Oklahoma

States - Big Screen

With the motto "Labor Conquers All Things," it's clear that Oklahoma values the contributions of all workers, including workers with disabilities, and has plenty to offer when it comes to career development.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oklahoma’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.85%
Change from
2014 to 2015
3,911,338
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
320,480
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.99%
Change from
2014 to 2015
111,672
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-4.53%
Change from
2014 to 2015
34.85%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.71%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.13%

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 3,850,568 3,878,051 3,911,338
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 319,393 331,028 320,480
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 114,435 120,597 111,672
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,486,316 1,492,128 1,517,596
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.83% 36.43% 34.85%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.21% 75.59% 76.13%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.30% 4.50% 4.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.20% 22.60% 21.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.80% 15.50% 15.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 299,117 298,775 292,432
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 295,300 311,423 304,652
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 454,066 465,901 450,062
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 39,477 43,504 42,915
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 27,654 31,949 28,179
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 48,962 48,315 48,707
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,429 5,588 5,173
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 493 N/A 340
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 40,131 38,269 41,977
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 6,859 8,493 7,910

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,006 4,133 4,159
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.30% 4.50% 4.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 127,973 127,712 127,565

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 11,602 10,000 8,966
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 31,848 27,405 23,560
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 54,586 48,322 42,357
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.30% 20.70% 21.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 0.10% 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 0.90% 0.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.70% 2.10% 2.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 44 36 59
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 504 336 305
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 784 788 789
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,387 7,021 7,102
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,369 2,291 1,100
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 961 981 447
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 41.00% 43.00% 0.41%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 25.19 25.48 11.43

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
852
4,010
4,643
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 389 304 406
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 304 304 470
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,113 1,163 1,307
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,155 1,203 1,268
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 569 581 577
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 432 455 615
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 30.50% 28.60% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 4,458 4,332
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 192,401 192,581
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 222 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 180 191 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $18,630,000 $18,929,000 $20,081,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $9,148,000 $9,244,000 $10,637,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,723,000 $5,627 $5,911,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 62.00% 62.00% 60.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,193 1,151 1,189
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,216 2,221 2,320
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 66.00 65.50 64.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 62.88% 64.68% 65.89%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.66% 9.51% 9.53%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.37% 1.30% 1.31%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 92.64% 95.47% 97.72%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 17.00% 15.59% 26.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 57.00% 48.92% 65.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 71.00% 59.68% 85.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 40.00% 33.33% 39.02%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 693,919
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 736
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 45,014
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 459,485
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 504,499
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 43
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 387
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 430
AbilityOne wages (products). $401,419
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,994,972

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 4 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 58 62 51
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 7 8 7
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 68 74 60
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 10 22 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,691 2,773 2,116
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 240 244 243
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,941 3,039 2,359

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

DSU Programs Field Representatives serve on the Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council. DSU Employment Support Services (ESS) staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the Employment First Alliance, which has a national goal of increased competitive integrated employment by 50% in the states. As a result of the Employment First Alliance, the Oklahoma Legislature passed the Employment First Law which became effective November 1, 2015. (Page 246)

The DSU serves eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities and barriers to employment first. When all priority groups are open and it is determined there is a need to implement Order of Selection, the first group to close is priority group 3, then priority group 2, and last priority group 1. If all three groups are closed, the first one to open is priority group 1, then priority group 2, and last priority group 3. (Page 271)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Customized Employment

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program. The DSU is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 233)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Factors that impeded the achievement of meeting goals and priorities include;

  • Lack of DSU contracted CRPs in rural areas of the state
  • Lack of options for DSU employment contracts to meet the needs of all individuals with significant barriers to employment (i.e. Customized Employment; Intensive SE Services)
  • Lack of joint contracted DSU/DDS CRPs (Page 292)
Braiding/Blending Resources

Oklahoma is encouraging the braiding of funding and leveraging of resources through the state’s new resource leveraging tool to be released in the fall of 2016. In this online tool, state agencies, including the core partners, can identify existing workforce development activities and send requests to partner. These requests are then supported and facilitated with the assistance of the Office of the Governor, if needed. Similarly, with the release of this tool, the Office of the Governor, under Oklahoma Works, in July of 2016, challenged each state agency and each Workforce Development Board, to identify one new partner (private or public) to engage. (Page 70)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

Oklahoma is focused on accessibility for all job seekers and businesses and employer’s work sites throughout all levels of Oklahoma Works. Working with the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development (GCWED), system partners bring sharper focus on developing and employing more Oklahoman’s with disabilities. (Page 146)

OESC complies with Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) [29 CFR 38]; there are trained bi-lingual staff located in the Workforce Centers and Unemployment Insurance Service Centers for on-site language interpreting for English language learners customers, as well as, Telephone Language Interpretive Services and Document Translation Services. The local one-stop center, based on funding availability, may provide access to Google Translate for individuals who are English-language learners and for whom translators may not be available. Additionally, the one-stop center will partner with local Adult Learning Centers to provide literacy services to LEP clients. (Page 150-151)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Top occupations in the Transportation & Distribution Ecosystem include: Wholesale and Manufacturing Sales Representatives, except technical and scientific products; Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers; Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers; General and Operations Managers; Aircraft Mechanics and Service Technicians; Industrial Machinery Mechanics; Customer Service Representatives; Wholesale and Manufacturing Sales Representatives for Technical and Scientific Products; Bookkeeping, Accounting and Auditing Clerks; Light Truck or Delivery Service Drivers; Commercial Pilots; Sales Managers; Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists; Accountants and Auditors. (Page 25)

DSU maintains an MOA with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) describing collaboration on delivery of Supported Employment services and transitional employment services.

The DSU has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five-community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness. (Page 241)

Joint budget requests that pertain to the prevention, early intervention, treatment and support for those with MEB disorders.

As a result of the second MOA, the DSU initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness. (Page 249)

Mental Health CRPs have the option of providing Supported Employment. DSU, the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services are collaboratively seeking strategies for improving services and enhancing service capacity for individuals with serious mental illness.

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of community mental health CRPs contracting to provide employment services in an effort to improve the employment outcomes of individuals with serious mental illness. The DSU has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness.

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program. The DSU is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 272)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

The DSU data reporting system indicated a problem with the Tulsa office not being strategically located in a good geographical area that assures services to individuals with disabilities. The application to eligibility and eligibility to planning rates are significantly lower. Due to budget constraints, the DSU is unable to relocate. A pilot project in this area is currently under way to implement a referral module through the case management system. This module will allow counselors time initially to work with jobseekers to assure individual plans reach successful employment outcomes. (Page 291)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), the Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD), and the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education (ODCTE) through the Oklahoma Works centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities.

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services, Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding.

OESC, OOWD, and ODCTE work to develop and support increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities (utilizing appropriate state and federal funding streams). Oklahoma Works Center staff routinely refer individuals with disabilities to the OKDRS for more intensive training and job placement opportunities. OKDRS has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Oklahoma Works Centers and OKDRS offices.

Oklahoma Works Center staff and OKDRS Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. Specifically, when referred by center staff, an OKDRS Benefits Planner will explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. OKDRS Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives. (Page10)

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), through the Oklahoma Works Centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities.

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services (OKDRS), Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding. (147)

Workforce Center staff and OKDRS Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. Specifically, when referred by center staff, an OKDRS Benefits Planner will explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. OKDRS Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives. ( Page 147- 148)

Oklahoma’s Workforce System recognizes opportunities to reach Oklahoma’s businesses and employers with a powerful message of Access for All. Through relationships old and new, OKDRS and OKABT will lead the workforce partners in working to arrange and deliver training to businesses and employers that will reduce their hesitation to hire job seekers with disabilities and to identify ways to educate about the benefits of directly recruiting and hiring job seekers with disabilities. The creation of fact sheets and other concise deliverables will help businesses and employers to understand not only their obligations, but also the importance of hiring and promoting job seekers with disabilities.  (Page 149)

OKDRS utilizes its ADA Coordinator as a resource to provide consultation, technical assistance, and site reviews to identify accessibility issues to all workforce system partners and other agencies, entities, and businesses and employers. The OKDRS ADA Coordinator provides training in various aspects of the Americans with Disability Act and the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design to staff and supervisors of these entities as well. These services are available in order to advance the promotion of equal access for individuals with disabilities in programs, services, and buildings statewide. (Page 11)

  • DSU moving towards highlighting benefits package on position announcement (DVR/DVS)
  • Increase academic development of staff (DVR/DVS)
    • Staff participate in out-of-state training centers and consumer organizations conventions and meetings (DVS)
    • Provide educational sponsorship for employees (DVR/DVS)
  • Competitive Salaries
    • Career progression and market salary adjustments
  • Supervisors and Counselors striving toward the same goal (DVR) (Page 266)

Social Security Administration Certified Benefits Planners 

DSU has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Workforce Centers and DSU offices. Workforce Center staff and DSU Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. DSU Benefits Planners explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. DSU Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives.(Page 274)

The DSU Innovations Unit is coordinating the process of submission of an Intensive Technical Assistance grant with the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The grant has been awarded to the DSU along with ten other VR agencies nationwide, affording access to a very strong network of technical assistance providers under the JDVRTAC umbrella which includes ICI, the University of Washington, the University of Arkansas Currents, Jobs for the Future (JFF), the United States Business Leadership Network (USBLN); the Association of University Centers on Disability (AUCD); and Powers, Pyles, Sutter, and Verville, PC (PPSV). Apart from the intangible benefits this learning opportunity entails, the total services, travel and consultancy gained with this one-year grant adds resources to the agency equivalent to what it would obtain through thousands of dollars in contractual arrangements.

The purpose of JDVRTAC is to identify, adapt, embed, and sustain job-driven practices into vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies. These practices will lead to improved employment outcomes for people with disabilities by developing a knowledge base on the following four topical areas, 1) Labor market information (LMI), 2) Services to employers, 3) Building and maintaining employer relations, and 4) Services to providers of customized and/or employer driven training. (Page 275)

To help build a foundation for the Access for All initiative, the DSU and Oklahoma ABLE Tech (OKABT), partnered to provide regional Access for All academies, webinars, newsletters, and weekly tips statewide. The one-day seminars focused on accessibility in the built environment and in technology, as well as some of the legal drivers to create accessible points of contact between workforce system partners and job seekers in Oklahoma. These academies are critical training components to help staff close the gaps in workforce utilization, income, and poverty among people with disabilities. To best prepare job seekers to gain employment, workforce system staff must be aware of the benefits and requirements for ensuring accessible workforce services and environments. The academies help workforce system staff focus on the requirements for better employer engagement and promoting physical and programmatic accessibility to employment and training services for individuals with disabilities.

The Access for All webinar series will bring focus on accessibility, legal, policy, and technology as they relate to job seekers with disabilities. Topics will include: An Overview of the Access for All Initiative in Oklahoma; Technology Accessibility 101: An Introduction to Accessibility in the Web; Accessibility Basics in Microsoft Word 2010; Basic Technology Accessibility Testing; An Overview of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act; and Workforce Center Structural Accessibility Toolkit Update. (Page 280-281)

Oklahoma’s Workforce System recognizes opportunities to reach Oklahoma’s businesses and employers with a powerful message of Access for All. Through relationships old and new, DSU and OKABT will lead the workforce partners in working to arrange and deliver training to businesses and employers that will reduce their hesitation to hire job seekers with disabilities and to identify ways to educate about the benefits of directly recruiting and hiring job seekers with disabilities. The creation of fact sheets and other concise deliverables will help businesses and employers to understand not only their obligations, but also the importance of hiring and promoting job seekers with disabilities.

DSU utilizes its ADA Coordinator as a resource to provide consultation, technical assistance, and site reviews to identify accessibility issues to all workforce system partners and other agencies, entities, and businesses and employers. (Page 282)

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), through the Oklahoma Works centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities. (Page 289)

School to Work Transition

No specific disability related information found.

Data Collection

Reporting Processes:

The workforce system partners are utilizing the Oklahoma Works, Key Objective: Data, to integrate and use workforce and economic development data to inform policy, track progress, and measure success. Under this objective, Workforce Partners have identified the “Common Connectivity” strategy in the form of a common intake portal as a priority for the state. Oklahoma is seeking the USDOL Reemployment and System Integration Dislocated Worker grant to secure the necessary resources to design and implement a common intake system in Oklahoma. If received, the State will be able to make more progress toward a coordinated system. Oklahoma is also continuing to leverage data infrastructure, such as that developed through the Workforce Data Quality Initiative and State Longitudinal Data Initiative grant, to continue to implement coordinated data collection and reporting. (Page 117)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

Private and public sector representatives also serve on Governor’s Council committees charged with developing and recommending initiatives to enhance and implement Oklahoma’s workforce and economic development strategy. Those committees are: Workforce System Oversight Committee, Youth Program Committee, Career Pathways Committee, and Healthcare Workforce Committee. Recommendations are taken to the full Council for action.

The Governor’s Council is staffed by the Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD). OOWD also staffs the Workforce System Oversight Committee, the Career Pathways Committee, and the Youth Programs Committee. The Department of Health staffs the Healthcare Workforce Committee. (Page 122)

  • Create a plan for Career Pathways efforts to be based on industry sectors within Oklahoma’s state and regional ecosystems.
  • Establish strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.
  • Create and use Career Pathways approaches to increase the proportion of low-skill learners who ultimately earn a degree or certificate.
  • Increase high school graduation rates - decrease high school dropout rates.
  • Increase the percentage of Oklahoma workers with a recognized postsecondary credential. (A credential consisting of an industry-recognized certificate or certification, a certificate of completion of an apprenticeship, a license recognized by the State or Federal government, or an associate or baccalaureate degree.
  • Reinforce the alignment with Registered Apprenticeship for earn-and-learn opportunities.
  • Use performance data to demonstrate progress and impact, thereby supporting partner buy-in and reinforcing continued engagement over time.
  • Make Career Pathways part of the Board certification process.
  • Introduce employers and educators to the value of partnering by describing best practices and success stories.
  • Develop or research pilots and models. (Page 124)

Outreach and communication will be essential components of developing and implementing the State’s RA strategy and partner/industry engagement activities. The inclusion of subject matter experts such as the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, the Oklahoma Manufacturing Alliance, the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology and other established Oklahoma Works partners during the strategic planning phase of the grant will help the State build upon existing strategies to expand and diversify Registered Apprenticeship (RA) as a viable workforce development strategy in Oklahoma, and to reach grant milestones and expand apprenticeships to additional businesses and industries, and additional, underserved populations. Oklahoma will have a strong focus on creating RA opportunities for individuals displaced due to the decline of the State’s Oil and Gas Industries, and increasing RA opportunities for special populations such as women, out-of-school youth, minorities, individuals with disabilities, veterans and others. Career pathways for the health care industry will also be a focus as Oklahoma expands Registered Apprenticeship opportunities in the State. There are currently no known apprenticeships in the health care industry. (Page 178)

10. Whether your organization’s activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways;

11. Whether your organization’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;

12. Whether your organization maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with question 4 above) and to monitor program performance; and

13. Whether the local areas in which your organization is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs. (Page 214)

Employment Networks

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Ticket to Work Program 

Coordinated activities under Ticket to Work are delivered by a statewide Ticket to Work Coordinator. The coordinator will organize activities within the DSU and with partnership employment networks (EN’s) to ensure the needs of ticket holders are met at a maximum level. Ongoing outreach efforts will be conducted to recruit new partnership employment networks in order to provide more opportunities to assist ticket holders in reaching Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level employment outcomes. The coordinator will continue to oversee the ticket to work hotline and will provide ticket holders with information and referral for state VR, partnership EN’s, and external EN’s. (Page 274)

Displaying 1 - 10 of 24

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

“This event will include numerous breakout sessions, featuring experts in employment, technology and best practices in services and support. Professionals will offer their experience, knowledge and success in providing individualized employment services to support individuals to choose, get and keep employment. Through the support of conference sponsors, the Oklahoma Department for Rehabilitation Services, Developmental Disabilities Services Division and the University of Oklahoma/NCDET Department, attendees will have the opportunity to:

Receive answers to difficult and challenging questions Build potential partnerships and relationships Consider new ideas and employment strategies Gain tips to obtain and maintain employment Celebrate this year’s award winners!”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

“Add Us In” Grant to University of Oklahoma - 09/23/2013

“The goal of the Add Us In initiative is to identify and develop strategies to increase the capacity of small businesses, including those in underrepresented and historically excluded communities, to employ youth and young adults with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R03.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma’s Transition Education Handbook - 08/01/2011

“Oklahoma’s special education policies and procedures ensure that all students with an IEP have access to a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepares students with IEPs for employment, further education, and independent living. Desired employment, further education, and independent living outcomes become the postsecondary goals that drive the transition planning process and the secondary IEP.

The transition planning process provides opportunities for the young adult with disabilities to ponder and identify post-school goals. Transition planning provides educators the opportunity to structure the IEP transition components to facilitate attainment of students’ post-school goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Plan - 08/03/2006

“The Plan includes information about recent developments made by the state of Oklahoma. These developments include legislation to improve certain aspects of service delivery and policies. The developments demonstrate progress in establishing the infrastructure needed to achieve the goals set forth by the Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Planning Committee. These developments were achieved through the collaboration and coordination of the Committee members. They reflect a strong commitment to enable people with disabilities to live, work and play in their home communities instead of living restricted lives in institutional settings. The Plan also contains a section on cross-systems recommendations. This section addresses changes that will impact services in all systems. Disabilities can happen to anyone at any time, so every system has a role in serving people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities - 05/27/1957

“The Governor's Committee was established as an agency of state government with the passing of House Bill 996 on May 27, 1957, by the 26th Oklahoma Legislature. It made provisions for the Governor to appoint 75 citizens to serve on the Committee without compensation for terms of two, four and six years. All areas of the state are served by appointees who represent a multitude of backgrounds from both the profit and non-profit sectors, labor, business, industry, medicine, law, education, religion, veteran affairs, rehabilitation, civic affairs and the media. The expertise and concern of each of these respective members converge to serve the Committee's common purpose: to promote the rehabilitation and employment of workers with disabilities in the State of Oklahoma.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Oklahoma’s Transition Education Handbook - 08/01/2011

“Oklahoma’s special education policies and procedures ensure that all students with an IEP have access to a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepares students with IEPs for employment, further education, and independent living. Desired employment, further education, and independent living outcomes become the postsecondary goals that drive the transition planning process and the secondary IEP.

The transition planning process provides opportunities for the young adult with disabilities to ponder and identify post-school goals. Transition planning provides educators the opportunity to structure the IEP transition components to facilitate attainment of students’ post-school goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Plan - 08/03/2006

“The Plan includes information about recent developments made by the state of Oklahoma. These developments include legislation to improve certain aspects of service delivery and policies. The developments demonstrate progress in establishing the infrastructure needed to achieve the goals set forth by the Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Planning Committee. These developments were achieved through the collaboration and coordination of the Committee members. They reflect a strong commitment to enable people with disabilities to live, work and play in their home communities instead of living restricted lives in institutional settings. The Plan also contains a section on cross-systems recommendations. This section addresses changes that will impact services in all systems. Disabilities can happen to anyone at any time, so every system has a role in serving people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT)

The Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT) model has been in existence nationally for nearly 30 years and is an effective, evidenced-based, outreach-oriented, service delivery model using a 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week approach to community-based mental health services. PACT delivers comprehensive treatment and rehabilitation services to consumers in their homes, at work and in community settings.  The program reaches clients that traditional services can’t seem to engage. A major goal of PACT is to reduce the need for inpatient care by providing assistance with basic needs, increasing medication adherence, keeping families together, and securing competitive employment.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) recognizes PACT as the leading treatment model of choice for people with severe mental illness. Over 40 states across the country have adopted the PACT model. NAMI represents the driving force behind Oklahoma’s PACT initiative and continues to pursue additional funding, along with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) and other mental health advocates, to expand PACT program capacity in Oklahoma.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Optional Program for Hiring Applicants with Disabilities

“G. Subsections A through E of this section shall not apply to persons with severe disabilities who are considered for employment under the provisions of this subsection. Provided, said persons may elect instead to be considered for employment according to the procedures set out in subsections A through E of this section. 1. As used in this subsection "persons with severe disabilities" means persons certified as having disabilities according to standards and procedures established by the Administrator. Said standards and procedures shall be developed by the Administrator of the Office of Personnel Management with the assistance of the Office of Handicapped Concerns, and the Department of Rehabilitation Services. 2. Agencies of this state may employ persons with severe disabilities who are legal residents of the state in competitive and noncompetitive jobs. Except for the requirement of minimum qualifications specified in applicable job specifications, such persons with disabilities shall be exempt from entrance examinations and hiring procedures administered by the Office of Personnel Management pursuant to this section and Section 840-4.13 of this title.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

OK Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Oklahoma Community Integrated Employment (CIE)

“Community Integrated Employment (CIE) is a service program that provides placement, job training and short-term or long-term supports to assist service recipients in achieving and maintaining employment within the community.  Services are delivered in integrated settings in the community be contracted providers.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Oklahoma’s Milestone Payment System

“ESS' Oklahoma Milestone Payment System received awards from the Ford Foundation and the Harvard School of Business, as well as other government groups, for cutting government spending, improving service delivery and increasing consumer satisfaction by linking payment for contract services to a series of checkpoints, or milestones, on the way to specific goals or outcomes, such as employment.”

The Milestone payment system integrates Total Quality Management concepts with payment mechanisms. Total Quality Management (TQM) is defined as “…a continuous improvement process which involves participatory management and makes use of teamwork.”1 TQM concepts are at the heart of the Reinventing Government and National Performance Review advocated by Vice President Gore. TQM is customer-driven, involving employees at all levels and using a team approach to eliminate waste and continuously improve quality.2  The fundamental problem that Womack et. al., identified for business systems is identical for government-funded programs. They state that the “…problems are inherent in the system’s incentive structure and logic.”3 The Milestone system rethinks the logic and incentive structure of the process for purchasing vocational services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

OK Developmental Disabilities Services Employment Policy 317:40-7-1

The policy states that, “The optimum goal [for employment services] is full-time employment at prevailing wage in business or industry at an occupation of the service recipient's choice with natural supports.…. There may be instances resulting from a variety of factors when people served have not achieved the goal of full employment.  The provider agency makes available those supports needed for the service recipient to achieve full employment.” It also provides a list of preferred options when full-time employment is not possible for circumstantial reasons.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment at the University of Oklahoma

“The Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment facilitates successful secondary and postsecondary educational, vocational and personal outcomes for students and adults with disabilities. ZC faculty, staff, and students do this through self-determination oriented evaluation, research, development, transition education instruction, and dissemination of best educational and support practices. The ZC also prepares undergraduate and graduate students to assume leadership roles in schools, universities, and support organizations.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

“Add Us In” Grant to University of Oklahoma - 09/23/2013

“The goal of the Add Us In initiative is to identify and develop strategies to increase the capacity of small businesses, including those in underrepresented and historically excluded communities, to employ youth and young adults with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

“This event will include numerous breakout sessions, featuring experts in employment, technology and best practices in services and support. Professionals will offer their experience, knowledge and success in providing individualized employment services to support individuals to choose, get and keep employment. Through the support of conference sponsors, the Oklahoma Department for Rehabilitation Services, Developmental Disabilities Services Division and the University of Oklahoma/NCDET Department, attendees will have the opportunity to:

Receive answers to difficult and challenging questions Build potential partnerships and relationships Consider new ideas and employment strategies Gain tips to obtain and maintain employment Celebrate this year’s award winners!”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

National Center for Disability Education and Training DRS Training

The National Center for Disability Education and Training (NCDET) designs and delivers cutting-edge training to staff of employment providers in a variety of competency-based courses leading to certification. The methods of training range from classroom to accessible multimedia products marketed across the United States.

Please click on the link below for more information about trainings offered through our contract with the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services. NCDET has delivered training under this  contract since 1987 and has prepared thousands of Employment Training Specialists to provide employment supports to individuals with significant disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

This program has several functions. It “develops new  employment services,  provides technical assistance, and training to contracted agencies and DRS staff statewide.    ESS  administers the supported employment program, which is a specialized type of job placement for people with the most significant  barriers to employment. Supported Employment provides  intensive, specialized onsite  training and long term supports  to assist individuals to find employment, learn their job tasks, and maintain successful employment.   Employment and Retention  is an  employment program  for individuals with significant barriers to employment.  This program is designed to provide individuals with short term on and off site training and supports to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment.   Job Placement is an employment program   intended to assist  individuals   requiring  minimal support  in finding full-time employment.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R03.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Living Choice/Money Follows the Person

“The Living Choice Project is Oklahoma’s brand name for the Money Follows the Person grant, and is administered by the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA). Oklahoma’s Living Choice Project is designed to transform the current long-term care system by promoting community based services instead of institutional services.

The Living Choice project serves three populations, the physically disabled (19-64), older persons (65 and older), and intellectually disabled. Individuals in any of these three populations are eligible for transition if they have resided in a qualified institution (i.e. nursing facility, intermediate care facility for persons with intellectual disabilities) for at least ninety days prior to their proposed transition date, and have had one day of their institutional stay paid by Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma HCBS Transition Plan

The purpose of this Transition Plan is to ensure the individuals receiving Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) are integrated in and have access to supports in the community, including opportunities to seek employment, work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources.  The State has prepared a revised transition plan in order to comply with federal regulations for community-based settings. Overall, the Transition Plan provides assurance that the individuals receiving HCBS have the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS. This updated Transition Plan outlines the proposed process that Oklahoma will be utilizing to ensure implementation of the new HCBS requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX State Plan  The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of any state’s Medicaid program.  As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act (the Act) the State Plan is developed by the state and approved by DHHS/CMS. Without a State Plan, OHCA would not be eligible for federal funding for providing SoonerCare services.  Essentially, the State Plan is our state’s agreement that it will conform to the requirements of the Act and the official issuances of DHHS/CMS.  The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act.
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

OK Developmental Disabilities Service Division Home and Community-Based Services Waiver

“Developmental Disabilities Service Division, a division of OKDHS, serves individuals who are 3 years of age and older who have mental retardation and certain persons with related conditions who would otherwise require placement in an intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

With the motto "Labor Conquers All Things," it's clear that Oklahoma values the contributions of all workers, including workers with disabilities, and has plenty to offer when it comes to career development.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oklahoma’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.85%
Change from
2014 to 2015
3,911,338
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
320,480
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.99%
Change from
2014 to 2015
111,672
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-4.53%
Change from
2014 to 2015
34.85%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.71%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.13%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 3,850,568 3,878,051 3,911,338
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 319,393 331,028 320,480
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 114,435 120,597 111,672
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,486,316 1,492,128 1,517,596
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.83% 36.43% 34.85%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.21% 75.59% 76.13%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.30% 4.50% 4.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.20% 22.60% 21.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.80% 15.50% 15.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 299,117 298,775 292,432
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 295,300 311,423 304,652
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 454,066 465,901 450,062
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 39,477 43,504 42,915
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 27,654 31,949 28,179
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 48,962 48,315 48,707
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,429 5,588 5,173
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 493 N/A 340
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 40,131 38,269 41,977
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 6,859 8,493 7,910

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,006 4,133 4,159
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.30% 4.50% 4.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 127,973 127,712 127,565

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 11,602 10,000 8,966
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 31,848 27,405 23,560
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 54,586 48,322 42,357
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.30% 20.70% 21.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 0.10% 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 0.90% 0.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.70% 2.10% 2.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 44 36 59
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 504 336 305
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 784 788 789
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,387 7,021 7,102
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,369 2,291 1,100
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 961 981 447
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 41.00% 43.00% 0.41%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 25.19 25.48 11.43

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
852
4,010
4,643
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 389 304 406
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 304 304 470
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,113 1,163 1,307
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,155 1,203 1,268
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 569 581 577
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 432 455 615
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 30.50% 28.60% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 4,458 4,332
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 192,401 192,581
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 222 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 180 191 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $18,630,000 $18,929,000 $20,081,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $9,148,000 $9,244,000 $10,637,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,723,000 $5,627 $5,911,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 62.00% 62.00% 60.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,193 1,151 1,189
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,216 2,221 2,320
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 66.00 65.50 64.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 62.88% 64.68% 65.89%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.66% 9.51% 9.53%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.37% 1.30% 1.31%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 92.64% 95.47% 97.72%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 17.00% 15.59% 26.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 57.00% 48.92% 65.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 71.00% 59.68% 85.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 40.00% 33.33% 39.02%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 693,919
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 736
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 45,014
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 459,485
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 504,499
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 43
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 387
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 430
AbilityOne wages (products). $401,419
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,994,972

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 4 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 58 62 51
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 7 8 7
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 68 74 60
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 10 22 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,691 2,773 2,116
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 240 244 243
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,941 3,039 2,359

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

DSU Programs Field Representatives serve on the Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council. DSU Employment Support Services (ESS) staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the Employment First Alliance, which has a national goal of increased competitive integrated employment by 50% in the states. As a result of the Employment First Alliance, the Oklahoma Legislature passed the Employment First Law which became effective November 1, 2015. (Page 246)

The DSU serves eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities and barriers to employment first. When all priority groups are open and it is determined there is a need to implement Order of Selection, the first group to close is priority group 3, then priority group 2, and last priority group 1. If all three groups are closed, the first one to open is priority group 1, then priority group 2, and last priority group 3. (Page 271)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Customized Employment

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program. The DSU is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 233)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Factors that impeded the achievement of meeting goals and priorities include;

  • Lack of DSU contracted CRPs in rural areas of the state
  • Lack of options for DSU employment contracts to meet the needs of all individuals with significant barriers to employment (i.e. Customized Employment; Intensive SE Services)
  • Lack of joint contracted DSU/DDS CRPs (Page 292)
Braiding/Blending Resources

Oklahoma is encouraging the braiding of funding and leveraging of resources through the state’s new resource leveraging tool to be released in the fall of 2016. In this online tool, state agencies, including the core partners, can identify existing workforce development activities and send requests to partner. These requests are then supported and facilitated with the assistance of the Office of the Governor, if needed. Similarly, with the release of this tool, the Office of the Governor, under Oklahoma Works, in July of 2016, challenged each state agency and each Workforce Development Board, to identify one new partner (private or public) to engage. (Page 70)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

Oklahoma is focused on accessibility for all job seekers and businesses and employer’s work sites throughout all levels of Oklahoma Works. Working with the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development (GCWED), system partners bring sharper focus on developing and employing more Oklahoman’s with disabilities. (Page 146)

OESC complies with Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) [29 CFR 38]; there are trained bi-lingual staff located in the Workforce Centers and Unemployment Insurance Service Centers for on-site language interpreting for English language learners customers, as well as, Telephone Language Interpretive Services and Document Translation Services. The local one-stop center, based on funding availability, may provide access to Google Translate for individuals who are English-language learners and for whom translators may not be available. Additionally, the one-stop center will partner with local Adult Learning Centers to provide literacy services to LEP clients. (Page 150-151)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Top occupations in the Transportation & Distribution Ecosystem include: Wholesale and Manufacturing Sales Representatives, except technical and scientific products; Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers; Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers; General and Operations Managers; Aircraft Mechanics and Service Technicians; Industrial Machinery Mechanics; Customer Service Representatives; Wholesale and Manufacturing Sales Representatives for Technical and Scientific Products; Bookkeeping, Accounting and Auditing Clerks; Light Truck or Delivery Service Drivers; Commercial Pilots; Sales Managers; Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists; Accountants and Auditors. (Page 25)

DSU maintains an MOA with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) describing collaboration on delivery of Supported Employment services and transitional employment services.

The DSU has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five-community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness. (Page 241)

Joint budget requests that pertain to the prevention, early intervention, treatment and support for those with MEB disorders.

As a result of the second MOA, the DSU initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness. (Page 249)

Mental Health CRPs have the option of providing Supported Employment. DSU, the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services are collaboratively seeking strategies for improving services and enhancing service capacity for individuals with serious mental illness.

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of community mental health CRPs contracting to provide employment services in an effort to improve the employment outcomes of individuals with serious mental illness. The DSU has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness.

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program. The DSU is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 272)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

The DSU data reporting system indicated a problem with the Tulsa office not being strategically located in a good geographical area that assures services to individuals with disabilities. The application to eligibility and eligibility to planning rates are significantly lower. Due to budget constraints, the DSU is unable to relocate. A pilot project in this area is currently under way to implement a referral module through the case management system. This module will allow counselors time initially to work with jobseekers to assure individual plans reach successful employment outcomes. (Page 291)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), the Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD), and the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education (ODCTE) through the Oklahoma Works centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities.

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services, Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding.

OESC, OOWD, and ODCTE work to develop and support increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities (utilizing appropriate state and federal funding streams). Oklahoma Works Center staff routinely refer individuals with disabilities to the OKDRS for more intensive training and job placement opportunities. OKDRS has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Oklahoma Works Centers and OKDRS offices.

Oklahoma Works Center staff and OKDRS Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. Specifically, when referred by center staff, an OKDRS Benefits Planner will explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. OKDRS Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives. (Page10)

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), through the Oklahoma Works Centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities.

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services (OKDRS), Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding. (147)

Workforce Center staff and OKDRS Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. Specifically, when referred by center staff, an OKDRS Benefits Planner will explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. OKDRS Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives. ( Page 147- 148)

Oklahoma’s Workforce System recognizes opportunities to reach Oklahoma’s businesses and employers with a powerful message of Access for All. Through relationships old and new, OKDRS and OKABT will lead the workforce partners in working to arrange and deliver training to businesses and employers that will reduce their hesitation to hire job seekers with disabilities and to identify ways to educate about the benefits of directly recruiting and hiring job seekers with disabilities. The creation of fact sheets and other concise deliverables will help businesses and employers to understand not only their obligations, but also the importance of hiring and promoting job seekers with disabilities.  (Page 149)

OKDRS utilizes its ADA Coordinator as a resource to provide consultation, technical assistance, and site reviews to identify accessibility issues to all workforce system partners and other agencies, entities, and businesses and employers. The OKDRS ADA Coordinator provides training in various aspects of the Americans with Disability Act and the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design to staff and supervisors of these entities as well. These services are available in order to advance the promotion of equal access for individuals with disabilities in programs, services, and buildings statewide. (Page 11)

  • DSU moving towards highlighting benefits package on position announcement (DVR/DVS)
  • Increase academic development of staff (DVR/DVS)
    • Staff participate in out-of-state training centers and consumer organizations conventions and meetings (DVS)
    • Provide educational sponsorship for employees (DVR/DVS)
  • Competitive Salaries
    • Career progression and market salary adjustments
  • Supervisors and Counselors striving toward the same goal (DVR) (Page 266)

Social Security Administration Certified Benefits Planners 

DSU has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Workforce Centers and DSU offices. Workforce Center staff and DSU Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. DSU Benefits Planners explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. DSU Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives.(Page 274)

The DSU Innovations Unit is coordinating the process of submission of an Intensive Technical Assistance grant with the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The grant has been awarded to the DSU along with ten other VR agencies nationwide, affording access to a very strong network of technical assistance providers under the JDVRTAC umbrella which includes ICI, the University of Washington, the University of Arkansas Currents, Jobs for the Future (JFF), the United States Business Leadership Network (USBLN); the Association of University Centers on Disability (AUCD); and Powers, Pyles, Sutter, and Verville, PC (PPSV). Apart from the intangible benefits this learning opportunity entails, the total services, travel and consultancy gained with this one-year grant adds resources to the agency equivalent to what it would obtain through thousands of dollars in contractual arrangements.

The purpose of JDVRTAC is to identify, adapt, embed, and sustain job-driven practices into vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies. These practices will lead to improved employment outcomes for people with disabilities by developing a knowledge base on the following four topical areas, 1) Labor market information (LMI), 2) Services to employers, 3) Building and maintaining employer relations, and 4) Services to providers of customized and/or employer driven training. (Page 275)

To help build a foundation for the Access for All initiative, the DSU and Oklahoma ABLE Tech (OKABT), partnered to provide regional Access for All academies, webinars, newsletters, and weekly tips statewide. The one-day seminars focused on accessibility in the built environment and in technology, as well as some of the legal drivers to create accessible points of contact between workforce system partners and job seekers in Oklahoma. These academies are critical training components to help staff close the gaps in workforce utilization, income, and poverty among people with disabilities. To best prepare job seekers to gain employment, workforce system staff must be aware of the benefits and requirements for ensuring accessible workforce services and environments. The academies help workforce system staff focus on the requirements for better employer engagement and promoting physical and programmatic accessibility to employment and training services for individuals with disabilities.

The Access for All webinar series will bring focus on accessibility, legal, policy, and technology as they relate to job seekers with disabilities. Topics will include: An Overview of the Access for All Initiative in Oklahoma; Technology Accessibility 101: An Introduction to Accessibility in the Web; Accessibility Basics in Microsoft Word 2010; Basic Technology Accessibility Testing; An Overview of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act; and Workforce Center Structural Accessibility Toolkit Update. (Page 280-281)

Oklahoma’s Workforce System recognizes opportunities to reach Oklahoma’s businesses and employers with a powerful message of Access for All. Through relationships old and new, DSU and OKABT will lead the workforce partners in working to arrange and deliver training to businesses and employers that will reduce their hesitation to hire job seekers with disabilities and to identify ways to educate about the benefits of directly recruiting and hiring job seekers with disabilities. The creation of fact sheets and other concise deliverables will help businesses and employers to understand not only their obligations, but also the importance of hiring and promoting job seekers with disabilities.

DSU utilizes its ADA Coordinator as a resource to provide consultation, technical assistance, and site reviews to identify accessibility issues to all workforce system partners and other agencies, entities, and businesses and employers. (Page 282)

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), through the Oklahoma Works centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities. (Page 289)

School to Work Transition

No specific disability related information found.

Data Collection

Reporting Processes:

The workforce system partners are utilizing the Oklahoma Works, Key Objective: Data, to integrate and use workforce and economic development data to inform policy, track progress, and measure success. Under this objective, Workforce Partners have identified the “Common Connectivity” strategy in the form of a common intake portal as a priority for the state. Oklahoma is seeking the USDOL Reemployment and System Integration Dislocated Worker grant to secure the necessary resources to design and implement a common intake system in Oklahoma. If received, the State will be able to make more progress toward a coordinated system. Oklahoma is also continuing to leverage data infrastructure, such as that developed through the Workforce Data Quality Initiative and State Longitudinal Data Initiative grant, to continue to implement coordinated data collection and reporting. (Page 117)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

Private and public sector representatives also serve on Governor’s Council committees charged with developing and recommending initiatives to enhance and implement Oklahoma’s workforce and economic development strategy. Those committees are: Workforce System Oversight Committee, Youth Program Committee, Career Pathways Committee, and Healthcare Workforce Committee. Recommendations are taken to the full Council for action.

The Governor’s Council is staffed by the Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD). OOWD also staffs the Workforce System Oversight Committee, the Career Pathways Committee, and the Youth Programs Committee. The Department of Health staffs the Healthcare Workforce Committee. (Page 122)

  • Create a plan for Career Pathways efforts to be based on industry sectors within Oklahoma’s state and regional ecosystems.
  • Establish strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.
  • Create and use Career Pathways approaches to increase the proportion of low-skill learners who ultimately earn a degree or certificate.
  • Increase high school graduation rates - decrease high school dropout rates.
  • Increase the percentage of Oklahoma workers with a recognized postsecondary credential. (A credential consisting of an industry-recognized certificate or certification, a certificate of completion of an apprenticeship, a license recognized by the State or Federal government, or an associate or baccalaureate degree.
  • Reinforce the alignment with Registered Apprenticeship for earn-and-learn opportunities.
  • Use performance data to demonstrate progress and impact, thereby supporting partner buy-in and reinforcing continued engagement over time.
  • Make Career Pathways part of the Board certification process.
  • Introduce employers and educators to the value of partnering by describing best practices and success stories.
  • Develop or research pilots and models. (Page 124)

Outreach and communication will be essential components of developing and implementing the State’s RA strategy and partner/industry engagement activities. The inclusion of subject matter experts such as the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, the Oklahoma Manufacturing Alliance, the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology and other established Oklahoma Works partners during the strategic planning phase of the grant will help the State build upon existing strategies to expand and diversify Registered Apprenticeship (RA) as a viable workforce development strategy in Oklahoma, and to reach grant milestones and expand apprenticeships to additional businesses and industries, and additional, underserved populations. Oklahoma will have a strong focus on creating RA opportunities for individuals displaced due to the decline of the State’s Oil and Gas Industries, and increasing RA opportunities for special populations such as women, out-of-school youth, minorities, individuals with disabilities, veterans and others. Career pathways for the health care industry will also be a focus as Oklahoma expands Registered Apprenticeship opportunities in the State. There are currently no known apprenticeships in the health care industry. (Page 178)

10. Whether your organization’s activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways;

11. Whether your organization’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;

12. Whether your organization maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with question 4 above) and to monitor program performance; and

13. Whether the local areas in which your organization is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs. (Page 214)

Employment Networks

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Ticket to Work Program 

Coordinated activities under Ticket to Work are delivered by a statewide Ticket to Work Coordinator. The coordinator will organize activities within the DSU and with partnership employment networks (EN’s) to ensure the needs of ticket holders are met at a maximum level. Ongoing outreach efforts will be conducted to recruit new partnership employment networks in order to provide more opportunities to assist ticket holders in reaching Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level employment outcomes. The coordinator will continue to oversee the ticket to work hotline and will provide ticket holders with information and referral for state VR, partnership EN’s, and external EN’s. (Page 274)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 24

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

“This event will include numerous breakout sessions, featuring experts in employment, technology and best practices in services and support. Professionals will offer their experience, knowledge and success in providing individualized employment services to support individuals to choose, get and keep employment. Through the support of conference sponsors, the Oklahoma Department for Rehabilitation Services, Developmental Disabilities Services Division and the University of Oklahoma/NCDET Department, attendees will have the opportunity to:

Receive answers to difficult and challenging questions Build potential partnerships and relationships Consider new ideas and employment strategies Gain tips to obtain and maintain employment Celebrate this year’s award winners!”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

“Add Us In” Grant to University of Oklahoma - 09/23/2013

“The goal of the Add Us In initiative is to identify and develop strategies to increase the capacity of small businesses, including those in underrepresented and historically excluded communities, to employ youth and young adults with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R03.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma’s Transition Education Handbook - 08/01/2011

“Oklahoma’s special education policies and procedures ensure that all students with an IEP have access to a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepares students with IEPs for employment, further education, and independent living. Desired employment, further education, and independent living outcomes become the postsecondary goals that drive the transition planning process and the secondary IEP.

The transition planning process provides opportunities for the young adult with disabilities to ponder and identify post-school goals. Transition planning provides educators the opportunity to structure the IEP transition components to facilitate attainment of students’ post-school goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Plan - 08/03/2006

“The Plan includes information about recent developments made by the state of Oklahoma. These developments include legislation to improve certain aspects of service delivery and policies. The developments demonstrate progress in establishing the infrastructure needed to achieve the goals set forth by the Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Planning Committee. These developments were achieved through the collaboration and coordination of the Committee members. They reflect a strong commitment to enable people with disabilities to live, work and play in their home communities instead of living restricted lives in institutional settings. The Plan also contains a section on cross-systems recommendations. This section addresses changes that will impact services in all systems. Disabilities can happen to anyone at any time, so every system has a role in serving people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities - 05/27/1957

“The Governor's Committee was established as an agency of state government with the passing of House Bill 996 on May 27, 1957, by the 26th Oklahoma Legislature. It made provisions for the Governor to appoint 75 citizens to serve on the Committee without compensation for terms of two, four and six years. All areas of the state are served by appointees who represent a multitude of backgrounds from both the profit and non-profit sectors, labor, business, industry, medicine, law, education, religion, veteran affairs, rehabilitation, civic affairs and the media. The expertise and concern of each of these respective members converge to serve the Committee's common purpose: to promote the rehabilitation and employment of workers with disabilities in the State of Oklahoma.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Oklahoma’s Transition Education Handbook - 08/01/2011

“Oklahoma’s special education policies and procedures ensure that all students with an IEP have access to a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepares students with IEPs for employment, further education, and independent living. Desired employment, further education, and independent living outcomes become the postsecondary goals that drive the transition planning process and the secondary IEP.

The transition planning process provides opportunities for the young adult with disabilities to ponder and identify post-school goals. Transition planning provides educators the opportunity to structure the IEP transition components to facilitate attainment of students’ post-school goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Plan - 08/03/2006

“The Plan includes information about recent developments made by the state of Oklahoma. These developments include legislation to improve certain aspects of service delivery and policies. The developments demonstrate progress in establishing the infrastructure needed to achieve the goals set forth by the Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Planning Committee. These developments were achieved through the collaboration and coordination of the Committee members. They reflect a strong commitment to enable people with disabilities to live, work and play in their home communities instead of living restricted lives in institutional settings. The Plan also contains a section on cross-systems recommendations. This section addresses changes that will impact services in all systems. Disabilities can happen to anyone at any time, so every system has a role in serving people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT)

The Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT) model has been in existence nationally for nearly 30 years and is an effective, evidenced-based, outreach-oriented, service delivery model using a 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week approach to community-based mental health services. PACT delivers comprehensive treatment and rehabilitation services to consumers in their homes, at work and in community settings.  The program reaches clients that traditional services can’t seem to engage. A major goal of PACT is to reduce the need for inpatient care by providing assistance with basic needs, increasing medication adherence, keeping families together, and securing competitive employment.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) recognizes PACT as the leading treatment model of choice for people with severe mental illness. Over 40 states across the country have adopted the PACT model. NAMI represents the driving force behind Oklahoma’s PACT initiative and continues to pursue additional funding, along with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) and other mental health advocates, to expand PACT program capacity in Oklahoma.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Optional Program for Hiring Applicants with Disabilities

“G. Subsections A through E of this section shall not apply to persons with severe disabilities who are considered for employment under the provisions of this subsection. Provided, said persons may elect instead to be considered for employment according to the procedures set out in subsections A through E of this section. 1. As used in this subsection "persons with severe disabilities" means persons certified as having disabilities according to standards and procedures established by the Administrator. Said standards and procedures shall be developed by the Administrator of the Office of Personnel Management with the assistance of the Office of Handicapped Concerns, and the Department of Rehabilitation Services. 2. Agencies of this state may employ persons with severe disabilities who are legal residents of the state in competitive and noncompetitive jobs. Except for the requirement of minimum qualifications specified in applicable job specifications, such persons with disabilities shall be exempt from entrance examinations and hiring procedures administered by the Office of Personnel Management pursuant to this section and Section 840-4.13 of this title.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

OK Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Oklahoma Community Integrated Employment (CIE)

“Community Integrated Employment (CIE) is a service program that provides placement, job training and short-term or long-term supports to assist service recipients in achieving and maintaining employment within the community.  Services are delivered in integrated settings in the community be contracted providers.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Oklahoma’s Milestone Payment System

“ESS' Oklahoma Milestone Payment System received awards from the Ford Foundation and the Harvard School of Business, as well as other government groups, for cutting government spending, improving service delivery and increasing consumer satisfaction by linking payment for contract services to a series of checkpoints, or milestones, on the way to specific goals or outcomes, such as employment.”

The Milestone payment system integrates Total Quality Management concepts with payment mechanisms. Total Quality Management (TQM) is defined as “…a continuous improvement process which involves participatory management and makes use of teamwork.”1 TQM concepts are at the heart of the Reinventing Government and National Performance Review advocated by Vice President Gore. TQM is customer-driven, involving employees at all levels and using a team approach to eliminate waste and continuously improve quality.2  The fundamental problem that Womack et. al., identified for business systems is identical for government-funded programs. They state that the “…problems are inherent in the system’s incentive structure and logic.”3 The Milestone system rethinks the logic and incentive structure of the process for purchasing vocational services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

OK Developmental Disabilities Services Employment Policy 317:40-7-1

The policy states that, “The optimum goal [for employment services] is full-time employment at prevailing wage in business or industry at an occupation of the service recipient's choice with natural supports.…. There may be instances resulting from a variety of factors when people served have not achieved the goal of full employment.  The provider agency makes available those supports needed for the service recipient to achieve full employment.” It also provides a list of preferred options when full-time employment is not possible for circumstantial reasons.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment at the University of Oklahoma

“The Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment facilitates successful secondary and postsecondary educational, vocational and personal outcomes for students and adults with disabilities. ZC faculty, staff, and students do this through self-determination oriented evaluation, research, development, transition education instruction, and dissemination of best educational and support practices. The ZC also prepares undergraduate and graduate students to assume leadership roles in schools, universities, and support organizations.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

“Add Us In” Grant to University of Oklahoma - 09/23/2013

“The goal of the Add Us In initiative is to identify and develop strategies to increase the capacity of small businesses, including those in underrepresented and historically excluded communities, to employ youth and young adults with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

“This event will include numerous breakout sessions, featuring experts in employment, technology and best practices in services and support. Professionals will offer their experience, knowledge and success in providing individualized employment services to support individuals to choose, get and keep employment. Through the support of conference sponsors, the Oklahoma Department for Rehabilitation Services, Developmental Disabilities Services Division and the University of Oklahoma/NCDET Department, attendees will have the opportunity to:

Receive answers to difficult and challenging questions Build potential partnerships and relationships Consider new ideas and employment strategies Gain tips to obtain and maintain employment Celebrate this year’s award winners!”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

National Center for Disability Education and Training DRS Training

The National Center for Disability Education and Training (NCDET) designs and delivers cutting-edge training to staff of employment providers in a variety of competency-based courses leading to certification. The methods of training range from classroom to accessible multimedia products marketed across the United States.

Please click on the link below for more information about trainings offered through our contract with the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services. NCDET has delivered training under this  contract since 1987 and has prepared thousands of Employment Training Specialists to provide employment supports to individuals with significant disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

This program has several functions. It “develops new  employment services,  provides technical assistance, and training to contracted agencies and DRS staff statewide.    ESS  administers the supported employment program, which is a specialized type of job placement for people with the most significant  barriers to employment. Supported Employment provides  intensive, specialized onsite  training and long term supports  to assist individuals to find employment, learn their job tasks, and maintain successful employment.   Employment and Retention  is an  employment program  for individuals with significant barriers to employment.  This program is designed to provide individuals with short term on and off site training and supports to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment.   Job Placement is an employment program   intended to assist  individuals   requiring  minimal support  in finding full-time employment.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R03.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Living Choice/Money Follows the Person

“The Living Choice Project is Oklahoma’s brand name for the Money Follows the Person grant, and is administered by the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA). Oklahoma’s Living Choice Project is designed to transform the current long-term care system by promoting community based services instead of institutional services.

The Living Choice project serves three populations, the physically disabled (19-64), older persons (65 and older), and intellectually disabled. Individuals in any of these three populations are eligible for transition if they have resided in a qualified institution (i.e. nursing facility, intermediate care facility for persons with intellectual disabilities) for at least ninety days prior to their proposed transition date, and have had one day of their institutional stay paid by Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma HCBS Transition Plan

The purpose of this Transition Plan is to ensure the individuals receiving Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) are integrated in and have access to supports in the community, including opportunities to seek employment, work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources.  The State has prepared a revised transition plan in order to comply with federal regulations for community-based settings. Overall, the Transition Plan provides assurance that the individuals receiving HCBS have the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS. This updated Transition Plan outlines the proposed process that Oklahoma will be utilizing to ensure implementation of the new HCBS requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX State Plan  The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of any state’s Medicaid program.  As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act (the Act) the State Plan is developed by the state and approved by DHHS/CMS. Without a State Plan, OHCA would not be eligible for federal funding for providing SoonerCare services.  Essentially, the State Plan is our state’s agreement that it will conform to the requirements of the Act and the official issuances of DHHS/CMS.  The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act.
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

OK Developmental Disabilities Service Division Home and Community-Based Services Waiver

“Developmental Disabilities Service Division, a division of OKDHS, serves individuals who are 3 years of age and older who have mental retardation and certain persons with related conditions who would otherwise require placement in an intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

With the motto "Labor Conquers All Things," it's clear that Oklahoma values the contributions of all workers, including workers with disabilities, and has plenty to offer when it comes to career development.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oklahoma’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.85%
Change from
2014 to 2015
3,911,338
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
320,480
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.99%
Change from
2014 to 2015
111,672
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-4.53%
Change from
2014 to 2015
34.85%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.71%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.13%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 3,850,568 3,878,051 3,911,338
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 319,393 331,028 320,480
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 114,435 120,597 111,672
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,486,316 1,492,128 1,517,596
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 35.83% 36.43% 34.85%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.21% 75.59% 76.13%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.30% 4.50% 4.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.20% 22.60% 21.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.80% 15.50% 15.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 299,117 298,775 292,432
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 295,300 311,423 304,652
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 454,066 465,901 450,062
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 39,477 43,504 42,915
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 27,654 31,949 28,179
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 48,962 48,315 48,707
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,429 5,588 5,173
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 493 N/A 340
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 40,131 38,269 41,977
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 6,859 8,493 7,910

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,006 4,133 4,159
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.30% 4.50% 4.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 127,973 127,712 127,565

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 11,602 10,000 8,966
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 31,848 27,405 23,560
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 54,586 48,322 42,357
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.30% 20.70% 21.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.10% 0.10% 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.10% 0.90% 0.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.70% 2.10% 2.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 44 36 59
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 504 336 305
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 784 788 789
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 6,387 7,021 7,102
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04 0.04 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 2,369 2,291 1,100
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 961 981 447
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 41.00% 43.00% 0.41%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 25.19 25.48 11.43

 

VR OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
852
4,010
4,643
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 389 304 406
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 304 304 470
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,113 1,163 1,307
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,155 1,203 1,268
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 569 581 577
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 432 455 615
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 30.50% 28.60% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. N/A 4,458 4,332
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. N/A 192,401 192,581
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 222 N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 180 191 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $18,630,000 $18,929,000 $20,081,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $9,148,000 $9,244,000 $10,637,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $0 $0 N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,723,000 $5,627 $5,911,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 62.00% 62.00% 60.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,193 1,151 1,189
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,216 2,221 2,320
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 0 0 N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 66.00 65.50 64.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 62.88% 64.68% 65.89%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.66% 9.51% 9.53%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.37% 1.30% 1.31%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 92.64% 95.47% 97.72%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 17.00% 15.59% 26.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 57.00% 48.92% 65.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 71.00% 59.68% 85.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 40.00% 33.33% 39.02%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 693,919
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 736
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 45,014
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 459,485
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 504,499
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 43
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 387
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 430
AbilityOne wages (products). $401,419
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,994,972

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 3 4 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 58 62 51
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 7 8 7
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 68 74 60
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 10 22 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,691 2,773 2,116
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 240 244 243
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,941 3,039 2,359

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

DSU Programs Field Representatives serve on the Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council. DSU Employment Support Services (ESS) staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the Employment First Alliance, which has a national goal of increased competitive integrated employment by 50% in the states. As a result of the Employment First Alliance, the Oklahoma Legislature passed the Employment First Law which became effective November 1, 2015. (Page 246)

The DSU serves eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities and barriers to employment first. When all priority groups are open and it is determined there is a need to implement Order of Selection, the first group to close is priority group 3, then priority group 2, and last priority group 1. If all three groups are closed, the first one to open is priority group 1, then priority group 2, and last priority group 3. (Page 271)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Customized Employment

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program. The DSU is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 233)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Factors that impeded the achievement of meeting goals and priorities include;

  • Lack of DSU contracted CRPs in rural areas of the state
  • Lack of options for DSU employment contracts to meet the needs of all individuals with significant barriers to employment (i.e. Customized Employment; Intensive SE Services)
  • Lack of joint contracted DSU/DDS CRPs (Page 292)
Braiding/Blending Resources

Oklahoma is encouraging the braiding of funding and leveraging of resources through the state’s new resource leveraging tool to be released in the fall of 2016. In this online tool, state agencies, including the core partners, can identify existing workforce development activities and send requests to partner. These requests are then supported and facilitated with the assistance of the Office of the Governor, if needed. Similarly, with the release of this tool, the Office of the Governor, under Oklahoma Works, in July of 2016, challenged each state agency and each Workforce Development Board, to identify one new partner (private or public) to engage. (Page 70)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

Oklahoma is focused on accessibility for all job seekers and businesses and employer’s work sites throughout all levels of Oklahoma Works. Working with the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development (GCWED), system partners bring sharper focus on developing and employing more Oklahoman’s with disabilities. (Page 146)

OESC complies with Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) [29 CFR 38]; there are trained bi-lingual staff located in the Workforce Centers and Unemployment Insurance Service Centers for on-site language interpreting for English language learners customers, as well as, Telephone Language Interpretive Services and Document Translation Services. The local one-stop center, based on funding availability, may provide access to Google Translate for individuals who are English-language learners and for whom translators may not be available. Additionally, the one-stop center will partner with local Adult Learning Centers to provide literacy services to LEP clients. (Page 150-151)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Top occupations in the Transportation & Distribution Ecosystem include: Wholesale and Manufacturing Sales Representatives, except technical and scientific products; Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers; Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers; General and Operations Managers; Aircraft Mechanics and Service Technicians; Industrial Machinery Mechanics; Customer Service Representatives; Wholesale and Manufacturing Sales Representatives for Technical and Scientific Products; Bookkeeping, Accounting and Auditing Clerks; Light Truck or Delivery Service Drivers; Commercial Pilots; Sales Managers; Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists; Accountants and Auditors. (Page 25)

DSU maintains an MOA with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) describing collaboration on delivery of Supported Employment services and transitional employment services.

The DSU has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five-community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness. (Page 241)

Joint budget requests that pertain to the prevention, early intervention, treatment and support for those with MEB disorders.

As a result of the second MOA, the DSU initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness. (Page 249)

Mental Health CRPs have the option of providing Supported Employment. DSU, the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services are collaboratively seeking strategies for improving services and enhancing service capacity for individuals with serious mental illness.

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of community mental health CRPs contracting to provide employment services in an effort to improve the employment outcomes of individuals with serious mental illness. The DSU has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness.

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program. The DSU is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 272)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

The DSU data reporting system indicated a problem with the Tulsa office not being strategically located in a good geographical area that assures services to individuals with disabilities. The application to eligibility and eligibility to planning rates are significantly lower. Due to budget constraints, the DSU is unable to relocate. A pilot project in this area is currently under way to implement a referral module through the case management system. This module will allow counselors time initially to work with jobseekers to assure individual plans reach successful employment outcomes. (Page 291)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), the Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD), and the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education (ODCTE) through the Oklahoma Works centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities.

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services, Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding.

OESC, OOWD, and ODCTE work to develop and support increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities (utilizing appropriate state and federal funding streams). Oklahoma Works Center staff routinely refer individuals with disabilities to the OKDRS for more intensive training and job placement opportunities. OKDRS has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Oklahoma Works Centers and OKDRS offices.

Oklahoma Works Center staff and OKDRS Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. Specifically, when referred by center staff, an OKDRS Benefits Planner will explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. OKDRS Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives. (Page10)

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), through the Oklahoma Works Centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities.

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services (OKDRS), Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding. (147)

Workforce Center staff and OKDRS Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. Specifically, when referred by center staff, an OKDRS Benefits Planner will explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. OKDRS Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives. ( Page 147- 148)

Oklahoma’s Workforce System recognizes opportunities to reach Oklahoma’s businesses and employers with a powerful message of Access for All. Through relationships old and new, OKDRS and OKABT will lead the workforce partners in working to arrange and deliver training to businesses and employers that will reduce their hesitation to hire job seekers with disabilities and to identify ways to educate about the benefits of directly recruiting and hiring job seekers with disabilities. The creation of fact sheets and other concise deliverables will help businesses and employers to understand not only their obligations, but also the importance of hiring and promoting job seekers with disabilities.  (Page 149)

OKDRS utilizes its ADA Coordinator as a resource to provide consultation, technical assistance, and site reviews to identify accessibility issues to all workforce system partners and other agencies, entities, and businesses and employers. The OKDRS ADA Coordinator provides training in various aspects of the Americans with Disability Act and the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design to staff and supervisors of these entities as well. These services are available in order to advance the promotion of equal access for individuals with disabilities in programs, services, and buildings statewide. (Page 11)

  • DSU moving towards highlighting benefits package on position announcement (DVR/DVS)
  • Increase academic development of staff (DVR/DVS)
    • Staff participate in out-of-state training centers and consumer organizations conventions and meetings (DVS)
    • Provide educational sponsorship for employees (DVR/DVS)
  • Competitive Salaries
    • Career progression and market salary adjustments
  • Supervisors and Counselors striving toward the same goal (DVR) (Page 266)

Social Security Administration Certified Benefits Planners 

DSU has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Workforce Centers and DSU offices. Workforce Center staff and DSU Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. DSU Benefits Planners explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. DSU Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives.(Page 274)

The DSU Innovations Unit is coordinating the process of submission of an Intensive Technical Assistance grant with the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The grant has been awarded to the DSU along with ten other VR agencies nationwide, affording access to a very strong network of technical assistance providers under the JDVRTAC umbrella which includes ICI, the University of Washington, the University of Arkansas Currents, Jobs for the Future (JFF), the United States Business Leadership Network (USBLN); the Association of University Centers on Disability (AUCD); and Powers, Pyles, Sutter, and Verville, PC (PPSV). Apart from the intangible benefits this learning opportunity entails, the total services, travel and consultancy gained with this one-year grant adds resources to the agency equivalent to what it would obtain through thousands of dollars in contractual arrangements.

The purpose of JDVRTAC is to identify, adapt, embed, and sustain job-driven practices into vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies. These practices will lead to improved employment outcomes for people with disabilities by developing a knowledge base on the following four topical areas, 1) Labor market information (LMI), 2) Services to employers, 3) Building and maintaining employer relations, and 4) Services to providers of customized and/or employer driven training. (Page 275)

To help build a foundation for the Access for All initiative, the DSU and Oklahoma ABLE Tech (OKABT), partnered to provide regional Access for All academies, webinars, newsletters, and weekly tips statewide. The one-day seminars focused on accessibility in the built environment and in technology, as well as some of the legal drivers to create accessible points of contact between workforce system partners and job seekers in Oklahoma. These academies are critical training components to help staff close the gaps in workforce utilization, income, and poverty among people with disabilities. To best prepare job seekers to gain employment, workforce system staff must be aware of the benefits and requirements for ensuring accessible workforce services and environments. The academies help workforce system staff focus on the requirements for better employer engagement and promoting physical and programmatic accessibility to employment and training services for individuals with disabilities.

The Access for All webinar series will bring focus on accessibility, legal, policy, and technology as they relate to job seekers with disabilities. Topics will include: An Overview of the Access for All Initiative in Oklahoma; Technology Accessibility 101: An Introduction to Accessibility in the Web; Accessibility Basics in Microsoft Word 2010; Basic Technology Accessibility Testing; An Overview of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act; and Workforce Center Structural Accessibility Toolkit Update. (Page 280-281)

Oklahoma’s Workforce System recognizes opportunities to reach Oklahoma’s businesses and employers with a powerful message of Access for All. Through relationships old and new, DSU and OKABT will lead the workforce partners in working to arrange and deliver training to businesses and employers that will reduce their hesitation to hire job seekers with disabilities and to identify ways to educate about the benefits of directly recruiting and hiring job seekers with disabilities. The creation of fact sheets and other concise deliverables will help businesses and employers to understand not only their obligations, but also the importance of hiring and promoting job seekers with disabilities.

DSU utilizes its ADA Coordinator as a resource to provide consultation, technical assistance, and site reviews to identify accessibility issues to all workforce system partners and other agencies, entities, and businesses and employers. (Page 282)

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), through the Oklahoma Works centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities. (Page 289)

School to Work Transition

No specific disability related information found.

Data Collection

Reporting Processes:

The workforce system partners are utilizing the Oklahoma Works, Key Objective: Data, to integrate and use workforce and economic development data to inform policy, track progress, and measure success. Under this objective, Workforce Partners have identified the “Common Connectivity” strategy in the form of a common intake portal as a priority for the state. Oklahoma is seeking the USDOL Reemployment and System Integration Dislocated Worker grant to secure the necessary resources to design and implement a common intake system in Oklahoma. If received, the State will be able to make more progress toward a coordinated system. Oklahoma is also continuing to leverage data infrastructure, such as that developed through the Workforce Data Quality Initiative and State Longitudinal Data Initiative grant, to continue to implement coordinated data collection and reporting. (Page 117)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

Private and public sector representatives also serve on Governor’s Council committees charged with developing and recommending initiatives to enhance and implement Oklahoma’s workforce and economic development strategy. Those committees are: Workforce System Oversight Committee, Youth Program Committee, Career Pathways Committee, and Healthcare Workforce Committee. Recommendations are taken to the full Council for action.

The Governor’s Council is staffed by the Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD). OOWD also staffs the Workforce System Oversight Committee, the Career Pathways Committee, and the Youth Programs Committee. The Department of Health staffs the Healthcare Workforce Committee. (Page 122)

  • Create a plan for Career Pathways efforts to be based on industry sectors within Oklahoma’s state and regional ecosystems.
  • Establish strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.
  • Create and use Career Pathways approaches to increase the proportion of low-skill learners who ultimately earn a degree or certificate.
  • Increase high school graduation rates - decrease high school dropout rates.
  • Increase the percentage of Oklahoma workers with a recognized postsecondary credential. (A credential consisting of an industry-recognized certificate or certification, a certificate of completion of an apprenticeship, a license recognized by the State or Federal government, or an associate or baccalaureate degree.
  • Reinforce the alignment with Registered Apprenticeship for earn-and-learn opportunities.
  • Use performance data to demonstrate progress and impact, thereby supporting partner buy-in and reinforcing continued engagement over time.
  • Make Career Pathways part of the Board certification process.
  • Introduce employers and educators to the value of partnering by describing best practices and success stories.
  • Develop or research pilots and models. (Page 124)

Outreach and communication will be essential components of developing and implementing the State’s RA strategy and partner/industry engagement activities. The inclusion of subject matter experts such as the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, the Oklahoma Manufacturing Alliance, the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology and other established Oklahoma Works partners during the strategic planning phase of the grant will help the State build upon existing strategies to expand and diversify Registered Apprenticeship (RA) as a viable workforce development strategy in Oklahoma, and to reach grant milestones and expand apprenticeships to additional businesses and industries, and additional, underserved populations. Oklahoma will have a strong focus on creating RA opportunities for individuals displaced due to the decline of the State’s Oil and Gas Industries, and increasing RA opportunities for special populations such as women, out-of-school youth, minorities, individuals with disabilities, veterans and others. Career pathways for the health care industry will also be a focus as Oklahoma expands Registered Apprenticeship opportunities in the State. There are currently no known apprenticeships in the health care industry. (Page 178)

10. Whether your organization’s activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways;

11. Whether your organization’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;

12. Whether your organization maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with question 4 above) and to monitor program performance; and

13. Whether the local areas in which your organization is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs. (Page 214)

Employment Networks

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Ticket to Work Program 

Coordinated activities under Ticket to Work are delivered by a statewide Ticket to Work Coordinator. The coordinator will organize activities within the DSU and with partnership employment networks (EN’s) to ensure the needs of ticket holders are met at a maximum level. Ongoing outreach efforts will be conducted to recruit new partnership employment networks in order to provide more opportunities to assist ticket holders in reaching Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level employment outcomes. The coordinator will continue to oversee the ticket to work hotline and will provide ticket holders with information and referral for state VR, partnership EN’s, and external EN’s. (Page 274)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 24

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

“This event will include numerous breakout sessions, featuring experts in employment, technology and best practices in services and support. Professionals will offer their experience, knowledge and success in providing individualized employment services to support individuals to choose, get and keep employment. Through the support of conference sponsors, the Oklahoma Department for Rehabilitation Services, Developmental Disabilities Services Division and the University of Oklahoma/NCDET Department, attendees will have the opportunity to:

Receive answers to difficult and challenging questions Build potential partnerships and relationships Consider new ideas and employment strategies Gain tips to obtain and maintain employment Celebrate this year’s award winners!”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

“Add Us In” Grant to University of Oklahoma - 09/23/2013

“The goal of the Add Us In initiative is to identify and develop strategies to increase the capacity of small businesses, including those in underrepresented and historically excluded communities, to employ youth and young adults with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R03.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma’s Transition Education Handbook - 08/01/2011

“Oklahoma’s special education policies and procedures ensure that all students with an IEP have access to a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepares students with IEPs for employment, further education, and independent living. Desired employment, further education, and independent living outcomes become the postsecondary goals that drive the transition planning process and the secondary IEP.

The transition planning process provides opportunities for the young adult with disabilities to ponder and identify post-school goals. Transition planning provides educators the opportunity to structure the IEP transition components to facilitate attainment of students’ post-school goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Plan - 08/03/2006

“The Plan includes information about recent developments made by the state of Oklahoma. These developments include legislation to improve certain aspects of service delivery and policies. The developments demonstrate progress in establishing the infrastructure needed to achieve the goals set forth by the Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Planning Committee. These developments were achieved through the collaboration and coordination of the Committee members. They reflect a strong commitment to enable people with disabilities to live, work and play in their home communities instead of living restricted lives in institutional settings. The Plan also contains a section on cross-systems recommendations. This section addresses changes that will impact services in all systems. Disabilities can happen to anyone at any time, so every system has a role in serving people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities - 05/27/1957

“The Governor's Committee was established as an agency of state government with the passing of House Bill 996 on May 27, 1957, by the 26th Oklahoma Legislature. It made provisions for the Governor to appoint 75 citizens to serve on the Committee without compensation for terms of two, four and six years. All areas of the state are served by appointees who represent a multitude of backgrounds from both the profit and non-profit sectors, labor, business, industry, medicine, law, education, religion, veteran affairs, rehabilitation, civic affairs and the media. The expertise and concern of each of these respective members converge to serve the Committee's common purpose: to promote the rehabilitation and employment of workers with disabilities in the State of Oklahoma.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Oklahoma’s Transition Education Handbook - 08/01/2011

“Oklahoma’s special education policies and procedures ensure that all students with an IEP have access to a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepares students with IEPs for employment, further education, and independent living. Desired employment, further education, and independent living outcomes become the postsecondary goals that drive the transition planning process and the secondary IEP.

The transition planning process provides opportunities for the young adult with disabilities to ponder and identify post-school goals. Transition planning provides educators the opportunity to structure the IEP transition components to facilitate attainment of students’ post-school goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Plan - 08/03/2006

“The Plan includes information about recent developments made by the state of Oklahoma. These developments include legislation to improve certain aspects of service delivery and policies. The developments demonstrate progress in establishing the infrastructure needed to achieve the goals set forth by the Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Planning Committee. These developments were achieved through the collaboration and coordination of the Committee members. They reflect a strong commitment to enable people with disabilities to live, work and play in their home communities instead of living restricted lives in institutional settings. The Plan also contains a section on cross-systems recommendations. This section addresses changes that will impact services in all systems. Disabilities can happen to anyone at any time, so every system has a role in serving people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT)

The Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT) model has been in existence nationally for nearly 30 years and is an effective, evidenced-based, outreach-oriented, service delivery model using a 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week approach to community-based mental health services. PACT delivers comprehensive treatment and rehabilitation services to consumers in their homes, at work and in community settings.  The program reaches clients that traditional services can’t seem to engage. A major goal of PACT is to reduce the need for inpatient care by providing assistance with basic needs, increasing medication adherence, keeping families together, and securing competitive employment.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) recognizes PACT as the leading treatment model of choice for people with severe mental illness. Over 40 states across the country have adopted the PACT model. NAMI represents the driving force behind Oklahoma’s PACT initiative and continues to pursue additional funding, along with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) and other mental health advocates, to expand PACT program capacity in Oklahoma.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Optional Program for Hiring Applicants with Disabilities

“G. Subsections A through E of this section shall not apply to persons with severe disabilities who are considered for employment under the provisions of this subsection. Provided, said persons may elect instead to be considered for employment according to the procedures set out in subsections A through E of this section. 1. As used in this subsection "persons with severe disabilities" means persons certified as having disabilities according to standards and procedures established by the Administrator. Said standards and procedures shall be developed by the Administrator of the Office of Personnel Management with the assistance of the Office of Handicapped Concerns, and the Department of Rehabilitation Services. 2. Agencies of this state may employ persons with severe disabilities who are legal residents of the state in competitive and noncompetitive jobs. Except for the requirement of minimum qualifications specified in applicable job specifications, such persons with disabilities shall be exempt from entrance examinations and hiring procedures administered by the Office of Personnel Management pursuant to this section and Section 840-4.13 of this title.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

OK Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Oklahoma Community Integrated Employment (CIE)

“Community Integrated Employment (CIE) is a service program that provides placement, job training and short-term or long-term supports to assist service recipients in achieving and maintaining employment within the community.  Services are delivered in integrated settings in the community be contracted providers.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Oklahoma’s Milestone Payment System

“ESS' Oklahoma Milestone Payment System received awards from the Ford Foundation and the Harvard School of Business, as well as other government groups, for cutting government spending, improving service delivery and increasing consumer satisfaction by linking payment for contract services to a series of checkpoints, or milestones, on the way to specific goals or outcomes, such as employment.”

The Milestone payment system integrates Total Quality Management concepts with payment mechanisms. Total Quality Management (TQM) is defined as “…a continuous improvement process which involves participatory management and makes use of teamwork.”1 TQM concepts are at the heart of the Reinventing Government and National Performance Review advocated by Vice President Gore. TQM is customer-driven, involving employees at all levels and using a team approach to eliminate waste and continuously improve quality.2  The fundamental problem that Womack et. al., identified for business systems is identical for government-funded programs. They state that the “…problems are inherent in the system’s incentive structure and logic.”3 The Milestone system rethinks the logic and incentive structure of the process for purchasing vocational services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

OK Developmental Disabilities Services Employment Policy 317:40-7-1

The policy states that, “The optimum goal [for employment services] is full-time employment at prevailing wage in business or industry at an occupation of the service recipient's choice with natural supports.…. There may be instances resulting from a variety of factors when people served have not achieved the goal of full employment.  The provider agency makes available those supports needed for the service recipient to achieve full employment.” It also provides a list of preferred options when full-time employment is not possible for circumstantial reasons.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment at the University of Oklahoma

“The Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment facilitates successful secondary and postsecondary educational, vocational and personal outcomes for students and adults with disabilities. ZC faculty, staff, and students do this through self-determination oriented evaluation, research, development, transition education instruction, and dissemination of best educational and support practices. The ZC also prepares undergraduate and graduate students to assume leadership roles in schools, universities, and support organizations.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

“Add Us In” Grant to University of Oklahoma - 09/23/2013

“The goal of the Add Us In initiative is to identify and develop strategies to increase the capacity of small businesses, including those in underrepresented and historically excluded communities, to employ youth and young adults with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

“This event will include numerous breakout sessions, featuring experts in employment, technology and best practices in services and support. Professionals will offer their experience, knowledge and success in providing individualized employment services to support individuals to choose, get and keep employment. Through the support of conference sponsors, the Oklahoma Department for Rehabilitation Services, Developmental Disabilities Services Division and the University of Oklahoma/NCDET Department, attendees will have the opportunity to:

Receive answers to difficult and challenging questions Build potential partnerships and relationships Consider new ideas and employment strategies Gain tips to obtain and maintain employment Celebrate this year’s award winners!”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

National Center for Disability Education and Training DRS Training

The National Center for Disability Education and Training (NCDET) designs and delivers cutting-edge training to staff of employment providers in a variety of competency-based courses leading to certification. The methods of training range from classroom to accessible multimedia products marketed across the United States.

Please click on the link below for more information about trainings offered through our contract with the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services. NCDET has delivered training under this  contract since 1987 and has prepared thousands of Employment Training Specialists to provide employment supports to individuals with significant disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

This program has several functions. It “develops new  employment services,  provides technical assistance, and training to contracted agencies and DRS staff statewide.    ESS  administers the supported employment program, which is a specialized type of job placement for people with the most significant  barriers to employment. Supported Employment provides  intensive, specialized onsite  training and long term supports  to assist individuals to find employment, learn their job tasks, and maintain successful employment.   Employment and Retention  is an  employment program  for individuals with significant barriers to employment.  This program is designed to provide individuals with short term on and off site training and supports to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment.   Job Placement is an employment program   intended to assist  individuals   requiring  minimal support  in finding full-time employment.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R03.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Living Choice/Money Follows the Person

“The Living Choice Project is Oklahoma’s brand name for the Money Follows the Person grant, and is administered by the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA). Oklahoma’s Living Choice Project is designed to transform the current long-term care system by promoting community based services instead of institutional services.

The Living Choice project serves three populations, the physically disabled (19-64), older persons (65 and older), and intellectually disabled. Individuals in any of these three populations are eligible for transition if they have resided in a qualified institution (i.e. nursing facility, intermediate care facility for persons with intellectual disabilities) for at least ninety days prior to their proposed transition date, and have had one day of their institutional stay paid by Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma HCBS Transition Plan

The purpose of this Transition Plan is to ensure the individuals receiving Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) are integrated in and have access to supports in the community, including opportunities to seek employment, work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources.  The State has prepared a revised transition plan in order to comply with federal regulations for community-based settings. Overall, the Transition Plan provides assurance that the individuals receiving HCBS have the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS. This updated Transition Plan outlines the proposed process that Oklahoma will be utilizing to ensure implementation of the new HCBS requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX State Plan  The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of any state’s Medicaid program.  As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act (the Act) the State Plan is developed by the state and approved by DHHS/CMS. Without a State Plan, OHCA would not be eligible for federal funding for providing SoonerCare services.  Essentially, the State Plan is our state’s agreement that it will conform to the requirements of the Act and the official issuances of DHHS/CMS.  The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act.
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

OK Developmental Disabilities Service Division Home and Community-Based Services Waiver

“Developmental Disabilities Service Division, a division of OKDHS, serves individuals who are 3 years of age and older who have mental retardation and certain persons with related conditions who would otherwise require placement in an intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

With the motto "Labor Conquers All Things," it's clear that Oklahoma values the contributions of all workers, including workers with disabilities, and has plenty to offer when it comes to career development.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oklahoma’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.85%
Change from
2014 to 2015
3,911,338
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
320,480
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.99%
Change from
2014 to 2015
111,672
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-4.53%
Change from
2014 to 2015
34.85%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.71%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.13%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 3,911,338
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 320,480
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 111,672
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,517,596
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.85%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.13%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 292,432
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 304,652
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 450,062
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 42,915
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 28,179
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 48,707
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 5,173
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 340
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 41,977
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 7,910

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,159
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 127,565

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,966
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 23,560
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 42,357
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 59
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 305
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 789
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,102
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 1,100
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 447
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 0.41%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.43

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,643
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 406
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 470
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,307
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,268
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 577
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 615
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,332
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 192,581
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $20,081,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $10,637,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,911,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 60.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,189
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,320
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 64.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 65.89%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.53%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.31%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.72%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 26.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 65.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 85.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 39.02%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 693,919
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 736
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 45,014
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 459,485
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 504,499
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 43
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 387
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 430
AbilityOne wages (products). $401,419
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,994,972

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 51
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 7
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 60
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,116
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 243
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,359

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

DSU Programs Field Representatives serve on the Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council. DSU Employment Support Services (ESS) staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the Employment First Alliance, which has a national goal of increased competitive integrated employment by 50% in the states. As a result of the Employment First Alliance, the Oklahoma Legislature passed the Employment First Law which became effective November 1, 2015. (Page 246)

The DSU serves eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities and barriers to employment first. When all priority groups are open and it is determined there is a need to implement Order of Selection, the first group to close is priority group 3, then priority group 2, and last priority group 1. If all three groups are closed, the first one to open is priority group 1, then priority group 2, and last priority group 3. (Page 271)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Customized Employment

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program. The DSU is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 233)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Factors that impeded the achievement of meeting goals and priorities include;

  • Lack of DSU contracted CRPs in rural areas of the state
  • Lack of options for DSU employment contracts to meet the needs of all individuals with significant barriers to employment (i.e. Customized Employment; Intensive SE Services)
  • Lack of joint contracted DSU/DDS CRPs (Page 292)
Braiding/Blending Resources

Oklahoma is encouraging the braiding of funding and leveraging of resources through the state’s new resource leveraging tool to be released in the fall of 2016. In this online tool, state agencies, including the core partners, can identify existing workforce development activities and send requests to partner. These requests are then supported and facilitated with the assistance of the Office of the Governor, if needed. Similarly, with the release of this tool, the Office of the Governor, under Oklahoma Works, in July of 2016, challenged each state agency and each Workforce Development Board, to identify one new partner (private or public) to engage. (Page 70)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

Oklahoma is focused on accessibility for all job seekers and businesses and employer’s work sites throughout all levels of Oklahoma Works. Working with the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development (GCWED), system partners bring sharper focus on developing and employing more Oklahoman’s with disabilities. (Page 146)

OESC complies with Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) [29 CFR 38]; there are trained bi-lingual staff located in the Workforce Centers and Unemployment Insurance Service Centers for on-site language interpreting for English language learners customers, as well as, Telephone Language Interpretive Services and Document Translation Services. The local one-stop center, based on funding availability, may provide access to Google Translate for individuals who are English-language learners and for whom translators may not be available. Additionally, the one-stop center will partner with local Adult Learning Centers to provide literacy services to LEP clients. (Page 150-151)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Top occupations in the Transportation & Distribution Ecosystem include: Wholesale and Manufacturing Sales Representatives, except technical and scientific products; Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers; Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers; General and Operations Managers; Aircraft Mechanics and Service Technicians; Industrial Machinery Mechanics; Customer Service Representatives; Wholesale and Manufacturing Sales Representatives for Technical and Scientific Products; Bookkeeping, Accounting and Auditing Clerks; Light Truck or Delivery Service Drivers; Commercial Pilots; Sales Managers; Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists; Accountants and Auditors. (Page 25)

DSU maintains an MOA with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) describing collaboration on delivery of Supported Employment services and transitional employment services.

The DSU has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five-community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness. (Page 241)

Joint budget requests that pertain to the prevention, early intervention, treatment and support for those with MEB disorders.

As a result of the second MOA, the DSU initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness. (Page 249)

Mental Health CRPs have the option of providing Supported Employment. DSU, the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services are collaboratively seeking strategies for improving services and enhancing service capacity for individuals with serious mental illness.

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of community mental health CRPs contracting to provide employment services in an effort to improve the employment outcomes of individuals with serious mental illness. The DSU has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness.

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program. The DSU is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 272)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

The DSU data reporting system indicated a problem with the Tulsa office not being strategically located in a good geographical area that assures services to individuals with disabilities. The application to eligibility and eligibility to planning rates are significantly lower. Due to budget constraints, the DSU is unable to relocate. A pilot project in this area is currently under way to implement a referral module through the case management system. This module will allow counselors time initially to work with jobseekers to assure individual plans reach successful employment outcomes. (Page 291)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), the Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD), and the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education (ODCTE) through the Oklahoma Works centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities.

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services, Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding.

OESC, OOWD, and ODCTE work to develop and support increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities (utilizing appropriate state and federal funding streams). Oklahoma Works Center staff routinely refer individuals with disabilities to the OKDRS for more intensive training and job placement opportunities. OKDRS has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Oklahoma Works Centers and OKDRS offices.

Oklahoma Works Center staff and OKDRS Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. Specifically, when referred by center staff, an OKDRS Benefits Planner will explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. OKDRS Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives. (Page10)

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), through the Oklahoma Works Centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities.

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services (OKDRS), Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding. (147)

Workforce Center staff and OKDRS Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. Specifically, when referred by center staff, an OKDRS Benefits Planner will explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. OKDRS Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives. ( Page 147- 148)

Oklahoma’s Workforce System recognizes opportunities to reach Oklahoma’s businesses and employers with a powerful message of Access for All. Through relationships old and new, OKDRS and OKABT will lead the workforce partners in working to arrange and deliver training to businesses and employers that will reduce their hesitation to hire job seekers with disabilities and to identify ways to educate about the benefits of directly recruiting and hiring job seekers with disabilities. The creation of fact sheets and other concise deliverables will help businesses and employers to understand not only their obligations, but also the importance of hiring and promoting job seekers with disabilities.  (Page 149)

OKDRS utilizes its ADA Coordinator as a resource to provide consultation, technical assistance, and site reviews to identify accessibility issues to all workforce system partners and other agencies, entities, and businesses and employers. The OKDRS ADA Coordinator provides training in various aspects of the Americans with Disability Act and the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design to staff and supervisors of these entities as well. These services are available in order to advance the promotion of equal access for individuals with disabilities in programs, services, and buildings statewide. (Page 11)

  • DSU moving towards highlighting benefits package on position announcement (DVR/DVS)
  • Increase academic development of staff (DVR/DVS)
    • Staff participate in out-of-state training centers and consumer organizations conventions and meetings (DVS)
    • Provide educational sponsorship for employees (DVR/DVS)
  • Competitive Salaries
    • Career progression and market salary adjustments
  • Supervisors and Counselors striving toward the same goal (DVR) (Page 266)

Social Security Administration Certified Benefits Planners 

DSU has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Workforce Centers and DSU offices. Workforce Center staff and DSU Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. DSU Benefits Planners explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. DSU Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives.(Page 274)

The DSU Innovations Unit is coordinating the process of submission of an Intensive Technical Assistance grant with the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The grant has been awarded to the DSU along with ten other VR agencies nationwide, affording access to a very strong network of technical assistance providers under the JDVRTAC umbrella which includes ICI, the University of Washington, the University of Arkansas Currents, Jobs for the Future (JFF), the United States Business Leadership Network (USBLN); the Association of University Centers on Disability (AUCD); and Powers, Pyles, Sutter, and Verville, PC (PPSV). Apart from the intangible benefits this learning opportunity entails, the total services, travel and consultancy gained with this one-year grant adds resources to the agency equivalent to what it would obtain through thousands of dollars in contractual arrangements.

The purpose of JDVRTAC is to identify, adapt, embed, and sustain job-driven practices into vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies. These practices will lead to improved employment outcomes for people with disabilities by developing a knowledge base on the following four topical areas, 1) Labor market information (LMI), 2) Services to employers, 3) Building and maintaining employer relations, and 4) Services to providers of customized and/or employer driven training. (Page 275)

To help build a foundation for the Access for All initiative, the DSU and Oklahoma ABLE Tech (OKABT), partnered to provide regional Access for All academies, webinars, newsletters, and weekly tips statewide. The one-day seminars focused on accessibility in the built environment and in technology, as well as some of the legal drivers to create accessible points of contact between workforce system partners and job seekers in Oklahoma. These academies are critical training components to help staff close the gaps in workforce utilization, income, and poverty among people with disabilities. To best prepare job seekers to gain employment, workforce system staff must be aware of the benefits and requirements for ensuring accessible workforce services and environments. The academies help workforce system staff focus on the requirements for better employer engagement and promoting physical and programmatic accessibility to employment and training services for individuals with disabilities.

The Access for All webinar series will bring focus on accessibility, legal, policy, and technology as they relate to job seekers with disabilities. Topics will include: An Overview of the Access for All Initiative in Oklahoma; Technology Accessibility 101: An Introduction to Accessibility in the Web; Accessibility Basics in Microsoft Word 2010; Basic Technology Accessibility Testing; An Overview of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act; and Workforce Center Structural Accessibility Toolkit Update. (Page 280-281)

Oklahoma’s Workforce System recognizes opportunities to reach Oklahoma’s businesses and employers with a powerful message of Access for All. Through relationships old and new, DSU and OKABT will lead the workforce partners in working to arrange and deliver training to businesses and employers that will reduce their hesitation to hire job seekers with disabilities and to identify ways to educate about the benefits of directly recruiting and hiring job seekers with disabilities. The creation of fact sheets and other concise deliverables will help businesses and employers to understand not only their obligations, but also the importance of hiring and promoting job seekers with disabilities.

DSU utilizes its ADA Coordinator as a resource to provide consultation, technical assistance, and site reviews to identify accessibility issues to all workforce system partners and other agencies, entities, and businesses and employers. (Page 282)

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), through the Oklahoma Works centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities. (Page 289)

School to Work Transition

No specific disability related information found.

Data Collection

Reporting Processes:

The workforce system partners are utilizing the Oklahoma Works, Key Objective: Data, to integrate and use workforce and economic development data to inform policy, track progress, and measure success. Under this objective, Workforce Partners have identified the “Common Connectivity” strategy in the form of a common intake portal as a priority for the state. Oklahoma is seeking the USDOL Reemployment and System Integration Dislocated Worker grant to secure the necessary resources to design and implement a common intake system in Oklahoma. If received, the State will be able to make more progress toward a coordinated system. Oklahoma is also continuing to leverage data infrastructure, such as that developed through the Workforce Data Quality Initiative and State Longitudinal Data Initiative grant, to continue to implement coordinated data collection and reporting. (Page 117)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

Private and public sector representatives also serve on Governor’s Council committees charged with developing and recommending initiatives to enhance and implement Oklahoma’s workforce and economic development strategy. Those committees are: Workforce System Oversight Committee, Youth Program Committee, Career Pathways Committee, and Healthcare Workforce Committee. Recommendations are taken to the full Council for action.

The Governor’s Council is staffed by the Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD). OOWD also staffs the Workforce System Oversight Committee, the Career Pathways Committee, and the Youth Programs Committee. The Department of Health staffs the Healthcare Workforce Committee. (Page 122)

  • Create a plan for Career Pathways efforts to be based on industry sectors within Oklahoma’s state and regional ecosystems.
  • Establish strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.
  • Create and use Career Pathways approaches to increase the proportion of low-skill learners who ultimately earn a degree or certificate.
  • Increase high school graduation rates - decrease high school dropout rates.
  • Increase the percentage of Oklahoma workers with a recognized postsecondary credential. (A credential consisting of an industry-recognized certificate or certification, a certificate of completion of an apprenticeship, a license recognized by the State or Federal government, or an associate or baccalaureate degree.
  • Reinforce the alignment with Registered Apprenticeship for earn-and-learn opportunities.
  • Use performance data to demonstrate progress and impact, thereby supporting partner buy-in and reinforcing continued engagement over time.
  • Make Career Pathways part of the Board certification process.
  • Introduce employers and educators to the value of partnering by describing best practices and success stories.
  • Develop or research pilots and models. (Page 124)

Outreach and communication will be essential components of developing and implementing the State’s RA strategy and partner/industry engagement activities. The inclusion of subject matter experts such as the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, the Oklahoma Manufacturing Alliance, the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology and other established Oklahoma Works partners during the strategic planning phase of the grant will help the State build upon existing strategies to expand and diversify Registered Apprenticeship (RA) as a viable workforce development strategy in Oklahoma, and to reach grant milestones and expand apprenticeships to additional businesses and industries, and additional, underserved populations. Oklahoma will have a strong focus on creating RA opportunities for individuals displaced due to the decline of the State’s Oil and Gas Industries, and increasing RA opportunities for special populations such as women, out-of-school youth, minorities, individuals with disabilities, veterans and others. Career pathways for the health care industry will also be a focus as Oklahoma expands Registered Apprenticeship opportunities in the State. There are currently no known apprenticeships in the health care industry. (Page 178)

10. Whether your organization’s activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways;

11. Whether your organization’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;

12. Whether your organization maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with question 4 above) and to monitor program performance; and

13. Whether the local areas in which your organization is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs. (Page 214)

Employment Networks

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Ticket to Work Program 

Coordinated activities under Ticket to Work are delivered by a statewide Ticket to Work Coordinator. The coordinator will organize activities within the DSU and with partnership employment networks (EN’s) to ensure the needs of ticket holders are met at a maximum level. Ongoing outreach efforts will be conducted to recruit new partnership employment networks in order to provide more opportunities to assist ticket holders in reaching Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level employment outcomes. The coordinator will continue to oversee the ticket to work hotline and will provide ticket holders with information and referral for state VR, partnership EN’s, and external EN’s. (Page 274)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 24

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

“This event will include numerous breakout sessions, featuring experts in employment, technology and best practices in services and support. Professionals will offer their experience, knowledge and success in providing individualized employment services to support individuals to choose, get and keep employment. Through the support of conference sponsors, the Oklahoma Department for Rehabilitation Services, Developmental Disabilities Services Division and the University of Oklahoma/NCDET Department, attendees will have the opportunity to:

Receive answers to difficult and challenging questions Build potential partnerships and relationships Consider new ideas and employment strategies Gain tips to obtain and maintain employment Celebrate this year’s award winners!”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

“Add Us In” Grant to University of Oklahoma - 09/23/2013

“The goal of the Add Us In initiative is to identify and develop strategies to increase the capacity of small businesses, including those in underrepresented and historically excluded communities, to employ youth and young adults with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R03.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma’s Transition Education Handbook - 08/01/2011

“Oklahoma’s special education policies and procedures ensure that all students with an IEP have access to a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepares students with IEPs for employment, further education, and independent living. Desired employment, further education, and independent living outcomes become the postsecondary goals that drive the transition planning process and the secondary IEP.

The transition planning process provides opportunities for the young adult with disabilities to ponder and identify post-school goals. Transition planning provides educators the opportunity to structure the IEP transition components to facilitate attainment of students’ post-school goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Plan - 08/03/2006

“The Plan includes information about recent developments made by the state of Oklahoma. These developments include legislation to improve certain aspects of service delivery and policies. The developments demonstrate progress in establishing the infrastructure needed to achieve the goals set forth by the Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Planning Committee. These developments were achieved through the collaboration and coordination of the Committee members. They reflect a strong commitment to enable people with disabilities to live, work and play in their home communities instead of living restricted lives in institutional settings. The Plan also contains a section on cross-systems recommendations. This section addresses changes that will impact services in all systems. Disabilities can happen to anyone at any time, so every system has a role in serving people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities - 05/27/1957

“The Governor's Committee was established as an agency of state government with the passing of House Bill 996 on May 27, 1957, by the 26th Oklahoma Legislature. It made provisions for the Governor to appoint 75 citizens to serve on the Committee without compensation for terms of two, four and six years. All areas of the state are served by appointees who represent a multitude of backgrounds from both the profit and non-profit sectors, labor, business, industry, medicine, law, education, religion, veteran affairs, rehabilitation, civic affairs and the media. The expertise and concern of each of these respective members converge to serve the Committee's common purpose: to promote the rehabilitation and employment of workers with disabilities in the State of Oklahoma.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Oklahoma’s Transition Education Handbook - 08/01/2011

“Oklahoma’s special education policies and procedures ensure that all students with an IEP have access to a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepares students with IEPs for employment, further education, and independent living. Desired employment, further education, and independent living outcomes become the postsecondary goals that drive the transition planning process and the secondary IEP.

The transition planning process provides opportunities for the young adult with disabilities to ponder and identify post-school goals. Transition planning provides educators the opportunity to structure the IEP transition components to facilitate attainment of students’ post-school goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Plan - 08/03/2006

“The Plan includes information about recent developments made by the state of Oklahoma. These developments include legislation to improve certain aspects of service delivery and policies. The developments demonstrate progress in establishing the infrastructure needed to achieve the goals set forth by the Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Planning Committee. These developments were achieved through the collaboration and coordination of the Committee members. They reflect a strong commitment to enable people with disabilities to live, work and play in their home communities instead of living restricted lives in institutional settings. The Plan also contains a section on cross-systems recommendations. This section addresses changes that will impact services in all systems. Disabilities can happen to anyone at any time, so every system has a role in serving people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT)

The Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT) model has been in existence nationally for nearly 30 years and is an effective, evidenced-based, outreach-oriented, service delivery model using a 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week approach to community-based mental health services. PACT delivers comprehensive treatment and rehabilitation services to consumers in their homes, at work and in community settings.  The program reaches clients that traditional services can’t seem to engage. A major goal of PACT is to reduce the need for inpatient care by providing assistance with basic needs, increasing medication adherence, keeping families together, and securing competitive employment.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) recognizes PACT as the leading treatment model of choice for people with severe mental illness. Over 40 states across the country have adopted the PACT model. NAMI represents the driving force behind Oklahoma’s PACT initiative and continues to pursue additional funding, along with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) and other mental health advocates, to expand PACT program capacity in Oklahoma.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Optional Program for Hiring Applicants with Disabilities

“G. Subsections A through E of this section shall not apply to persons with severe disabilities who are considered for employment under the provisions of this subsection. Provided, said persons may elect instead to be considered for employment according to the procedures set out in subsections A through E of this section. 1. As used in this subsection "persons with severe disabilities" means persons certified as having disabilities according to standards and procedures established by the Administrator. Said standards and procedures shall be developed by the Administrator of the Office of Personnel Management with the assistance of the Office of Handicapped Concerns, and the Department of Rehabilitation Services. 2. Agencies of this state may employ persons with severe disabilities who are legal residents of the state in competitive and noncompetitive jobs. Except for the requirement of minimum qualifications specified in applicable job specifications, such persons with disabilities shall be exempt from entrance examinations and hiring procedures administered by the Office of Personnel Management pursuant to this section and Section 840-4.13 of this title.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

OK Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Oklahoma Community Integrated Employment (CIE)

“Community Integrated Employment (CIE) is a service program that provides placement, job training and short-term or long-term supports to assist service recipients in achieving and maintaining employment within the community.  Services are delivered in integrated settings in the community be contracted providers.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Oklahoma’s Milestone Payment System

“ESS' Oklahoma Milestone Payment System received awards from the Ford Foundation and the Harvard School of Business, as well as other government groups, for cutting government spending, improving service delivery and increasing consumer satisfaction by linking payment for contract services to a series of checkpoints, or milestones, on the way to specific goals or outcomes, such as employment.”

The Milestone payment system integrates Total Quality Management concepts with payment mechanisms. Total Quality Management (TQM) is defined as “…a continuous improvement process which involves participatory management and makes use of teamwork.”1 TQM concepts are at the heart of the Reinventing Government and National Performance Review advocated by Vice President Gore. TQM is customer-driven, involving employees at all levels and using a team approach to eliminate waste and continuously improve quality.2  The fundamental problem that Womack et. al., identified for business systems is identical for government-funded programs. They state that the “…problems are inherent in the system’s incentive structure and logic.”3 The Milestone system rethinks the logic and incentive structure of the process for purchasing vocational services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

OK Developmental Disabilities Services Employment Policy 317:40-7-1

The policy states that, “The optimum goal [for employment services] is full-time employment at prevailing wage in business or industry at an occupation of the service recipient's choice with natural supports.…. There may be instances resulting from a variety of factors when people served have not achieved the goal of full employment.  The provider agency makes available those supports needed for the service recipient to achieve full employment.” It also provides a list of preferred options when full-time employment is not possible for circumstantial reasons.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment at the University of Oklahoma

“The Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment facilitates successful secondary and postsecondary educational, vocational and personal outcomes for students and adults with disabilities. ZC faculty, staff, and students do this through self-determination oriented evaluation, research, development, transition education instruction, and dissemination of best educational and support practices. The ZC also prepares undergraduate and graduate students to assume leadership roles in schools, universities, and support organizations.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

“Add Us In” Grant to University of Oklahoma - 09/23/2013

“The goal of the Add Us In initiative is to identify and develop strategies to increase the capacity of small businesses, including those in underrepresented and historically excluded communities, to employ youth and young adults with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

“This event will include numerous breakout sessions, featuring experts in employment, technology and best practices in services and support. Professionals will offer their experience, knowledge and success in providing individualized employment services to support individuals to choose, get and keep employment. Through the support of conference sponsors, the Oklahoma Department for Rehabilitation Services, Developmental Disabilities Services Division and the University of Oklahoma/NCDET Department, attendees will have the opportunity to:

Receive answers to difficult and challenging questions Build potential partnerships and relationships Consider new ideas and employment strategies Gain tips to obtain and maintain employment Celebrate this year’s award winners!”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

National Center for Disability Education and Training DRS Training

The National Center for Disability Education and Training (NCDET) designs and delivers cutting-edge training to staff of employment providers in a variety of competency-based courses leading to certification. The methods of training range from classroom to accessible multimedia products marketed across the United States.

Please click on the link below for more information about trainings offered through our contract with the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services. NCDET has delivered training under this  contract since 1987 and has prepared thousands of Employment Training Specialists to provide employment supports to individuals with significant disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

This program has several functions. It “develops new  employment services,  provides technical assistance, and training to contracted agencies and DRS staff statewide.    ESS  administers the supported employment program, which is a specialized type of job placement for people with the most significant  barriers to employment. Supported Employment provides  intensive, specialized onsite  training and long term supports  to assist individuals to find employment, learn their job tasks, and maintain successful employment.   Employment and Retention  is an  employment program  for individuals with significant barriers to employment.  This program is designed to provide individuals with short term on and off site training and supports to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment.   Job Placement is an employment program   intended to assist  individuals   requiring  minimal support  in finding full-time employment.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R03.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Living Choice/Money Follows the Person

“The Living Choice Project is Oklahoma’s brand name for the Money Follows the Person grant, and is administered by the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA). Oklahoma’s Living Choice Project is designed to transform the current long-term care system by promoting community based services instead of institutional services.

The Living Choice project serves three populations, the physically disabled (19-64), older persons (65 and older), and intellectually disabled. Individuals in any of these three populations are eligible for transition if they have resided in a qualified institution (i.e. nursing facility, intermediate care facility for persons with intellectual disabilities) for at least ninety days prior to their proposed transition date, and have had one day of their institutional stay paid by Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma HCBS Transition Plan

The purpose of this Transition Plan is to ensure the individuals receiving Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) are integrated in and have access to supports in the community, including opportunities to seek employment, work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources.  The State has prepared a revised transition plan in order to comply with federal regulations for community-based settings. Overall, the Transition Plan provides assurance that the individuals receiving HCBS have the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS. This updated Transition Plan outlines the proposed process that Oklahoma will be utilizing to ensure implementation of the new HCBS requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX State Plan  The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of any state’s Medicaid program.  As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act (the Act) the State Plan is developed by the state and approved by DHHS/CMS. Without a State Plan, OHCA would not be eligible for federal funding for providing SoonerCare services.  Essentially, the State Plan is our state’s agreement that it will conform to the requirements of the Act and the official issuances of DHHS/CMS.  The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act.
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

OK Developmental Disabilities Service Division Home and Community-Based Services Waiver

“Developmental Disabilities Service Division, a division of OKDHS, serves individuals who are 3 years of age and older who have mental retardation and certain persons with related conditions who would otherwise require placement in an intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

With the motto "Labor Conquers All Things," it's clear that Oklahoma values the contributions of all workers, including workers with disabilities, and has plenty to offer when it comes to career development.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oklahoma’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.85%
Change from
2014 to 2015
3,911,338
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.29%
Change from
2014 to 2015
320,480
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.99%
Change from
2014 to 2015
111,672
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-4.53%
Change from
2014 to 2015
34.85%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.71%
Change from
2014 to 2015
76.13%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 3,911,338
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 320,480
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 111,672
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,517,596
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.85%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.13%
Overall unemployment rate. 4.40%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.10%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 292,432
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 304,652
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 450,062
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 42,915
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 28,179
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 48,707
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 5,173
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 340
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 41,977
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 7,910

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,159
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 127,565

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 8,966
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 23,560
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 42,357
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.20%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 59
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 305
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 789
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 7,102
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 1,100
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 447
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 0.41%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 11.43

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,643
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 406
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 470
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,307
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,268
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 577
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 615
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,332
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 192,581
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $20,081,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $10,637,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,911,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 60.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 1,189
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,320
Number of people served in facility based non-work. N/A
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 64.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 65.89%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.53%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.31%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 97.72%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 26.53%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 65.55%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 85.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 39.02%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 693,919
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 736
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 45,014
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 459,485
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 504,499
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 43
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 387
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 430
AbilityOne wages (products). $401,419
AbilityOne wages (services). $4,994,972

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 51
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 7
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 60
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,116
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 243
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,359

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentor Program (EFSLMP)

DSU Programs Field Representatives serve on the Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council. DSU Employment Support Services (ESS) staff and State level Transition Staff participate on the Employment First Alliance, which has a national goal of increased competitive integrated employment by 50% in the states. As a result of the Employment First Alliance, the Oklahoma Legislature passed the Employment First Law which became effective November 1, 2015. (Page 246)

The DSU serves eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities and barriers to employment first. When all priority groups are open and it is determined there is a need to implement Order of Selection, the first group to close is priority group 3, then priority group 2, and last priority group 1. If all three groups are closed, the first one to open is priority group 1, then priority group 2, and last priority group 3. (Page 271)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Customized Employment

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program. The DSU is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 233)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Factors that impeded the achievement of meeting goals and priorities include;

  • Lack of DSU contracted CRPs in rural areas of the state
  • Lack of options for DSU employment contracts to meet the needs of all individuals with significant barriers to employment (i.e. Customized Employment; Intensive SE Services)
  • Lack of joint contracted DSU/DDS CRPs (Page 292)
Braiding/Blending Resources

Oklahoma is encouraging the braiding of funding and leveraging of resources through the state’s new resource leveraging tool to be released in the fall of 2016. In this online tool, state agencies, including the core partners, can identify existing workforce development activities and send requests to partner. These requests are then supported and facilitated with the assistance of the Office of the Governor, if needed. Similarly, with the release of this tool, the Office of the Governor, under Oklahoma Works, in July of 2016, challenged each state agency and each Workforce Development Board, to identify one new partner (private or public) to engage. (Page 70)

Section 188/Section 188 Guide

Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. Describe the State’s one-stop center certification policy, particularly the accessibility criteria.

Oklahoma is focused on accessibility for all job seekers and businesses and employer’s work sites throughout all levels of Oklahoma Works. Working with the Governor’s Council for Workforce and Economic Development (GCWED), system partners bring sharper focus on developing and employing more Oklahoman’s with disabilities. (Page 146)

OESC complies with Section 188 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA) [29 CFR 38]; there are trained bi-lingual staff located in the Workforce Centers and Unemployment Insurance Service Centers for on-site language interpreting for English language learners customers, as well as, Telephone Language Interpretive Services and Document Translation Services. The local one-stop center, based on funding availability, may provide access to Google Translate for individuals who are English-language learners and for whom translators may not be available. Additionally, the one-stop center will partner with local Adult Learning Centers to provide literacy services to LEP clients. (Page 150-151)

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Other State Programs/Pilots that Support Competitive Integrated Employment

Top occupations in the Transportation & Distribution Ecosystem include: Wholesale and Manufacturing Sales Representatives, except technical and scientific products; Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers; Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers; General and Operations Managers; Aircraft Mechanics and Service Technicians; Industrial Machinery Mechanics; Customer Service Representatives; Wholesale and Manufacturing Sales Representatives for Technical and Scientific Products; Bookkeeping, Accounting and Auditing Clerks; Light Truck or Delivery Service Drivers; Commercial Pilots; Sales Managers; Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists; Accountants and Auditors. (Page 25)

DSU maintains an MOA with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) describing collaboration on delivery of Supported Employment services and transitional employment services.

The DSU has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five-community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness. (Page 241)

Joint budget requests that pertain to the prevention, early intervention, treatment and support for those with MEB disorders.

As a result of the second MOA, the DSU initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness. (Page 249)

Mental Health CRPs have the option of providing Supported Employment. DSU, the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services are collaboratively seeking strategies for improving services and enhancing service capacity for individuals with serious mental illness.

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of community mental health CRPs contracting to provide employment services in an effort to improve the employment outcomes of individuals with serious mental illness. The DSU has initiated a pilot project with ODMHSAS and five community mental health centers to provide individualized career planning and employment to individuals between the ages of 16-25 with serious mental illness.

DSU will provide outreach to increase the number of Rural Employment CRPs in order to increase services and better meet the employment needs of individuals with disabilities in the rural areas of the state.

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program. The DSU is developing an expansion plan to fund the additional services required under the Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). (Page 272)

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

The DSU data reporting system indicated a problem with the Tulsa office not being strategically located in a good geographical area that assures services to individuals with disabilities. The application to eligibility and eligibility to planning rates are significantly lower. Due to budget constraints, the DSU is unable to relocate. A pilot project in this area is currently under way to implement a referral module through the case management system. This module will allow counselors time initially to work with jobseekers to assure individual plans reach successful employment outcomes. (Page 291)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

Benefits

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), the Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD), and the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education (ODCTE) through the Oklahoma Works centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities.

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services, Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding.

OESC, OOWD, and ODCTE work to develop and support increased employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities (utilizing appropriate state and federal funding streams). Oklahoma Works Center staff routinely refer individuals with disabilities to the OKDRS for more intensive training and job placement opportunities. OKDRS has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Oklahoma Works Centers and OKDRS offices.

Oklahoma Works Center staff and OKDRS Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. Specifically, when referred by center staff, an OKDRS Benefits Planner will explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. OKDRS Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives. (Page10)

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), through the Oklahoma Works Centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities.

These partners include education/training institutions; employers; healthcare, mental health, and childcare facilities; faith-based organizations; community-based non-profits; legal assistance providers; and other state and federal agencies, such as the Department of Rehabilitation Services (OKDRS), Veterans Administration, Department of Human Services, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Department of Corrections. Many of these linkages are formal and codified in memorandums of understanding. (147)

Workforce Center staff and OKDRS Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. Specifically, when referred by center staff, an OKDRS Benefits Planner will explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. OKDRS Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives. ( Page 147- 148)

Oklahoma’s Workforce System recognizes opportunities to reach Oklahoma’s businesses and employers with a powerful message of Access for All. Through relationships old and new, OKDRS and OKABT will lead the workforce partners in working to arrange and deliver training to businesses and employers that will reduce their hesitation to hire job seekers with disabilities and to identify ways to educate about the benefits of directly recruiting and hiring job seekers with disabilities. The creation of fact sheets and other concise deliverables will help businesses and employers to understand not only their obligations, but also the importance of hiring and promoting job seekers with disabilities.  (Page 149)

OKDRS utilizes its ADA Coordinator as a resource to provide consultation, technical assistance, and site reviews to identify accessibility issues to all workforce system partners and other agencies, entities, and businesses and employers. The OKDRS ADA Coordinator provides training in various aspects of the Americans with Disability Act and the 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design to staff and supervisors of these entities as well. These services are available in order to advance the promotion of equal access for individuals with disabilities in programs, services, and buildings statewide. (Page 11)

  • DSU moving towards highlighting benefits package on position announcement (DVR/DVS)
  • Increase academic development of staff (DVR/DVS)
    • Staff participate in out-of-state training centers and consumer organizations conventions and meetings (DVS)
    • Provide educational sponsorship for employees (DVR/DVS)
  • Competitive Salaries
    • Career progression and market salary adjustments
  • Supervisors and Counselors striving toward the same goal (DVR) (Page 266)

Social Security Administration Certified Benefits Planners 

DSU has three certified Social Security Administration (SSA) Work Incentive Counselors working and co-located within Workforce Centers and another three rotating between the remainder of the Workforce Centers and DSU offices. Workforce Center staff and DSU Benefits Planners collaborate to assist job seekers receiving SSA benefits. DSU Benefits Planners explain the importance of working at the highest possible level and above SSA’s Substantial Gainful Activity benchmark. Job seekers are provided general information concerning the impact of work on SSA disability benefits. Upon applying for VR services, these individuals would then also receive detailed reports illustrating the impact of work on other benefits and services the individual may be receiving, such as TANF, SNAP, UI compensation, Veteran’s benefits, etc. DSU Benefits Planners address concerns of individuals with disabilities about the possibility of losing benefits and help them understand and maximize their work incentives.(Page 274)

The DSU Innovations Unit is coordinating the process of submission of an Intensive Technical Assistance grant with the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The grant has been awarded to the DSU along with ten other VR agencies nationwide, affording access to a very strong network of technical assistance providers under the JDVRTAC umbrella which includes ICI, the University of Washington, the University of Arkansas Currents, Jobs for the Future (JFF), the United States Business Leadership Network (USBLN); the Association of University Centers on Disability (AUCD); and Powers, Pyles, Sutter, and Verville, PC (PPSV). Apart from the intangible benefits this learning opportunity entails, the total services, travel and consultancy gained with this one-year grant adds resources to the agency equivalent to what it would obtain through thousands of dollars in contractual arrangements.

The purpose of JDVRTAC is to identify, adapt, embed, and sustain job-driven practices into vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies. These practices will lead to improved employment outcomes for people with disabilities by developing a knowledge base on the following four topical areas, 1) Labor market information (LMI), 2) Services to employers, 3) Building and maintaining employer relations, and 4) Services to providers of customized and/or employer driven training. (Page 275)

To help build a foundation for the Access for All initiative, the DSU and Oklahoma ABLE Tech (OKABT), partnered to provide regional Access for All academies, webinars, newsletters, and weekly tips statewide. The one-day seminars focused on accessibility in the built environment and in technology, as well as some of the legal drivers to create accessible points of contact between workforce system partners and job seekers in Oklahoma. These academies are critical training components to help staff close the gaps in workforce utilization, income, and poverty among people with disabilities. To best prepare job seekers to gain employment, workforce system staff must be aware of the benefits and requirements for ensuring accessible workforce services and environments. The academies help workforce system staff focus on the requirements for better employer engagement and promoting physical and programmatic accessibility to employment and training services for individuals with disabilities.

The Access for All webinar series will bring focus on accessibility, legal, policy, and technology as they relate to job seekers with disabilities. Topics will include: An Overview of the Access for All Initiative in Oklahoma; Technology Accessibility 101: An Introduction to Accessibility in the Web; Accessibility Basics in Microsoft Word 2010; Basic Technology Accessibility Testing; An Overview of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act; and Workforce Center Structural Accessibility Toolkit Update. (Page 280-281)

Oklahoma’s Workforce System recognizes opportunities to reach Oklahoma’s businesses and employers with a powerful message of Access for All. Through relationships old and new, DSU and OKABT will lead the workforce partners in working to arrange and deliver training to businesses and employers that will reduce their hesitation to hire job seekers with disabilities and to identify ways to educate about the benefits of directly recruiting and hiring job seekers with disabilities. The creation of fact sheets and other concise deliverables will help businesses and employers to understand not only their obligations, but also the importance of hiring and promoting job seekers with disabilities.

DSU utilizes its ADA Coordinator as a resource to provide consultation, technical assistance, and site reviews to identify accessibility issues to all workforce system partners and other agencies, entities, and businesses and employers. (Page 282)

The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC), through the Oklahoma Works centers, strive to expand capacity, enhance partnerships, and improve service delivery to improve training and employment opportunities and outcomes for youth and adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. Staff work daily with a variety of partners locally and across the state that provide services to individuals with disabilities and the general population either directly at the Oklahoma Works centers or through referrals to partner facilities. (Page 289)

School to Work Transition

No specific disability related information found.

Data Collection

Reporting Processes:

The workforce system partners are utilizing the Oklahoma Works, Key Objective: Data, to integrate and use workforce and economic development data to inform policy, track progress, and measure success. Under this objective, Workforce Partners have identified the “Common Connectivity” strategy in the form of a common intake portal as a priority for the state. Oklahoma is seeking the USDOL Reemployment and System Integration Dislocated Worker grant to secure the necessary resources to design and implement a common intake system in Oklahoma. If received, the State will be able to make more progress toward a coordinated system. Oklahoma is also continuing to leverage data infrastructure, such as that developed through the Workforce Data Quality Initiative and State Longitudinal Data Initiative grant, to continue to implement coordinated data collection and reporting. (Page 117)

Small business/Entrepreneurship

No specific disability related information found.

Career Pathways

Private and public sector representatives also serve on Governor’s Council committees charged with developing and recommending initiatives to enhance and implement Oklahoma’s workforce and economic development strategy. Those committees are: Workforce System Oversight Committee, Youth Program Committee, Career Pathways Committee, and Healthcare Workforce Committee. Recommendations are taken to the full Council for action.

The Governor’s Council is staffed by the Oklahoma Office of Workforce Development (OOWD). OOWD also staffs the Workforce System Oversight Committee, the Career Pathways Committee, and the Youth Programs Committee. The Department of Health staffs the Healthcare Workforce Committee. (Page 122)

  • Create a plan for Career Pathways efforts to be based on industry sectors within Oklahoma’s state and regional ecosystems.
  • Establish strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low-skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities) with workforce development activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment.
  • Create and use Career Pathways approaches to increase the proportion of low-skill learners who ultimately earn a degree or certificate.
  • Increase high school graduation rates - decrease high school dropout rates.
  • Increase the percentage of Oklahoma workers with a recognized postsecondary credential. (A credential consisting of an industry-recognized certificate or certification, a certificate of completion of an apprenticeship, a license recognized by the State or Federal government, or an associate or baccalaureate degree.
  • Reinforce the alignment with Registered Apprenticeship for earn-and-learn opportunities.
  • Use performance data to demonstrate progress and impact, thereby supporting partner buy-in and reinforcing continued engagement over time.
  • Make Career Pathways part of the Board certification process.
  • Introduce employers and educators to the value of partnering by describing best practices and success stories.
  • Develop or research pilots and models. (Page 124)

Outreach and communication will be essential components of developing and implementing the State’s RA strategy and partner/industry engagement activities. The inclusion of subject matter experts such as the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, the Oklahoma Manufacturing Alliance, the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology and other established Oklahoma Works partners during the strategic planning phase of the grant will help the State build upon existing strategies to expand and diversify Registered Apprenticeship (RA) as a viable workforce development strategy in Oklahoma, and to reach grant milestones and expand apprenticeships to additional businesses and industries, and additional, underserved populations. Oklahoma will have a strong focus on creating RA opportunities for individuals displaced due to the decline of the State’s Oil and Gas Industries, and increasing RA opportunities for special populations such as women, out-of-school youth, minorities, individuals with disabilities, veterans and others. Career pathways for the health care industry will also be a focus as Oklahoma expands Registered Apprenticeship opportunities in the State. There are currently no known apprenticeships in the health care industry. (Page 178)

10. Whether your organization’s activities coordinate with other available education, training, and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce investment boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries, for the development of career pathways;

11. Whether your organization’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;

12. Whether your organization maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with question 4 above) and to monitor program performance; and

13. Whether the local areas in which your organization is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs. (Page 214)

Employment Networks

In an effort to increase services, DSU is initiating a customized employment program in FY 2017. The DSU has also developed a pilot project with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) to provide a more intensive supported employment program for youth with serious mental illness. DSU has MOAs with ODMHSAS and Developmental Disability Services (DDS) of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to assist with the expansion of supported employment services and funding for extended services. DSU is pursuing technical assistance and training from the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s (ODEP) Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program in an effort to develop braided funding resources for expanded services. In addition, DSU assists youth with the most significant disabilities to access SSA work incentives, employment networks, natural supports and private pay options for extended services. (Page 273)

Ticket to Work Program 

Coordinated activities under Ticket to Work are delivered by a statewide Ticket to Work Coordinator. The coordinator will organize activities within the DSU and with partnership employment networks (EN’s) to ensure the needs of ticket holders are met at a maximum level. Ongoing outreach efforts will be conducted to recruit new partnership employment networks in order to provide more opportunities to assist ticket holders in reaching Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level employment outcomes. The coordinator will continue to oversee the ticket to work hotline and will provide ticket holders with information and referral for state VR, partnership EN’s, and external EN’s. (Page 274)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 24

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

“This event will include numerous breakout sessions, featuring experts in employment, technology and best practices in services and support. Professionals will offer their experience, knowledge and success in providing individualized employment services to support individuals to choose, get and keep employment. Through the support of conference sponsors, the Oklahoma Department for Rehabilitation Services, Developmental Disabilities Services Division and the University of Oklahoma/NCDET Department, attendees will have the opportunity to:

Receive answers to difficult and challenging questions Build potential partnerships and relationships Consider new ideas and employment strategies Gain tips to obtain and maintain employment Celebrate this year’s award winners!”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

“Add Us In” Grant to University of Oklahoma - 09/23/2013

“The goal of the Add Us In initiative is to identify and develop strategies to increase the capacity of small businesses, including those in underrepresented and historically excluded communities, to employ youth and young adults with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R03.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma’s Transition Education Handbook - 08/01/2011

“Oklahoma’s special education policies and procedures ensure that all students with an IEP have access to a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepares students with IEPs for employment, further education, and independent living. Desired employment, further education, and independent living outcomes become the postsecondary goals that drive the transition planning process and the secondary IEP.

The transition planning process provides opportunities for the young adult with disabilities to ponder and identify post-school goals. Transition planning provides educators the opportunity to structure the IEP transition components to facilitate attainment of students’ post-school goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Plan - 08/03/2006

“The Plan includes information about recent developments made by the state of Oklahoma. These developments include legislation to improve certain aspects of service delivery and policies. The developments demonstrate progress in establishing the infrastructure needed to achieve the goals set forth by the Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Planning Committee. These developments were achieved through the collaboration and coordination of the Committee members. They reflect a strong commitment to enable people with disabilities to live, work and play in their home communities instead of living restricted lives in institutional settings. The Plan also contains a section on cross-systems recommendations. This section addresses changes that will impact services in all systems. Disabilities can happen to anyone at any time, so every system has a role in serving people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Oklahoma HB 2821: ABLE Legislation - 06/06/2016

An Act relating to public health and safety; enacting the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Act; stating legislative intent; defining terms; creating Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Trust; providing for cotrustees; creating the Achieving a Better Life Experience Program Committee; providing for membership; providing for adoption of rules; imposing duties; authorizing contracts; imposing requirements with respect to rules; providing for contributions to ABLE accounts; imposing restrictions; prohibiting certain direction regarding investments; prescribing procedures with respect to account activity; requiring records and accounting; providing for designation of beneficiaries; authorizing transfers; imposing limitation based upon reasonable expenses; restricting certain uses of account; providing accounts not subject to certain proceedings related to creditors; providing for exemption from Oklahoma income tax; providing for applicability of income tax to nonqualified distributions; providing for income tax treatment of earnings; prohibiting certain obligations with respect to accounts; providing immunity for certain losses; excluding guaranty with regard to accounts; providing for liberal construction; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Oklahoma HB 1969: Employment First Act - 11/01/2015

 “An Act relating to labor; creating the Oklahoma Employment First Act; requiring state agencies to coordinate efforts to ensure certain policies and funding support employment of disabled individuals; authorizing state agencies to adopt rules; defining terms; providing for codification; and providing an effective date.”

LPassed March 3, 2015, Law became effective November 1, 2015 

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities - 05/27/1957

“The Governor's Committee was established as an agency of state government with the passing of House Bill 996 on May 27, 1957, by the 26th Oklahoma Legislature. It made provisions for the Governor to appoint 75 citizens to serve on the Committee without compensation for terms of two, four and six years. All areas of the state are served by appointees who represent a multitude of backgrounds from both the profit and non-profit sectors, labor, business, industry, medicine, law, education, religion, veteran affairs, rehabilitation, civic affairs and the media. The expertise and concern of each of these respective members converge to serve the Committee's common purpose: to promote the rehabilitation and employment of workers with disabilities in the State of Oklahoma.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Oklahoma’s Transition Education Handbook - 08/01/2011

“Oklahoma’s special education policies and procedures ensure that all students with an IEP have access to a free appropriate public education that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet their unique needs and prepares students with IEPs for employment, further education, and independent living. Desired employment, further education, and independent living outcomes become the postsecondary goals that drive the transition planning process and the secondary IEP.

The transition planning process provides opportunities for the young adult with disabilities to ponder and identify post-school goals. Transition planning provides educators the opportunity to structure the IEP transition components to facilitate attainment of students’ post-school goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Plan - 08/03/2006

“The Plan includes information about recent developments made by the state of Oklahoma. These developments include legislation to improve certain aspects of service delivery and policies. The developments demonstrate progress in establishing the infrastructure needed to achieve the goals set forth by the Oklahoma Olmstead Strategic Planning Committee. These developments were achieved through the collaboration and coordination of the Committee members. They reflect a strong commitment to enable people with disabilities to live, work and play in their home communities instead of living restricted lives in institutional settings. The Plan also contains a section on cross-systems recommendations. This section addresses changes that will impact services in all systems. Disabilities can happen to anyone at any time, so every system has a role in serving people with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT)

The Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT) model has been in existence nationally for nearly 30 years and is an effective, evidenced-based, outreach-oriented, service delivery model using a 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week approach to community-based mental health services. PACT delivers comprehensive treatment and rehabilitation services to consumers in their homes, at work and in community settings.  The program reaches clients that traditional services can’t seem to engage. A major goal of PACT is to reduce the need for inpatient care by providing assistance with basic needs, increasing medication adherence, keeping families together, and securing competitive employment.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) recognizes PACT as the leading treatment model of choice for people with severe mental illness. Over 40 states across the country have adopted the PACT model. NAMI represents the driving force behind Oklahoma’s PACT initiative and continues to pursue additional funding, along with the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) and other mental health advocates, to expand PACT program capacity in Oklahoma.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Optional Program for Hiring Applicants with Disabilities

“G. Subsections A through E of this section shall not apply to persons with severe disabilities who are considered for employment under the provisions of this subsection. Provided, said persons may elect instead to be considered for employment according to the procedures set out in subsections A through E of this section. 1. As used in this subsection "persons with severe disabilities" means persons certified as having disabilities according to standards and procedures established by the Administrator. Said standards and procedures shall be developed by the Administrator of the Office of Personnel Management with the assistance of the Office of Handicapped Concerns, and the Department of Rehabilitation Services. 2. Agencies of this state may employ persons with severe disabilities who are legal residents of the state in competitive and noncompetitive jobs. Except for the requirement of minimum qualifications specified in applicable job specifications, such persons with disabilities shall be exempt from entrance examinations and hiring procedures administered by the Office of Personnel Management pursuant to this section and Section 840-4.13 of this title.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

OK Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement

Oklahoma Community Integrated Employment (CIE)

“Community Integrated Employment (CIE) is a service program that provides placement, job training and short-term or long-term supports to assist service recipients in achieving and maintaining employment within the community.  Services are delivered in integrated settings in the community be contracted providers.”
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Oklahoma’s Milestone Payment System

“ESS' Oklahoma Milestone Payment System received awards from the Ford Foundation and the Harvard School of Business, as well as other government groups, for cutting government spending, improving service delivery and increasing consumer satisfaction by linking payment for contract services to a series of checkpoints, or milestones, on the way to specific goals or outcomes, such as employment.”

The Milestone payment system integrates Total Quality Management concepts with payment mechanisms. Total Quality Management (TQM) is defined as “…a continuous improvement process which involves participatory management and makes use of teamwork.”1 TQM concepts are at the heart of the Reinventing Government and National Performance Review advocated by Vice President Gore. TQM is customer-driven, involving employees at all levels and using a team approach to eliminate waste and continuously improve quality.2  The fundamental problem that Womack et. al., identified for business systems is identical for government-funded programs. They state that the “…problems are inherent in the system’s incentive structure and logic.”3 The Milestone system rethinks the logic and incentive structure of the process for purchasing vocational services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

OK Developmental Disabilities Services Employment Policy 317:40-7-1

The policy states that, “The optimum goal [for employment services] is full-time employment at prevailing wage in business or industry at an occupation of the service recipient's choice with natural supports.…. There may be instances resulting from a variety of factors when people served have not achieved the goal of full employment.  The provider agency makes available those supports needed for the service recipient to achieve full employment.” It also provides a list of preferred options when full-time employment is not possible for circumstantial reasons.

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oklahoma Transition: School-to-Work - 03/01/2015

“The Transition: School-to-Work Program helps students with disabilities who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for employment and life after high school.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment at the University of Oklahoma

“The Zarrow Center for Learning Enrichment facilitates successful secondary and postsecondary educational, vocational and personal outcomes for students and adults with disabilities. ZC faculty, staff, and students do this through self-determination oriented evaluation, research, development, transition education instruction, and dissemination of best educational and support practices. The ZC also prepares undergraduate and graduate students to assume leadership roles in schools, universities, and support organizations.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

“Add Us In” Grant to University of Oklahoma - 09/23/2013

“The goal of the Add Us In initiative is to identify and develop strategies to increase the capacity of small businesses, including those in underrepresented and historically excluded communities, to employ youth and young adults with disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Oklahoma APSE 2017 Employment Conference - 06/28/2017

“This event will include numerous breakout sessions, featuring experts in employment, technology and best practices in services and support. Professionals will offer their experience, knowledge and success in providing individualized employment services to support individuals to choose, get and keep employment. Through the support of conference sponsors, the Oklahoma Department for Rehabilitation Services, Developmental Disabilities Services Division and the University of Oklahoma/NCDET Department, attendees will have the opportunity to:

Receive answers to difficult and challenging questions Build potential partnerships and relationships Consider new ideas and employment strategies Gain tips to obtain and maintain employment Celebrate this year’s award winners!”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oklahoma Works Conference 2017 - 04/12/2017

This agenda outlines the schedule and breakout sessions of the annual Oklahoma Works Conference, a conference designed to help build capacity in members of the workforce system. Several breakout sessions on people with disabilities were included.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • WIOA

National Center for Disability Education and Training DRS Training

The National Center for Disability Education and Training (NCDET) designs and delivers cutting-edge training to staff of employment providers in a variety of competency-based courses leading to certification. The methods of training range from classroom to accessible multimedia products marketed across the United States.

Please click on the link below for more information about trainings offered through our contract with the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services. NCDET has delivered training under this  contract since 1987 and has prepared thousands of Employment Training Specialists to provide employment supports to individuals with significant disabilities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitative Services Community Based Employment Services, Employment Support Services Unit

This program has several functions. It “develops new  employment services,  provides technical assistance, and training to contracted agencies and DRS staff statewide.    ESS  administers the supported employment program, which is a specialized type of job placement for people with the most significant  barriers to employment. Supported Employment provides  intensive, specialized onsite  training and long term supports  to assist individuals to find employment, learn their job tasks, and maintain successful employment.   Employment and Retention  is an  employment program  for individuals with significant barriers to employment.  This program is designed to provide individuals with short term on and off site training and supports to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment.   Job Placement is an employment program   intended to assist  individuals   requiring  minimal support  in finding full-time employment.”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

UPCO To Pay $106,000 For Disability Discrimination: Improper Use of Pre-Employment Medical Exam Screened Out Qualified Employee - 05/31/2017

"A Claremore, Okla.-based manufacturer of sucker rods and accessories for the oil and gas industry will pay $106,000 and furnish other relief to settle a disability discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the federal agency announced today.

According to the EEOC's lawsuit, Lydia Summers began working as a temporary receptionist and assisting in the accounting department. After five months, UPCO made Summers a conditional offer of full-time, permanent employment, conditioned on Summers passing a pre-employment medical exam conducted by a third-party vendor. Following the exam, the vendor's physician, who never examined or questioned Summers, refused to approve her for employment with UPCO because of the supposed side effects of her prescription medications. Even after Summers provided UPCO with a letter from her personal physician stating that she was not impaired by her medications, UPCO rescinded its job offer, the EEOC alleged.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

OK In-Home Supports Waiver for Adults (0343.R03.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day, habilitation training specialist services, homemaker, prevocational, respite, supported employment, prescribed drugs, psychological services, assistive technology, specialized medical supplies, audiology, dental, environmental accessibility adaptations and architectural mods, family counseling, family training, nutrition services, OT, PT, physician services (provided by a psychiatrist), psychological services, self-directed good and services, specialized medical supplies and assistive technology, speech therapy, transportation for individuals w/IID ages 18 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Living Choice/Money Follows the Person

“The Living Choice Project is Oklahoma’s brand name for the Money Follows the Person grant, and is administered by the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA). Oklahoma’s Living Choice Project is designed to transform the current long-term care system by promoting community based services instead of institutional services.

The Living Choice project serves three populations, the physically disabled (19-64), older persons (65 and older), and intellectually disabled. Individuals in any of these three populations are eligible for transition if they have resided in a qualified institution (i.e. nursing facility, intermediate care facility for persons with intellectual disabilities) for at least ninety days prior to their proposed transition date, and have had one day of their institutional stay paid by Medicaid.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma HCBS Transition Plan

The purpose of this Transition Plan is to ensure the individuals receiving Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) are integrated in and have access to supports in the community, including opportunities to seek employment, work in competitive integrated settings, engage in community life, and control personal resources.  The State has prepared a revised transition plan in order to comply with federal regulations for community-based settings. Overall, the Transition Plan provides assurance that the individuals receiving HCBS have the same degree of access as individuals not receiving Medicaid HCBS. This updated Transition Plan outlines the proposed process that Oklahoma will be utilizing to ensure implementation of the new HCBS requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oklahoma Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX State Plan  The State Plan is the officially recognized statement describing the nature and scope of any state’s Medicaid program.  As required under Section 1902 of the Social Security Act (the Act) the State Plan is developed by the state and approved by DHHS/CMS. Without a State Plan, OHCA would not be eligible for federal funding for providing SoonerCare services.  Essentially, the State Plan is our state’s agreement that it will conform to the requirements of the Act and the official issuances of DHHS/CMS.  The State Plan includes the many provisions required by the Act.
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

OK Developmental Disabilities Service Division Home and Community-Based Services Waiver

“Developmental Disabilities Service Division, a division of OKDHS, serves individuals who are 3 years of age and older who have mental retardation and certain persons with related conditions who would otherwise require placement in an intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)