuals with disabilities in the WIOA employment and training services with a focus on improvements needed to make the Cherokee Nation Career Services career pathways system fully inclusive of and accessible to individuals with disabilities. CN DEI will increase the number of individuals with disabilities who access Career Pathways utilizing vocational training, alternative education, work experience, career development skills, supportive services, and on-the-job training. Targeted industry sectors will include Healthcare, Tourism/Hospitality and Manufacturing.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“Riata Center for Entrepreneurship, Spears School of Business at Oklahoma State University (Stillwater, Oklahoma): Veterans Entrepreneurship Program (VEP) ...VEP opens the door to small business ownership by developing skills needed to create and sustaining a business, while coordinating the offering of additional programs and services for service-disabled veterans….

The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of Oklahoma, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—working poor; lower income residents with life changing events such as divorce or new custody actions; hourly wage workers in retail and food service; and independent contractors.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Chambers of commerce, Small business and trade associations, Faith-based organizations, Community-based primary care and pediatric providers, Local Social Security offices, OK State Department of Health,  and Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) locations across the state.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Gayla MachellPhone: (405) 557-0049Email: gayla.machell@laok.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DRS offers free summer training for young jobseekers with disabilities - 06/03/2019

~~“OKLAHOMA CITY – Career planning and on-the-job training will continue for Oklahoma students with disabilities when school ends, thanks to Transition School to Work.

Students from across the state are signing up for innovative job training programs offered free of charge by Vocational Rehabilitation and Visual services.

VR and VS are divisions of the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services.

“We match up students in our Summer Transition Employment Programs – STEP for short – with paid, part-time employment in a career area they’re interested in,” Transition Coordinator Renee Sansom said. “Then our instructors and VR and VS counselors boost their confidence and develop the personal skills like problem-solving and teamwork that employers value most.”

STEP was previously known as iJobs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Provider List - 05/13/2019

~~This page lists the types of services offered by the current contracted providers

“Provider Agencies contracting for Community Services through Developmental Disabilities Services Division (DDSD). The following is a list of current contracted providers”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Oklahoma Works Conference - 05/01/2019

~~“The Oklahoma Works Conference is the educational training event of the year for partners working in workforce development. The Conference will take place May 1-3, 2019, and include important content for all partners with workshops including:• Case Management• Customer Service• EEO/Accessibility• Apprenticeships• Financial/Infrastructure• HSE Testing Vendors• Adult Basic Education Program Strategies• ABE/Workforce Co-enrollment Strategies• Career Pathways• Expunging Records• Performance” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Oklahoma Department of Human Resources Training Resources - 02/14/2019

~~“This informational packet is meant as a starting point to finding training resources in Oklahoma.  Many programs are dependent upon outside funding, so some programs may be unavailable while new ones may have started.

This packet provides resources for people seeking training due to a disability, criminal background, and loss of previous job.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

~~“This event brought together key community stakeholders, individuals with disabilities, family members and educators to network and discuss state-of-the-art strategies to ensure competitive and equitable employment for Oklahoman’s with disabilities. The attendees come from different backgrounds and experiences, but had a common goal:  to see that individuals with disabilities experience full inclusion in the workplace and in the community.

 As stakeholder’s, we strive to move toward employment first, and employment for all. Together we understand Employment First is a declaration of both philosophy and policy stating that:  Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. Our goal is for the Employment First philosophy to raise awareness of the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

National Center for Disability Education and Training DRS Training

The National Center for Disability Education and Training (NCDET) designs and delivers cutting-edge training to staff of employment providers in a variety of competency-based courses leading to certification. The methods of training range from classroom to accessible multimedia products marketed across the United States.

Please click on the link below for more information about trainings offered through our contract with the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services. NCDET has delivered training under this  contract since 1987 and has prepared thousands of Employment Training Specialists to provide employment supports to individuals with significant disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

This program has several functions. It “develops new  employment services,  provides technical assistance, and training to contracted agencies and DRS staff statewide.    ESS  administers the supported employment program, which is a specialized type of job placement for people with the most significant  barriers to employment. Supported Employment provides  intensive, specialized onsite  training and long term supports  to assist individuals to find employment, learn their job tasks, and maintain successful employment.   Employment and Retention  is an  employment program  for individuals with significant barriers to employment.  This program is designed to provide individuals with short term on and off site training and supports to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment.   Job Placement is an employment program   intended to assist  individuals   requiring  minimal support  in finding full-time employment.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R04.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Living Choice/Money Follows the Person

“The Living Choice Project is Oklahoma’s brand name for the Money Follows the Person grant, and is administered by the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA). Oklahoma’s Living Choice Project is designed to transform the current long-term care system by promoting community based services instead of institutional services.

The Living Choice project serves three populations, the physically disabled (19-64), older persons (65 and older), and intellectually disabled. Individuals in any of these three populations are eligible for transition if they have resided in a qualified institution (i.e. nursing facility, intermediate care facility for persons with intellectual disabilities) for at least ninety days prior to their proposed transition date, and have had one day of their institutional stay paid by Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma HCBS Transition Plan

The purpose of this Transition Plan is to ensure the individuals receiving Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) are integrated in and have access to supports in the community, including opportunities to seek employment, work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources.  The State has prepared a revised transition plan in order to comply with federal regulations for community-based settings. Overall, the Transition Plan provides assurance that the individuals receiving HCBS have the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS. This updated Transition Plan outlines the proposed process that Oklahoma will be utilizing to ensure implementation of the new HCBS requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX State Plan  The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of any state’s Medicaid program.  As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act (the Act) the State Plan is developed by the state and approved by DHHS/CMS. Without a State Plan, OHCA would not be eligible for federal funding for providing SoonerCare services.  Essentially, the State Plan is our state’s agreement that it will conform to the requirements of the Act and the official issuances of DHHS/CMS.  The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act.
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

OK Developmental Disabilities Service Division Home and Community-Based Services Waiver

“Developmental Disabilities Service Division, a division of OKDHS, serves individuals who are 3 years of age and older who have mental retardation and certain persons with related conditions who would otherwise require placement in an intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

With the motto "Labor Conquers All Things," it's clear that Oklahoma values the contributions of all workers, including workers with disabilities, and has plenty to offer when it comes to career development.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oklahoma’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,943,079
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.87%
Change from
2017 to 2018
327,111
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.21%
Change from
2017 to 2018
129,170
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.89%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39.49%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.86%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.00%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 3,923,561 3,930,864 3,943,079
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 334,056 339,773 327,111
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 123,568 127,608 129,170
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,495,651 1,502,073 1,523,986
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 36.99% 37.56% 39.49%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.44% 76.34% 77.00%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90% 4.30% 3.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.60% 21.90% 20.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.30% 14.70% 14.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 303,865 316,907 316,459
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 316,387 318,169 312,061
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 468,477 477,134 475,522
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 45,965 45,378 43,570
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 32,172 37,678 33,908
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 48,113 50,277 50,351
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,685 6,697 5,198
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 484 N/A 1,118
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 44,725 45,511 44,029
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,803 9,608 8,732

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,992 3,949 3,967
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.40% 4.30% 4.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 126,364 125,634 124,606

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 11,622 10,635 12,316
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 30,820 30,587 34,830
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 55,803 53,035 55,687
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.80% 20.00% 22.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 0.30% 20.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.80% 0.80% 60.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.70% 1.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 105 167 111
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 370 411 343
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 663 858 769
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,387 7,021 7,102
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,291 1,100 599
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 981 447 285
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 43.00% 41.00% 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 25.48 11.43 7.29

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,947
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 346 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 439 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,041 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 952 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 694 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 475 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.70% 28.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,023 4,316 4,341
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 193,085 192,660 192,540
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 174 158 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 196 142 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $20,163,000 $20,371,000 $20,762,029
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $10,908,000 $10,539,000 $9,666,645
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,866,000 $5,602,000 $5,491,343
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 60.00% 61.00% 64.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,175 1,182 1,222
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,314 2,284 2,133
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 63.30 63.10 63.49

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.76% 70.87% 67.98%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.44% 8.26% 9.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.23% 0.79% 0.64%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.72% 99.57% 99.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.27% 22.32% 24.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 60.19% 62.74% 60.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.28% 74.74% 76.60%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.92% 40.42% 36.02%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 693,919
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 736
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 45,014
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 459,485
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 504,499
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 43
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 387
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 430
AbilityOne wages (products). $401,419
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,994,972

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 2 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 51 62 47
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 7 7 6
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 60 71 55
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 7
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,116 2,411 1,776
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 243 218 113
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,359 2,629 1,896

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~DSA Programs Field Representatives serve on the Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council. DSA Employment Support Services (ESS) staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the Employment First Alliance, which has a national goal of increased competitive integrated employment by 50% in the states. As a result of the Employment First Alliance, the Oklahoma operates under the Employment First Law.

DSA ESS staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) -DSA ESS staff represents DSA on the Oklahoma Developmental Disabilities Council. (Page 260) Title IV
 

Customized Employment

~~The initiative’s full array of workforce partners must align their efforts and take active roles in ensuring resources are used in ways that maximize, strengthen, and support the education to workforce pipeline for all Oklahomans.

According to a 2018 Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis conducted with WIOA Core Partners, accomplishments since 2016, include but are not limited to:

ALIGNMENT:
• Further development of the Oklahoma Works Strategic Plan with additional strategies to strengthen broadband access, and facilitate entrepreneurship.
• Creation and distribution of a transportation asset map to identify gaps and duplication impacting access to school and work.
• Development of “Oklahoma Works for All,” a pilot project across WIOA Core Partners and private partners for customized employment supports for businesses and potential employees with intellectual and developmental disabilities to be tested in the South Central Workforce Development Area.
• Development of “My Reemployment Plan,” a project across WIOA Core Partners to align case-management with readiness and transition services
• Joint WIOA policy development and release to reflect WIOA administration change and WIA to WIOA transition, including: local and regional planning guidance and approval, competitive procurement of one-stop operators, and Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Center certification of American Job Centers, among others. (Page 34) Title I

DSA has contracts with private non-profit, for-profit, and government Community Rehabilitation Service Providers (CRPs) of Supported Employment and other employment programs for individuals with significant barriers to employment. CRPs request the opportunity to provide Supported Employment, employment and retention (i.e. short term job coaching), job placement, JOBS (short-term placement), work-adjustment training, employment support and transitional employment services for DSA job seekers. DSA approves contracts based on pre-established criteria, including acceptable levels of payment for outcomes achieved.

DSA will continue to increase employment CRPs to meet the needs statewide focusing in rural areas, by initiating a customized employment contract within designated areas across the state. The Employment Support Services Unit (ESS) educates potential CRPs and DSA field staff of available contracts. The list of contracts and CRPs is available on the DSA intranet. (Page 255-256) Title IV

The Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) serves as the Medicaid Agency for provisions of title XIX of the Social Security Act. The OHCA and Department of Human Services (DHS) maintain an MOA for provision of services. The DHS administers waiver programs which include extended services as a part of the waiver. Each Medicaid waiver individual plan includes outcomes which would create a pathway to achieve competitive integrated employment. DRS has implemented a new customized employment contract which can be utilized by individuals to achieve employment. Increased education and in-service with contractors has occurred to encourage contracts with both the DSA and DDS to ensure a more streamlined access to competitive integrated employment opportunities. The DHS and DSA utilizes an MOA to outline the provisions and responsibilities for extended services utilized in Medicaid funded programs. (Pages 259- 260) Title IV

Research determined that there are not minority groups disproportionately underserved in Oklahoma, but the DSA with the SRC held focus groups to obtain further qualitative information. Based on the last assessment, research was focused on rural counties that were identified as being underserved. Despite active DSA programs to serve SSI/SSDI recipients, focus group attendees reported there is a family disconnect and fear regarding the loss of benefits. This fear results in the parents of youth with disabilities being resistant to services that are employment oriented.

Those in need of supported or customized employment in some rural areas of the state also face a lack of CRP vendors in remote areas, including southeastern Oklahoma. Needs were identified for more employer outreach to address accessibility issues with employer application methods, additional cooperation between schools and DSA counselors in the setting of appropriate career goals for youth with disabilities and making sure IPE and IEP goals are in-line prior to graduation.

In rural areas, there is a gap in service when serving the homeless populations and those that lack transportation. This is a result of missing auxiliary services that are available through other agencies and/or programs in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. In addition, transportation is a service gap that affects individuals with disabilities not just in rural areas, but across the state. (Page 272) Title IV

DSA will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSA is initiating a customized employment program. The DSA is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 281) Title IV

Customized Employment Services Project
Memorandum of Understanding: The DSA entered into a contracted agreement with 24 vendors, known as the Contractor.

Scope of Work: This is a project to provide Customized Employment Services and/or other employment services to individuals in Priority Group 1 with the most significant disabilities. Some of the other employment services are available to individuals in Priority Group 2 with significant disabilities. This contract is intended to meet the requirements of WIOA. Career Exploration and Internship services are optional and can be used with individuals in Priority Group 1 or 2, receiving CE, SE or ER contract services. Onsite Supports and Training and Extended Services for Transition (EST) can be used with individuals in Priority Group 1 only, receiving CE or SE contract services. The DSA Counselor, working with the individual and the Contractor, will designate the services to be used. The Discovery and Profile and Career Exploration services only, can be used with transition aged youth, age 16 or above, on a Trial Work Plan or Individualized Plan of Employment, to gather assessment information related to employment, and to help identify additional employment related transition services and/or a career path. (Page 281) Title IV

Partner Responsibilities: The Contractor will:

1. The Contractor has completed discovery activities that utilize a person centered approach to describe “who the individual is”. and guides the planning process to develop a customized job. The Contractor will summarize the Discovery findings on the individual’s profile. The Contractor has provided benefits planning information to any individual who is receiving Social Security Administration (SSA) benefits, and has referred the individual to a DSA Benefits Planning Specialist if the individual, payee, or family member has requested the service.

2.The Contractor will provide opportunities for the individual to explore potential occupations, job conditions, interests and job tasks in order to enhance their vocational goal and prepare the individual for a successful job match. Exploration activities could include but are not limited to: job shadowing, work-site tour, job sampling, trial work experiences, volunteer experiences and situational assessments.

3.The Contractor will schedule and conduct a Team Meeting with the individual, DRS Counselor and all other relevant team members to create a CE Employer Development Plan.

4.The Contractor has created the Visual Résumé with the individual. This résumé was used in the job development process to highlight the individual’s potential contributions and the types of tasks the individual is interested and capable of performing. The Contractor has explained Customized Employment and outlined what the employer can expect from the individual and the Contractor during the job development process. The Contractor has developed a successful job match that meets the individual’s contributions, conditions and interests and the employer’s unmet needs. A job can be developed within an individual’s family’s business as long as the job meets the definition of competitive integrated employment. (Page 282) Title IV

5. The individual has worked successfully for a minimum of eight (8) weeks beginning with the first (1st) day of employment and has received all appropriate onsite supports and training. At the completion of this service, individuals can be moved to CE Maintenance if they meet the following criteria: individual is working at least sixty percent (60%) of their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE, and on-site support needs cannot be more than twenty-five percent (25%) of their total work hours per month.

6. The individual has worked successfully for a minimum four of (4) and a maximum of eight (8) additional weeks beyond the CE Job Coaching I and has received all appropriate onsite supports and training. The Contractor can move the individual to CE Maintenance after the maintenance criteria is met. To move to CE Maintenance, the individual must be working at sixty percent (60%) of their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE, and their on-site support needs cannot be more than twenty-five percent (25%) of their total work hours per month. If the maintenance criteria is not met at the end of six (6) weeks, then a team meeting is required to determine if the individual needs to be moved to Onsite Supports and Training at the completion of CE Job Coaching II. (Page 282) Title II

8. The individual can be moved to CE Maintenance at the end of any four (4) week increment if they meet the maintenance criteria. The maintenance criteria specifies the individual must be working at sixty (60%) of their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE, and on-site support needs cannot be more than twenty-five (25%) of their total work hours per month.

9. If the individual remains in this service at the end of the initial three and a half (3½) months and has not been moved to CE Maintenance, a team meeting is required. Additional Onsite Supports and Training can be authorized and provided if the team determines it is needed to assist the individual with meeting the maintenance criteria.

10. The individual has worked successfully for at least four (4) weeks, and received all appropriate onsite supports and training. To achieve maintenance, the individual must work at least one entire work week without EC support, must work at their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE for the four (4) weeks of maintenance, their onsite/offsite support and training needs must be less than or equal to twenty percent (20%) of their total work hours per month, the employer is satisfied with the individual’s job performance, and the individual is satisfied with their job. At the completion of CE Maintenance, if the individual has met all of the requirements, they can be moved to the CE Employment Outcome Service. (Page 283) Title IV

Referral Process: At the time of referral, the DSA Counselor will provide the Contractor with a copy of the Eligibility Determination Form, Individualized Plan of Employment (IPE) or Trial Work Plan, and Personal Information Form. Once the intake is scheduled, the Contractor will send a CE Authorization Request Form to the DSA Counselor, Rehabilitation Technician and Program Manager. The DSA Counselor authorizes for the first two services to be used (i.e. CE Discovery and Profile and Career Exploration, etc.) within five (5) business days.

The Contractor should contact the DSA Counselor and ask for the authorization to be sent if not received within five (5) business days. The Contractor will only provide services that have been pre-authorized by the DSA Counselor. The only services that can be provided under a trial work plan include the CE Discovery and Profile service and the Career Exploration service. (Page 284) Title IV

The DSA conducted an Employment Support Services 360 analysis resulting in the need for supported or customized employment in some rural areas of the state, also a lack of CRP vendors in remote areas, including southeastern Oklahoma. (Page 290) Title IV

Online Introduction to Positive Behavior Supports in the Workplace (prerequisite for positive behavior supports and instructional supports); Positive Behavior in the Workplace, customized employment and instructional supports. Following completion of the required training listed above, six hours of continuing education is required each year. The DSA staff also provides quarterly training and two additional advanced trainings annually to CRPs to keep them up-to-date on current best practices.

DSA monitors contract compliance, provides an outcomes based report on data drawn from the AWARE case management program. DSA reports to CRPs on minimum contract standards and whether those standards have been met or will require a plan for improvement. Every CRP has a TA who helps resolve service delivery problems and monitors for contract compliance on an annual basis. (Page 306) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Oklahoma is encouraging the braiding of funding and leveraging of resources through the state’s new resource leveraging tool to be released in the fall of 2016. In this online tool, state agencies, including the core partners, can identify existing workforce development activities and send requests to partner. These requests are then supported and facilitated with the assistance of the Office of the Governor, if needed. Similarly, with the release of this tool, the Office of the Governor, under Oklahoma Works, in July of 2016, challenged each state agency and each Workforce Development Board, to identify one new partner (private or public) to engage.

With stagnant or declining funding from state and federal funding streams, the State is continually seeking more efficient ways to provide services to Oklahomans. Resources continue to be one of the largest threats to achieving the goals set forth in this plan, according to a 2018 Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats analysis with WIOA Core Partners. Despite other potential threats to success, including the complexity and isolation of the state’s data systems, the culture shift required for systems thinking as opposed to programs thinking under WIOA, and the culture shift required by today’s global economy for skills--and the workforce-- to be flexible, adaptable, and stackable, opportunities exist to utilize the capacity in place, or to enhance capacity, for the sake of our talent pipeline. Optimizing capacity to focus on opportunities, such as a 2018 Gubernatorial election to strengthen workforce advocacy, system-building and cross-training to support systems thinking and customer-centered, or human-centered, design of the workforce development system, will allow the system to adapt to changing resources in the form of funds and/or human capital. (Page 45) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~7. implement a series of surveys developed by the national LEAD Center to assess the experience of:

• Job seekers
• Employers
• American Job Center staff

to determine their readiness and satisfaction with employers and the Oklahoma Works Workforce Development System;

*The LEAD Center is a collaborative of disability, workforce and economic empowerment organization dedicated to improving employment and economic advancement outcomes for all people with disabilities — funded by the Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor.

8. continue to work collaboratively with DSA to provide technical assistance and support to ACT regarding the accessibility of web-based versions of the ACT test and WorkKeys assessments in an effort to remove technological barriers for both students and job seekers with disabilities; Accessibility standards have been defined by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI). The ultimate goal is to allow students and job seekers to participate independently and in the most integrated setting possible in compliance with non-discrimination provisions. (Page 247) Title IV
.

School to Work Transition

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.

The DSA will maintain a formal interagency agreement with the State Educational Agency (SEA) as well as relationships at the local level with LEAs. The focus of our work will be to forage those relationships and partner with stakeholders to provide services to youth and students with disabilities to help them prepare for life after high school, including, but not limited to, further education/training, competitive integrated employment, independent living and social skills, self-determination, and self-advocacy. It is our intent to perform outreach to underrepresented groups, such as those on Section 504 Plans, youth in foster care, adjudicated youth, out-of-school youth, and those with other disabilities not documented on a 504 or IEP. The DSA does not have any updated transition and pre-employment transition policies but intend to complete the revisions by October 1, 2019. (Page 250) Title IV

The DSA will coordinate services with local educational agency staff to help prepare youth and students with disabilities for competitive integrated employment. DSA staff will share results of the vocational evaluation and other assessments, as well as progress reports for various work experiences with school personnel for the purpose of including information in the IEP and transition planning process. The DSA will work with school personnel to not only have input into the IEP process but also to access a copy of the IEP for assistance with coordination with the VR IPE.

The DSA and educational officials will provide the following types of services:

o Consultation and technical assistance services to assist State educational agencies and local educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postsecondary life, including employment.

o Transition services to youth with disabilities and students with disabilities, for which a vocational rehabilitation counselor works in concert with educational agencies, providers of job training programs, providers of services under the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1396 et seq.), entities designated by the State to provide services for individuals with developmental disabilities, centers for independent living (as defined in section 796a of this title), housing and transportation authorities, workforce development systems, and businesses and employers. (Page 251) Title IV

The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on working with VR staff and LEA staff to facilitate completion of a comprehensive and quality Individualized Education Program (IEP) and Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that appropriately includes transition planning and coordination of services.

The OSDE will continue to enforce the IDEA requirements regarding inviting those agencies responsible for providing or paying for transition services, including referral to VR at the age of 15 so services can be in place by the age of 16.

The OSDE will:
(1) provide to the LEAs a referral form to VR through the state IEP development system; (2) educate LEAs on the best practices for inviting VR and other transition providers to participate in the development of the IEP and participate through multiple means (e.g., in person, by phone, virtually, by providing documents in advance) in IEP and other meetings; and (3) continue to monitor the involvement of, invitations to, and referrals to VR through the state monitoring system, Indicator 13 checklist, and other means as decided. 3. The ODRS will continue to enforce the WIOA requirements regarding attending IEP and other meetings (when invited) as well as the process for receiving and responding to referrals, including referral to VR at the age of 15 1/2 so services can be in place by the age of 16.

The DSA will:
o Provide to the OSDE the content to be included in the referral to VR form
o Train its staff on the requirements of receiving the referral form along with the release of confidential information from LEAs and other referral sources
o Train its staff to develop internal procedures with each school for how referrals will be submitted to the local VR counselor
o Train its staff on best practices for engaging with schools and teams, planning and attending IEP and other meetings, to participate in the development of the IEP and participate through multiple means (e.g., in person, by phone, virtually, by providing documents in advance)
o Train its staff on providing regular updates to the referring source on the status of that referral, if the student/family applied for services, if a plan for employment is in place, what services may be implemented at school, etc
o Encourage its staff and schools to take advantage of the online VR application to streamline the application process, possibly in lieu of even a referral
o Continue to educate and encourage its staff to actively contribute to the development of annual goals and coordinated services to be included in the IEP to help the student reach his or her postsecondary goals
o Train its staff to assist schools in developing annual IEP goals around the VR services provided to support the achievement of the IEP and IPE goals; and work with the OSDE and LEAs to improve documentation of the collaborative transition service delivery occurring for a student by encouraging wording in the IEP. (Page 252) Title IV

The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on performing outreach statewide to identify students with disabilities in need of transition services under IDEA and pre-employment transition services under WIOA, those residing in rural areas, and those low-incidence populations, such as blindness and hearing impairments. The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on joint community and professional presentations to educate and inform LEAs, parents, and others about reaching the needs of youth and students on Section 504 Plans and those with documented disabilities not being served through an IEP or Section 504 Plan. The DSA will work with the Oklahoma Rehabilitation Council's Transition Committee, Oklahoma School for the Blind, and Oklahoma School for the Deaf to conduct outreach activities. This may include, but is not limited to, developing and disseminating public service announcements, making presentations within these schools and LEAs, hosting events for groups of students with disabilities (e.g., advocacy, STEM). (Page 253) Title IV

Because the definition of a "student with a disability," for the VR program includes an individual with a disability for purposes of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, it is broader than the definition under IDEA, VR is authorized to provide transition services to this broader population of students with disabilities than LEAs under IDEA. Since the VR program may serve students with disabilities, including those individuals with a disability for purposes of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, these students may not have an IEP under IDEA, and, therefore, would not be eligible for or receiving special education and related services under IDEA.

The OSDE will continue to educate LEAs on the availability of VR services for students with disabilities on section 504 plans and encourage the referral of such students to the VR counselors. In addition, the Rehabilitation Act also allows the VR agency to provide pre-employment transition services to "potentially" eligible students with disabilities. This may include those students who are not receiving special education and related services under an IEP, students who are not receiving services or accommodations under a section 504 plan, and who have documented disabilities (e.g., a student may wear a hearing aid, have chronic health issues, such as asthma, leukemia, diabetes, suffer from depression, bipolar, and anxiety. (Page 255) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Make recommendations, inform, coordinate and facilitate statewide efforts to improve Oklahomans’ exposure to high-demand career and entrepreneurship opportunities, along with the education and training required for entry into and advancement within a chosen career. Develop industry sector strategies in state and regional ecosystems to ensure that the education and training system is delivering the skills needed by employers.

Goals/Objectives
o Create a plan for Career Pathways efforts to be based on industry sectors within Oklahoma’s state and regional ecosystems.
o Establish strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.
o Create and use Career Pathways approaches to increase the proportion of low-skill learners who ultimately earn a degree or certificate.
o Increase high school graduation rates - decrease high school dropout rates.
o Increase the percentage of Oklahoma workers with a recognized postsecondary credential. (A credential consisting of an industry-recognized certificate or certification, a certificate of completion of an apprenticeship, a license recognized by the State or Federal government, or an associate or baccalaureate degree.
o Reinforce the alignment with Registered Apprenticeship for earn-and-learn opportunities.
o Use performance data to demonstrate progress and impact, thereby supporting partner buy-in and reinforcing continued engagement over time.
o Make Career Pathways part of the Board certification process.
o Introduce employers and educators to the value of partnering by describing best practices and success stories.
o Develop or research pilots and models. (Page 120-121) Title I

Apprenticeship

During annual monitoring the state will require the local areas to submit documentation describing how the 14 program elements are being implemented. The state will also include a sample of youth RFP’s and contracts in their annual monitoring to assure that the 14 elements were included in the program design and framework and are available to all youth in the WIOA program. There is a section in our youth program monitoring tool that specifically asks our local boards for a description of how the following program elements are being implemented and we request a list of the entities providing the elements and the services available at least annual in accordance with monitoring requirements:

o Tutoring, study skills training, instruction and evidence-based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent (including a recognized certificate of attendance or similar document for individuals with disabilities) or for a recognized postsecondary credential:

o Alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate:

o Paid and unpaid work experiences that have academic and occupational education as a component of the work experience:

o Occupational skill training, which includes priority consideration for training programs that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials that align with in-demand industry sectors or occupations in the local area involved, if the Local WDB determines that the programs meet the quality criteria described in WIOA sec. 123:

o Education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster:

o Leadership development opportunities, including community service and peer-centered activities encouraging responsibility and other positive social and civic behaviors: o Supportive services, including the services listed in § 681.570: o Adult mentoring for a duration of at least 12 months that may occur both during and after program participation: o Follow-up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as provided in § 681.580: o Comprehensive guidance and counseling, which may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the individual youth: o Financial literacy education: o Entrepreneurial skills training: o Services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area, such as career awareness, career counseling, and career exploration services: o Activities that help youth prepare for and transition to postsecondary education and training: (Page 191) Title I

Prepare and distribute “Tool Kit of Solutions”— a checklist of the physical elements reviewed during 2015 site visits, current status, meets/does not meet guideline, ADA guideline, remedy, resources, timeframe for completion, date of completion o Landlord responsibilities fact sheet: new construction and leases o Certificate of completion for remediation of items o Sites will self—assess every two years using Tool Kit of Solutions listed above o Site point of contact will send an updated checklist to the DSA ADA Coordinator o Implement site review prior to renovations and new construction, DSA ADA Coordinator will provide technical assistance (Page 294) Title IV

Accessibility work with private sector companies  ACT WorkKeys Continue working with DRS outreach efforts to improve the accessibility of the Career Readiness Certificate (CRC) product for individuals with hearing loss and/or blind and visually impaired. (Page 295) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Research determined that there are not minority groups disproportionately underserved in Oklahoma, but the DSA with the SRC held focus groups to obtain further qualitative information. Based on the last assessment, research was focused on rural counties that were identified as being underserved. Despite active DSA programs to serve SSI/SSDI recipients, focus group attendees reported there is a family disconnect and fear regarding the loss of benefits. This fear results in the parents of youth with disabilities being resistant to services that are employment oriented.
Those in need of supported or customized employment in some rural areas of the state also face a lack of CRP vendors in remote areas, including southeastern Oklahoma. Needs were identified for more employer outreach to address accessibility issues with employer application methods, additional cooperation between schools and DSA counselors in the setting of appropriate career goals for youth with disabilities and making sure IPE and IEP goals are in-line prior to graduation.

In rural areas, there is a gap in service when serving the homeless populations and those that lack transportation. This is a result of missing auxiliary services that are available through other agencies and/or programs in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. In addition, transportation is a service gap that affects individuals with disabilities not just in rural areas, but across the state. (Page 272) Title IV

The DSA conducted the Employment Support Services 360 analysis that surveyed the CRP providers, the DSA staff who work with CRP providers, and the DSA consumers that were served through CRPs. As a result of the analysis, DSA needs were identified for improvement in the areas of collaboration with CRP vendors to ensure vocational goals match the skill levels of clients to place job seekers in positions that match their vocation goal, additional vendor training regarding disability types and billing and/or paperwork and the need for CRPs to have more employer contacts and providers in rural areas. CRPs requested more training opportunities from the DSA, including benefits training regarding SSI/SSDI. Consumers who were served by the CRPs reported a need for ADA and sensitivity training for some CRP employees, but expressed an overall appreciation for the patience of the job coaches and reported that the services boosted the client’s confidence in their ability to work. The majority of clients served by CRPs reported their job was a good fit (80.5%) and 77.8% reported they were happy with the job with a median wage reported of $9.00. (Page 273) Title IV

Ticket to Work Program
Coordinated activities under Ticket to Work are delivered by a statewide Ticket to Work Coordinator. The coordinator will organize activities within the DSA and with partnership employment networks (EN’s) to ensure the needs of ticket holders are met at a maximum level. Ongoing outreach efforts will be conducted to recruit new partnership employment networks in order to provide more opportunities to assist ticket holders in reaching Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level employment outcomes. The coordinator will continue to oversee the ticket to work hotline and will provide ticket holders with information and referral for state VR, partnership EN’s, and external EN’s. (Page 285) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~Under the new section 511, the determination of individuals who may benefit from employment services, the DSA has developed contracts with CRP to provide Trial Work Services to establish the ability to benefit from employment services.

DSA maintains an MOA with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) describing collaboration on delivery of Supported Employment services and transitional employment services.

The DSA has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five-community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness.

DSA maintains an MOA with the DDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual disabilities. The MOA outlines the coordination of services and identifies the DSA as first dollar funding source for competitive integrated employment. DDS continues to provide extended services for individuals with intellectual disabilities in Supported Employment services by utilizing the DDS Home and Community Based Waiver (HCBW) and DDS state dollars. The HCBW is utilized to provide the long-term ongoing supports. DSA has maintained an MOA with DDS since 1989. Under the MOA, the HCBW is also utilized to provide pre-vocational services. (Page 257) Title IV

DSA ESS staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) -DSA ESS staff represents DSA on the Oklahoma Developmental Disabilities Council.

DDS Staff serves on the Oklahoma Transition Council (OTC) resulting in statewide conferences, resources, technical assistance, and additional professional development opportunities. Many issues and challenges are brought forth with a wide range of experts to assist the DSA and DDS in resolving and achieving their goals.

The DSA Statewide Transition Coordinator will work with DDS staff to ensure staff from each agency, schools, families, and CRPs understand the changes in WIOA regarding sub-minimum wage, are well-trained, and that Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) are provided to students with disabilities accessing vocational rehabilitation services through the DSA.

The DSA ESS staff will work with DDS staff to ensure CRPs and staff at each agency is provided ongoing training and consultation required by WIOA for any youth with a significant disability hired at subminimum wage. The partners will also ensure the required reviews take place according to WIOA to ensure every opportunity for achieving full competitive integrated employment. (Page 260) Title IV

DSA conducts annual outreach and review services for individuals earning subminimum wage under a 14c certificate. Individuals will receive information about career counseling and information and referral services, as well as other components to the Vocational Rehabilitation program. The intent is to inform all individuals of the VR process in relation to seeking and obtaining competitive integrated employment. All individuals newly hired have to receive the career counseling and information and referral services two times the first year of employment and annually afterwards. In 2016-2017 the DSA reached approximately 4000 individuals through this outreach effort. The DSA also worked with the Department of Labor to provide information and training services to employers who hold the 14c certificate. All newly hired individuals have to receive the career counseling and information and referral services two times the first year of employment and annually afterwards. The DSA provides documentation in collaboration with the local school district of specific services to youth 24 and younger, if those individuals are known by the DSA to be seeking subminimum wage work.

Other DSA program areas that are utilized to expand and improve services include:
• Visual Services Center in Tulsa and Oklahoma City
• DVS Technology Lab and Training Lab in Tulsa and Oklahoma City
• DVS Adult Blind Living Evaluation (ABLE)
• DVS Training Adult Program (TAP)
• DVR Technology Lab and Training Lab in Oklahoma City
• Oklahoma School for the Blind (OSB) transition work adjustment program
• Partnering with OSB for Vocational Evaluations
• Project Search
• Business Enterprise Program
• Office of Juvenile Affairs collaborations
• Department of Veterans Affairs collaborations
• On-line applications
• Customized Employment
• JOBS Contract
• Wellness Recovery Action Plan Training (WRAP) (Page 285-286) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity, which provides guidance to communicate Oklahoma’s process and procedures regarding nondiscrimination and equal opportunity procedures that apply to all Local Workforce Development Areas (LWDBs); WIOA Section 188 Discrimination Complaint Procedures Governing WIOA Activities and Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Center Activities, which provides guidance on the WIOA Section 188 Discrimination Complaint Procedures; Supplemental Wage Information Collection, which provides guidance for the use of supplemental wage information, when appropriate, to assist in carrying out the performance accountability requirements under section 116 for the WIOA Title I Programs and the Wagner-Peyser Employment Services as amended by Title III; WIOA Roles and Responsibilities, which provides guidance to communicate the roles and responsibilities of various entities created as a result of WIOA; WIOA Worksite Agreement, which provides guidance on the utilization of the standardized Worksite Agreement for all participants in Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth work experience programs, including transitional jobs for Adult or Dislocated Worker program participants; and, Grievance and Complaint Process, which provides guidance to communicate Oklahoma’s instructions for the grievance and complaint process under WIOA. (Page 118) Title I

Oklahoma is focused on accessibility for all job seekers and businesses and employer’s work sites throughout all levels of Oklahoma Works. Working with the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development (GCWED), system partners bring sharper focus on developing and employing more Oklahomans with disabilities. The objective is to provide equitable services to individuals with disabilities and to ensure that all Workforce System partners comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Access for All Initiative The Access for All initiative within Oklahoma Works places a focus on recruitment, hiring, and promotion of individuals with disabilities in the state of Oklahoma’s workforce system. Access for All focuses on the Oklahoma Works system partners as well as employers in the state. This initiative provides training, consulting, and resources to ensure that individuals with disabilities are intentionally included in efforts to achieve greater household wealth for Oklahomans. Access for All equips Oklahoma’s Workforce System with knowledge and resources to make it more accessible to individuals with disabilities that utilize one-stop system programs in person, on the phone, or through the web. Access for All is brought to Oklahoma Works through a partnership between the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services (Oklahoma’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program) and Oklahoma ABLE Tech (Oklahoma’s Assistive Technology Act Program). To help build a foundation for the Access for All initiative, the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services (OKDRS) and Oklahoma ABLE Tech (OKABT), partner to provide regional Access for All technical assistance in the form of, academies, webinars, newsletters, and weekly tips statewide. (Page 148-149) Title I

Oklahoma’s Workforce System commitment to enhanced accessibility continues by incorporating accessibility seamlessly into the everyday business practices of the local areas. Access for All within the Oklahoma Works system, is a standard that has been set to springboard success for Oklahoma’s business and employers and job seekers in reaching Oklahoma’s Goal of Wealth Generation. The one-stop system standards and certification criteria policy are designed to integrate physical and programmatic accessibility by incorporating the Access for All Certification process into the benchmark criteria for center certification. The Access for All Certification process includes two parts—physical and technology. The full Access for All Certification Process details the requirements necessary, and provides tools, to receive certification under the Oklahoma Works Workforce System Access for All initiative. Prior to center certification approval, physical and technology accessibility is reviewed at each Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) center by Certification Teams. The Certification Teams are selected by the LWDBs and are responsible for conducting independent and objective evaluations of one-stop sites and making center certification recommendations to LWDBs. When issues related to physical and programmatic accessibility are identified, an Equally Effective Alternative Access Plan (EEAAP) is created. These plans are designed to function as corrective action plans, which are designed to be monitored regularly and updated by local Equal Opportunity Officers and/or relevant program staff. (Page 150-151) Title I

In January 2018, OOWD issued WIOA Section 188 Discrimination Complaint Procedures Governing WIOA Activities and Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Center Activities (OWDI 01-2018). The policy was developed to centralize complaint processing procedures for equal opportunity and nondiscrimination issues arising in the Oklahoma Works (one-stop) Centers. OOWD partnered with OKDRS to conduct ADA Physical Accessibility Site Reviews, as a part of the center certification process, for every Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Centers and create corrective action plans (Equally Effective Alternative Access Plans) for all centers with barriers to accessibility. Access for All trainings were delivered in 2018. Access for All trainings covered disability etiquette, review of and how to use available assistive devices. (Page 151) Title I

OOWD complies with Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) [29 CFR 38]. National origin discrimination includes Limited English Proficient individuals under 29 CFR Section 38.9 and specifically states that in providing any aid, benefit, service, or training under a WIOA title I-financially assisted program or activity, a recipient must not, directly or through contractual, licensing, or other arrangements, discriminate on the basis of national origin, including LEP which includes English Language Learners (ELL). Additionally, 29 CFR Section 38.41 added “LEP and preferred language” to the list of categories of information that each recipient must record about each applicant, registrant, eligible applicant/registrant, participant, and terminee. It is the policy of the State to provide services and information in a language other than English for customers with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) in order to effectively inform or enable those customers to participate in departmental programs or activities. LWDBs must ensure that above all, these services are free of charge and provided in a timely manner. An LEP individual must be given adequate notice about the existence of interpretation and translation services and that they are available free of charge. (Page 152) Title I

As the federally funded Assistive Technology Act Program for the State of Oklahoma, the mission of Oklahoma ABLE Tech is to get assistive technology ‘AT’ into the hands of Oklahomans with disabilities through activities that provide increased access and acquisition. The DSA has a long standing history of working closely with Oklahoma ABLE Tech to enhance the provision of assistive technology services across the state. Memorandum of Understanding: The DSA and Oklahoma Able Tech, Oklahoma’s AT Act Program have an agreement to provide programmatic technology accessibility details regarding the DSA Access for All initiative under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). Scope of Work: The DSA is leading the Oklahoma Workforce System towards enhanced accessibility. The DSA initiative of Access for All was adopted by the workforce system statewide. This initiative is in partnership with Oklahoma Able Tech within programmatic accessibility, with a goal of creating fully accessible workforce services for Oklahoma job seekers. (Page 246) Title IV

Through the Oklahoma Works American Job centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the centers or through referrals to partner facilities. OESC began a two-phase project focusing upon physical and programmatic accessibility entitled “Thinking Accessibility” within the Workforce Centers, UI Service Centers, UI Adjudication Centers and the Appeal Tribunal. This partnership brings OKDRS and OKABT together to provide the resources and tools to assist OESC on continuing their commitment in serving individuals with disabilities. (Page 299) Title IV

Veterans

Provide an analysis of the State’s workforce development activities, including education and training activities of the core programs, Combined State Plan partner programs included in this plan, and required and optional one-stop delivery system partners.* __________ * Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 30) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Oklahoma Works System Partners: 17 state agency leadership stakeholders who have investment in the workforce development system. Partners include: Office of the Governor, Office of Management and Enterprise Services, Oklahoma Achieves (State Chamber), Oklahoma Board of Private and Vocational Schools, Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, Oklahoma Department of Human Services, Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs, Oklahoma Department of Commerce, Oklahoma Department of Corrections, Oklahoma Employment Security Commission, Oklahoma Health Care Authority, Oklahoma Office of Educational Quality and Accountability, Oklahoma State Department of Education, Oklahoma State Department of Health, and Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. (Page 8) Title I

The strategic planning effort involved the WIOA Core Partners (Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services, the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission, Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, and Office of Workforce Development) as well as other state agency partners who are a part of the state’s workforce development system (Oklahoma Board of Private Vocational Schools, Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology Education, Department of Commerce, Department of Health, Department of Human Services, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Department of Veterans Affairs, Health Care Authority, Office of Educational Quality and Accountability, Office of Management and Enterprise Services, State Department of Education, and State Regents for Higher Education). In addition to these workforce system partners, the Oklahoma State Chamber’s Oklahoma Achieves (formerly the Oklahoma Educated Workforce Initiative), business leaders from all regions of the state, members of our Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development, members of the Workforce Development Boards, and our state leaders were involved in the planning process. The resulting Oklahoma Works Strategic Delivery Plan was approved by Governor Fallin and key state leaders on December 8, 2015 and has subsequently been update twice to improve alignment and incorporate new strategies. This Plan is the overarching workforce development strategy to guide workforce development activities in the state. (Page 32) Title I

The Oklahoma Works System Oversight Subcommittee, established in 2012, is composed of Oklahoma workforce development system partners, led and established by the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development Workforce Systems Oversight Committee. A business member of the GCWED System Oversight Committee is the leader of the subcommittee. System partners include: the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education—Adult Basic Education, the Department of Rehabilitation Services - Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Human Services, the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission--Wagner-Peyser, the State Regents for Higher Education, the Oklahoma Department of Commerce, and Title I programs representing Adults, Dislocated Workers and Youth. It is hoped that other entities, such as the Department of Corrections, and the Departments of Health and Mental Health will eventually be added to establish a more comprehensive approach for creating solutions.

The team has been a cohesive unit since Governor Fallin recognized the necessity to build a new, more responsive, workforce development system to meet the needs of Oklahoma’s businesses and create wealth for the state. This subcommittee was designed to carry out the strategic mission of GCWED and reports to the Workforce System Oversight Committee of that body. (Page 78) Title I

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services (OKDRS), Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding.

OOWD works to develop and support increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Oklahoma Works Center staff routinely refer individuals with disabilities to the OKDRS for more intensive training and job placement opportunities. OKDRS has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Workforce Centers and OKDRS offices. (Page 149) Title I

Memorandum of Understanding:
The DSA and the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMSAS) agreement is for the purpose of the Mental Health Individualized Career Planning Model Project. The focus is on helping youth adults with mental illness and coordinating connections, resources, and referrals for services in the areas of education, employment, housing, maintaining mental/emotional health, and legal/system related needs.

Scope of Work:
The two agencies will work together to address barriers through a program that will provide needed training and technical assistance to providers in the individualized career planning model specific to persons with serious mental illness (SMI). This program will continue training that will result in individualized career planning that will increase the likelihood that persons with SMI will find, obtain, and keep a job in the career field of their choice. (Page 248-249) Title IV

The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on ensuring education officials, school personnel, and VR personnel are cross-trained, have opportunities for networking and collaboration, and receive consistent messages and guidance from the DSA and OSDE.

The DSA will continue to coordinate with non-educational agencies to reach out-of-school youth to support them in their employment efforts. This includes collaboration with subminimum wage employers, workforce development boards, Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, mental health providers, community rehabilitation providers, Oklahoma Department of Human Services, Office of Juvenile Affairs, Oklahoma Parents Center, Oklahoma Family Network, Oklahoma Autism Network, Down Syndrome Association of Oklahoma, and other stakeholders.
The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on performing outreach statewide to identify students with disabilities in need of transition services under IDEA and pre-employment transition services under WIOA, those residing in rural areas, and those low-incidence populations, such as blindness and hearing impairments. The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on joint community and professional presentations to educate and inform LEAs, parents, and others about reaching the needs of youth and students on Section 504 Plans and those with documented disabilities not being served through an IEP or Section 504 Plan. The DSA will work with the Oklahoma Rehabilitation Council's Transition Committee, Oklahoma School for the Blind, and Oklahoma School for the Deaf to conduct outreach activities. This may include, but is not limited to, developing and disseminating public service announcements, making presentations within these schools and LEAs, hosting events for groups of students with disabilities (e.g., advocacy, STEM). (Page 253) Title IV

There are no restrictions on the types of disabilities served through the contracts, although the majority of individuals served continue to be those with intellectual disabilities or serious mental illness as a primary diagnosis. Although most CRPs serve a diverse population of individuals with the most significant barriers to employment, mental health CRPs continue to serve exclusively individuals with serious mental illness.

Mental Health CRPs have the option of providing Supported Employment. DSA, the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services are collaboratively seeking strategies for improving services and enhancing service capacity for individuals with serious mental illness.

DSA will provide outreach to increase the number of community mental health CRPs contracting to provide employment services in an effort to improve the employment outcomes of individuals with serious mental illness. The DSA has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16—25 with serious mental illness. (Page 280) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

In addition to other career services in the Oklahoma Works centers, Oklahoma provides two reemployment services tracks to help Unemployment Insurance (UI) claimants and/or unemployed individuals return to work more quickly: Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment and 50% Eligibility Review Interview.

Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA)

RESEA is an individualized process consisting of an orientation to the Center and all available workforce system resources, a UI eligibility review, an assessment of a claimant’s skills and career goals including any necessary transferable skills discussions, a discussion of job search strategies, establishment of an individual reemployment plan, provision of job referrals, and follow-up appointments. This program addresses the “harder to serve/need intensive” category i.e. those with multiple barriers to employment needing a variety of assistive services to return to work. RESEA claimants have been identified as likely to exhaust UI benefits and unlikely to return to their previous occupation; therefore, they must be scheduled before receiving the 5th week of UI benefits. Additionally, RESEA also serves Unemployment Compensation for ex-service members (UCX) claimants. These reemployment services are provided in an effort to reduce the time a claimant will be paid UI benefits and increase the likelihood the claimant will attain self-sufficient employment. (Page 199) Title I

50% Eligibility Review Interview (ERI) The 50% Eligibility Review Interview (ERI) is delivered in a group process consisting of information on available services, work search review, expansion of work search efforts, and the provision of job referrals. This group is intended to be a triage type, informational session designed to serve the masses; taking far less time than its Reemployment Services counterpart, RESEA. The ERI is conducted with claimants in demand occupations who possess the skills and experience to return to work, often in the same or similar occupation. These claimants are equipped with additional reemployment strategies and tools, and are expected to return to work more quickly. (Page 199) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 42

Occupational Skills Training Service Status Definitions and Reporting Accuracy - 07/06/2020

“The Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD), as the Governor’s chosen Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) administrative entity, provides this technical assistance to the local workforce development areas to ensure appropriate Service Status entries for individuals determined eligible to participant in Occupational Skills Training (OST) under the Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Out-of-School Youth (OSY) programs.

 

Under WIOA, occupational skills training may be provided to individuals in need of training services to obtain or retain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Revised Procedures for Title I Enrollments due to AJC Closures - 03/20/2020

“In light of the recent closures of all Oklahoma American Job Centers (AJCs) due to the COVID-19 pandemic, procedures have been put into place to ensure the ability to serve new clients and enroll eligible individuals into Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs without undue delays.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

OKLAHOMA STATUTES TITLE 40. LABOR - 12/19/2019

“§40-360.  Short title - Oklahoma Employment First Act - Definitions.

 

A.  This act shall be known and may be cited as the "Oklahoma Employment First Act".

 

B.  All state agencies shall coordinate efforts and shall collaborate within and among such agencies to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures and funding support competitive integrated employment of individuals with disabilities.  All state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems in order to track progress toward full implementation of this act….

 

D. As used in this act:

1. "Competitive employment" means work in the competitive labor market, or self-employment, that is performed on a full-time or part-time basis in an integrated setting with the opportunity for advancement and for which a person with a disability is compensated at or above the minimum wage but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by persons without disabilities;

 

2. "Disability" means, with respect to an individual:

a. a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities of such individual,

b. a record of such an impairment, or

c. being regarded as having such an impairment as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended;

 

3. "Integrated setting" means, with respect to an employment outcome, a setting typically found in the community in which applicants or eligible individuals interact with persons without disabilities, other than those who are providing services to those applicants or eligible individuals, to the same extent that individuals without disabilities in comparable positions interact with other persons…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“Riata Center for Entrepreneurship, Spears School of Business at Oklahoma State University (Stillwater, Oklahoma): Veterans Entrepreneurship Program (VEP) ...VEP opens the door to small business ownership by developing skills needed to create and sustaining a business, while coordinating the offering of additional programs and services for service-disabled veterans….

The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of Oklahoma, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—working poor; lower income residents with life changing events such as divorce or new custody actions; hourly wage workers in retail and food service; and independent contractors.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Chambers of commerce, Small business and trade associations, Faith-based organizations, Community-based primary care and pediatric providers, Local Social Security offices, OK State Department of Health,  and Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) locations across the state.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Gayla MachellPhone: (405) 557-0049Email: gayla.machell@laok.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WIOA Policy Center - 06/15/2019

~~This page has documents related to WIOA. Visitors are able to browse through them.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

DRS offers free summer training for young jobseekers with disabilities - 06/03/2019

~~“OKLAHOMA CITY – Career planning and on-the-job training will continue for Oklahoma students with disabilities when school ends, thanks to Transition School to Work.

Students from across the state are signing up for innovative job training programs offered free of charge by Vocational Rehabilitation and Visual services.

VR and VS are divisions of the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services.

“We match up students in our Summer Transition Employment Programs – STEP for short – with paid, part-time employment in a career area they’re interested in,” Transition Coordinator Renee Sansom said. “Then our instructors and VR and VS counselors boost their confidence and develop the personal skills like problem-solving and teamwork that employers value most.”

STEP was previously known as iJobs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Provider List - 05/13/2019

~~This page lists the types of services offered by the current contracted providers

“Provider Agencies contracting for Community Services through Developmental Disabilities Services Division (DDSD). The following is a list of current contracted providers”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Oklahoma Data Validation and Source Documentation Requirements - 05/01/2019

~~“The  Oklahoma  Office  of  Workforce  Development  (OOWD)  as  the  Governor’s  chosen Workforce  Innovation  and  Opportunity  Act  (WIOA)  administrative  entity,  provides  this  issuance as guidance to the workforce system on the State of Oklahoma’s Data Validation and Source  Documentation  Requirements  for  the WIOA  Title  I  Programs  and  the  Wagner-Peyser Employment Services as amended by Title III.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Oklahoma Works Conference - 05/01/2019

~~“The Oklahoma Works Conference is the educational training event of the year for partners working in workforce development. The Conference will take place May 1-3, 2019, and include important content for all partners with workshops including:• Case Management• Customer Service• EEO/Accessibility• Apprenticeships• Financial/Infrastructure• HSE Testing Vendors• Adult Basic Education Program Strategies• ABE/Workforce Co-enrollment Strategies• Career Pathways• Expunging Records• Performance” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

OKLAHOMA STATUTES TITLE 40. LABOR - 12/19/2019

“§40-360.  Short title - Oklahoma Employment First Act - Definitions.

 

A.  This act shall be known and may be cited as the "Oklahoma Employment First Act".

 

B.  All state agencies shall coordinate efforts and shall collaborate within and among such agencies to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures and funding support competitive integrated employment of individuals with disabilities.  All state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems in order to track progress toward full implementation of this act….

 

D. As used in this act:

1. "Competitive employment" means work in the competitive labor market, or self-employment, that is performed on a full-time or part-time basis in an integrated setting with the opportunity for advancement and for which a person with a disability is compensated at or above the minimum wage but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by persons without disabilities;

 

2. "Disability" means, with respect to an individual:

a. a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities of such individual,

b. a record of such an impairment, or

c. being regarded as having such an impairment as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended;

 

3. "Integrated setting" means, with respect to an employment outcome, a setting typically found in the community in which applicants or eligible individuals interact with persons without disabilities, other than those who are providing services to those applicants or eligible individuals, to the same extent that individuals without disabilities in comparable positions interact with other persons…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

Occupational Skills Training Service Status Definitions and Reporting Accuracy - 07/06/2020

“The Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD), as the Governor’s chosen Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) administrative entity, provides this technical assistance to the local workforce development areas to ensure appropriate Service Status entries for individuals determined eligible to participant in Occupational Skills Training (OST) under the Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Out-of-School Youth (OSY) programs.

 

Under WIOA, occupational skills training may be provided to individuals in need of training services to obtain or retain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Revised Procedures for Title I Enrollments due to AJC Closures - 03/20/2020

“In light of the recent closures of all Oklahoma American Job Centers (AJCs) due to the COVID-19 pandemic, procedures have been put into place to ensure the ability to serve new clients and enroll eligible individuals into Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs without undue delays.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

WIOA Policy Center - 06/15/2019

~~This page has documents related to WIOA. Visitors are able to browse through them.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Oklahoma Data Validation and Source Documentation Requirements - 05/01/2019

~~“The  Oklahoma  Office  of  Workforce  Development  (OOWD)  as  the  Governor’s  chosen Workforce  Innovation  and  Opportunity  Act  (WIOA)  administrative  entity,  provides  this  issuance as guidance to the workforce system on the State of Oklahoma’s Data Validation and Source  Documentation  Requirements  for  the WIOA  Title  I  Programs  and  the  Wagner-Peyser Employment Services as amended by Title III.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Developmental Disabilities Services - 04/04/2019

~~“Our mission is to help individuals with developmental disabilities and their families help themselves to lead safer, healthier, more independent and productive lives.

Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS) serves persons ages 3 and up who have a primary diagnosis of intellectual disabilities.  Persons served may also have other developmental disabilities in addition to intellectual disabilities such as autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, etc.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Special Education - 03/15/2019

~~“The Oklahoma State Department of Education, Special Education Services (OSDE-SES) is committed to providing guidance and support in order to promote excellence in education from infancy to adulthood for children with disabilities as outlined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA).

This mission is accomplished by disseminating information to families, schools, communities, and agencies through meaningful resources, fostering collaborative partnerships and providing timely and accurate technical assistance.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment - 01/01/2019

“A VA Veteran who is eligible for an evaluation under Chapter 31 must first apply for services and receive an appointment with a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC). The VRC will work with the Veteran to determine if an employment handicap exists as a result of his or her service- connected disability. If an employment handicap is established and the Veteran is found entitled to services. The VRC and the Veteran will continue counseling to select a track of services and jointly develop a plan to address the Veteran's rehabilitation and employment needs. For additional information, please visit the Federal VA site at Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment.

The rehabilitation plan will specify an employment or independent living goal, identify intermediate goals, and outline services and resources that VA will provide to assist the Veteran to achieve his / her goals. The VRC and the Veteran will work together to implement the plan to assist the Veteran to achieve his or her employment and / or independent living goals.“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

Veterans Preference (State Employment) - 01/01/2019

~~“In establishing employment lists of eligible persons for competitive and noncompetitive appointment, certain preferences shall be allowed for veterans honorably discharged from the Armed Forces of the United State[74:840-4.14(A)]. A description of the categories of preference can be found by accessing the web-link.”

Systems
  • Other

Vet Centers - 12/25/2018

~~“Vet Center Call Center 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)Life isn't always easy after a deployment. That's where Vet Centers can help.We are the people in VA who welcome home war veterans with honor by providing quality readjustment counseling in a caring manner. Vet Centers understand and appreciate Veterans’ war experiences while assisting them and their family members toward a successful post-war adjustment in or near their community. All services are free of cost and are strictly confidential.Readjustment counseling is a wide range of psycho social services offered to eligible Veterans, Service members, and their families in the effort to make a successful transition from military to civilian life.  They include:• Individual and group counseling for Veterans, Service members, and their families• Family counseling for military related issues• Bereavement counseling for families who experience an active duty death• Military sexual trauma counseling and referral• Outreach and education including PDHRA, community events, etc.• Substance abuse assessment and referral• Employment assessment & referral• VBA benefits explanation and referral• Screening & referral for medical issues including TBI, depression, etc.” 

Systems
  • Other

13th Annual Oklahoma Transition Institute “Strategies for Success: Creating Connections” - 10/15/2018

~~“The Department of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) offers a summer work experience program, iJobs, for students with disabilities in, Tulsa, Owasso, and Collinsville. iJobs  is  a  summer  work  training  and  experience  program for high school students with disabilities. DRS clients apply and interview to participate in this summer program. It begins the first week of June with a week  of  classroom employability  instruction,  independent  living  skills,  and  practice  navigating  public  transportation.  Students spend  the  remainder  of  summer  working  on  part-time jobs in their areas of interest within their home communities, while spending one day each  week  obtaining  additional  instruction,  volunteering,  or  accessing  resources  in  the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment at the University of Oklahoma

“The Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment facilitates successful secondary and postsecondary educational, vocational and personal outcomes for students and adults with disabilities. ZC faculty, staff, and students do this through self-determination oriented evaluation, research, development, transition education instruction, and dissemination of best educational and support practices. The ZC also prepares undergraduate and graduate students to assume leadership roles in schools, universities, and support organizations.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Cherokee Nation DEI Grant - 10/01/2017

“Cherokee Nation (CN DEI), is a self-governance tribal government. CN DEI will fund two Disability Resource Coordinators and implement activities that will increase access to and the participation of individuals with disabilities in the WIOA employment and training services with a focus on improvements needed to make the Cherokee Nation Career Services career pathways system fully inclusive of and accessible to individuals with disabilities. CN DEI will increase the number of individuals with disabilities who access Career Pathways utilizing vocational training, alternative education, work experience, career development skills, supportive services, and on-the-job training. Targeted industry sectors will include Healthcare, Tourism/Hospitality and Manufacturing.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“Riata Center for Entrepreneurship, Spears School of Business at Oklahoma State University (Stillwater, Oklahoma): Veterans Entrepreneurship Program (VEP) ...VEP opens the door to small business ownership by developing skills needed to create and sustaining a business, while coordinating the offering of additional programs and services for service-disabled veterans….

The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of Oklahoma, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—working poor; lower income residents with life changing events such as divorce or new custody actions; hourly wage workers in retail and food service; and independent contractors.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Chambers of commerce, Small business and trade associations, Faith-based organizations, Community-based primary care and pediatric providers, Local Social Security offices, OK State Department of Health,  and Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) locations across the state.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Gayla MachellPhone: (405) 557-0049Email: gayla.machell@laok.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DRS offers free summer training for young jobseekers with disabilities - 06/03/2019

~~“OKLAHOMA CITY – Career planning and on-the-job training will continue for Oklahoma students with disabilities when school ends, thanks to Transition School to Work.

Students from across the state are signing up for innovative job training programs offered free of charge by Vocational Rehabilitation and Visual services.

VR and VS are divisions of the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services.

“We match up students in our Summer Transition Employment Programs – STEP for short – with paid, part-time employment in a career area they’re interested in,” Transition Coordinator Renee Sansom said. “Then our instructors and VR and VS counselors boost their confidence and develop the personal skills like problem-solving and teamwork that employers value most.”

STEP was previously known as iJobs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Provider List - 05/13/2019

~~This page lists the types of services offered by the current contracted providers

“Provider Agencies contracting for Community Services through Developmental Disabilities Services Division (DDSD). The following is a list of current contracted providers”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Oklahoma Works Conference - 05/01/2019

~~“The Oklahoma Works Conference is the educational training event of the year for partners working in workforce development. The Conference will take place May 1-3, 2019, and include important content for all partners with workshops including:• Case Management• Customer Service• EEO/Accessibility• Apprenticeships• Financial/Infrastructure• HSE Testing Vendors• Adult Basic Education Program Strategies• ABE/Workforce Co-enrollment Strategies• Career Pathways• Expunging Records• Performance” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Oklahoma Department of Human Resources Training Resources - 02/14/2019

~~“This informational packet is meant as a starting point to finding training resources in Oklahoma.  Many programs are dependent upon outside funding, so some programs may be unavailable while new ones may have started.

This packet provides resources for people seeking training due to a disability, criminal background, and loss of previous job.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

~~“This event brought together key community stakeholders, individuals with disabilities, family members and educators to network and discuss state-of-the-art strategies to ensure competitive and equitable employment for Oklahoman’s with disabilities. The attendees come from different backgrounds and experiences, but had a common goal:  to see that individuals with disabilities experience full inclusion in the workplace and in the community.

 As stakeholder’s, we strive to move toward employment first, and employment for all. Together we understand Employment First is a declaration of both philosophy and policy stating that:  Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. Our goal is for the Employment First philosophy to raise awareness of the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

National Center for Disability Education and Training DRS Training

The National Center for Disability Education and Training (NCDET) designs and delivers cutting-edge training to staff of employment providers in a variety of competency-based courses leading to certification. The methods of training range from classroom to accessible multimedia products marketed across the United States.

Please click on the link below for more information about trainings offered through our contract with the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services. NCDET has delivered training under this  contract since 1987 and has prepared thousands of Employment Training Specialists to provide employment supports to individuals with significant disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

This program has several functions. It “develops new  employment services,  provides technical assistance, and training to contracted agencies and DRS staff statewide.    ESS  administers the supported employment program, which is a specialized type of job placement for people with the most significant  barriers to employment. Supported Employment provides  intensive, specialized onsite  training and long term supports  to assist individuals to find employment, learn their job tasks, and maintain successful employment.   Employment and Retention  is an  employment program  for individuals with significant barriers to employment.  This program is designed to provide individuals with short term on and off site training and supports to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment.   Job Placement is an employment program   intended to assist  individuals   requiring  minimal support  in finding full-time employment.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R04.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Living Choice/Money Follows the Person

“The Living Choice Project is Oklahoma’s brand name for the Money Follows the Person grant, and is administered by the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA). Oklahoma’s Living Choice Project is designed to transform the current long-term care system by promoting community based services instead of institutional services.

The Living Choice project serves three populations, the physically disabled (19-64), older persons (65 and older), and intellectually disabled. Individuals in any of these three populations are eligible for transition if they have resided in a qualified institution (i.e. nursing facility, intermediate care facility for persons with intellectual disabilities) for at least ninety days prior to their proposed transition date, and have had one day of their institutional stay paid by Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma HCBS Transition Plan

The purpose of this Transition Plan is to ensure the individuals receiving Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) are integrated in and have access to supports in the community, including opportunities to seek employment, work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources.  The State has prepared a revised transition plan in order to comply with federal regulations for community-based settings. Overall, the Transition Plan provides assurance that the individuals receiving HCBS have the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS. This updated Transition Plan outlines the proposed process that Oklahoma will be utilizing to ensure implementation of the new HCBS requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX State Plan  The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of any state’s Medicaid program.  As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act (the Act) the State Plan is developed by the state and approved by DHHS/CMS. Without a State Plan, OHCA would not be eligible for federal funding for providing SoonerCare services.  Essentially, the State Plan is our state’s agreement that it will conform to the requirements of the Act and the official issuances of DHHS/CMS.  The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act.
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

OK Developmental Disabilities Service Division Home and Community-Based Services Waiver

“Developmental Disabilities Service Division, a division of OKDHS, serves individuals who are 3 years of age and older who have mental retardation and certain persons with related conditions who would otherwise require placement in an intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

With the motto "Labor Conquers All Things," it's clear that Oklahoma values the contributions of all workers, including workers with disabilities, and has plenty to offer when it comes to career development.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oklahoma’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,943,079
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.87%
Change from
2017 to 2018
327,111
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.21%
Change from
2017 to 2018
129,170
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.89%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39.49%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.86%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.00%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 3,923,561 3,930,864 3,943,079
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 334,056 339,773 327,111
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 123,568 127,608 129,170
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,495,651 1,502,073 1,523,986
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 36.99% 37.56% 39.49%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.44% 76.34% 77.00%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90% 4.30% 3.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.60% 21.90% 20.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.30% 14.70% 14.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 303,865 316,907 316,459
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 316,387 318,169 312,061
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 468,477 477,134 475,522
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 45,965 45,378 43,570
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 32,172 37,678 33,908
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 48,113 50,277 50,351
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,685 6,697 5,198
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 484 N/A 1,118
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 44,725 45,511 44,029
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,803 9,608 8,732

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,992 3,949 3,967
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.40% 4.30% 4.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 126,364 125,634 124,606

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 11,622 10,635 12,316
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 30,820 30,587 34,830
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 55,803 53,035 55,687
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.80% 20.00% 22.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20% 0.30% 20.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.80% 0.80% 60.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.70% 1.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 105 167 111
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 370 411 343
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 663 858 769
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,387 7,021 7,102
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,291 1,100 599
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 981 447 285
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 43.00% 41.00% 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 25.48 11.43 7.29

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
3,947
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 346 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 439 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,041 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 952 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 694 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 475 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 29.70% 28.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,023 4,316 4,341
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 193,085 192,660 192,540
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 174 158 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 196 142 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $20,163,000 $20,371,000 $20,762,029
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $10,908,000 $10,539,000 $9,666,645
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,866,000 $5,602,000 $5,491,343
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 60.00% 61.00% 64.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,175 1,182 1,222
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,314 2,284 2,133
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 63.30 63.10 63.49

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.76% 70.87% 67.98%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.44% 8.26% 9.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.23% 0.79% 0.64%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.72% 99.57% 99.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.27% 22.32% 24.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 60.19% 62.74% 60.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 82.28% 74.74% 76.60%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.92% 40.42% 36.02%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 693,919
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 736
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 45,014
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 459,485
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 504,499
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 43
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 387
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 430
AbilityOne wages (products). $401,419
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,994,972

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 2 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 51 62 47
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 7 7 6
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 60 71 55
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 7
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,116 2,411 1,776
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 243 218 113
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,359 2,629 1,896

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~DSA Programs Field Representatives serve on the Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council. DSA Employment Support Services (ESS) staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the Employment First Alliance, which has a national goal of increased competitive integrated employment by 50% in the states. As a result of the Employment First Alliance, the Oklahoma operates under the Employment First Law.

DSA ESS staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) -DSA ESS staff represents DSA on the Oklahoma Developmental Disabilities Council. (Page 260) Title IV
 

Customized Employment

~~The initiative’s full array of workforce partners must align their efforts and take active roles in ensuring resources are used in ways that maximize, strengthen, and support the education to workforce pipeline for all Oklahomans.

According to a 2018 Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis conducted with WIOA Core Partners, accomplishments since 2016, include but are not limited to:

ALIGNMENT:
• Further development of the Oklahoma Works Strategic Plan with additional strategies to strengthen broadband access, and facilitate entrepreneurship.
• Creation and distribution of a transportation asset map to identify gaps and duplication impacting access to school and work.
• Development of “Oklahoma Works for All,” a pilot project across WIOA Core Partners and private partners for customized employment supports for businesses and potential employees with intellectual and developmental disabilities to be tested in the South Central Workforce Development Area.
• Development of “My Reemployment Plan,” a project across WIOA Core Partners to align case-management with readiness and transition services
• Joint WIOA policy development and release to reflect WIOA administration change and WIA to WIOA transition, including: local and regional planning guidance and approval, competitive procurement of one-stop operators, and Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Center certification of American Job Centers, among others. (Page 34) Title I

DSA has contracts with private non-profit, for-profit, and government Community Rehabilitation Service Providers (CRPs) of Supported Employment and other employment programs for individuals with significant barriers to employment. CRPs request the opportunity to provide Supported Employment, employment and retention (i.e. short term job coaching), job placement, JOBS (short-term placement), work-adjustment training, employment support and transitional employment services for DSA job seekers. DSA approves contracts based on pre-established criteria, including acceptable levels of payment for outcomes achieved.

DSA will continue to increase employment CRPs to meet the needs statewide focusing in rural areas, by initiating a customized employment contract within designated areas across the state. The Employment Support Services Unit (ESS) educates potential CRPs and DSA field staff of available contracts. The list of contracts and CRPs is available on the DSA intranet. (Page 255-256) Title IV

The Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) serves as the Medicaid Agency for provisions of title XIX of the Social Security Act. The OHCA and Department of Human Services (DHS) maintain an MOA for provision of services. The DHS administers waiver programs which include extended services as a part of the waiver. Each Medicaid waiver individual plan includes outcomes which would create a pathway to achieve competitive integrated employment. DRS has implemented a new customized employment contract which can be utilized by individuals to achieve employment. Increased education and in-service with contractors has occurred to encourage contracts with both the DSA and DDS to ensure a more streamlined access to competitive integrated employment opportunities. The DHS and DSA utilizes an MOA to outline the provisions and responsibilities for extended services utilized in Medicaid funded programs. (Pages 259- 260) Title IV

Research determined that there are not minority groups disproportionately underserved in Oklahoma, but the DSA with the SRC held focus groups to obtain further qualitative information. Based on the last assessment, research was focused on rural counties that were identified as being underserved. Despite active DSA programs to serve SSI/SSDI recipients, focus group attendees reported there is a family disconnect and fear regarding the loss of benefits. This fear results in the parents of youth with disabilities being resistant to services that are employment oriented.

Those in need of supported or customized employment in some rural areas of the state also face a lack of CRP vendors in remote areas, including southeastern Oklahoma. Needs were identified for more employer outreach to address accessibility issues with employer application methods, additional cooperation between schools and DSA counselors in the setting of appropriate career goals for youth with disabilities and making sure IPE and IEP goals are in-line prior to graduation.

In rural areas, there is a gap in service when serving the homeless populations and those that lack transportation. This is a result of missing auxiliary services that are available through other agencies and/or programs in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. In addition, transportation is a service gap that affects individuals with disabilities not just in rural areas, but across the state. (Page 272) Title IV

DSA will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSA is initiating a customized employment program. The DSA is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 281) Title IV

Customized Employment Services Project
Memorandum of Understanding: The DSA entered into a contracted agreement with 24 vendors, known as the Contractor.

Scope of Work: This is a project to provide Customized Employment Services and/or other employment services to individuals in Priority Group 1 with the most significant disabilities. Some of the other employment services are available to individuals in Priority Group 2 with significant disabilities. This contract is intended to meet the requirements of WIOA. Career Exploration and Internship services are optional and can be used with individuals in Priority Group 1 or 2, receiving CE, SE or ER contract services. Onsite Supports and Training and Extended Services for Transition (EST) can be used with individuals in Priority Group 1 only, receiving CE or SE contract services. The DSA Counselor, working with the individual and the Contractor, will designate the services to be used. The Discovery and Profile and Career Exploration services only, can be used with transition aged youth, age 16 or above, on a Trial Work Plan or Individualized Plan of Employment, to gather assessment information related to employment, and to help identify additional employment related transition services and/or a career path. (Page 281) Title IV

Partner Responsibilities: The Contractor will:

1. The Contractor has completed discovery activities that utilize a person centered approach to describe “who the individual is”. and guides the planning process to develop a customized job. The Contractor will summarize the Discovery findings on the individual’s profile. The Contractor has provided benefits planning information to any individual who is receiving Social Security Administration (SSA) benefits, and has referred the individual to a DSA Benefits Planning Specialist if the individual, payee, or family member has requested the service.

2.The Contractor will provide opportunities for the individual to explore potential occupations, job conditions, interests and job tasks in order to enhance their vocational goal and prepare the individual for a successful job match. Exploration activities could include but are not limited to: job shadowing, work-site tour, job sampling, trial work experiences, volunteer experiences and situational assessments.

3.The Contractor will schedule and conduct a Team Meeting with the individual, DRS Counselor and all other relevant team members to create a CE Employer Development Plan.

4.The Contractor has created the Visual Résumé with the individual. This résumé was used in the job development process to highlight the individual’s potential contributions and the types of tasks the individual is interested and capable of performing. The Contractor has explained Customized Employment and outlined what the employer can expect from the individual and the Contractor during the job development process. The Contractor has developed a successful job match that meets the individual’s contributions, conditions and interests and the employer’s unmet needs. A job can be developed within an individual’s family’s business as long as the job meets the definition of competitive integrated employment. (Page 282) Title IV

5. The individual has worked successfully for a minimum of eight (8) weeks beginning with the first (1st) day of employment and has received all appropriate onsite supports and training. At the completion of this service, individuals can be moved to CE Maintenance if they meet the following criteria: individual is working at least sixty percent (60%) of their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE, and on-site support needs cannot be more than twenty-five percent (25%) of their total work hours per month.

6. The individual has worked successfully for a minimum four of (4) and a maximum of eight (8) additional weeks beyond the CE Job Coaching I and has received all appropriate onsite supports and training. The Contractor can move the individual to CE Maintenance after the maintenance criteria is met. To move to CE Maintenance, the individual must be working at sixty percent (60%) of their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE, and their on-site support needs cannot be more than twenty-five percent (25%) of their total work hours per month. If the maintenance criteria is not met at the end of six (6) weeks, then a team meeting is required to determine if the individual needs to be moved to Onsite Supports and Training at the completion of CE Job Coaching II. (Page 282) Title II

8. The individual can be moved to CE Maintenance at the end of any four (4) week increment if they meet the maintenance criteria. The maintenance criteria specifies the individual must be working at sixty (60%) of their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE, and on-site support needs cannot be more than twenty-five (25%) of their total work hours per month.

9. If the individual remains in this service at the end of the initial three and a half (3½) months and has not been moved to CE Maintenance, a team meeting is required. Additional Onsite Supports and Training can be authorized and provided if the team determines it is needed to assist the individual with meeting the maintenance criteria.

10. The individual has worked successfully for at least four (4) weeks, and received all appropriate onsite supports and training. To achieve maintenance, the individual must work at least one entire work week without EC support, must work at their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE for the four (4) weeks of maintenance, their onsite/offsite support and training needs must be less than or equal to twenty percent (20%) of their total work hours per month, the employer is satisfied with the individual’s job performance, and the individual is satisfied with their job. At the completion of CE Maintenance, if the individual has met all of the requirements, they can be moved to the CE Employment Outcome Service. (Page 283) Title IV

Referral Process: At the time of referral, the DSA Counselor will provide the Contractor with a copy of the Eligibility Determination Form, Individualized Plan of Employment (IPE) or Trial Work Plan, and Personal Information Form. Once the intake is scheduled, the Contractor will send a CE Authorization Request Form to the DSA Counselor, Rehabilitation Technician and Program Manager. The DSA Counselor authorizes for the first two services to be used (i.e. CE Discovery and Profile and Career Exploration, etc.) within five (5) business days.

The Contractor should contact the DSA Counselor and ask for the authorization to be sent if not received within five (5) business days. The Contractor will only provide services that have been pre-authorized by the DSA Counselor. The only services that can be provided under a trial work plan include the CE Discovery and Profile service and the Career Exploration service. (Page 284) Title IV

The DSA conducted an Employment Support Services 360 analysis resulting in the need for supported or customized employment in some rural areas of the state, also a lack of CRP vendors in remote areas, including southeastern Oklahoma. (Page 290) Title IV

Online Introduction to Positive Behavior Supports in the Workplace (prerequisite for positive behavior supports and instructional supports); Positive Behavior in the Workplace, customized employment and instructional supports. Following completion of the required training listed above, six hours of continuing education is required each year. The DSA staff also provides quarterly training and two additional advanced trainings annually to CRPs to keep them up-to-date on current best practices.

DSA monitors contract compliance, provides an outcomes based report on data drawn from the AWARE case management program. DSA reports to CRPs on minimum contract standards and whether those standards have been met or will require a plan for improvement. Every CRP has a TA who helps resolve service delivery problems and monitors for contract compliance on an annual basis. (Page 306) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Oklahoma is encouraging the braiding of funding and leveraging of resources through the state’s new resource leveraging tool to be released in the fall of 2016. In this online tool, state agencies, including the core partners, can identify existing workforce development activities and send requests to partner. These requests are then supported and facilitated with the assistance of the Office of the Governor, if needed. Similarly, with the release of this tool, the Office of the Governor, under Oklahoma Works, in July of 2016, challenged each state agency and each Workforce Development Board, to identify one new partner (private or public) to engage.

With stagnant or declining funding from state and federal funding streams, the State is continually seeking more efficient ways to provide services to Oklahomans. Resources continue to be one of the largest threats to achieving the goals set forth in this plan, according to a 2018 Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats analysis with WIOA Core Partners. Despite other potential threats to success, including the complexity and isolation of the state’s data systems, the culture shift required for systems thinking as opposed to programs thinking under WIOA, and the culture shift required by today’s global economy for skills--and the workforce-- to be flexible, adaptable, and stackable, opportunities exist to utilize the capacity in place, or to enhance capacity, for the sake of our talent pipeline. Optimizing capacity to focus on opportunities, such as a 2018 Gubernatorial election to strengthen workforce advocacy, system-building and cross-training to support systems thinking and customer-centered, or human-centered, design of the workforce development system, will allow the system to adapt to changing resources in the form of funds and/or human capital. (Page 45) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~7. implement a series of surveys developed by the national LEAD Center to assess the experience of:

• Job seekers
• Employers
• American Job Center staff

to determine their readiness and satisfaction with employers and the Oklahoma Works Workforce Development System;

*The LEAD Center is a collaborative of disability, workforce and economic empowerment organization dedicated to improving employment and economic advancement outcomes for all people with disabilities — funded by the Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor.

8. continue to work collaboratively with DSA to provide technical assistance and support to ACT regarding the accessibility of web-based versions of the ACT test and WorkKeys assessments in an effort to remove technological barriers for both students and job seekers with disabilities; Accessibility standards have been defined by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI). The ultimate goal is to allow students and job seekers to participate independently and in the most integrated setting possible in compliance with non-discrimination provisions. (Page 247) Title IV
.

School to Work Transition

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.

The DSA will maintain a formal interagency agreement with the State Educational Agency (SEA) as well as relationships at the local level with LEAs. The focus of our work will be to forage those relationships and partner with stakeholders to provide services to youth and students with disabilities to help them prepare for life after high school, including, but not limited to, further education/training, competitive integrated employment, independent living and social skills, self-determination, and self-advocacy. It is our intent to perform outreach to underrepresented groups, such as those on Section 504 Plans, youth in foster care, adjudicated youth, out-of-school youth, and those with other disabilities not documented on a 504 or IEP. The DSA does not have any updated transition and pre-employment transition policies but intend to complete the revisions by October 1, 2019. (Page 250) Title IV

The DSA will coordinate services with local educational agency staff to help prepare youth and students with disabilities for competitive integrated employment. DSA staff will share results of the vocational evaluation and other assessments, as well as progress reports for various work experiences with school personnel for the purpose of including information in the IEP and transition planning process. The DSA will work with school personnel to not only have input into the IEP process but also to access a copy of the IEP for assistance with coordination with the VR IPE.

The DSA and educational officials will provide the following types of services:

o Consultation and technical assistance services to assist State educational agencies and local educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postsecondary life, including employment.

o Transition services to youth with disabilities and students with disabilities, for which a vocational rehabilitation counselor works in concert with educational agencies, providers of job training programs, providers of services under the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1396 et seq.), entities designated by the State to provide services for individuals with developmental disabilities, centers for independent living (as defined in section 796a of this title), housing and transportation authorities, workforce development systems, and businesses and employers. (Page 251) Title IV

The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on working with VR staff and LEA staff to facilitate completion of a comprehensive and quality Individualized Education Program (IEP) and Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that appropriately includes transition planning and coordination of services.

The OSDE will continue to enforce the IDEA requirements regarding inviting those agencies responsible for providing or paying for transition services, including referral to VR at the age of 15 so services can be in place by the age of 16.

The OSDE will:
(1) provide to the LEAs a referral form to VR through the state IEP development system; (2) educate LEAs on the best practices for inviting VR and other transition providers to participate in the development of the IEP and participate through multiple means (e.g., in person, by phone, virtually, by providing documents in advance) in IEP and other meetings; and (3) continue to monitor the involvement of, invitations to, and referrals to VR through the state monitoring system, Indicator 13 checklist, and other means as decided. 3. The ODRS will continue to enforce the WIOA requirements regarding attending IEP and other meetings (when invited) as well as the process for receiving and responding to referrals, including referral to VR at the age of 15 1/2 so services can be in place by the age of 16.

The DSA will:
o Provide to the OSDE the content to be included in the referral to VR form
o Train its staff on the requirements of receiving the referral form along with the release of confidential information from LEAs and other referral sources
o Train its staff to develop internal procedures with each school for how referrals will be submitted to the local VR counselor
o Train its staff on best practices for engaging with schools and teams, planning and attending IEP and other meetings, to participate in the development of the IEP and participate through multiple means (e.g., in person, by phone, virtually, by providing documents in advance)
o Train its staff on providing regular updates to the referring source on the status of that referral, if the student/family applied for services, if a plan for employment is in place, what services may be implemented at school, etc
o Encourage its staff and schools to take advantage of the online VR application to streamline the application process, possibly in lieu of even a referral
o Continue to educate and encourage its staff to actively contribute to the development of annual goals and coordinated services to be included in the IEP to help the student reach his or her postsecondary goals
o Train its staff to assist schools in developing annual IEP goals around the VR services provided to support the achievement of the IEP and IPE goals; and work with the OSDE and LEAs to improve documentation of the collaborative transition service delivery occurring for a student by encouraging wording in the IEP. (Page 252) Title IV

The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on performing outreach statewide to identify students with disabilities in need of transition services under IDEA and pre-employment transition services under WIOA, those residing in rural areas, and those low-incidence populations, such as blindness and hearing impairments. The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on joint community and professional presentations to educate and inform LEAs, parents, and others about reaching the needs of youth and students on Section 504 Plans and those with documented disabilities not being served through an IEP or Section 504 Plan. The DSA will work with the Oklahoma Rehabilitation Council's Transition Committee, Oklahoma School for the Blind, and Oklahoma School for the Deaf to conduct outreach activities. This may include, but is not limited to, developing and disseminating public service announcements, making presentations within these schools and LEAs, hosting events for groups of students with disabilities (e.g., advocacy, STEM). (Page 253) Title IV

Because the definition of a "student with a disability," for the VR program includes an individual with a disability for purposes of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, it is broader than the definition under IDEA, VR is authorized to provide transition services to this broader population of students with disabilities than LEAs under IDEA. Since the VR program may serve students with disabilities, including those individuals with a disability for purposes of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, these students may not have an IEP under IDEA, and, therefore, would not be eligible for or receiving special education and related services under IDEA.

The OSDE will continue to educate LEAs on the availability of VR services for students with disabilities on section 504 plans and encourage the referral of such students to the VR counselors. In addition, the Rehabilitation Act also allows the VR agency to provide pre-employment transition services to "potentially" eligible students with disabilities. This may include those students who are not receiving special education and related services under an IEP, students who are not receiving services or accommodations under a section 504 plan, and who have documented disabilities (e.g., a student may wear a hearing aid, have chronic health issues, such as asthma, leukemia, diabetes, suffer from depression, bipolar, and anxiety. (Page 255) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Make recommendations, inform, coordinate and facilitate statewide efforts to improve Oklahomans’ exposure to high-demand career and entrepreneurship opportunities, along with the education and training required for entry into and advancement within a chosen career. Develop industry sector strategies in state and regional ecosystems to ensure that the education and training system is delivering the skills needed by employers.

Goals/Objectives
o Create a plan for Career Pathways efforts to be based on industry sectors within Oklahoma’s state and regional ecosystems.
o Establish strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.
o Create and use Career Pathways approaches to increase the proportion of low-skill learners who ultimately earn a degree or certificate.
o Increase high school graduation rates - decrease high school dropout rates.
o Increase the percentage of Oklahoma workers with a recognized postsecondary credential. (A credential consisting of an industry-recognized certificate or certification, a certificate of completion of an apprenticeship, a license recognized by the State or Federal government, or an associate or baccalaureate degree.
o Reinforce the alignment with Registered Apprenticeship for earn-and-learn opportunities.
o Use performance data to demonstrate progress and impact, thereby supporting partner buy-in and reinforcing continued engagement over time.
o Make Career Pathways part of the Board certification process.
o Introduce employers and educators to the value of partnering by describing best practices and success stories.
o Develop or research pilots and models. (Page 120-121) Title I

Apprenticeship

During annual monitoring the state will require the local areas to submit documentation describing how the 14 program elements are being implemented. The state will also include a sample of youth RFP’s and contracts in their annual monitoring to assure that the 14 elements were included in the program design and framework and are available to all youth in the WIOA program. There is a section in our youth program monitoring tool that specifically asks our local boards for a description of how the following program elements are being implemented and we request a list of the entities providing the elements and the services available at least annual in accordance with monitoring requirements:

o Tutoring, study skills training, instruction and evidence-based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent (including a recognized certificate of attendance or similar document for individuals with disabilities) or for a recognized postsecondary credential:

o Alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate:

o Paid and unpaid work experiences that have academic and occupational education as a component of the work experience:

o Occupational skill training, which includes priority consideration for training programs that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials that align with in-demand industry sectors or occupations in the local area involved, if the Local WDB determines that the programs meet the quality criteria described in WIOA sec. 123:

o Education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster:

o Leadership development opportunities, including community service and peer-centered activities encouraging responsibility and other positive social and civic behaviors: o Supportive services, including the services listed in § 681.570: o Adult mentoring for a duration of at least 12 months that may occur both during and after program participation: o Follow-up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as provided in § 681.580: o Comprehensive guidance and counseling, which may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the individual youth: o Financial literacy education: o Entrepreneurial skills training: o Services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area, such as career awareness, career counseling, and career exploration services: o Activities that help youth prepare for and transition to postsecondary education and training: (Page 191) Title I

Prepare and distribute “Tool Kit of Solutions”— a checklist of the physical elements reviewed during 2015 site visits, current status, meets/does not meet guideline, ADA guideline, remedy, resources, timeframe for completion, date of completion o Landlord responsibilities fact sheet: new construction and leases o Certificate of completion for remediation of items o Sites will self—assess every two years using Tool Kit of Solutions listed above o Site point of contact will send an updated checklist to the DSA ADA Coordinator o Implement site review prior to renovations and new construction, DSA ADA Coordinator will provide technical assistance (Page 294) Title IV

Accessibility work with private sector companies  ACT WorkKeys Continue working with DRS outreach efforts to improve the accessibility of the Career Readiness Certificate (CRC) product for individuals with hearing loss and/or blind and visually impaired. (Page 295) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Research determined that there are not minority groups disproportionately underserved in Oklahoma, but the DSA with the SRC held focus groups to obtain further qualitative information. Based on the last assessment, research was focused on rural counties that were identified as being underserved. Despite active DSA programs to serve SSI/SSDI recipients, focus group attendees reported there is a family disconnect and fear regarding the loss of benefits. This fear results in the parents of youth with disabilities being resistant to services that are employment oriented.
Those in need of supported or customized employment in some rural areas of the state also face a lack of CRP vendors in remote areas, including southeastern Oklahoma. Needs were identified for more employer outreach to address accessibility issues with employer application methods, additional cooperation between schools and DSA counselors in the setting of appropriate career goals for youth with disabilities and making sure IPE and IEP goals are in-line prior to graduation.

In rural areas, there is a gap in service when serving the homeless populations and those that lack transportation. This is a result of missing auxiliary services that are available through other agencies and/or programs in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. In addition, transportation is a service gap that affects individuals with disabilities not just in rural areas, but across the state. (Page 272) Title IV

The DSA conducted the Employment Support Services 360 analysis that surveyed the CRP providers, the DSA staff who work with CRP providers, and the DSA consumers that were served through CRPs. As a result of the analysis, DSA needs were identified for improvement in the areas of collaboration with CRP vendors to ensure vocational goals match the skill levels of clients to place job seekers in positions that match their vocation goal, additional vendor training regarding disability types and billing and/or paperwork and the need for CRPs to have more employer contacts and providers in rural areas. CRPs requested more training opportunities from the DSA, including benefits training regarding SSI/SSDI. Consumers who were served by the CRPs reported a need for ADA and sensitivity training for some CRP employees, but expressed an overall appreciation for the patience of the job coaches and reported that the services boosted the client’s confidence in their ability to work. The majority of clients served by CRPs reported their job was a good fit (80.5%) and 77.8% reported they were happy with the job with a median wage reported of $9.00. (Page 273) Title IV

Ticket to Work Program
Coordinated activities under Ticket to Work are delivered by a statewide Ticket to Work Coordinator. The coordinator will organize activities within the DSA and with partnership employment networks (EN’s) to ensure the needs of ticket holders are met at a maximum level. Ongoing outreach efforts will be conducted to recruit new partnership employment networks in order to provide more opportunities to assist ticket holders in reaching Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level employment outcomes. The coordinator will continue to oversee the ticket to work hotline and will provide ticket holders with information and referral for state VR, partnership EN’s, and external EN’s. (Page 285) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~Under the new section 511, the determination of individuals who may benefit from employment services, the DSA has developed contracts with CRP to provide Trial Work Services to establish the ability to benefit from employment services.

DSA maintains an MOA with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) describing collaboration on delivery of Supported Employment services and transitional employment services.

The DSA has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five-community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness.

DSA maintains an MOA with the DDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual disabilities. The MOA outlines the coordination of services and identifies the DSA as first dollar funding source for competitive integrated employment. DDS continues to provide extended services for individuals with intellectual disabilities in Supported Employment services by utilizing the DDS Home and Community Based Waiver (HCBW) and DDS state dollars. The HCBW is utilized to provide the long-term ongoing supports. DSA has maintained an MOA with DDS since 1989. Under the MOA, the HCBW is also utilized to provide pre-vocational services. (Page 257) Title IV

DSA ESS staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) -DSA ESS staff represents DSA on the Oklahoma Developmental Disabilities Council.

DDS Staff serves on the Oklahoma Transition Council (OTC) resulting in statewide conferences, resources, technical assistance, and additional professional development opportunities. Many issues and challenges are brought forth with a wide range of experts to assist the DSA and DDS in resolving and achieving their goals.

The DSA Statewide Transition Coordinator will work with DDS staff to ensure staff from each agency, schools, families, and CRPs understand the changes in WIOA regarding sub-minimum wage, are well-trained, and that Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) are provided to students with disabilities accessing vocational rehabilitation services through the DSA.

The DSA ESS staff will work with DDS staff to ensure CRPs and staff at each agency is provided ongoing training and consultation required by WIOA for any youth with a significant disability hired at subminimum wage. The partners will also ensure the required reviews take place according to WIOA to ensure every opportunity for achieving full competitive integrated employment. (Page 260) Title IV

DSA conducts annual outreach and review services for individuals earning subminimum wage under a 14c certificate. Individuals will receive information about career counseling and information and referral services, as well as other components to the Vocational Rehabilitation program. The intent is to inform all individuals of the VR process in relation to seeking and obtaining competitive integrated employment. All individuals newly hired have to receive the career counseling and information and referral services two times the first year of employment and annually afterwards. In 2016-2017 the DSA reached approximately 4000 individuals through this outreach effort. The DSA also worked with the Department of Labor to provide information and training services to employers who hold the 14c certificate. All newly hired individuals have to receive the career counseling and information and referral services two times the first year of employment and annually afterwards. The DSA provides documentation in collaboration with the local school district of specific services to youth 24 and younger, if those individuals are known by the DSA to be seeking subminimum wage work.

Other DSA program areas that are utilized to expand and improve services include:
• Visual Services Center in Tulsa and Oklahoma City
• DVS Technology Lab and Training Lab in Tulsa and Oklahoma City
• DVS Adult Blind Living Evaluation (ABLE)
• DVS Training Adult Program (TAP)
• DVR Technology Lab and Training Lab in Oklahoma City
• Oklahoma School for the Blind (OSB) transition work adjustment program
• Partnering with OSB for Vocational Evaluations
• Project Search
• Business Enterprise Program
• Office of Juvenile Affairs collaborations
• Department of Veterans Affairs collaborations
• On-line applications
• Customized Employment
• JOBS Contract
• Wellness Recovery Action Plan Training (WRAP) (Page 285-286) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity, which provides guidance to communicate Oklahoma’s process and procedures regarding nondiscrimination and equal opportunity procedures that apply to all Local Workforce Development Areas (LWDBs); WIOA Section 188 Discrimination Complaint Procedures Governing WIOA Activities and Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Center Activities, which provides guidance on the WIOA Section 188 Discrimination Complaint Procedures; Supplemental Wage Information Collection, which provides guidance for the use of supplemental wage information, when appropriate, to assist in carrying out the performance accountability requirements under section 116 for the WIOA Title I Programs and the Wagner-Peyser Employment Services as amended by Title III; WIOA Roles and Responsibilities, which provides guidance to communicate the roles and responsibilities of various entities created as a result of WIOA; WIOA Worksite Agreement, which provides guidance on the utilization of the standardized Worksite Agreement for all participants in Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth work experience programs, including transitional jobs for Adult or Dislocated Worker program participants; and, Grievance and Complaint Process, which provides guidance to communicate Oklahoma’s instructions for the grievance and complaint process under WIOA. (Page 118) Title I

Oklahoma is focused on accessibility for all job seekers and businesses and employer’s work sites throughout all levels of Oklahoma Works. Working with the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development (GCWED), system partners bring sharper focus on developing and employing more Oklahomans with disabilities. The objective is to provide equitable services to individuals with disabilities and to ensure that all Workforce System partners comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Access for All Initiative The Access for All initiative within Oklahoma Works places a focus on recruitment, hiring, and promotion of individuals with disabilities in the state of Oklahoma’s workforce system. Access for All focuses on the Oklahoma Works system partners as well as employers in the state. This initiative provides training, consulting, and resources to ensure that individuals with disabilities are intentionally included in efforts to achieve greater household wealth for Oklahomans. Access for All equips Oklahoma’s Workforce System with knowledge and resources to make it more accessible to individuals with disabilities that utilize one-stop system programs in person, on the phone, or through the web. Access for All is brought to Oklahoma Works through a partnership between the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services (Oklahoma’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program) and Oklahoma ABLE Tech (Oklahoma’s Assistive Technology Act Program). To help build a foundation for the Access for All initiative, the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services (OKDRS) and Oklahoma ABLE Tech (OKABT), partner to provide regional Access for All technical assistance in the form of, academies, webinars, newsletters, and weekly tips statewide. (Page 148-149) Title I

Oklahoma’s Workforce System commitment to enhanced accessibility continues by incorporating accessibility seamlessly into the everyday business practices of the local areas. Access for All within the Oklahoma Works system, is a standard that has been set to springboard success for Oklahoma’s business and employers and job seekers in reaching Oklahoma’s Goal of Wealth Generation. The one-stop system standards and certification criteria policy are designed to integrate physical and programmatic accessibility by incorporating the Access for All Certification process into the benchmark criteria for center certification. The Access for All Certification process includes two parts—physical and technology. The full Access for All Certification Process details the requirements necessary, and provides tools, to receive certification under the Oklahoma Works Workforce System Access for All initiative. Prior to center certification approval, physical and technology accessibility is reviewed at each Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) center by Certification Teams. The Certification Teams are selected by the LWDBs and are responsible for conducting independent and objective evaluations of one-stop sites and making center certification recommendations to LWDBs. When issues related to physical and programmatic accessibility are identified, an Equally Effective Alternative Access Plan (EEAAP) is created. These plans are designed to function as corrective action plans, which are designed to be monitored regularly and updated by local Equal Opportunity Officers and/or relevant program staff. (Page 150-151) Title I

In January 2018, OOWD issued WIOA Section 188 Discrimination Complaint Procedures Governing WIOA Activities and Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Center Activities (OWDI 01-2018). The policy was developed to centralize complaint processing procedures for equal opportunity and nondiscrimination issues arising in the Oklahoma Works (one-stop) Centers. OOWD partnered with OKDRS to conduct ADA Physical Accessibility Site Reviews, as a part of the center certification process, for every Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Centers and create corrective action plans (Equally Effective Alternative Access Plans) for all centers with barriers to accessibility. Access for All trainings were delivered in 2018. Access for All trainings covered disability etiquette, review of and how to use available assistive devices. (Page 151) Title I

OOWD complies with Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) [29 CFR 38]. National origin discrimination includes Limited English Proficient individuals under 29 CFR Section 38.9 and specifically states that in providing any aid, benefit, service, or training under a WIOA title I-financially assisted program or activity, a recipient must not, directly or through contractual, licensing, or other arrangements, discriminate on the basis of national origin, including LEP which includes English Language Learners (ELL). Additionally, 29 CFR Section 38.41 added “LEP and preferred language” to the list of categories of information that each recipient must record about each applicant, registrant, eligible applicant/registrant, participant, and terminee. It is the policy of the State to provide services and information in a language other than English for customers with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) in order to effectively inform or enable those customers to participate in departmental programs or activities. LWDBs must ensure that above all, these services are free of charge and provided in a timely manner. An LEP individual must be given adequate notice about the existence of interpretation and translation services and that they are available free of charge. (Page 152) Title I

As the federally funded Assistive Technology Act Program for the State of Oklahoma, the mission of Oklahoma ABLE Tech is to get assistive technology ‘AT’ into the hands of Oklahomans with disabilities through activities that provide increased access and acquisition. The DSA has a long standing history of working closely with Oklahoma ABLE Tech to enhance the provision of assistive technology services across the state. Memorandum of Understanding: The DSA and Oklahoma Able Tech, Oklahoma’s AT Act Program have an agreement to provide programmatic technology accessibility details regarding the DSA Access for All initiative under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). Scope of Work: The DSA is leading the Oklahoma Workforce System towards enhanced accessibility. The DSA initiative of Access for All was adopted by the workforce system statewide. This initiative is in partnership with Oklahoma Able Tech within programmatic accessibility, with a goal of creating fully accessible workforce services for Oklahoma job seekers. (Page 246) Title IV

Through the Oklahoma Works American Job centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the centers or through referrals to partner facilities. OESC began a two-phase project focusing upon physical and programmatic accessibility entitled “Thinking Accessibility” within the Workforce Centers, UI Service Centers, UI Adjudication Centers and the Appeal Tribunal. This partnership brings OKDRS and OKABT together to provide the resources and tools to assist OESC on continuing their commitment in serving individuals with disabilities. (Page 299) Title IV

Veterans

Provide an analysis of the State’s workforce development activities, including education and training activities of the core programs, Combined State Plan partner programs included in this plan, and required and optional one-stop delivery system partners.* __________ * Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 30) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Oklahoma Works System Partners: 17 state agency leadership stakeholders who have investment in the workforce development system. Partners include: Office of the Governor, Office of Management and Enterprise Services, Oklahoma Achieves (State Chamber), Oklahoma Board of Private and Vocational Schools, Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, Oklahoma Department of Human Services, Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs, Oklahoma Department of Commerce, Oklahoma Department of Corrections, Oklahoma Employment Security Commission, Oklahoma Health Care Authority, Oklahoma Office of Educational Quality and Accountability, Oklahoma State Department of Education, Oklahoma State Department of Health, and Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. (Page 8) Title I

The strategic planning effort involved the WIOA Core Partners (Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services, the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission, Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, and Office of Workforce Development) as well as other state agency partners who are a part of the state’s workforce development system (Oklahoma Board of Private Vocational Schools, Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology Education, Department of Commerce, Department of Health, Department of Human Services, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Department of Veterans Affairs, Health Care Authority, Office of Educational Quality and Accountability, Office of Management and Enterprise Services, State Department of Education, and State Regents for Higher Education). In addition to these workforce system partners, the Oklahoma State Chamber’s Oklahoma Achieves (formerly the Oklahoma Educated Workforce Initiative), business leaders from all regions of the state, members of our Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development, members of the Workforce Development Boards, and our state leaders were involved in the planning process. The resulting Oklahoma Works Strategic Delivery Plan was approved by Governor Fallin and key state leaders on December 8, 2015 and has subsequently been update twice to improve alignment and incorporate new strategies. This Plan is the overarching workforce development strategy to guide workforce development activities in the state. (Page 32) Title I

The Oklahoma Works System Oversight Subcommittee, established in 2012, is composed of Oklahoma workforce development system partners, led and established by the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development Workforce Systems Oversight Committee. A business member of the GCWED System Oversight Committee is the leader of the subcommittee. System partners include: the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education—Adult Basic Education, the Department of Rehabilitation Services - Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Human Services, the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission--Wagner-Peyser, the State Regents for Higher Education, the Oklahoma Department of Commerce, and Title I programs representing Adults, Dislocated Workers and Youth. It is hoped that other entities, such as the Department of Corrections, and the Departments of Health and Mental Health will eventually be added to establish a more comprehensive approach for creating solutions.

The team has been a cohesive unit since Governor Fallin recognized the necessity to build a new, more responsive, workforce development system to meet the needs of Oklahoma’s businesses and create wealth for the state. This subcommittee was designed to carry out the strategic mission of GCWED and reports to the Workforce System Oversight Committee of that body. (Page 78) Title I

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services (OKDRS), Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding.

OOWD works to develop and support increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Oklahoma Works Center staff routinely refer individuals with disabilities to the OKDRS for more intensive training and job placement opportunities. OKDRS has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Workforce Centers and OKDRS offices. (Page 149) Title I

Memorandum of Understanding:
The DSA and the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMSAS) agreement is for the purpose of the Mental Health Individualized Career Planning Model Project. The focus is on helping youth adults with mental illness and coordinating connections, resources, and referrals for services in the areas of education, employment, housing, maintaining mental/emotional health, and legal/system related needs.

Scope of Work:
The two agencies will work together to address barriers through a program that will provide needed training and technical assistance to providers in the individualized career planning model specific to persons with serious mental illness (SMI). This program will continue training that will result in individualized career planning that will increase the likelihood that persons with SMI will find, obtain, and keep a job in the career field of their choice. (Page 248-249) Title IV

The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on ensuring education officials, school personnel, and VR personnel are cross-trained, have opportunities for networking and collaboration, and receive consistent messages and guidance from the DSA and OSDE.

The DSA will continue to coordinate with non-educational agencies to reach out-of-school youth to support them in their employment efforts. This includes collaboration with subminimum wage employers, workforce development boards, Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, mental health providers, community rehabilitation providers, Oklahoma Department of Human Services, Office of Juvenile Affairs, Oklahoma Parents Center, Oklahoma Family Network, Oklahoma Autism Network, Down Syndrome Association of Oklahoma, and other stakeholders.
The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on performing outreach statewide to identify students with disabilities in need of transition services under IDEA and pre-employment transition services under WIOA, those residing in rural areas, and those low-incidence populations, such as blindness and hearing impairments. The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on joint community and professional presentations to educate and inform LEAs, parents, and others about reaching the needs of youth and students on Section 504 Plans and those with documented disabilities not being served through an IEP or Section 504 Plan. The DSA will work with the Oklahoma Rehabilitation Council's Transition Committee, Oklahoma School for the Blind, and Oklahoma School for the Deaf to conduct outreach activities. This may include, but is not limited to, developing and disseminating public service announcements, making presentations within these schools and LEAs, hosting events for groups of students with disabilities (e.g., advocacy, STEM). (Page 253) Title IV

There are no restrictions on the types of disabilities served through the contracts, although the majority of individuals served continue to be those with intellectual disabilities or serious mental illness as a primary diagnosis. Although most CRPs serve a diverse population of individuals with the most significant barriers to employment, mental health CRPs continue to serve exclusively individuals with serious mental illness.

Mental Health CRPs have the option of providing Supported Employment. DSA, the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services are collaboratively seeking strategies for improving services and enhancing service capacity for individuals with serious mental illness.

DSA will provide outreach to increase the number of community mental health CRPs contracting to provide employment services in an effort to improve the employment outcomes of individuals with serious mental illness. The DSA has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16—25 with serious mental illness. (Page 280) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

In addition to other career services in the Oklahoma Works centers, Oklahoma provides two reemployment services tracks to help Unemployment Insurance (UI) claimants and/or unemployed individuals return to work more quickly: Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment and 50% Eligibility Review Interview.

Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA)

RESEA is an individualized process consisting of an orientation to the Center and all available workforce system resources, a UI eligibility review, an assessment of a claimant’s skills and career goals including any necessary transferable skills discussions, a discussion of job search strategies, establishment of an individual reemployment plan, provision of job referrals, and follow-up appointments. This program addresses the “harder to serve/need intensive” category i.e. those with multiple barriers to employment needing a variety of assistive services to return to work. RESEA claimants have been identified as likely to exhaust UI benefits and unlikely to return to their previous occupation; therefore, they must be scheduled before receiving the 5th week of UI benefits. Additionally, RESEA also serves Unemployment Compensation for ex-service members (UCX) claimants. These reemployment services are provided in an effort to reduce the time a claimant will be paid UI benefits and increase the likelihood the claimant will attain self-sufficient employment. (Page 199) Title I

50% Eligibility Review Interview (ERI) The 50% Eligibility Review Interview (ERI) is delivered in a group process consisting of information on available services, work search review, expansion of work search efforts, and the provision of job referrals. This group is intended to be a triage type, informational session designed to serve the masses; taking far less time than its Reemployment Services counterpart, RESEA. The ERI is conducted with claimants in demand occupations who possess the skills and experience to return to work, often in the same or similar occupation. These claimants are equipped with additional reemployment strategies and tools, and are expected to return to work more quickly. (Page 199) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 42

Occupational Skills Training Service Status Definitions and Reporting Accuracy - 07/06/2020

“The Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD), as the Governor’s chosen Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) administrative entity, provides this technical assistance to the local workforce development areas to ensure appropriate Service Status entries for individuals determined eligible to participant in Occupational Skills Training (OST) under the Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Out-of-School Youth (OSY) programs.

 

Under WIOA, occupational skills training may be provided to individuals in need of training services to obtain or retain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Revised Procedures for Title I Enrollments due to AJC Closures - 03/20/2020

“In light of the recent closures of all Oklahoma American Job Centers (AJCs) due to the COVID-19 pandemic, procedures have been put into place to ensure the ability to serve new clients and enroll eligible individuals into Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs without undue delays.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

OKLAHOMA STATUTES TITLE 40. LABOR - 12/19/2019

“§40-360.  Short title - Oklahoma Employment First Act - Definitions.

 

A.  This act shall be known and may be cited as the "Oklahoma Employment First Act".

 

B.  All state agencies shall coordinate efforts and shall collaborate within and among such agencies to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures and funding support competitive integrated employment of individuals with disabilities.  All state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems in order to track progress toward full implementation of this act….

 

D. As used in this act:

1. "Competitive employment" means work in the competitive labor market, or self-employment, that is performed on a full-time or part-time basis in an integrated setting with the opportunity for advancement and for which a person with a disability is compensated at or above the minimum wage but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by persons without disabilities;

 

2. "Disability" means, with respect to an individual:

a. a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities of such individual,

b. a record of such an impairment, or

c. being regarded as having such an impairment as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended;

 

3. "Integrated setting" means, with respect to an employment outcome, a setting typically found in the community in which applicants or eligible individuals interact with persons without disabilities, other than those who are providing services to those applicants or eligible individuals, to the same extent that individuals without disabilities in comparable positions interact with other persons…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“Riata Center for Entrepreneurship, Spears School of Business at Oklahoma State University (Stillwater, Oklahoma): Veterans Entrepreneurship Program (VEP) ...VEP opens the door to small business ownership by developing skills needed to create and sustaining a business, while coordinating the offering of additional programs and services for service-disabled veterans….

The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of Oklahoma, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—working poor; lower income residents with life changing events such as divorce or new custody actions; hourly wage workers in retail and food service; and independent contractors.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Chambers of commerce, Small business and trade associations, Faith-based organizations, Community-based primary care and pediatric providers, Local Social Security offices, OK State Department of Health,  and Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) locations across the state.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Gayla MachellPhone: (405) 557-0049Email: gayla.machell@laok.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WIOA Policy Center - 06/15/2019

~~This page has documents related to WIOA. Visitors are able to browse through them.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

DRS offers free summer training for young jobseekers with disabilities - 06/03/2019

~~“OKLAHOMA CITY – Career planning and on-the-job training will continue for Oklahoma students with disabilities when school ends, thanks to Transition School to Work.

Students from across the state are signing up for innovative job training programs offered free of charge by Vocational Rehabilitation and Visual services.

VR and VS are divisions of the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services.

“We match up students in our Summer Transition Employment Programs – STEP for short – with paid, part-time employment in a career area they’re interested in,” Transition Coordinator Renee Sansom said. “Then our instructors and VR and VS counselors boost their confidence and develop the personal skills like problem-solving and teamwork that employers value most.”

STEP was previously known as iJobs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Provider List - 05/13/2019

~~This page lists the types of services offered by the current contracted providers

“Provider Agencies contracting for Community Services through Developmental Disabilities Services Division (DDSD). The following is a list of current contracted providers”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Oklahoma Data Validation and Source Documentation Requirements - 05/01/2019

~~“The  Oklahoma  Office  of  Workforce  Development  (OOWD)  as  the  Governor’s  chosen Workforce  Innovation  and  Opportunity  Act  (WIOA)  administrative  entity,  provides  this  issuance as guidance to the workforce system on the State of Oklahoma’s Data Validation and Source  Documentation  Requirements  for  the WIOA  Title  I  Programs  and  the  Wagner-Peyser Employment Services as amended by Title III.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Oklahoma Works Conference - 05/01/2019

~~“The Oklahoma Works Conference is the educational training event of the year for partners working in workforce development. The Conference will take place May 1-3, 2019, and include important content for all partners with workshops including:• Case Management• Customer Service• EEO/Accessibility• Apprenticeships• Financial/Infrastructure• HSE Testing Vendors• Adult Basic Education Program Strategies• ABE/Workforce Co-enrollment Strategies• Career Pathways• Expunging Records• Performance” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

OKLAHOMA STATUTES TITLE 40. LABOR - 12/19/2019

“§40-360.  Short title - Oklahoma Employment First Act - Definitions.

 

A.  This act shall be known and may be cited as the "Oklahoma Employment First Act".

 

B.  All state agencies shall coordinate efforts and shall collaborate within and among such agencies to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures and funding support competitive integrated employment of individuals with disabilities.  All state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems in order to track progress toward full implementation of this act….

 

D. As used in this act:

1. "Competitive employment" means work in the competitive labor market, or self-employment, that is performed on a full-time or part-time basis in an integrated setting with the opportunity for advancement and for which a person with a disability is compensated at or above the minimum wage but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by persons without disabilities;

 

2. "Disability" means, with respect to an individual:

a. a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities of such individual,

b. a record of such an impairment, or

c. being regarded as having such an impairment as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended;

 

3. "Integrated setting" means, with respect to an employment outcome, a setting typically found in the community in which applicants or eligible individuals interact with persons without disabilities, other than those who are providing services to those applicants or eligible individuals, to the same extent that individuals without disabilities in comparable positions interact with other persons…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

Occupational Skills Training Service Status Definitions and Reporting Accuracy - 07/06/2020

“The Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD), as the Governor’s chosen Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) administrative entity, provides this technical assistance to the local workforce development areas to ensure appropriate Service Status entries for individuals determined eligible to participant in Occupational Skills Training (OST) under the Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Out-of-School Youth (OSY) programs.

 

Under WIOA, occupational skills training may be provided to individuals in need of training services to obtain or retain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Revised Procedures for Title I Enrollments due to AJC Closures - 03/20/2020

“In light of the recent closures of all Oklahoma American Job Centers (AJCs) due to the COVID-19 pandemic, procedures have been put into place to ensure the ability to serve new clients and enroll eligible individuals into Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs without undue delays.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

WIOA Policy Center - 06/15/2019

~~This page has documents related to WIOA. Visitors are able to browse through them.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Oklahoma Data Validation and Source Documentation Requirements - 05/01/2019

~~“The  Oklahoma  Office  of  Workforce  Development  (OOWD)  as  the  Governor’s  chosen Workforce  Innovation  and  Opportunity  Act  (WIOA)  administrative  entity,  provides  this  issuance as guidance to the workforce system on the State of Oklahoma’s Data Validation and Source  Documentation  Requirements  for  the WIOA  Title  I  Programs  and  the  Wagner-Peyser Employment Services as amended by Title III.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Developmental Disabilities Services - 04/04/2019

~~“Our mission is to help individuals with developmental disabilities and their families help themselves to lead safer, healthier, more independent and productive lives.

Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS) serves persons ages 3 and up who have a primary diagnosis of intellectual disabilities.  Persons served may also have other developmental disabilities in addition to intellectual disabilities such as autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, etc.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Special Education - 03/15/2019

~~“The Oklahoma State Department of Education, Special Education Services (OSDE-SES) is committed to providing guidance and support in order to promote excellence in education from infancy to adulthood for children with disabilities as outlined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA).

This mission is accomplished by disseminating information to families, schools, communities, and agencies through meaningful resources, fostering collaborative partnerships and providing timely and accurate technical assistance.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment - 01/01/2019

“A VA Veteran who is eligible for an evaluation under Chapter 31 must first apply for services and receive an appointment with a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC). The VRC will work with the Veteran to determine if an employment handicap exists as a result of his or her service- connected disability. If an employment handicap is established and the Veteran is found entitled to services. The VRC and the Veteran will continue counseling to select a track of services and jointly develop a plan to address the Veteran's rehabilitation and employment needs. For additional information, please visit the Federal VA site at Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment.

The rehabilitation plan will specify an employment or independent living goal, identify intermediate goals, and outline services and resources that VA will provide to assist the Veteran to achieve his / her goals. The VRC and the Veteran will work together to implement the plan to assist the Veteran to achieve his or her employment and / or independent living goals.“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

Veterans Preference (State Employment) - 01/01/2019

~~“In establishing employment lists of eligible persons for competitive and noncompetitive appointment, certain preferences shall be allowed for veterans honorably discharged from the Armed Forces of the United State[74:840-4.14(A)]. A description of the categories of preference can be found by accessing the web-link.”

Systems
  • Other

Vet Centers - 12/25/2018

~~“Vet Center Call Center 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)Life isn't always easy after a deployment. That's where Vet Centers can help.We are the people in VA who welcome home war veterans with honor by providing quality readjustment counseling in a caring manner. Vet Centers understand and appreciate Veterans’ war experiences while assisting them and their family members toward a successful post-war adjustment in or near their community. All services are free of cost and are strictly confidential.Readjustment counseling is a wide range of psycho social services offered to eligible Veterans, Service members, and their families in the effort to make a successful transition from military to civilian life.  They include:• Individual and group counseling for Veterans, Service members, and their families• Family counseling for military related issues• Bereavement counseling for families who experience an active duty death• Military sexual trauma counseling and referral• Outreach and education including PDHRA, community events, etc.• Substance abuse assessment and referral• Employment assessment & referral• VBA benefits explanation and referral• Screening & referral for medical issues including TBI, depression, etc.” 

Systems
  • Other

13th Annual Oklahoma Transition Institute “Strategies for Success: Creating Connections” - 10/15/2018

~~“The Department of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) offers a summer work experience program, iJobs, for students with disabilities in, Tulsa, Owasso, and Collinsville. iJobs  is  a  summer  work  training  and  experience  program for high school students with disabilities. DRS clients apply and interview to participate in this summer program. It begins the first week of June with a week  of  classroom employability  instruction,  independent  living  skills,  and  practice  navigating  public  transportation.  Students spend  the  remainder  of  summer  working  on  part-time jobs in their areas of interest within their home communities, while spending one day each  week  obtaining  additional  instruction,  volunteering,  or  accessing  resources  in  the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment at the University of Oklahoma

“The Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment facilitates successful secondary and postsecondary educational, vocational and personal outcomes for students and adults with disabilities. ZC faculty, staff, and students do this through self-determination oriented evaluation, research, development, transition education instruction, and dissemination of best educational and support practices. The ZC also prepares undergraduate and graduate students to assume leadership roles in schools, universities, and support organizations.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Cherokee Nation DEI Grant - 10/01/2017

“Cherokee Nation (CN DEI), is a self-governance tribal government. CN DEI will fund two Disability Resource Coordinators and implement activities that will increase access to and the participation of individuals with disabilities in the WIOA employment and training services with a focus on improvements needed to make the Cherokee Nation Career Services career pathways system fully inclusive of and accessible to individuals with disabilities. CN DEI will increase the number of individuals with disabilities who access Career Pathways utilizing vocational training, alternative education, work experience, career development skills, supportive services, and on-the-job training. Targeted industry sectors will include Healthcare, Tourism/Hospitality and Manufacturing.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“Riata Center for Entrepreneurship, Spears School of Business at Oklahoma State University (Stillwater, Oklahoma): Veterans Entrepreneurship Program (VEP) ...VEP opens the door to small business ownership by developing skills needed to create and sustaining a business, while coordinating the offering of additional programs and services for service-disabled veterans….

The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of Oklahoma, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—working poor; lower income residents with life changing events such as divorce or new custody actions; hourly wage workers in retail and food service; and independent contractors.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Chambers of commerce, Small business and trade associations, Faith-based organizations, Community-based primary care and pediatric providers, Local Social Security offices, OK State Department of Health,  and Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) locations across the state.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Gayla MachellPhone: (405) 557-0049Email: gayla.machell@laok.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DRS offers free summer training for young jobseekers with disabilities - 06/03/2019

~~“OKLAHOMA CITY – Career planning and on-the-job training will continue for Oklahoma students with disabilities when school ends, thanks to Transition School to Work.

Students from across the state are signing up for innovative job training programs offered free of charge by Vocational Rehabilitation and Visual services.

VR and VS are divisions of the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services.

“We match up students in our Summer Transition Employment Programs – STEP for short – with paid, part-time employment in a career area they’re interested in,” Transition Coordinator Renee Sansom said. “Then our instructors and VR and VS counselors boost their confidence and develop the personal skills like problem-solving and teamwork that employers value most.”

STEP was previously known as iJobs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Provider List - 05/13/2019

~~This page lists the types of services offered by the current contracted providers

“Provider Agencies contracting for Community Services through Developmental Disabilities Services Division (DDSD). The following is a list of current contracted providers”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Oklahoma Works Conference - 05/01/2019

~~“The Oklahoma Works Conference is the educational training event of the year for partners working in workforce development. The Conference will take place May 1-3, 2019, and include important content for all partners with workshops including:• Case Management• Customer Service• EEO/Accessibility• Apprenticeships• Financial/Infrastructure• HSE Testing Vendors• Adult Basic Education Program Strategies• ABE/Workforce Co-enrollment Strategies• Career Pathways• Expunging Records• Performance” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Oklahoma Department of Human Resources Training Resources - 02/14/2019

~~“This informational packet is meant as a starting point to finding training resources in Oklahoma.  Many programs are dependent upon outside funding, so some programs may be unavailable while new ones may have started.

This packet provides resources for people seeking training due to a disability, criminal background, and loss of previous job.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

~~“This event brought together key community stakeholders, individuals with disabilities, family members and educators to network and discuss state-of-the-art strategies to ensure competitive and equitable employment for Oklahoman’s with disabilities. The attendees come from different backgrounds and experiences, but had a common goal:  to see that individuals with disabilities experience full inclusion in the workplace and in the community.

 As stakeholder’s, we strive to move toward employment first, and employment for all. Together we understand Employment First is a declaration of both philosophy and policy stating that:  Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. Our goal is for the Employment First philosophy to raise awareness of the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

National Center for Disability Education and Training DRS Training

The National Center for Disability Education and Training (NCDET) designs and delivers cutting-edge training to staff of employment providers in a variety of competency-based courses leading to certification. The methods of training range from classroom to accessible multimedia products marketed across the United States.

Please click on the link below for more information about trainings offered through our contract with the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services. NCDET has delivered training under this  contract since 1987 and has prepared thousands of Employment Training Specialists to provide employment supports to individuals with significant disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

This program has several functions. It “develops new  employment services,  provides technical assistance, and training to contracted agencies and DRS staff statewide.    ESS  administers the supported employment program, which is a specialized type of job placement for people with the most significant  barriers to employment. Supported Employment provides  intensive, specialized onsite  training and long term supports  to assist individuals to find employment, learn their job tasks, and maintain successful employment.   Employment and Retention  is an  employment program  for individuals with significant barriers to employment.  This program is designed to provide individuals with short term on and off site training and supports to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment.   Job Placement is an employment program   intended to assist  individuals   requiring  minimal support  in finding full-time employment.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R04.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Living Choice/Money Follows the Person

“The Living Choice Project is Oklahoma’s brand name for the Money Follows the Person grant, and is administered by the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA). Oklahoma’s Living Choice Project is designed to transform the current long-term care system by promoting community based services instead of institutional services.

The Living Choice project serves three populations, the physically disabled (19-64), older persons (65 and older), and intellectually disabled. Individuals in any of these three populations are eligible for transition if they have resided in a qualified institution (i.e. nursing facility, intermediate care facility for persons with intellectual disabilities) for at least ninety days prior to their proposed transition date, and have had one day of their institutional stay paid by Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma HCBS Transition Plan

The purpose of this Transition Plan is to ensure the individuals receiving Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) are integrated in and have access to supports in the community, including opportunities to seek employment, work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources.  The State has prepared a revised transition plan in order to comply with federal regulations for community-based settings. Overall, the Transition Plan provides assurance that the individuals receiving HCBS have the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS. This updated Transition Plan outlines the proposed process that Oklahoma will be utilizing to ensure implementation of the new HCBS requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX State Plan  The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of any state’s Medicaid program.  As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act (the Act) the State Plan is developed by the state and approved by DHHS/CMS. Without a State Plan, OHCA would not be eligible for federal funding for providing SoonerCare services.  Essentially, the State Plan is our state’s agreement that it will conform to the requirements of the Act and the official issuances of DHHS/CMS.  The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act.
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

OK Developmental Disabilities Service Division Home and Community-Based Services Waiver

“Developmental Disabilities Service Division, a division of OKDHS, serves individuals who are 3 years of age and older who have mental retardation and certain persons with related conditions who would otherwise require placement in an intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

With the motto "Labor Conquers All Things," it's clear that Oklahoma values the contributions of all workers, including workers with disabilities, and has plenty to offer when it comes to career development.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oklahoma’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,943,079
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.87%
Change from
2017 to 2018
327,111
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.21%
Change from
2017 to 2018
129,170
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.89%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39.49%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.86%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.00%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 3,943,079
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 327,111
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 129,170
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,523,986
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.49%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.00%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 316,459
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 312,061
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 475,522
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 43,570
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 33,908
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 50,351
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 5,198
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,118
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 44,029
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 8,732

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,967
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 124,606

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 12,316
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 34,830
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 55,687
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 20.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 60.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 111
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 343
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 769
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,102
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 599
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 285
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 7.29

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,341
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 192,540
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $20,762,029
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $9,666,645
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,491,343
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 64.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,222
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,133
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 63.49

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 67.98%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.64%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 60.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 76.60%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 36.02%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 693,919
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 736
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 45,014
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 459,485
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 504,499
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 43
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 387
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 430
AbilityOne wages (products). $401,419
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,994,972

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 47
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 6
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 55
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 7
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,776
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 113
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,896

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~DSA Programs Field Representatives serve on the Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council. DSA Employment Support Services (ESS) staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the Employment First Alliance, which has a national goal of increased competitive integrated employment by 50% in the states. As a result of the Employment First Alliance, the Oklahoma operates under the Employment First Law.

DSA ESS staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) -DSA ESS staff represents DSA on the Oklahoma Developmental Disabilities Council. (Page 260) Title IV
 

Customized Employment

~~The initiative’s full array of workforce partners must align their efforts and take active roles in ensuring resources are used in ways that maximize, strengthen, and support the education to workforce pipeline for all Oklahomans.

According to a 2018 Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis conducted with WIOA Core Partners, accomplishments since 2016, include but are not limited to:

ALIGNMENT:
• Further development of the Oklahoma Works Strategic Plan with additional strategies to strengthen broadband access, and facilitate entrepreneurship.
• Creation and distribution of a transportation asset map to identify gaps and duplication impacting access to school and work.
• Development of “Oklahoma Works for All,” a pilot project across WIOA Core Partners and private partners for customized employment supports for businesses and potential employees with intellectual and developmental disabilities to be tested in the South Central Workforce Development Area.
• Development of “My Reemployment Plan,” a project across WIOA Core Partners to align case-management with readiness and transition services
• Joint WIOA policy development and release to reflect WIOA administration change and WIA to WIOA transition, including: local and regional planning guidance and approval, competitive procurement of one-stop operators, and Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Center certification of American Job Centers, among others. (Page 34) Title I

DSA has contracts with private non-profit, for-profit, and government Community Rehabilitation Service Providers (CRPs) of Supported Employment and other employment programs for individuals with significant barriers to employment. CRPs request the opportunity to provide Supported Employment, employment and retention (i.e. short term job coaching), job placement, JOBS (short-term placement), work-adjustment training, employment support and transitional employment services for DSA job seekers. DSA approves contracts based on pre-established criteria, including acceptable levels of payment for outcomes achieved.

DSA will continue to increase employment CRPs to meet the needs statewide focusing in rural areas, by initiating a customized employment contract within designated areas across the state. The Employment Support Services Unit (ESS) educates potential CRPs and DSA field staff of available contracts. The list of contracts and CRPs is available on the DSA intranet. (Page 255-256) Title IV

The Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) serves as the Medicaid Agency for provisions of title XIX of the Social Security Act. The OHCA and Department of Human Services (DHS) maintain an MOA for provision of services. The DHS administers waiver programs which include extended services as a part of the waiver. Each Medicaid waiver individual plan includes outcomes which would create a pathway to achieve competitive integrated employment. DRS has implemented a new customized employment contract which can be utilized by individuals to achieve employment. Increased education and in-service with contractors has occurred to encourage contracts with both the DSA and DDS to ensure a more streamlined access to competitive integrated employment opportunities. The DHS and DSA utilizes an MOA to outline the provisions and responsibilities for extended services utilized in Medicaid funded programs. (Pages 259- 260) Title IV

Research determined that there are not minority groups disproportionately underserved in Oklahoma, but the DSA with the SRC held focus groups to obtain further qualitative information. Based on the last assessment, research was focused on rural counties that were identified as being underserved. Despite active DSA programs to serve SSI/SSDI recipients, focus group attendees reported there is a family disconnect and fear regarding the loss of benefits. This fear results in the parents of youth with disabilities being resistant to services that are employment oriented.

Those in need of supported or customized employment in some rural areas of the state also face a lack of CRP vendors in remote areas, including southeastern Oklahoma. Needs were identified for more employer outreach to address accessibility issues with employer application methods, additional cooperation between schools and DSA counselors in the setting of appropriate career goals for youth with disabilities and making sure IPE and IEP goals are in-line prior to graduation.

In rural areas, there is a gap in service when serving the homeless populations and those that lack transportation. This is a result of missing auxiliary services that are available through other agencies and/or programs in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. In addition, transportation is a service gap that affects individuals with disabilities not just in rural areas, but across the state. (Page 272) Title IV

DSA will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSA is initiating a customized employment program. The DSA is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 281) Title IV

Customized Employment Services Project
Memorandum of Understanding: The DSA entered into a contracted agreement with 24 vendors, known as the Contractor.

Scope of Work: This is a project to provide Customized Employment Services and/or other employment services to individuals in Priority Group 1 with the most significant disabilities. Some of the other employment services are available to individuals in Priority Group 2 with significant disabilities. This contract is intended to meet the requirements of WIOA. Career Exploration and Internship services are optional and can be used with individuals in Priority Group 1 or 2, receiving CE, SE or ER contract services. Onsite Supports and Training and Extended Services for Transition (EST) can be used with individuals in Priority Group 1 only, receiving CE or SE contract services. The DSA Counselor, working with the individual and the Contractor, will designate the services to be used. The Discovery and Profile and Career Exploration services only, can be used with transition aged youth, age 16 or above, on a Trial Work Plan or Individualized Plan of Employment, to gather assessment information related to employment, and to help identify additional employment related transition services and/or a career path. (Page 281) Title IV

Partner Responsibilities: The Contractor will:

1. The Contractor has completed discovery activities that utilize a person centered approach to describe “who the individual is”. and guides the planning process to develop a customized job. The Contractor will summarize the Discovery findings on the individual’s profile. The Contractor has provided benefits planning information to any individual who is receiving Social Security Administration (SSA) benefits, and has referred the individual to a DSA Benefits Planning Specialist if the individual, payee, or family member has requested the service.

2.The Contractor will provide opportunities for the individual to explore potential occupations, job conditions, interests and job tasks in order to enhance their vocational goal and prepare the individual for a successful job match. Exploration activities could include but are not limited to: job shadowing, work-site tour, job sampling, trial work experiences, volunteer experiences and situational assessments.

3.The Contractor will schedule and conduct a Team Meeting with the individual, DRS Counselor and all other relevant team members to create a CE Employer Development Plan.

4.The Contractor has created the Visual Résumé with the individual. This résumé was used in the job development process to highlight the individual’s potential contributions and the types of tasks the individual is interested and capable of performing. The Contractor has explained Customized Employment and outlined what the employer can expect from the individual and the Contractor during the job development process. The Contractor has developed a successful job match that meets the individual’s contributions, conditions and interests and the employer’s unmet needs. A job can be developed within an individual’s family’s business as long as the job meets the definition of competitive integrated employment. (Page 282) Title IV

5. The individual has worked successfully for a minimum of eight (8) weeks beginning with the first (1st) day of employment and has received all appropriate onsite supports and training. At the completion of this service, individuals can be moved to CE Maintenance if they meet the following criteria: individual is working at least sixty percent (60%) of their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE, and on-site support needs cannot be more than twenty-five percent (25%) of their total work hours per month.

6. The individual has worked successfully for a minimum four of (4) and a maximum of eight (8) additional weeks beyond the CE Job Coaching I and has received all appropriate onsite supports and training. The Contractor can move the individual to CE Maintenance after the maintenance criteria is met. To move to CE Maintenance, the individual must be working at sixty percent (60%) of their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE, and their on-site support needs cannot be more than twenty-five percent (25%) of their total work hours per month. If the maintenance criteria is not met at the end of six (6) weeks, then a team meeting is required to determine if the individual needs to be moved to Onsite Supports and Training at the completion of CE Job Coaching II. (Page 282) Title II

8. The individual can be moved to CE Maintenance at the end of any four (4) week increment if they meet the maintenance criteria. The maintenance criteria specifies the individual must be working at sixty (60%) of their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE, and on-site support needs cannot be more than twenty-five (25%) of their total work hours per month.

9. If the individual remains in this service at the end of the initial three and a half (3½) months and has not been moved to CE Maintenance, a team meeting is required. Additional Onsite Supports and Training can be authorized and provided if the team determines it is needed to assist the individual with meeting the maintenance criteria.

10. The individual has worked successfully for at least four (4) weeks, and received all appropriate onsite supports and training. To achieve maintenance, the individual must work at least one entire work week without EC support, must work at their weekly work goal as identified on their IPE for the four (4) weeks of maintenance, their onsite/offsite support and training needs must be less than or equal to twenty percent (20%) of their total work hours per month, the employer is satisfied with the individual’s job performance, and the individual is satisfied with their job. At the completion of CE Maintenance, if the individual has met all of the requirements, they can be moved to the CE Employment Outcome Service. (Page 283) Title IV

Referral Process: At the time of referral, the DSA Counselor will provide the Contractor with a copy of the Eligibility Determination Form, Individualized Plan of Employment (IPE) or Trial Work Plan, and Personal Information Form. Once the intake is scheduled, the Contractor will send a CE Authorization Request Form to the DSA Counselor, Rehabilitation Technician and Program Manager. The DSA Counselor authorizes for the first two services to be used (i.e. CE Discovery and Profile and Career Exploration, etc.) within five (5) business days.

The Contractor should contact the DSA Counselor and ask for the authorization to be sent if not received within five (5) business days. The Contractor will only provide services that have been pre-authorized by the DSA Counselor. The only services that can be provided under a trial work plan include the CE Discovery and Profile service and the Career Exploration service. (Page 284) Title IV

The DSA conducted an Employment Support Services 360 analysis resulting in the need for supported or customized employment in some rural areas of the state, also a lack of CRP vendors in remote areas, including southeastern Oklahoma. (Page 290) Title IV

Online Introduction to Positive Behavior Supports in the Workplace (prerequisite for positive behavior supports and instructional supports); Positive Behavior in the Workplace, customized employment and instructional supports. Following completion of the required training listed above, six hours of continuing education is required each year. The DSA staff also provides quarterly training and two additional advanced trainings annually to CRPs to keep them up-to-date on current best practices.

DSA monitors contract compliance, provides an outcomes based report on data drawn from the AWARE case management program. DSA reports to CRPs on minimum contract standards and whether those standards have been met or will require a plan for improvement. Every CRP has a TA who helps resolve service delivery problems and monitors for contract compliance on an annual basis. (Page 306) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Oklahoma is encouraging the braiding of funding and leveraging of resources through the state’s new resource leveraging tool to be released in the fall of 2016. In this online tool, state agencies, including the core partners, can identify existing workforce development activities and send requests to partner. These requests are then supported and facilitated with the assistance of the Office of the Governor, if needed. Similarly, with the release of this tool, the Office of the Governor, under Oklahoma Works, in July of 2016, challenged each state agency and each Workforce Development Board, to identify one new partner (private or public) to engage.

With stagnant or declining funding from state and federal funding streams, the State is continually seeking more efficient ways to provide services to Oklahomans. Resources continue to be one of the largest threats to achieving the goals set forth in this plan, according to a 2018 Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats analysis with WIOA Core Partners. Despite other potential threats to success, including the complexity and isolation of the state’s data systems, the culture shift required for systems thinking as opposed to programs thinking under WIOA, and the culture shift required by today’s global economy for skills--and the workforce-- to be flexible, adaptable, and stackable, opportunities exist to utilize the capacity in place, or to enhance capacity, for the sake of our talent pipeline. Optimizing capacity to focus on opportunities, such as a 2018 Gubernatorial election to strengthen workforce advocacy, system-building and cross-training to support systems thinking and customer-centered, or human-centered, design of the workforce development system, will allow the system to adapt to changing resources in the form of funds and/or human capital. (Page 45) Title I
 

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~7. implement a series of surveys developed by the national LEAD Center to assess the experience of:

• Job seekers
• Employers
• American Job Center staff

to determine their readiness and satisfaction with employers and the Oklahoma Works Workforce Development System;

*The LEAD Center is a collaborative of disability, workforce and economic empowerment organization dedicated to improving employment and economic advancement outcomes for all people with disabilities — funded by the Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor.

8. continue to work collaboratively with DSA to provide technical assistance and support to ACT regarding the accessibility of web-based versions of the ACT test and WorkKeys assessments in an effort to remove technological barriers for both students and job seekers with disabilities; Accessibility standards have been defined by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI). The ultimate goal is to allow students and job seekers to participate independently and in the most integrated setting possible in compliance with non-discrimination provisions. (Page 247) Title IV
.

School to Work Transition

~~The designated State unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.

The DSA will maintain a formal interagency agreement with the State Educational Agency (SEA) as well as relationships at the local level with LEAs. The focus of our work will be to forage those relationships and partner with stakeholders to provide services to youth and students with disabilities to help them prepare for life after high school, including, but not limited to, further education/training, competitive integrated employment, independent living and social skills, self-determination, and self-advocacy. It is our intent to perform outreach to underrepresented groups, such as those on Section 504 Plans, youth in foster care, adjudicated youth, out-of-school youth, and those with other disabilities not documented on a 504 or IEP. The DSA does not have any updated transition and pre-employment transition policies but intend to complete the revisions by October 1, 2019. (Page 250) Title IV

The DSA will coordinate services with local educational agency staff to help prepare youth and students with disabilities for competitive integrated employment. DSA staff will share results of the vocational evaluation and other assessments, as well as progress reports for various work experiences with school personnel for the purpose of including information in the IEP and transition planning process. The DSA will work with school personnel to not only have input into the IEP process but also to access a copy of the IEP for assistance with coordination with the VR IPE.

The DSA and educational officials will provide the following types of services:

o Consultation and technical assistance services to assist State educational agencies and local educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postsecondary life, including employment.

o Transition services to youth with disabilities and students with disabilities, for which a vocational rehabilitation counselor works in concert with educational agencies, providers of job training programs, providers of services under the Medicaid program under title XIX of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1396 et seq.), entities designated by the State to provide services for individuals with developmental disabilities, centers for independent living (as defined in section 796a of this title), housing and transportation authorities, workforce development systems, and businesses and employers. (Page 251) Title IV

The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on working with VR staff and LEA staff to facilitate completion of a comprehensive and quality Individualized Education Program (IEP) and Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that appropriately includes transition planning and coordination of services.

The OSDE will continue to enforce the IDEA requirements regarding inviting those agencies responsible for providing or paying for transition services, including referral to VR at the age of 15 so services can be in place by the age of 16.

The OSDE will:
(1) provide to the LEAs a referral form to VR through the state IEP development system; (2) educate LEAs on the best practices for inviting VR and other transition providers to participate in the development of the IEP and participate through multiple means (e.g., in person, by phone, virtually, by providing documents in advance) in IEP and other meetings; and (3) continue to monitor the involvement of, invitations to, and referrals to VR through the state monitoring system, Indicator 13 checklist, and other means as decided. 3. The ODRS will continue to enforce the WIOA requirements regarding attending IEP and other meetings (when invited) as well as the process for receiving and responding to referrals, including referral to VR at the age of 15 1/2 so services can be in place by the age of 16.

The DSA will:
o Provide to the OSDE the content to be included in the referral to VR form
o Train its staff on the requirements of receiving the referral form along with the release of confidential information from LEAs and other referral sources
o Train its staff to develop internal procedures with each school for how referrals will be submitted to the local VR counselor
o Train its staff on best practices for engaging with schools and teams, planning and attending IEP and other meetings, to participate in the development of the IEP and participate through multiple means (e.g., in person, by phone, virtually, by providing documents in advance)
o Train its staff on providing regular updates to the referring source on the status of that referral, if the student/family applied for services, if a plan for employment is in place, what services may be implemented at school, etc
o Encourage its staff and schools to take advantage of the online VR application to streamline the application process, possibly in lieu of even a referral
o Continue to educate and encourage its staff to actively contribute to the development of annual goals and coordinated services to be included in the IEP to help the student reach his or her postsecondary goals
o Train its staff to assist schools in developing annual IEP goals around the VR services provided to support the achievement of the IEP and IPE goals; and work with the OSDE and LEAs to improve documentation of the collaborative transition service delivery occurring for a student by encouraging wording in the IEP. (Page 252) Title IV

The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on performing outreach statewide to identify students with disabilities in need of transition services under IDEA and pre-employment transition services under WIOA, those residing in rural areas, and those low-incidence populations, such as blindness and hearing impairments. The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on joint community and professional presentations to educate and inform LEAs, parents, and others about reaching the needs of youth and students on Section 504 Plans and those with documented disabilities not being served through an IEP or Section 504 Plan. The DSA will work with the Oklahoma Rehabilitation Council's Transition Committee, Oklahoma School for the Blind, and Oklahoma School for the Deaf to conduct outreach activities. This may include, but is not limited to, developing and disseminating public service announcements, making presentations within these schools and LEAs, hosting events for groups of students with disabilities (e.g., advocacy, STEM). (Page 253) Title IV

Because the definition of a "student with a disability," for the VR program includes an individual with a disability for purposes of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, it is broader than the definition under IDEA, VR is authorized to provide transition services to this broader population of students with disabilities than LEAs under IDEA. Since the VR program may serve students with disabilities, including those individuals with a disability for purposes of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, these students may not have an IEP under IDEA, and, therefore, would not be eligible for or receiving special education and related services under IDEA.

The OSDE will continue to educate LEAs on the availability of VR services for students with disabilities on section 504 plans and encourage the referral of such students to the VR counselors. In addition, the Rehabilitation Act also allows the VR agency to provide pre-employment transition services to "potentially" eligible students with disabilities. This may include those students who are not receiving special education and related services under an IEP, students who are not receiving services or accommodations under a section 504 plan, and who have documented disabilities (e.g., a student may wear a hearing aid, have chronic health issues, such as asthma, leukemia, diabetes, suffer from depression, bipolar, and anxiety. (Page 255) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~Make recommendations, inform, coordinate and facilitate statewide efforts to improve Oklahomans’ exposure to high-demand career and entrepreneurship opportunities, along with the education and training required for entry into and advancement within a chosen career. Develop industry sector strategies in state and regional ecosystems to ensure that the education and training system is delivering the skills needed by employers.

Goals/Objectives
o Create a plan for Career Pathways efforts to be based on industry sectors within Oklahoma’s state and regional ecosystems.
o Establish strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.
o Create and use Career Pathways approaches to increase the proportion of low-skill learners who ultimately earn a degree or certificate.
o Increase high school graduation rates - decrease high school dropout rates.
o Increase the percentage of Oklahoma workers with a recognized postsecondary credential. (A credential consisting of an industry-recognized certificate or certification, a certificate of completion of an apprenticeship, a license recognized by the State or Federal government, or an associate or baccalaureate degree.
o Reinforce the alignment with Registered Apprenticeship for earn-and-learn opportunities.
o Use performance data to demonstrate progress and impact, thereby supporting partner buy-in and reinforcing continued engagement over time.
o Make Career Pathways part of the Board certification process.
o Introduce employers and educators to the value of partnering by describing best practices and success stories.
o Develop or research pilots and models. (Page 120-121) Title I

Apprenticeship

During annual monitoring the state will require the local areas to submit documentation describing how the 14 program elements are being implemented. The state will also include a sample of youth RFP’s and contracts in their annual monitoring to assure that the 14 elements were included in the program design and framework and are available to all youth in the WIOA program. There is a section in our youth program monitoring tool that specifically asks our local boards for a description of how the following program elements are being implemented and we request a list of the entities providing the elements and the services available at least annual in accordance with monitoring requirements:

o Tutoring, study skills training, instruction and evidence-based dropout prevention and recovery strategies that lead to completion of the requirements for a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent (including a recognized certificate of attendance or similar document for individuals with disabilities) or for a recognized postsecondary credential:

o Alternative secondary school services, or dropout recovery services, as appropriate:

o Paid and unpaid work experiences that have academic and occupational education as a component of the work experience:

o Occupational skill training, which includes priority consideration for training programs that lead to recognized postsecondary credentials that align with in-demand industry sectors or occupations in the local area involved, if the Local WDB determines that the programs meet the quality criteria described in WIOA sec. 123:

o Education offered concurrently with and in the same context as workforce preparation activities and training for a specific occupation or occupational cluster:

o Leadership development opportunities, including community service and peer-centered activities encouraging responsibility and other positive social and civic behaviors: o Supportive services, including the services listed in § 681.570: o Adult mentoring for a duration of at least 12 months that may occur both during and after program participation: o Follow-up services for not less than 12 months after the completion of participation, as provided in § 681.580: o Comprehensive guidance and counseling, which may include drug and alcohol abuse counseling, as well as referrals to counseling, as appropriate to the needs of the individual youth: o Financial literacy education: o Entrepreneurial skills training: o Services that provide labor market and employment information about in-demand industry sectors or occupations available in the local area, such as career awareness, career counseling, and career exploration services: o Activities that help youth prepare for and transition to postsecondary education and training: (Page 191) Title I

Prepare and distribute “Tool Kit of Solutions”— a checklist of the physical elements reviewed during 2015 site visits, current status, meets/does not meet guideline, ADA guideline, remedy, resources, timeframe for completion, date of completion o Landlord responsibilities fact sheet: new construction and leases o Certificate of completion for remediation of items o Sites will self—assess every two years using Tool Kit of Solutions listed above o Site point of contact will send an updated checklist to the DSA ADA Coordinator o Implement site review prior to renovations and new construction, DSA ADA Coordinator will provide technical assistance (Page 294) Title IV

Accessibility work with private sector companies  ACT WorkKeys Continue working with DRS outreach efforts to improve the accessibility of the Career Readiness Certificate (CRC) product for individuals with hearing loss and/or blind and visually impaired. (Page 295) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Research determined that there are not minority groups disproportionately underserved in Oklahoma, but the DSA with the SRC held focus groups to obtain further qualitative information. Based on the last assessment, research was focused on rural counties that were identified as being underserved. Despite active DSA programs to serve SSI/SSDI recipients, focus group attendees reported there is a family disconnect and fear regarding the loss of benefits. This fear results in the parents of youth with disabilities being resistant to services that are employment oriented.
Those in need of supported or customized employment in some rural areas of the state also face a lack of CRP vendors in remote areas, including southeastern Oklahoma. Needs were identified for more employer outreach to address accessibility issues with employer application methods, additional cooperation between schools and DSA counselors in the setting of appropriate career goals for youth with disabilities and making sure IPE and IEP goals are in-line prior to graduation.

In rural areas, there is a gap in service when serving the homeless populations and those that lack transportation. This is a result of missing auxiliary services that are available through other agencies and/or programs in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. In addition, transportation is a service gap that affects individuals with disabilities not just in rural areas, but across the state. (Page 272) Title IV

The DSA conducted the Employment Support Services 360 analysis that surveyed the CRP providers, the DSA staff who work with CRP providers, and the DSA consumers that were served through CRPs. As a result of the analysis, DSA needs were identified for improvement in the areas of collaboration with CRP vendors to ensure vocational goals match the skill levels of clients to place job seekers in positions that match their vocation goal, additional vendor training regarding disability types and billing and/or paperwork and the need for CRPs to have more employer contacts and providers in rural areas. CRPs requested more training opportunities from the DSA, including benefits training regarding SSI/SSDI. Consumers who were served by the CRPs reported a need for ADA and sensitivity training for some CRP employees, but expressed an overall appreciation for the patience of the job coaches and reported that the services boosted the client’s confidence in their ability to work. The majority of clients served by CRPs reported their job was a good fit (80.5%) and 77.8% reported they were happy with the job with a median wage reported of $9.00. (Page 273) Title IV

Ticket to Work Program
Coordinated activities under Ticket to Work are delivered by a statewide Ticket to Work Coordinator. The coordinator will organize activities within the DSA and with partnership employment networks (EN’s) to ensure the needs of ticket holders are met at a maximum level. Ongoing outreach efforts will be conducted to recruit new partnership employment networks in order to provide more opportunities to assist ticket holders in reaching Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level employment outcomes. The coordinator will continue to oversee the ticket to work hotline and will provide ticket holders with information and referral for state VR, partnership EN’s, and external EN’s. (Page 285) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Data Collection

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~Under the new section 511, the determination of individuals who may benefit from employment services, the DSA has developed contracts with CRP to provide Trial Work Services to establish the ability to benefit from employment services.

DSA maintains an MOA with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) describing collaboration on delivery of Supported Employment services and transitional employment services.

The DSA has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five-community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness.

DSA maintains an MOA with the DDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual disabilities. The MOA outlines the coordination of services and identifies the DSA as first dollar funding source for competitive integrated employment. DDS continues to provide extended services for individuals with intellectual disabilities in Supported Employment services by utilizing the DDS Home and Community Based Waiver (HCBW) and DDS state dollars. The HCBW is utilized to provide the long-term ongoing supports. DSA has maintained an MOA with DDS since 1989. Under the MOA, the HCBW is also utilized to provide pre-vocational services. (Page 257) Title IV

DSA ESS staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) -DSA ESS staff represents DSA on the Oklahoma Developmental Disabilities Council.

DDS Staff serves on the Oklahoma Transition Council (OTC) resulting in statewide conferences, resources, technical assistance, and additional professional development opportunities. Many issues and challenges are brought forth with a wide range of experts to assist the DSA and DDS in resolving and achieving their goals.

The DSA Statewide Transition Coordinator will work with DDS staff to ensure staff from each agency, schools, families, and CRPs understand the changes in WIOA regarding sub-minimum wage, are well-trained, and that Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) are provided to students with disabilities accessing vocational rehabilitation services through the DSA.

The DSA ESS staff will work with DDS staff to ensure CRPs and staff at each agency is provided ongoing training and consultation required by WIOA for any youth with a significant disability hired at subminimum wage. The partners will also ensure the required reviews take place according to WIOA to ensure every opportunity for achieving full competitive integrated employment. (Page 260) Title IV

DSA conducts annual outreach and review services for individuals earning subminimum wage under a 14c certificate. Individuals will receive information about career counseling and information and referral services, as well as other components to the Vocational Rehabilitation program. The intent is to inform all individuals of the VR process in relation to seeking and obtaining competitive integrated employment. All individuals newly hired have to receive the career counseling and information and referral services two times the first year of employment and annually afterwards. In 2016-2017 the DSA reached approximately 4000 individuals through this outreach effort. The DSA also worked with the Department of Labor to provide information and training services to employers who hold the 14c certificate. All newly hired individuals have to receive the career counseling and information and referral services two times the first year of employment and annually afterwards. The DSA provides documentation in collaboration with the local school district of specific services to youth 24 and younger, if those individuals are known by the DSA to be seeking subminimum wage work.

Other DSA program areas that are utilized to expand and improve services include:
• Visual Services Center in Tulsa and Oklahoma City
• DVS Technology Lab and Training Lab in Tulsa and Oklahoma City
• DVS Adult Blind Living Evaluation (ABLE)
• DVS Training Adult Program (TAP)
• DVR Technology Lab and Training Lab in Oklahoma City
• Oklahoma School for the Blind (OSB) transition work adjustment program
• Partnering with OSB for Vocational Evaluations
• Project Search
• Business Enterprise Program
• Office of Juvenile Affairs collaborations
• Department of Veterans Affairs collaborations
• On-line applications
• Customized Employment
• JOBS Contract
• Wellness Recovery Action Plan Training (WRAP) (Page 285-286) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity, which provides guidance to communicate Oklahoma’s process and procedures regarding nondiscrimination and equal opportunity procedures that apply to all Local Workforce Development Areas (LWDBs); WIOA Section 188 Discrimination Complaint Procedures Governing WIOA Activities and Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Center Activities, which provides guidance on the WIOA Section 188 Discrimination Complaint Procedures; Supplemental Wage Information Collection, which provides guidance for the use of supplemental wage information, when appropriate, to assist in carrying out the performance accountability requirements under section 116 for the WIOA Title I Programs and the Wagner-Peyser Employment Services as amended by Title III; WIOA Roles and Responsibilities, which provides guidance to communicate the roles and responsibilities of various entities created as a result of WIOA; WIOA Worksite Agreement, which provides guidance on the utilization of the standardized Worksite Agreement for all participants in Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth work experience programs, including transitional jobs for Adult or Dislocated Worker program participants; and, Grievance and Complaint Process, which provides guidance to communicate Oklahoma’s instructions for the grievance and complaint process under WIOA. (Page 118) Title I

Oklahoma is focused on accessibility for all job seekers and businesses and employer’s work sites throughout all levels of Oklahoma Works. Working with the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development (GCWED), system partners bring sharper focus on developing and employing more Oklahomans with disabilities. The objective is to provide equitable services to individuals with disabilities and to ensure that all Workforce System partners comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Access for All Initiative The Access for All initiative within Oklahoma Works places a focus on recruitment, hiring, and promotion of individuals with disabilities in the state of Oklahoma’s workforce system. Access for All focuses on the Oklahoma Works system partners as well as employers in the state. This initiative provides training, consulting, and resources to ensure that individuals with disabilities are intentionally included in efforts to achieve greater household wealth for Oklahomans. Access for All equips Oklahoma’s Workforce System with knowledge and resources to make it more accessible to individuals with disabilities that utilize one-stop system programs in person, on the phone, or through the web. Access for All is brought to Oklahoma Works through a partnership between the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services (Oklahoma’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program) and Oklahoma ABLE Tech (Oklahoma’s Assistive Technology Act Program). To help build a foundation for the Access for All initiative, the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services (OKDRS) and Oklahoma ABLE Tech (OKABT), partner to provide regional Access for All technical assistance in the form of, academies, webinars, newsletters, and weekly tips statewide. (Page 148-149) Title I

Oklahoma’s Workforce System commitment to enhanced accessibility continues by incorporating accessibility seamlessly into the everyday business practices of the local areas. Access for All within the Oklahoma Works system, is a standard that has been set to springboard success for Oklahoma’s business and employers and job seekers in reaching Oklahoma’s Goal of Wealth Generation. The one-stop system standards and certification criteria policy are designed to integrate physical and programmatic accessibility by incorporating the Access for All Certification process into the benchmark criteria for center certification. The Access for All Certification process includes two parts—physical and technology. The full Access for All Certification Process details the requirements necessary, and provides tools, to receive certification under the Oklahoma Works Workforce System Access for All initiative. Prior to center certification approval, physical and technology accessibility is reviewed at each Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) center by Certification Teams. The Certification Teams are selected by the LWDBs and are responsible for conducting independent and objective evaluations of one-stop sites and making center certification recommendations to LWDBs. When issues related to physical and programmatic accessibility are identified, an Equally Effective Alternative Access Plan (EEAAP) is created. These plans are designed to function as corrective action plans, which are designed to be monitored regularly and updated by local Equal Opportunity Officers and/or relevant program staff. (Page 150-151) Title I

In January 2018, OOWD issued WIOA Section 188 Discrimination Complaint Procedures Governing WIOA Activities and Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Center Activities (OWDI 01-2018). The policy was developed to centralize complaint processing procedures for equal opportunity and nondiscrimination issues arising in the Oklahoma Works (one-stop) Centers. OOWD partnered with OKDRS to conduct ADA Physical Accessibility Site Reviews, as a part of the center certification process, for every Oklahoma Works (One-Stop) Centers and create corrective action plans (Equally Effective Alternative Access Plans) for all centers with barriers to accessibility. Access for All trainings were delivered in 2018. Access for All trainings covered disability etiquette, review of and how to use available assistive devices. (Page 151) Title I

OOWD complies with Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) [29 CFR 38]. National origin discrimination includes Limited English Proficient individuals under 29 CFR Section 38.9 and specifically states that in providing any aid, benefit, service, or training under a WIOA title I-financially assisted program or activity, a recipient must not, directly or through contractual, licensing, or other arrangements, discriminate on the basis of national origin, including LEP which includes English Language Learners (ELL). Additionally, 29 CFR Section 38.41 added “LEP and preferred language” to the list of categories of information that each recipient must record about each applicant, registrant, eligible applicant/registrant, participant, and terminee. It is the policy of the State to provide services and information in a language other than English for customers with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) in order to effectively inform or enable those customers to participate in departmental programs or activities. LWDBs must ensure that above all, these services are free of charge and provided in a timely manner. An LEP individual must be given adequate notice about the existence of interpretation and translation services and that they are available free of charge. (Page 152) Title I

As the federally funded Assistive Technology Act Program for the State of Oklahoma, the mission of Oklahoma ABLE Tech is to get assistive technology ‘AT’ into the hands of Oklahomans with disabilities through activities that provide increased access and acquisition. The DSA has a long standing history of working closely with Oklahoma ABLE Tech to enhance the provision of assistive technology services across the state. Memorandum of Understanding: The DSA and Oklahoma Able Tech, Oklahoma’s AT Act Program have an agreement to provide programmatic technology accessibility details regarding the DSA Access for All initiative under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). Scope of Work: The DSA is leading the Oklahoma Workforce System towards enhanced accessibility. The DSA initiative of Access for All was adopted by the workforce system statewide. This initiative is in partnership with Oklahoma Able Tech within programmatic accessibility, with a goal of creating fully accessible workforce services for Oklahoma job seekers. (Page 246) Title IV

Through the Oklahoma Works American Job centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the centers or through referrals to partner facilities. OESC began a two-phase project focusing upon physical and programmatic accessibility entitled “Thinking Accessibility” within the Workforce Centers, UI Service Centers, UI Adjudication Centers and the Appeal Tribunal. This partnership brings OKDRS and OKABT together to provide the resources and tools to assist OESC on continuing their commitment in serving individuals with disabilities. (Page 299) Title IV

Veterans

Provide an analysis of the State’s workforce development activities, including education and training activities of the core programs, Combined State Plan partner programs included in this plan, and required and optional one-stop delivery system partners.* __________ * Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. (Page 30) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~Oklahoma Works System Partners: 17 state agency leadership stakeholders who have investment in the workforce development system. Partners include: Office of the Governor, Office of Management and Enterprise Services, Oklahoma Achieves (State Chamber), Oklahoma Board of Private and Vocational Schools, Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, Oklahoma Department of Human Services, Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs, Oklahoma Department of Commerce, Oklahoma Department of Corrections, Oklahoma Employment Security Commission, Oklahoma Health Care Authority, Oklahoma Office of Educational Quality and Accountability, Oklahoma State Department of Education, Oklahoma State Department of Health, and Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. (Page 8) Title I

The strategic planning effort involved the WIOA Core Partners (Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services, the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission, Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, and Office of Workforce Development) as well as other state agency partners who are a part of the state’s workforce development system (Oklahoma Board of Private Vocational Schools, Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology Education, Department of Commerce, Department of Health, Department of Human Services, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Department of Veterans Affairs, Health Care Authority, Office of Educational Quality and Accountability, Office of Management and Enterprise Services, State Department of Education, and State Regents for Higher Education). In addition to these workforce system partners, the Oklahoma State Chamber’s Oklahoma Achieves (formerly the Oklahoma Educated Workforce Initiative), business leaders from all regions of the state, members of our Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development, members of the Workforce Development Boards, and our state leaders were involved in the planning process. The resulting Oklahoma Works Strategic Delivery Plan was approved by Governor Fallin and key state leaders on December 8, 2015 and has subsequently been update twice to improve alignment and incorporate new strategies. This Plan is the overarching workforce development strategy to guide workforce development activities in the state. (Page 32) Title I

The Oklahoma Works System Oversight Subcommittee, established in 2012, is composed of Oklahoma workforce development system partners, led and established by the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development Workforce Systems Oversight Committee. A business member of the GCWED System Oversight Committee is the leader of the subcommittee. System partners include: the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education—Adult Basic Education, the Department of Rehabilitation Services - Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Human Services, the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission--Wagner-Peyser, the State Regents for Higher Education, the Oklahoma Department of Commerce, and Title I programs representing Adults, Dislocated Workers and Youth. It is hoped that other entities, such as the Department of Corrections, and the Departments of Health and Mental Health will eventually be added to establish a more comprehensive approach for creating solutions.

The team has been a cohesive unit since Governor Fallin recognized the necessity to build a new, more responsive, workforce development system to meet the needs of Oklahoma’s businesses and create wealth for the state. This subcommittee was designed to carry out the strategic mission of GCWED and reports to the Workforce System Oversight Committee of that body. (Page 78) Title I

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services (OKDRS), Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding.

OOWD works to develop and support increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Oklahoma Works Center staff routinely refer individuals with disabilities to the OKDRS for more intensive training and job placement opportunities. OKDRS has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Workforce Centers and OKDRS offices. (Page 149) Title I

Memorandum of Understanding:
The DSA and the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMSAS) agreement is for the purpose of the Mental Health Individualized Career Planning Model Project. The focus is on helping youth adults with mental illness and coordinating connections, resources, and referrals for services in the areas of education, employment, housing, maintaining mental/emotional health, and legal/system related needs.

Scope of Work:
The two agencies will work together to address barriers through a program that will provide needed training and technical assistance to providers in the individualized career planning model specific to persons with serious mental illness (SMI). This program will continue training that will result in individualized career planning that will increase the likelihood that persons with SMI will find, obtain, and keep a job in the career field of their choice. (Page 248-249) Title IV

The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on ensuring education officials, school personnel, and VR personnel are cross-trained, have opportunities for networking and collaboration, and receive consistent messages and guidance from the DSA and OSDE.

The DSA will continue to coordinate with non-educational agencies to reach out-of-school youth to support them in their employment efforts. This includes collaboration with subminimum wage employers, workforce development boards, Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, mental health providers, community rehabilitation providers, Oklahoma Department of Human Services, Office of Juvenile Affairs, Oklahoma Parents Center, Oklahoma Family Network, Oklahoma Autism Network, Down Syndrome Association of Oklahoma, and other stakeholders.
The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on performing outreach statewide to identify students with disabilities in need of transition services under IDEA and pre-employment transition services under WIOA, those residing in rural areas, and those low-incidence populations, such as blindness and hearing impairments. The DSA and OSDE will collaborate on joint community and professional presentations to educate and inform LEAs, parents, and others about reaching the needs of youth and students on Section 504 Plans and those with documented disabilities not being served through an IEP or Section 504 Plan. The DSA will work with the Oklahoma Rehabilitation Council's Transition Committee, Oklahoma School for the Blind, and Oklahoma School for the Deaf to conduct outreach activities. This may include, but is not limited to, developing and disseminating public service announcements, making presentations within these schools and LEAs, hosting events for groups of students with disabilities (e.g., advocacy, STEM). (Page 253) Title IV

There are no restrictions on the types of disabilities served through the contracts, although the majority of individuals served continue to be those with intellectual disabilities or serious mental illness as a primary diagnosis. Although most CRPs serve a diverse population of individuals with the most significant barriers to employment, mental health CRPs continue to serve exclusively individuals with serious mental illness.

Mental Health CRPs have the option of providing Supported Employment. DSA, the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services are collaboratively seeking strategies for improving services and enhancing service capacity for individuals with serious mental illness.

DSA will provide outreach to increase the number of community mental health CRPs contracting to provide employment services in an effort to improve the employment outcomes of individuals with serious mental illness. The DSA has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16—25 with serious mental illness. (Page 280) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

In addition to other career services in the Oklahoma Works centers, Oklahoma provides two reemployment services tracks to help Unemployment Insurance (UI) claimants and/or unemployed individuals return to work more quickly: Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment and 50% Eligibility Review Interview.

Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA)

RESEA is an individualized process consisting of an orientation to the Center and all available workforce system resources, a UI eligibility review, an assessment of a claimant’s skills and career goals including any necessary transferable skills discussions, a discussion of job search strategies, establishment of an individual reemployment plan, provision of job referrals, and follow-up appointments. This program addresses the “harder to serve/need intensive” category i.e. those with multiple barriers to employment needing a variety of assistive services to return to work. RESEA claimants have been identified as likely to exhaust UI benefits and unlikely to return to their previous occupation; therefore, they must be scheduled before receiving the 5th week of UI benefits. Additionally, RESEA also serves Unemployment Compensation for ex-service members (UCX) claimants. These reemployment services are provided in an effort to reduce the time a claimant will be paid UI benefits and increase the likelihood the claimant will attain self-sufficient employment. (Page 199) Title I

50% Eligibility Review Interview (ERI) The 50% Eligibility Review Interview (ERI) is delivered in a group process consisting of information on available services, work search review, expansion of work search efforts, and the provision of job referrals. This group is intended to be a triage type, informational session designed to serve the masses; taking far less time than its Reemployment Services counterpart, RESEA. The ERI is conducted with claimants in demand occupations who possess the skills and experience to return to work, often in the same or similar occupation. These claimants are equipped with additional reemployment strategies and tools, and are expected to return to work more quickly. (Page 199) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 42

Occupational Skills Training Service Status Definitions and Reporting Accuracy - 07/06/2020

“The Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD), as the Governor’s chosen Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) administrative entity, provides this technical assistance to the local workforce development areas to ensure appropriate Service Status entries for individuals determined eligible to participant in Occupational Skills Training (OST) under the Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Out-of-School Youth (OSY) programs.

 

Under WIOA, occupational skills training may be provided to individuals in need of training services to obtain or retain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Revised Procedures for Title I Enrollments due to AJC Closures - 03/20/2020

“In light of the recent closures of all Oklahoma American Job Centers (AJCs) due to the COVID-19 pandemic, procedures have been put into place to ensure the ability to serve new clients and enroll eligible individuals into Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs without undue delays.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

OKLAHOMA STATUTES TITLE 40. LABOR - 12/19/2019

“§40-360.  Short title - Oklahoma Employment First Act - Definitions.

 

A.  This act shall be known and may be cited as the "Oklahoma Employment First Act".

 

B.  All state agencies shall coordinate efforts and shall collaborate within and among such agencies to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures and funding support competitive integrated employment of individuals with disabilities.  All state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems in order to track progress toward full implementation of this act….

 

D. As used in this act:

1. "Competitive employment" means work in the competitive labor market, or self-employment, that is performed on a full-time or part-time basis in an integrated setting with the opportunity for advancement and for which a person with a disability is compensated at or above the minimum wage but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by persons without disabilities;

 

2. "Disability" means, with respect to an individual:

a. a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities of such individual,

b. a record of such an impairment, or

c. being regarded as having such an impairment as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended;

 

3. "Integrated setting" means, with respect to an employment outcome, a setting typically found in the community in which applicants or eligible individuals interact with persons without disabilities, other than those who are providing services to those applicants or eligible individuals, to the same extent that individuals without disabilities in comparable positions interact with other persons…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“Riata Center for Entrepreneurship, Spears School of Business at Oklahoma State University (Stillwater, Oklahoma): Veterans Entrepreneurship Program (VEP) ...VEP opens the door to small business ownership by developing skills needed to create and sustaining a business, while coordinating the offering of additional programs and services for service-disabled veterans….

The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of Oklahoma, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—working poor; lower income residents with life changing events such as divorce or new custody actions; hourly wage workers in retail and food service; and independent contractors.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Chambers of commerce, Small business and trade associations, Faith-based organizations, Community-based primary care and pediatric providers, Local Social Security offices, OK State Department of Health,  and Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) locations across the state.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Gayla MachellPhone: (405) 557-0049Email: gayla.machell@laok.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

WIOA Policy Center - 06/15/2019

~~This page has documents related to WIOA. Visitors are able to browse through them.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

DRS offers free summer training for young jobseekers with disabilities - 06/03/2019

~~“OKLAHOMA CITY – Career planning and on-the-job training will continue for Oklahoma students with disabilities when school ends, thanks to Transition School to Work.

Students from across the state are signing up for innovative job training programs offered free of charge by Vocational Rehabilitation and Visual services.

VR and VS are divisions of the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services.

“We match up students in our Summer Transition Employment Programs – STEP for short – with paid, part-time employment in a career area they’re interested in,” Transition Coordinator Renee Sansom said. “Then our instructors and VR and VS counselors boost their confidence and develop the personal skills like problem-solving and teamwork that employers value most.”

STEP was previously known as iJobs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Provider List - 05/13/2019

~~This page lists the types of services offered by the current contracted providers

“Provider Agencies contracting for Community Services through Developmental Disabilities Services Division (DDSD). The following is a list of current contracted providers”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Oklahoma Data Validation and Source Documentation Requirements - 05/01/2019

~~“The  Oklahoma  Office  of  Workforce  Development  (OOWD)  as  the  Governor’s  chosen Workforce  Innovation  and  Opportunity  Act  (WIOA)  administrative  entity,  provides  this  issuance as guidance to the workforce system on the State of Oklahoma’s Data Validation and Source  Documentation  Requirements  for  the WIOA  Title  I  Programs  and  the  Wagner-Peyser Employment Services as amended by Title III.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Oklahoma Works Conference - 05/01/2019

~~“The Oklahoma Works Conference is the educational training event of the year for partners working in workforce development. The Conference will take place May 1-3, 2019, and include important content for all partners with workshops including:• Case Management• Customer Service• EEO/Accessibility• Apprenticeships• Financial/Infrastructure• HSE Testing Vendors• Adult Basic Education Program Strategies• ABE/Workforce Co-enrollment Strategies• Career Pathways• Expunging Records• Performance” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

OKLAHOMA STATUTES TITLE 40. LABOR - 12/19/2019

“§40-360.  Short title - Oklahoma Employment First Act - Definitions.

 

A.  This act shall be known and may be cited as the "Oklahoma Employment First Act".

 

B.  All state agencies shall coordinate efforts and shall collaborate within and among such agencies to ensure that state programs, policies, procedures and funding support competitive integrated employment of individuals with disabilities.  All state agencies shall, whenever feasible, share data and information across systems in order to track progress toward full implementation of this act….

 

D. As used in this act:

1. "Competitive employment" means work in the competitive labor market, or self-employment, that is performed on a full-time or part-time basis in an integrated setting with the opportunity for advancement and for which a person with a disability is compensated at or above the minimum wage but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by persons without disabilities;

 

2. "Disability" means, with respect to an individual:

a. a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities of such individual,

b. a record of such an impairment, or

c. being regarded as having such an impairment as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended;

 

3. "Integrated setting" means, with respect to an employment outcome, a setting typically found in the community in which applicants or eligible individuals interact with persons without disabilities, other than those who are providing services to those applicants or eligible individuals, to the same extent that individuals without disabilities in comparable positions interact with other persons…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 20

Occupational Skills Training Service Status Definitions and Reporting Accuracy - 07/06/2020

“The Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD), as the Governor’s chosen Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) administrative entity, provides this technical assistance to the local workforce development areas to ensure appropriate Service Status entries for individuals determined eligible to participant in Occupational Skills Training (OST) under the Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Out-of-School Youth (OSY) programs.

 

Under WIOA, occupational skills training may be provided to individuals in need of training services to obtain or retain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Revised Procedures for Title I Enrollments due to AJC Closures - 03/20/2020

“In light of the recent closures of all Oklahoma American Job Centers (AJCs) due to the COVID-19 pandemic, procedures have been put into place to ensure the ability to serve new clients and enroll eligible individuals into Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, and Youth programs without undue delays.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

WIOA Policy Center - 06/15/2019

~~This page has documents related to WIOA. Visitors are able to browse through them.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Oklahoma Data Validation and Source Documentation Requirements - 05/01/2019

~~“The  Oklahoma  Office  of  Workforce  Development  (OOWD)  as  the  Governor’s  chosen Workforce  Innovation  and  Opportunity  Act  (WIOA)  administrative  entity,  provides  this  issuance as guidance to the workforce system on the State of Oklahoma’s Data Validation and Source  Documentation  Requirements  for  the WIOA  Title  I  Programs  and  the  Wagner-Peyser Employment Services as amended by Title III.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • WIOA

Developmental Disabilities Services - 04/04/2019

~~“Our mission is to help individuals with developmental disabilities and their families help themselves to lead safer, healthier, more independent and productive lives.

Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS) serves persons ages 3 and up who have a primary diagnosis of intellectual disabilities.  Persons served may also have other developmental disabilities in addition to intellectual disabilities such as autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, etc.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Special Education - 03/15/2019

~~“The Oklahoma State Department of Education, Special Education Services (OSDE-SES) is committed to providing guidance and support in order to promote excellence in education from infancy to adulthood for children with disabilities as outlined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA).

This mission is accomplished by disseminating information to families, schools, communities, and agencies through meaningful resources, fostering collaborative partnerships and providing timely and accurate technical assistance.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment - 01/01/2019

“A VA Veteran who is eligible for an evaluation under Chapter 31 must first apply for services and receive an appointment with a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC). The VRC will work with the Veteran to determine if an employment handicap exists as a result of his or her service- connected disability. If an employment handicap is established and the Veteran is found entitled to services. The VRC and the Veteran will continue counseling to select a track of services and jointly develop a plan to address the Veteran's rehabilitation and employment needs. For additional information, please visit the Federal VA site at Vocational Rehabilitation & Employment.

The rehabilitation plan will specify an employment or independent living goal, identify intermediate goals, and outline services and resources that VA will provide to assist the Veteran to achieve his / her goals. The VRC and the Veteran will work together to implement the plan to assist the Veteran to achieve his or her employment and / or independent living goals.“

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Veterans

Veterans Preference (State Employment) - 01/01/2019

~~“In establishing employment lists of eligible persons for competitive and noncompetitive appointment, certain preferences shall be allowed for veterans honorably discharged from the Armed Forces of the United State[74:840-4.14(A)]. A description of the categories of preference can be found by accessing the web-link.”

Systems
  • Other

Vet Centers - 12/25/2018

~~“Vet Center Call Center 877-WAR-VETS (927-8387)Life isn't always easy after a deployment. That's where Vet Centers can help.We are the people in VA who welcome home war veterans with honor by providing quality readjustment counseling in a caring manner. Vet Centers understand and appreciate Veterans’ war experiences while assisting them and their family members toward a successful post-war adjustment in or near their community. All services are free of cost and are strictly confidential.Readjustment counseling is a wide range of psycho social services offered to eligible Veterans, Service members, and their families in the effort to make a successful transition from military to civilian life.  They include:• Individual and group counseling for Veterans, Service members, and their families• Family counseling for military related issues• Bereavement counseling for families who experience an active duty death• Military sexual trauma counseling and referral• Outreach and education including PDHRA, community events, etc.• Substance abuse assessment and referral• Employment assessment & referral• VBA benefits explanation and referral• Screening & referral for medical issues including TBI, depression, etc.” 

Systems
  • Other

13th Annual Oklahoma Transition Institute “Strategies for Success: Creating Connections” - 10/15/2018

~~“The Department of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) offers a summer work experience program, iJobs, for students with disabilities in, Tulsa, Owasso, and Collinsville. iJobs  is  a  summer  work  training  and  experience  program for high school students with disabilities. DRS clients apply and interview to participate in this summer program. It begins the first week of June with a week  of  classroom employability  instruction,  independent  living  skills,  and  practice  navigating  public  transportation.  Students spend  the  remainder  of  summer  working  on  part-time jobs in their areas of interest within their home communities, while spending one day each  week  obtaining  additional  instruction,  volunteering,  or  accessing  resources  in  the community.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment at the University of Oklahoma

“The Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment facilitates successful secondary and postsecondary educational, vocational and personal outcomes for students and adults with disabilities. ZC faculty, staff, and students do this through self-determination oriented evaluation, research, development, transition education instruction, and dissemination of best educational and support practices. The ZC also prepares undergraduate and graduate students to assume leadership roles in schools, universities, and support organizations.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Cherokee Nation DEI Grant - 10/01/2017

“Cherokee Nation (CN DEI), is a self-governance tribal government. CN DEI will fund two Disability Resource Coordinators and implement activities that will increase access to and the participation of individuals with disabilities in the WIOA employment and training services with a focus on improvements needed to make the Cherokee Nation Career Services career pathways system fully inclusive of and accessible to individuals with disabilities. CN DEI will increase the number of individuals with disabilities who access Career Pathways utilizing vocational training, alternative education, work experience, career development skills, supportive services, and on-the-job training. Targeted industry sectors will include Healthcare, Tourism/Hospitality and Manufacturing.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • WIOA
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

SBA Awards Funding to Organizations Delivering Entrepreneurship Training to Service-Disabled Veterans - 09/16/2019

~~“Riata Center for Entrepreneurship, Spears School of Business at Oklahoma State University (Stillwater, Oklahoma): Veterans Entrepreneurship Program (VEP) ...VEP opens the door to small business ownership by developing skills needed to create and sustaining a business, while coordinating the offering of additional programs and services for service-disabled veterans….

The funding opportunity, offered by SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development, supports each organization’s programs for service-disabled veterans planning to start a new business or expand and diversify existing small businesses. Each awardee was chosen based on their demonstrated history of and commitment to providing training programs and resources to service-disabled veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“Legal Aid of Oklahoma, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving “Left behind” populations—working poor; lower income residents with life changing events such as divorce or new custody actions; hourly wage workers in retail and food service; and independent contractors.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with Chambers of commerce, Small business and trade associations, Faith-based organizations, Community-based primary care and pediatric providers, Local Social Security offices, OK State Department of Health,  and Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) locations across the state.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Gayla MachellPhone: (405) 557-0049Email: gayla.machell@laok.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DRS offers free summer training for young jobseekers with disabilities - 06/03/2019

~~“OKLAHOMA CITY – Career planning and on-the-job training will continue for Oklahoma students with disabilities when school ends, thanks to Transition School to Work.

Students from across the state are signing up for innovative job training programs offered free of charge by Vocational Rehabilitation and Visual services.

VR and VS are divisions of the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services.

“We match up students in our Summer Transition Employment Programs – STEP for short – with paid, part-time employment in a career area they’re interested in,” Transition Coordinator Renee Sansom said. “Then our instructors and VR and VS counselors boost their confidence and develop the personal skills like problem-solving and teamwork that employers value most.”

STEP was previously known as iJobs.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Provider List - 05/13/2019

~~This page lists the types of services offered by the current contracted providers

“Provider Agencies contracting for Community Services through Developmental Disabilities Services Division (DDSD). The following is a list of current contracted providers”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

Oklahoma Works Conference - 05/01/2019

~~“The Oklahoma Works Conference is the educational training event of the year for partners working in workforce development. The Conference will take place May 1-3, 2019, and include important content for all partners with workshops including:• Case Management• Customer Service• EEO/Accessibility• Apprenticeships• Financial/Infrastructure• HSE Testing Vendors• Adult Basic Education Program Strategies• ABE/Workforce Co-enrollment Strategies• Career Pathways• Expunging Records• Performance” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Oklahoma Department of Human Resources Training Resources - 02/14/2019

~~“This informational packet is meant as a starting point to finding training resources in Oklahoma.  Many programs are dependent upon outside funding, so some programs may be unavailable while new ones may have started.

This packet provides resources for people seeking training due to a disability, criminal background, and loss of previous job.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

~~“This event brought together key community stakeholders, individuals with disabilities, family members and educators to network and discuss state-of-the-art strategies to ensure competitive and equitable employment for Oklahoman’s with disabilities. The attendees come from different backgrounds and experiences, but had a common goal:  to see that individuals with disabilities experience full inclusion in the workplace and in the community.

 As stakeholder’s, we strive to move toward employment first, and employment for all. Together we understand Employment First is a declaration of both philosophy and policy stating that:  Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens with disabilities, regardless of level of disability. Our goal is for the Employment First philosophy to raise awareness of the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

National Center for Disability Education and Training DRS Training

The National Center for Disability Education and Training (NCDET) designs and delivers cutting-edge training to staff of employment providers in a variety of competency-based courses leading to certification. The methods of training range from classroom to accessible multimedia products marketed across the United States.

Please click on the link below for more information about trainings offered through our contract with the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services. NCDET has delivered training under this  contract since 1987 and has prepared thousands of Employment Training Specialists to provide employment supports to individuals with significant disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

This program has several functions. It “develops new  employment services,  provides technical assistance, and training to contracted agencies and DRS staff statewide.    ESS  administers the supported employment program, which is a specialized type of job placement for people with the most significant  barriers to employment. Supported Employment provides  intensive, specialized onsite  training and long term supports  to assist individuals to find employment, learn their job tasks, and maintain successful employment.   Employment and Retention  is an  employment program  for individuals with significant barriers to employment.  This program is designed to provide individuals with short term on and off site training and supports to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment.   Job Placement is an employment program   intended to assist  individuals   requiring  minimal support  in finding full-time employment.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R04.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Living Choice/Money Follows the Person

“The Living Choice Project is Oklahoma’s brand name for the Money Follows the Person grant, and is administered by the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA). Oklahoma’s Living Choice Project is designed to transform the current long-term care system by promoting community based services instead of institutional services.

The Living Choice project serves three populations, the physically disabled (19-64), older persons (65 and older), and intellectually disabled. Individuals in any of these three populations are eligible for transition if they have resided in a qualified institution (i.e. nursing facility, intermediate care facility for persons with intellectual disabilities) for at least ninety days prior to their proposed transition date, and have had one day of their institutional stay paid by Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma HCBS Transition Plan

The purpose of this Transition Plan is to ensure the individuals receiving Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) are integrated in and have access to supports in the community, including opportunities to seek employment, work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources.  The State has prepared a revised transition plan in order to comply with federal regulations for community-based settings. Overall, the Transition Plan provides assurance that the individuals receiving HCBS have the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS. This updated Transition Plan outlines the proposed process that Oklahoma will be utilizing to ensure implementation of the new HCBS requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX State Plan  The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of any state’s Medicaid program.  As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act (the Act) the State Plan is developed by the state and approved by DHHS/CMS. Without a State Plan, OHCA would not be eligible for federal funding for providing SoonerCare services.  Essentially, the State Plan is our state’s agreement that it will conform to the requirements of the Act and the official issuances of DHHS/CMS.  The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act.
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

OK Developmental Disabilities Service Division Home and Community-Based Services Waiver

“Developmental Disabilities Service Division, a division of OKDHS, serves individuals who are 3 years of age and older who have mental retardation and certain persons with related conditions who would otherwise require placement in an intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

With the motto "Labor Conquers All Things," it's clear that Oklahoma values the contributions of all workers, including workers with disabilities, and has plenty to offer when it comes to career development.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oklahoma’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.31%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,943,079
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.87%
Change from
2017 to 2018
327,111
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.21%
Change from
2017 to 2018
129,170
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.89%
Change from
2017 to 2018
39.49%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.86%
Change from
2017 to 2018
77.00%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 3,943,079
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 327,111
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 129,170
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,523,986
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.49%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.00%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.20%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.70%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 316,459
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 312,061
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 475,522
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 43,570
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 33,908
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 50,351
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 5,198
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,118
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 44,029
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 8,732

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 3,967
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.30%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 124,606

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 12,316
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 34,830
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 55,687
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.10%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 20.00%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 60.00%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 111
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 343
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 769
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,102
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 599
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 285
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 7.29

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,341
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 192,540
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $20,762,029
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $9,666,645
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,491,343
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 64.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,222
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,133
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 63.49

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 67.98%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.19%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 0.64%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.86%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 60.58%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 76.60%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 36.02%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 693,919
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 736
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 45,014
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 459,485
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 504,499
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 43
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 387
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 430
AbilityOne wages (products). $401,419
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,994,972

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 47
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 6
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 55