Oregon

States - Big Screen

The Beaver State of Oregon believes that "Things Look Different Here" when it comes to creating innovative employment options for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oregon’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2017 to 2018
4,190,713
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.24%
Change from
2017 to 2018
295,114
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
10.77%
Change from
2017 to 2018
122,184
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
8.72%
Change from
2017 to 2018
41.40%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.43%
Change from
2017 to 2018
78.38%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 4,093,465 4,142,776 4,190,713
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 303,115 288,493 295,114
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 118,914 109,027 122,184
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,696,553 1,751,754 1,768,886
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.23% 37.79% 41.40%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.91% 78.04% 78.38%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90% 4.10% 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.80% 20.70% 21.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.20% 12.00% 11.20%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 298,208 289,157 292,709
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 296,968 283,759 288,752
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 523,359 505,721 509,538
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,151 10,873 11,116
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 46,866 39,234 40,709
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,629 9,991 9,205
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 13,981 14,137 13,553
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,678 1,037 770
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,138 24,617 26,131
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 8,240 6,540 11,148

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,806 4,951 4,900
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.10% 6.20% 6.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 108,974 107,703 105,296

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 7,857 11,607 15,659
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 18,564 24,671 30,533
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 20,659 39,390 49,752
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.00% 29.50% 31.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10% 2.40% 3.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.30% 1.70%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,982 2,261 2,445
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 875 1,206 1,270
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 16,874 15,839 15,471
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6,910 3,689 3,819
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2,765 1,637 1,815
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 40.00% 44.00% 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 70.36 40.63 45.05

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,583
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 28 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 719 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,031 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,402 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 874 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 529 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 37.90% 39.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,378 4,072 4,130
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 167,800 168,828 167,485
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 351 737 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 424 686 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $26,199,000 $32,691,000 $40,054,369
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $18,824,000 $15,891,000 $10,847,560
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $20,516,000 $20,322,000 $18,613,806
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $10,816,000 $11,632,000 $13,164,718
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 49.00% 56.00% 57.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,617 3,831 4,228
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,210 2,572 1,785
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,466 3,411 3,207
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 59.40 107.40 109.54

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.37% 73.49% 73.66%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.15% 9.90% 9.84%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.19% 1.20% 1.44%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 83.24% 79.73% 83.94%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.41% 24.56% 22.82%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.52% 60.46% 61.99%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.24% 74.59% 74.20%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.11% 35.90% 39.17%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,723,537
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,680
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 8,299
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 289,705
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 298,004
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 308
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 327
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,095,598
AbilityOne wages (services). $97,396

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 27 15 10
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 29 16 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,339 1,211 675
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,341 1,212 676

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~VR works closely with other State agencies whose populations benefit from VR Supported Employment (SE) Services. VR, the Department of Education, and the Office of Developmental Disability Services work together with the State’s Employment First program to ensure that individuals who experience Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities receive coordinated and sequenced services that meet their employment needs. This multi—agency collaboration operates under the guidance of Executive Order 15—01 and the Lane v. Brown Settlement, actively working to ensure that policies and services are aligned in a way that makes sense for transition age students as well as adults seeking services. VR has a close relationships with OHA Behavioral health programs to ensure that individuals who access VR’s services who are also working with Mental Health Programs across the state get access to quality Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) Services. VR continues our collaboration with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) who oversees the fidelity of the 37 programs that currently offer IPS services throughout the state. VR continues to work with OSECE to expand the availability of these services across the state. In addition to aligning policies and service sequences, VR is working with OHA Behavioral Health and ODDS to ensure that our certification requirements for service providers are in alignment. VR initiated a new Job Placement Services contract in 2015. Now, joint certification and coordinated training makes it easier for providers of Job Placement and Support Services who are funded by VR to continue to provide employment support services to clients when hand—offs occur between agencies. VR currently has more than 200 providers under contract in our new Job Placement Services Contract. In 2017, VR created training for Job Placement Contractors, with OSECE and ODDS participating in development and in presentation of the pilot. A monthly schedule of that training is planned for 2018 in multiple locations where VR wants to increase capacity. VR is establishing a system to identify areas of the state where capacity issues exist. Recruitment of providers in these areas continues to be a priority moving forward. A pilot that would measure the effectiveness of a rural transportation rate change is planned for 2018-2019. VR and ODDS, with the Home Care Commission as the training entity, are increasing job coach capacity through use of Personal Care Attendants. Additionally, VR is working with several community colleges to explore the possibility of a career pathway program that will train future service providers in a curriculum jointly developed with these community colleges. (Page 157) Title IV

VR and Oregon Department of Developmental Disability Services have refocused their work together over the last couple of years to achieve the outcomes set forth in Executive order 13-04, which was updated in Executive Order 15-01. These Executive Orders emphasize with more clarity the State’s Employment First Policy. Additionally, the State of Oregon has recently settled a lawsuit that calls for increased integrated employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. VR, ODDS, and the I/DD service delivery system have a working relationship that shares information, leverages and braids funding, and encourages the joint case management of joint clients. Moving forward VR will continue to work with ODDS and I/DD service delivery system as well as the Department of Education to increase our collaboration to maximize funding, streamline processes, and meet the competitive and integrated employment goals of joint clients.

Over the last year VR, ODE and ODDS have:
• Hired staff specialists who serve individuals with I/DD. These three groups of regional staff meet regularly; co-train other agency staff; and, co-develop tools and strategies to provide services that are consistent and reflect best practices • Have established collaborative training regarding consistency and quality in curricula used for VR, ODDS and ODE staff throughout Oregon; accomplished through: o Agency conferences (VR In-Service, DD Case Management Conference, and ODE Regional Transition Conferences) used mixed groups of staff and cross training techniques to further collaborative training goals o VR, DD, and school transition (ODE) staff training on varied topics, presented regionally to groups consisting of staff from all three agencies o Staff are consistently co-trained by specialists from the three agencies • Ongoing and regularly scheduled meetings lead to collaborative actions by Office of Developmental Disabilities (ODDS), VR and Oregon Department of Education (ODE): o Employment First Steering Committee meetings direct the overall work of the following collaborative meetings. This committee is co-led by VR and ODDS Administrators o Policy and Innovation meetings are co-led by VR staff and DD Staff to facilitate these collaborative actions: • The three agencies review and discuss all new or newly revised policy to assure alignment across agencies • Each agency sends policy transmittals to their regional and community staff when another of them adopts new or newly revised policy o Education and Transition meetings discuss pertinent issues for students who have transition plans including those receiving Pre-Vocational Services; facilitating these collaborative actions: • A jointly held goal of seamless transition for: students with transition plans, students in transition programs, and post high school students • Examination of agency procedures, leading to: development of tools and strategies for use by field staff; and referral to the Policy Work Stream for potential policy revision or development o Training and Technical Assistance meetings address issues of staff and vendor training to facilitate: • Increased numbers of vendors shared across agencies • Increased knowledge and skill (competency) of agency staff and vendors o Quality Assurance is a cross-agency group that evaluates collaborative outcomes providing a means to assess collaborative efforts. (Pages 159-160) Title IV

Feedback on Community Partner Relationships • Communication. Stakeholders felt communication with community partners was lacking. • Primary partnerships. Participants most commonly work with mental health, IDD, education, and aging and disability providers (in addition to WorkSource). • Individual Placement and Support. The Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model used with people with mental illness is cited as a best practice, which has supported effective partnership between vocational rehabilitation and mental health providers. • Employment First. The Employment First initiative has facilitated increased collaboration between vocational rehabilitation, the education system, and IDD providers to support people with IDD in finding employment. • IDD system collaboration challenges. Collaboration with IDD system partners has improved, but stakeholder proposed opportunities to address ongoing challenges, including reconciling Employment First and individual choice, sheltered workshop closures and limited employment pathway options, discovery requirements, and contract differences. Feedback on WorkSource Relationships • The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act has required additional collaboration with the broader Oregon workforce system. Local leadership teams, including vocational rehabilitation, are working on how to connect more people to workforce services throughout the health and human services infrastructure. Vocational rehabilitation is getting additional referrals as a result of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act collaboration. (Page 173) Title IV

The Oregon Department of Education is another central partner in Employment First partnerships. The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act is also creating changes in transition service delivery for students with disabilities through preemployment transition services. A subsequent section discusses the youth transition service system in depth. • Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation works closely with Oregon’s community colleges on transition and service coordination issues. Additionally, community colleges help to train vocational rehabilitation service providers (job developers and coaches). Vocational rehabilitation is also working with community colleges as a part of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act to increase opportunities for people with disabilities to gain skills and credentials. Participant focus group attendees discussed taking classes and participating in clubs and business development centers at local community colleges, and how well their vocational rehabilitation counselors worked with the colleges to support their participation. Feedback on Self-Sufficiency Office • Oregon’s Self-Sufficiency Offices connect individuals to food benefits (Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash benefits, child care assistance, and refugee services. People with disabilities can also access food and nutrition services through their local Seniors and People with Disabilities Program, which is often an Aging and People with Disabilities program. (Page 174) Title IV

Participant survey respondents were asked to indicate which vocational rehabilitation partners they receive services from. Almost half did not work with listed community partners. The most commonly identified partner was WorkSource Oregon, following by community mental health programs, Developmental Disability Services, and Aging and People with Disabilities services. Surveyed vocational rehabilitation staff were asked to select up to three community partners with whom Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation has the strongest relationships as well as three whose relationship needs improvement. The figure below shows responses ordered by perception of partnership strength, highest to lowest. The three partnerships seen as strongest are 1) vocational rehabilitation contracted vendors; 2) developmental disabilities services; and 3) community mental health programs. Staff noted a wide array of partnerships needing improvement, with local businesses and employers, self-sufficiency, employment department, and parole and probation department topping the list. Community partners observed an increasing emphasis by Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation on working as part of a broader team, including individuals with disabilities, families, schools, employers, and other service providers. Stakeholders particularly noted increasing teamwork and associated positive outcomes around youth transition, Employment First, and Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act initiatives. Staff and partner survey respondents were also asked why the vocational needs of people with disabilities were unmet by service providers. (Page 176) Title IV

Transition Network Facilitators (TNF) Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation and the Oregon Department of Education operate a cooperative agreement to blend funding for nine regional transition network facilitators as a part of the settlement of the Lane v. Brown lawsuit and the resulting Governor’s Executive Order (No. 15-01) to improve Oregon’s systems providing employment services for students with disabilities. Transition network facilitators collaborate with vocational rehabilitation and schools as well as local businesses/employers and others to implement Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Employment First goals of improving transition outcomes for youth. Transition network facilitators are working to create an equitable, sustainable, simplified system, aligned across agencies that reduces redundancies. Interviewees spoke of their role as helping to support students, teachers, families and districts by providing support and information about life after school for people with disabilities. Facilitators connect students to IDD, Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation, Social Security, and other services that can help to create a seamless transition from school to adulthood. Facilitators work more at a systems level than on an individual level. However, facilitators spoke about doing more with schools that do not have Youth Transition Program grants or specialists. Five percent (26 of 396) of vocational rehabilitation participant survey respondents have worked with a Transition Network Facilitator. This small percentage makes sense because this is a relatively new role in Oregon, and one that works more with programs than with individual students. (Page 178) Title IV

(1) Establish quarterly review of caseloads to ensure equitable access and outcomes (2) Establish local plans for community outreach when underserved or underrepresented populations are identified (3) Partner with agencies that provide culturally specific service (4) Continue working with Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation programs to ensure access to joint case management and culturally appropriate services (5) Convene cross agency workgroup to address the needs of underserved populations in the workforce system as a whole. An example is the recently expanded DHS Workforce Roundtable that includes VR (Policy, YTP, youth transition. Business outreach), SSP, Home Care Commission, Child Welfare (young adult transition), Employment First, SNAP/TANF (workforce coordinator) and APD. (Page 188) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~Local state agency branch and field office managers from core and mandatory partners will work with their LWBs to ensure that those receiving public assistance, low—income individuals, and those who are basic skills deficient are included in local WIOA plans and that they have a voice in the system. The agencies will work to find a way to market WIOA services to the above categories of individuals to ensure that they are aware of services and that they may use their classification to ensure priority of service. Staff at the WorkSource Oregon centers and Affiliate Sites will be trained to understand that upon discovery that an individual belongs to a priority category that priority of service will be explained to that individual. Basic skills deficient individuals can be identified through Initial Skills Review testing in the WorkSource Oregon centers, through AccuVision (soft skills) testing, and the National Career Readiness Certificate. Basic skills deficient individuals can be identified for priority of service and can be expedited into job search and occupational skills training programs. (Page 53) Title I

The agencies will continue to provide services to individuals with barriers to employment and to locally outreach to them, as funds permit, to ensure that they are aware of services and that they may use their classification to ensure priority of service. Perhaps more importantly, Oregon is continuing to expand coordination between state agencies who already serve individuals with barriers to employment, thus allowing easier identification and access to these populations. Expanded coordination with programs serving disabled (Vocational Rehabilitation), low-income (TANF and SNAP) and ex-inmates (Corrections) are examples. Staff at the WSO centers and affiliate sites will be trained to understand that upon discovery that an individual belongs to a priority category, priority of service will be explained to that individual. (Pages 55-56) Title I

OCB also uses this RFA process for vendors who provide services such as Rehabilitation Teaching, Orientation & Mobility and Assistive Technology training. Prior to permitting direct-unsupervised access with agency participants, including supported employment participants, all vendors/providers of services are required to complete and pass background checks. In requiring both the technical qualification process and the criminal background check of providers, OCB has taken the necessary steps to ensure that when agency participants choose to utilize community providers, they can count on safety and quality services for our clients.

In addition, the OCB is included in the Integrated Work Plan for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. The Oregon Department of Human Services (OHS) along with its many partners and stakeholders, strives to support the choices of individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families within local communities by promoting and providing services that are person-centered and directed, flexible, inclusive and supportive of the discovery and development of each individual's unique gifts, talents and abilities. Oregon is committed to work toward service options that ensure people with I/DD have the opportunity to live lives that are fulfilling and meaningful. (Page 219) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Strengthening the framework for partnering by developing and implementing processes will make it easier for state agencies, local boards and other workforce organizations to work together and better understand each other’s services. This process will help to underline current policies that both help and hinder collaboration and will inform future policy—making decisions to support integration. More effective partnering includes state and local workforce organizations leveraging resources, whether those resources are in the form of data, funds, or staff. As resources become scarcer, partnering will help to stretch them further to impact the outcomes of all participating organizations. Financial, institutional, political and other barriers to effective partnering will be reviewed and revised to minimize their effect on partnerships. (Page 41) Title I

VR knows that given the needs of our clients, a robust employer engagement model is required to be successful. VR continues to use Job Placement contractors to identify individual employment, assessment, and training opportunities for those who require those services to become employed. Additionally, VR strives to expand the base of employers who work with our clients who do not require individualized outreach to employers. By leveraging opportunities with other workforce partners, VR believes that it can increase employment opportunities for Oregonians with disabilities and begin to change perceptions associated with individuals with disabilities in the workforce. Oregon VR has one fulltime business engagement specialists located in the central administration office that supports each of the local branch offices in activates detailed below. VR will: • partner with the local Employment Department Business Teams to coordinate employment services, • partner with the local workforce development boards (LWDB) to coordinate employer engagement activities, • provide information to VR staff regarding apprenticeship programs and processes. • partner with local mental health providers in coordinating employment services • continue to partner with Oregon Commission of the Blind on employment services, • participate and coordinate local employer recruitment events and job fairs, • contract with providers to provide local employer engagement events and activities for individuals with disabilities, • contract with providers to and other providers • provide Job Developer Orientation Training (JDOT) or another VR approved Job Developer training to contracted job placement and partner providers, • establish local MOU’s with federal business contractor. (Page 158) Title I

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~At application, the majority of VR program clients are already receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits as a result of legal blindness. During development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), the OCB explores the client’s vocational goals and income needs, and commensurate with their skills, strengths and previous work experience jointly sets employment goals. For client’s targeting employment with earnings above the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level, the OCB utilizes the Ticket to Work program for cost reimbursement upon 9 months of successful employment at or above SGA level earnings. (Page 22) Title I

3.4 Rethink and restructure training and skill development to include innovative and effective work—based learning and apprenticeship models and to accelerate training.
Effective training often must go beyond classroom training to address all types of learners and provide hands—on experiences. Work—based learning and other innovative strategies that can help individuals understand more clearly what it is like to work in a certain industry or company are important to both improve learning outcomes and to help individuals with career exploration.
Goal 4: Create and develop talent by providing young people with information and experiences that engage their interests, spur further career development, and connect to Oregon employers. (Page 39) Title I

Goal 3 of the OWIB Strategic Plan is about investing in Oregonians to build in—demand skills, match training and job seekers to opportunities, and accelerate career momentum. Strategy 3.4 focuses on rethinking and restructuring training and skill development to include innovative and effective work—based learning and apprenticeship models and to accelerate training. This work will require engagement with the community colleges, and other training providers to build responsive and effective training models.

Effective training often must go beyond classroom training to address all types of learners and provide hands—on experiences. Work—based learning and other innovative strategies that can help individuals understand more clearly what it is like to work in a certain industry or company are important to both improve learning outcomes and to help individuals with career exploration. (Page 61) Title I

Targeting Resources for Occupational Training
Staff will develop and deploy a training program to educate staff in WorkSource Oregon centers and agency central offices about structured work—based learning, which includes registered apprenticeship. The training program will help all workforce partners understand the different training options that employers and individuals can access through the workforce system and each of their defining characteristics. The training will also teach staff how to identify an apprenticeable occupation, the characteristics of a good apprentice, and how to refer both individuals and employers to structured work—based learning training programs, certificates and credentials. The training program will help WorkSource Oregon staff understand the value of registered apprenticeship and structured work based learning, which will enable them to share the information broadly with employers and other service delivery partners. (Pages 64-65) Title I

Effective training often must go beyond classroom training to address all types of learners and provide hands—on experiences. Work—based learning and other innovative strategies that can help individuals understand more clearly what it is like to work in a certain industry or company are important to both improve learning outcomes and to help individuals with career exploration.
Provide Technical Assistance/Incentives to Support Adoption of Work—Based Learning Models
The system will build coalitions and relationships with industry and community partners to create and expand registered apprenticeship programs through two apprenticeship focused positions at OED and the Oregon Department of Education (ODE). OED will partner with local workforce boards to ensure that technical assistance and support for new apprenticeship programs are aligned with industry need and local sector strategies. ODE will partner with secondary and post—secondary institutions and community partners to increase the opportunities for youth to transition from high school into an apprenticeship or a pre—apprenticeship program. (Page 65) Title I

INPUT 2: SRC recognizes the extensive work VR staff have done to expand the Youth Transition Program and improve on the outcome of VR services for youth with disabilities. RECOMMENDATION: SRC would encourage the development of data sharing with the Oregon Department of Education on Indicators 13 and 14. We submit that the data could be helpful for VR counselors who are working with youth with disabilities, 16 years of age and older, in knowing how to help youth in transition better prepare for post-secondary life, (Indicator 13), and how successful youth have become as a result of VR intervention, i.e. was the youth employed in an appropriate career selection developed in the IPE (Indicator 14). (Pages 147-148) Title I

• Instruction on vocational, independent living and social skills. • Career development activities. • Collaboration with the local VR office to arrange for the provision of pre— employment transition services for all students with disabilities, in need of such services, without regard to the type of disability. YTP provides the five required Pre-Employment Transition Services directly to potentially eligible students with disabilities when requested. Depending on the type of request YTP may provide one, multiple or all five of the required Pre-ETS: job exploration counseling; work-based learning experiences; counseling on postsecondary educational opportunities; workplace readiness training; and instruction in self-advocacy. Oregon VR considers these students as “reportable individuals” and reports them in our quarterly 911 report. In the event that there are existing services available within the local educational agency that can meet the students need in the area of Pre-Employment Transition Services YTP may refer students to those existing services. Oregon VR does not consider students that only receive Information and Referral services from YTP as “reportable individuals” and therefore does not report them in our quarterly 911 report. YTP will not reduce the partnering school district’s obligation under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act to provide or pay for any transition services that are also considered special education or related services and that are necessary for ensuring a free appropriate public education. • Exposure and connections to paid employment. (Page 151) Title I

YTP Transition Specialists, TNFs, and school transition staff members partner with local VR offices and VR Counselors to coordinate the development and implementation of individualized education programs. When a student is determined eligible for VR services, he or she works with a school transition specialist and a vocational rehabilitation counselor to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that reflects the interests, strengths, and abilities of the student, and which addresses the barriers to training or employment outcomes for the student. VR is serving all eligible individuals and is not utilizing an Order of Selection waitlist. Should it be necessary for VR to reinstitute an Order of Selection, the scope of VR services and expected employment outcomes for all individuals served by VR, including YTP students, will be modified to comply with VR’s Order of Selection. (Page 155) Title I

A primary effort of VR and OHA Behavioral Health Programs has been development and expansion of evidence-based supported employment services by increasing the number of county mental health organizations providing such services and meeting fidelity standards. VR continues to partner with and utilize the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. As of the end of Program Year 2017, 37 community mental health programs and 35 out of 36 counties are providing IPS. With the inclusion of IPS into Oregon’s OARs, evidence-based supported employment services continue to expand across Oregon.

Additionally, VR supports and collaborates with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance in assisting young people with psychiatric disabilities by assisting them in obtaining or maintaining employment (an evidence-based practice, which is effective in reducing the onset and symptoms of mental illness). In partnership with Portland State University, VR helped create a center for excellence that provides ongoing technical assistance to EASA programs throughout the state.

VR will continue to focus on Mental Health supported employment outcomes, the quality of the outcomes, the skills of employment service providers and the capacity of community rehabilitation programs and providers. Oregon VR has reviewed potential participation with the Supported Education process that is now increasingly being utilized by many IPS providers. There are now 83 Mental Health IPS employment specialist across the State. (Pages160- 161) Title IV

Program staff and community partners were also asked to identify strategies to serve under and unserved populations. Increased staff was the strategy identified by the greatest share of program staff (63 percent), and increased transportation options was identified by the greatest share of community partners (63 percent). More interactions with the community, and providing more job skills development training were identified as strategies to serve unserved populations by more than a majority of both program staff and community partners. Almost half of all staff (48 percent) and 57 percent of community partners felt that staff training to work on specialty caseloads would help serve under and unserved participants. More than half of community partner respondents also cited improving interagency collaboration and public awareness campaign key strategies for serving under or unserved populations. Underserved and Unserved Youth with Disabilities Despite the many strengths of Oregon’s youth transition work, some youth are underserved or fall through the cracks. A quarter (25 percent, or 18) of vocational rehabilitation staff and a third (33 percent, or 31) of vocational rehabilitation community partners felt that people between the ages of 16 to 21 are underserved by vocational rehabilitation services. Interviewees discussed varying reasons for this. Some students don’t choose to participate in transition services while in school, do not have a YTP program available to them, or do not have a disability focused on by their school’s transition services. If those students take a break between school and connecting to vocational rehabilitation services, they have often lost and need to be re-taught the structures, routines and soft skills obtained through school attendance. Sometimes the gap between graduation and vocational rehabilitation participation is not a student’s choice, but rather the result of high vocational rehabilitation caseloads causing backlogs. Stakeholders suggest increased collaboration with programs serving out of school youth to improve outcomes for this population. Additionally, some staff expressed a desire to be involved with students earlier in their school careers, and to have more communication including increased involvement at individualized education program (IEP) meetings. Interviewees and focus group participants discussed limited connection between contracted job developers and students in transition seeking employment. Some stakeholders discussed this as an educator’s or a youth transition program counselor’s responsibility. Participating contractors were looking for guidance in how to formally provide services to this population. (Pages 171- 172) Title IV

Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation is making additional investments in pre-employment transition services through the following partnerships: • Silver Falls Came LEAD (Leadership Empowerment Advocacy Development). Students with disabilities participate in leadership academies, focused on job exploration, work-based learning experiences, postsecondary education counseling, workplace readiness training, and self-advocacy instruction. • AntFarm. Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation partners with AntFarm to provide work experiences in gardening and farming. • Worksystems, Inc. Students receive work experiences in Washington and Multnomah counties with public and private employers. • Motivational Enhancement Group Intervention interviewing. Students gain self-advocacy skills through a collaborative, goal-oriented style of communication. (Page 178) Title IV

2. Increase capacity and resources to provide enhanced levels of service to Oregonians with Disabilities a. Assist the workforce system with increasing its capacity and capability to serve Oregonians with Disabilities i. Convene cross agency workgroup to address the needs of underserved populations in the workforce system as a whole ii. Provide training to workforce partners on working with individuals with disabilities iii. Work with other agencies who work with clients with barriers to employment to address common access issues in the workforce system iv. Work with local workforce boards to ensure that programmatic access issues are identified and addressed b. Restructure the VR service delivery model to comply with state contracting requirements and be outcome driven i. Continue transition to newly structured pay-for-performance Job Placement Services Contract which includes a third track for individuals with the most significantly disabilities. These individuals require addition services that are were not funded appropriately in our traditional supported employment track. ii. Create contracts with clear minimum qualifications, scope of work, and cost structure for all personal services to ensure high quality and consistent services statewide c. Expand the availability of Vendor and Partner services that meet the needs of Oregonians with disabilities, including those requiring supported employment services i. Develop a community college based Career Pathway to develop job placement professionals and job coaches in the community ii. Identify areas of limited service availability, including supported employment services, and develop and implement recruitment and solicitation plans iii. Work with providers of sheltered and subminimum wage employment to transition to the integration of their clients into competitive and integrated employment in their respective communities. 3. Improve the performance of the VR program with respect to the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA. a. Increase staff knowledge of the labor market i. Encourage branch level engagement with regional economists and workforce analysts to educate staff on local labor market issues ii. Work with Local Workforce Development Boards to engage with local sector strategies and pursue high wage, high demand work opportunities. b. Expand opportunities for skill gain and credentialing i. Identify and access local skill upgrading opportunities within the Local Workforce Areas (LWA) ii. Partner with community college Disability Service Offices (DSO) to increase access to existing credentialing programs iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability c. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs i. Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities i. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns ii. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity iii. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon. (Page 182-183) Title IV

Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability 3. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs a. Use labor market information to create work—based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs b. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level c. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. 4. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work—based learning opportunities a. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide b. Implement a progressive employment model c. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams d. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities e. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets f. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers 5. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities a. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns b. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity c. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon The Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Program is an active participant in the implementation of the WIOA. (Pages 189) Title IV

Partner with community college Disability Service Offices (DSO) to increase access to existing credentialing programs iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability c. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs i. Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities. (Pages 194) Title IV

VR’s SE program continues to provide opportunities for individuals of all ages with the most significant disabilities to achieve competitive integrated employment with ongoing support provided by a variety of partners. These same individuals are those for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred. VR provides a continuum of SE services in partnership with other human services agencies and programs that persons with the most significant disabilities need to develop, maintain and advance in competitive employment. VR continues to work closely with other state programs, local governmental units, community—based organizations and groups to develop, refine and expand the availability of SE services throughout Oregon. During FFY 15 VR revamped our pay for performance Job Placement Services Contracts that provides Job Placement, Job Coaching, and Retention services. VR currently has over 200 contracts in place to provide job placement statewide. These contracts give VR the ability to pay for placement services in three tiers based on the significance of the functional limitation that the client experiences. Tiers two and three focus on clients who require SE services in order to be successful in the labor market. In FFY 2017, VR provided SE services to 3,922 individuals with significant disabilities, including persons with psychiatric disabilities, intellectual and/or developmental disabilities or traumatic brain injuries. During this same period, 727 individuals who received SE services entered into competitive integrated employment, and 2,517 individuals continued to participate in their SE IPEs. (Page 196) Title IV

Clients and employer are satisfied with placements. Historically, VR has partnered with OHA Behavioral Health Programs in promoting Individualized Placement and Support (IPS), an evidence—based SE model. Quality of these programs is assessed through compliance with a scale, which measures the ‘fidelity’ or the degree to which a program is being implemented in accordance the evidence based fidelity model developed after extensive research from Dartmouth College. Some of the measures used in the IPS fidelity scales are the kinds of employment outcomes participants are obtaining; the degree of collaboration with vocational rehabilitation; availability of rapid job search and evidence of consumer choice. VR maintains quality SE outcomes through ongoing collaboration with mental health providers on the local level and OHA Mental Health Programs central office staff. Supported employment is integrated into the array of services and programs available to Oregonians with disabilities, including Oregon’s mental health and developmental disability service systems. Success in SE requires a partnership among the responsible state and community programs, other service providers, consumers and families, advocacy organizations, employers and others. Long— term success continues to depend on the availability of funding for follow—along SE services. VR utilizes Title VI, Part B and Title I funds for the time—limited services necessary for an individual to stabilize in a community—based job. Services that may be part of a SE IPE include: • Person centered planning • Community—based assessment • Job development • Job placement • On—site training for worker and/or coworkers • Long—term support development • Other services and goods • Post—employment services The specific type, level and location of ongoing supports provided to an individual are based upon his or her needs and those of the employer. Ongoing support may be provided by a variety of public and/or private sector resources including: • OHA Behavioral Health Programs and community mental health programs • DDS community supports • County developmental disability case managers and developmental disability service brokerages • Social Security work incentives • Employer—provided reasonable accommodations • Natural supports • Family or community sponsorship • By VR, for youth with the most significant disabilities who: need extended support services; are not currently eligible for extended support services from any other known source; are 23 or younger; and, have an annually amended and approved IPE to include VR extended support services; and, for no longer than a total of 4 Yrs. (Page 197) Title IV

There is active information sharing and coordinated planning between OCB and regional programs, OVRS, education and health care organizations throughout the state. Partners join in planning outreach efforts, coordinate referral of potentially eligible youth for VR, and implement process improvements for assessment & training statewide in the areas of daily living skills, orientation and mobility/cane travel, communication skills, technology, vocational aptitudes, interpersonal /social skills, and academic preparation for transition-age youth.
Ages 14 - 21 OCB's application for vocational rehabilitation services generally begins around age 16 (as early as age 14), and requires the development of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for all students within 90 days of eligibility, which matches the timeline for adult services.
In addition, the Oregon Commission for the Blind has an Interagency Agreement with the Oregon Department of Education. (Page 214) Title IV

Oregon Department of Education will assist local education agencies, Oregon School for the Deaf and community colleges in accessing the services provided by OCB, which can be requested to aid in the transition to employment services, serve as a liaison between the parties, Encourage the screening, identifying and referring of potential clients to OCB to provide a continuum of appropriate procedures and services, identify methods to coordinate the IEP with the IPE, provide information related to the availability of public education programs, facilitate the availability of diagnostic and evaluative information to the Commission for the Blind relevant to the determination of eligibility. (Page 215) Title IV

OCB is able to develop relationships with youth who are blind/visually impaired and parents, providing a vocational context within IEP and 504 Planning & Implementation Team discussions and ensuring an important link to identifying the individualized skills needing to be addressed in order for the youth to be prepared for adult life after graduation.
OCB transition counselors provide youth with counseling/services/programs to aid in preparation for transitioning to post-high school/college/employment. Individuals who are blind/low vision who have early exposure to adaptive skills training, vocational exploration and active socialization have a head start to becoming functional, employed and fully integrated adults. The OCB knows not all learning can take place in the classroom, and therefor offers Summer Work Experience Programs (SWEP) to complement the learning that is available through the public education system. These pre-employment transition programs serve to give each participant a safe environment to discover their vocational aptitudes, develop confidence in adaptive skills and encourage self-advocacy and independence. These pre-employment transition programs (offered in the Summer) are a key to the agency's success in quality of employment outcomes for students with vision loss. (Page 216) Title IV

Coordination of professional development under IDEA Agency staff who work with transition-age youth coordinate transition activities throughout Oregon to teachers of the visually impaired and other Special Education personnel. These staff work with regional staff to ensure customers receive services and information necessary to facilitate a smooth transition from high school to adult services. Based on assessments and training provided by OCB, OCB staff provide recommendations and information to regional programs, parents and students about vocational rehabilitation services including availability, referral, and eligibility requirements that support a coordinated transition plan from high school to post-school services.
Consultation is also provided as early as necessary to special education staff regarding IEP planning and development. OCB staff shares data and reports relevant to program development and planning. (Page 227) Title IV

If the assessment shows that the student will require ongoing support to sustain acceptable work performance and maintain employment, supported employment is included in the services to be provided in the IPE. The IPE includes collaboration and funding from other agencies or organizations that assist by providing the ongoing support services required. All services provided by the Commission for the Blind are time limited unless the eligible individual and the counselor jointly agree that additional time is required to reach the IPE goal and the individual is progressing toward that goal. (Page 239) Title IV

The Oregon Commission for the Blind uses its Title VI, Part B funds to provide supported employment services to eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities for whom competitive employment in an integrated setting is their current vocational goal. These clients, because of the nature of their disability, often require extensive services in order to be successful. Specialized placement assistance, lengthened training periods and planning for ongoing support is required in order for clients to be successful. All of the funds are used for individual case costs. Our approach for supported employment services is as follows: If an individual's goal is to pursue an employment outcome in an integrated setting, an IPE will be developed in accordance with the individual's strengths, interests, resources, priorities, and informed choice. Services are purchased on a fee-for service basis from providers within the community. Careful job analysis and intensive one to one training are provided. (Page 246) Title IV

The Oregon Commission for the Blind will continue to leverage IGAs with partners/regional programs throughout the state to meet the needs of students with the most significant disabilities. The OCB is committed to working alongside DHS/DD/ID providers to insure that each student is surrounded with a qualified team of professionals to assist him/her towards their IPE. (Page 248) Title IV
The OCB will continue to provide its array of services/programs and paid work experiences to students with vision loss/blindness. OCB will continue to organize and manage our two paid summer work experience programs (in Salem and Portland) for eligible students age 16+, and will expand the program and staffing to provide more paid work experience and pre- employment transition service opportunities throughout the year.
o The OCB will continue to nurture the relationships with business that support these work opportunities for students who are blind.
o The OCB will continue to build relationships and participate in IEP meetings with school districts, teachers of the visually impaired, students and families throughout the state.
o The OCB will explore methods for supporting work experience for students with visual disability more locally across the state and more broadly throughout the year outside of summer programs.
o The OCB is also exploring new methods for providing pre- employment transition services to students with visual disability, focusing in particular upon the adaptive and soft skills necessary to succeed in an adult workplace. (Page 257) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~AEFLA-funded Adult-Basic-Skills Programs work with employers through connections with their colleges’ Career Pathways, Customized Training, Workforce Training, and Occupational Skills Training programs. Another critical partner is VR. The Vocational Rehabilitation program by design contacts the Business and employer community utilizing a client specific approach. VR’s approach of utilizing contracted vendors to job develop for individual clients indicates a different model regarding employer outreach. However, employers also approach the VR offices with Job Opportunities and VR will address a process where these contacts and opportunities can be blended into a Workforce combined business outreach method. (Page 58) Title I

These individuals require addition services that are were not funded appropriately in our traditional supported employment track ii. Create contracts with clear minimum qualifications, scope of work, and cost structure for all personal services to ensure high quality and consistent services statewide c. Expand the availability of Vendor and Partner services that meet the needs of Oregonians with disabilities, including those requiring supported employment services i. Develop a community college based Career Pathway to develop job placement professionals and job coaches in the community ii. Identify areas of limited service availability, including supported employment services, and develop and implement recruitment and solicitation plans iii. Work with providers of sheltered and subminimum wage employment to transition to the integration of their clients into competitive and integrated employment in their respective communities. 3. Improve the performance of the VR program with respect to the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA a. Increase staff knowledge of the labor market i. Encourage branch level engagement with regional economists and workforce analysts to educate staff on local labor market issues ii. Work with Local Workforce Development Boards to engage with local sector strategies and pursue high wage, high demand work opportunities b. Expand opportunities for skill gain and credentialing i. Identify and access local skill upgrading opportunities within the Local Workforce Areas (LWA ii. Partner with community college Disability Service Offices (DSO) to increase access to existing credentialing programs iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability. (Page 194) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The OCB expects participants who are blind, low vision and deaf blind to become fully engaged in the array of workforce services. OCB expects our counseling staff to be active and equal partners among the regional and local workforce partners, where the talents of agency participants can be more effectively matched with business needs through sharing of employment strategies and real time labor market information. OCB expects partner programs to identify shared core- participant job readiness skill needs, and to work with all partners to develop common-need trainings - and share presentation efforts where applicable - to strengthen the skill sets of our agency participants through access to all. OCB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual's aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self- sufficiency. (Pages 259-260) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) continues to establish relationships with private non—profit and for profit entities that are community rehabilitation providers, medical services providers, and providers of other services and supports that are required by VR clients to achieve the goals in their Individualized Plans for Employment. VR staff develop relationships in the community to meet the needs of their client and to provide choice of providers to their clients. Services provided by the community rehabilitation providers, contractors, and vendors include medical and psychological assessments and services, job development and employer services, job coaching and facilitation, accommodations and ergonomics, independent living services to support employment goals, follow up services, and other services especially for individuals with significant disabilities. The cooperative relationship vary from information and referral relationships to fee—for—service and pay for performance relationships. VR follows State of Oregon contractual processes when establishing contracts for services. VR works with and establishes relationships with non—profit organizations to fully utilize the benefits provided through the SSA TTW program. In January 2010, Oregon VR initiated a Ticket to Work shared payment agreement pilot with ten community mental health programs that provide evidence—based mental health supported employment services. These mental health agencies are governed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) who contracts with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) to provide annual programs and technical assistance. These agreements allow Oregon VR to be the Employment Network of record with SSA, partner with the mental health agency to provide dual services to an individual. Once the VR case is closed, the mental health agency continues to support the individual until the support is no longer needed. If the individual works and reaches the SSA TTW wage thresholds, Oregon VR receives TTW payments which in turn are split with the mental health agencies. This pilot evolved into a project that has strengthened the relationship between VR and these participating agencies by providing additional TTW dollars for additional program funding. As of July 2017 we have sixteen agreements in place. We will continue to review our contracts with Private Non Profit organizations and update this section when new contracts are completed. (Pages 156-157) Title IV

Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities i. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns ii. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity iii. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon. (Pages 183)  Title I

a. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide b. Implement a progressive employment model c. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams d. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities e. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets f. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers 5. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities a. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns b. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity c. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon The Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Program is an active participant in the implementation of the WIOA. (Page 189) Title I

Another factor that may indicate significant disability is receipt of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). In order to receive SSI or SSDI an individual must prove that he or she is unable to work. The RSA longitudinal study of the vocational rehabilitation services program found that individuals accepted for services were more likely to exit the program prior to receiving VR services if they were receiving SSI or SSDI at entry. The following data describes the percentage of people receiving public financial assistance at program entry and the associated outcome.
Outcome % of participants who were receiving SSI/SSDI at application:
Exited VR after services without an employment outcome: PY 15: 65%, PY 16: 65%
Exited VR after services with an employment outcome: PY 15: 62%, PY 16: 59%
While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income-dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services.
Commission Services for Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities:
The Commission is reaching those with the most significant disabilities through outreach and by providing individualized services.
The Commission provides post- employment services if the disability changes, the technology on the job has changed, or there is new software and the person needs training on the new software. (Page 230-231) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~VR knows that given the needs of our clients, a robust employer engagement model is required to be successful. VR continues to use Job Placement contractors to identify individual employment, assessment, and training opportunities for those who require those services to become employed. Additionally, VR strives to expand the base of employers who work with our clients who do not require individualized outreach to employers. By leveraging opportunities with other workforce partners, VR believes that it can increase employment opportunities for Oregonians with disabilities and begin to change perceptions associated with individuals with disabilities in the workforce. Oregon VR has one fulltime business engagement specialists located in the central administration office that supports each of the local branch offices in activates detailed below.

VR will:

  • partner with the local Employment Department Business Teams to coordinate employment services,
  • partner with the local workforce development boards (LWDB) to coordinate employer engagement activities,
  • provide information to VR staff regarding apprenticeship programs and processes.
  • partner with local mental health providers in coordinating employment services
  • continue to partner with Oregon Commission of the Blind on employment services,
  • participate and coordinate local employer recruitment events and job fairs,
  • contract with providers to provide local employer engagement events and activities for individuals with disabilities,
  • contract with providers to and other providers
  • provide Job Developer Orientation Training (JDOT) or another VR approved Job Developer training to contracted job placement and partner providers,
  • establish local MOU’s with federal business contractors.
  • provide information to VR staff regarding 503 information, protocols and processes.
  • provide local trainings and resources on disability awareness and accommodations,
  • establish partnerships with local nonprofits that provide employment services,
  • participate in in local area business events to enhance disability awareness,
  • Promote and develop local area internships for individuals with disabilities.

Employer survey respondents were asked to rate the perceived helpfulness of a variety of potential services provided to employers by VR. The survey items with the highest perceived helpfulness reported by respondents to the business survey were:

  • Providing workers with disabilities with the accommodations and supports they need to do the employer’s work;
  • If concerns arise, providing consultation with management, the workers, and co—workers to resolve the concerns;
  • Placing qualified individuals in internships at the business with full reimbursement of the employer’s expenses;
  • Providing training consultation and resources related to the provision of reasonable accommodations; and
  • Finding workers that meet the employer’s workforce needs. (Page 158) Title IV

o Train students in workplace readiness o Provide screening and referral of appropriate youth o Identification of appropriate worksites and task o Provide counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive training opportunities to meet the desired qualification of employers • In the Portland Metro area VR staff are working with health providers Legacy and Providence Health to pilot training and streamlined hiring program for students with disabilities. Students placed in competitive integrated employment with these employers are supported with 12 months of follow along services to ensure stable employment. • VR Contractors are working with business and schools regarding employer engagement models to offer competitive, integrated employment and career exploration opportunities. These trainings include: o Pre— employment trainings with school staff to meet employer needs o Interest inventories with students o Trainings on developing partnership agreements o Trainings on job needs analysis o Marketing school based programs o Pre and post training evaluations for students involved in work experiences. Oregon VR has hired two Pre-Employment Transition Coordinators that are actively working with employers to create paid and unpaid work experiences for students with disabilities. The Pre-Employment Transition Coordinators are also working with employers to develop essential skills profiles for students to identify current work readiness expectations from local employers. (Page159) Title IV

iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability c. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs i. Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities i. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns ii. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity iii. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon. (Page 183) Title IV

Data Collection

1. Increase quality employment outcomes for all Oregonians with disabilities. According to the current data our rehabilitation rate has slightly declined. 2016 rehab rate was 62.3%, and dropped in 2017 to 60.2%. As of the end of December 2nd quarter PY 18 it is 57.5%. We are evaluating why this is occurring. a. Support and accelerate the customer experience to be empowering, effective, and efficient

i. Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process We continue to work towards earlier engagement with our Workforce partners. There are varying degrees of involvement with the 9 Local Workforce Development Boards. Local development activities are continuing between VR and d the Local Workface Development Boards to continue to identify mechanisms to increase earlier engagement.

ii. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies Data sharing agreements are in place with OED (Wagner Peyser) the Department of Education, and various other entities. VR continues to work to develop the technological connections for efficient and timely transfer of Data between Core partners in order to populate our RSA 911 quarterly reports and to utilize the data to see where programmatic adjustments will need to be made.

iii. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process to get clients into plan more quickly. Since 2016 Plan completion we have gotten our clients into plan (or plan extension) more quickly as identified by the following data: SFY 2015 62.0% (we were shifting from 180-day timeline to 90. SFY 2016 77% SFY 2017 84% SFY 2018 Q1 91% SFY 2018 Q2 92% iv. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication This process is still in development. (Page 192) Title IV

Baseline performance metrics are currently being established. Oregon VR achieved the following 116 metrics for PY2015. As Baselines are being established, the program will continue to review our outcomes and the strategies that impact these metrics. Common Performance Measures achieved (July1, 2015-June 30 2016) PY2015 SFY 2016 Percentage rehabilitated 62.30%. Percentage of clients who closed from plan employed during the 2nd quarter following closure. 56.75% Percentage of clients who closed from plan employed during 4th quarter following closure. 54.67% Median quarterly wage at 2nd quarter following closure from the program $3,391.84 Percent of clients employed with same employer during the second and fourth quarters following exit from program 71.64%. (Pages 195-196) Title IV

511

~~OCB believes that all individuals are capable of integrated and competitive work with the right supports in place, and the state has over the years reduced options for sub-minimum wage employment. The new regulations requiring the agency to provide pre-employment transition services for youth with disability before certification for sub-minimum wage work is expected to have little impact on the agency, as this is the direction the state has been moving towards. A challenge for supported employment is that the comparable benefit resources available in Oregon State to provide extended long-term support services are limited. OCB works in collaboration with all available resources and partners on cases that have co-occurring disabling conditions that make long-term supports necessary. The OCB continues to work with employers and other natural supports to identify funding for long-term support services.  (Page 218) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Vets

* Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. The State’s Workforce Development Activities. The Workforce system provides services focused in broad categories: •Enhancing the job skills of Oregon’s workforce. (Page 19) Title I

For example, the VR program is working with the Local Leadership Teams and LWDB’s to have full understanding of the determined Sector Strategies and Sector Partnerships at the local level. As individual VR clients are counselled and address his or her career development, the local sector partnership details and goals are shared with these job seekers with disabilities. These participants can then determine if these sector industries/employment areas, and associated career development, are something the individual client would wish to pursue. Additionally, Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs) partner with the Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI) apprenticeship and On the Job Training (OJT) representatives to ensure that employers are aware of the benefits of hiring a veteran. LVERs also communicate apprenticeship and OJT opportunities for veterans to WorkSource Oregon Business and Employment Specialists and DVOP staff. (Page 58) Title I

The State Veterans Program Coordinator provided the following materials in accordance with the Jobs for Veterans Act, section 4215 of 38 U.S.C. to all WSO centers in order to educate the WorkSource center staff on the roles and responsibilities of Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPs), and Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs), and to ensure that veterans and eligible spouses receive priority of service in all Oregon WorkSource locations: • Priority of Service example tools • Customer workflow diagram example, and • Department of Labor approved Priority of Service Training for Frontline Staff available online via iLearn, Oregon’s interactive training site for all WSO staff and partner staff. The priority of service training materials were disseminated to each WorkSource location in Oregon in order to ensure: • That eligible veterans and eligible spouses receive priority of service in the customer intake process, for training opportunities, referrals to employers and for employment based workshops offered at each OED/WorkSource location. • OED/WorkSource staff can refer special disabled veterans and veterans with barriers to employment to DVOPs for intensive services and case management services. • Each Business and Employment Specialist staff member can provide excellent customer service and core employment services to those veterans that are not eligible to meet with a DVOP. (Page 86) Title I

Mental Health

~~11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer the flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs.

12. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with WIOA section 116) and to monitor program performance.

13. Whether the local area in which the eligible provider is located has a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs. (Page 136) Title I

The Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Program (VR) has developed and maintains cooperative agreements and cooperative relationships where necessary with federal and state agencies not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system. This cooperation includes, but is not limited to the Centers for Independent Living (CILs), Oregon Developmental Disability Services (ODDS), local I/DD brokerages, county service providers, Oregon’s Mental Health Programs (including programs that serve in and out of school youth), the Client Assistance Program (CAP), Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation 121 Programs, Oregon Department of Education (ODE), local school districts, community colleges, Access Technologies Inc. (ATI), and local agencies providing services to our clients. VR strives to have cooperative relationships that streamline referral and service delivery, including joint planning, leverages funds, provide coordinated and non—duplicated services, and maximize the use of wrap around services to ensure success. VR’s goal is to simplify, streamline, and expedite services to clients while maximizing access to services that will help with their success. (Page 152) Title I

A primary effort of VR and OHA Behavioral Health Programs has been development and expansion of evidence-based supported employment services by increasing the number of county mental health organizations providing such services and meeting fidelity standards. VR continues to partner with and utilize the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. As of the end of Program Year 2017, 37 community mental health programs and 35 out of 36 counties are providing IPS. With the inclusion of IPS into Oregon’s OARs, evidence-based supported employment services continue to expand across Oregon. (Page 160) Title I

VR will continue to focus on Mental Health supported employment outcomes, the quality of the outcomes, the skills of employment service providers and the capacity of community rehabilitation programs and providers. Oregon VR has reviewed potential participation with the Supported Education process that is now increasingly being utilized by many IPS providers. There are now 83 Mental Health IPS employment specialist across the State. (Page 161) Title I

Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation collaborates with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance, a statewide effort to provide systematic early psychosis interventions at mental health centers to assist young people with psychiatric disabilities in obtaining or maintaining employment. Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation worked with Addictions and Mental Health and Portland State University to create a center of excellence providing ongoing technical assistance to statewide Early Assessment and Support Alliance programs. Vocational rehabilitation funded four county pilot sites to identify a best practices model to engage youth experiencing a first psychotic episode in accessing vocational rehabilitation and local workforce programs. • Seamless Transition Project. A few organizations are piloting a seamless transition project targeting youth. Similar to Project SEARCH from Cincinnati Community Health, it is a series of rotating internships provided by host businesses to prepare youth with disabilities for employment. (Page 178-179) Title IV

VR and the State Rehabilitation Council have had opportunities over the last year to work together on several aspects of the VR program, policies, procedures, and service delivery. Additionally, VR and SRC worked to jointly develop our State’s goals, priorities and strategies looking forward. The SRC approved the final draft of the VR portion of Section 6 of the Unified State Plan at their February 2016 meeting after a final opportunity to add comments. A comprehensive needs assessment was completed September 23, 2013, a survey was completed by the SRC April 2015 in regards to the VR programs Job Placement Services process and contract, regular case reviews are conducted by the Business and Finance Manager as well as Branch Managers. The results of these reports and activities were taken into account in the development of these goals, priorities, and strategies. The performance measures as defined by the WIOA, and activities necessary to meet the expected outcomes were also taken in to consideration. VR put the Plan up for public comment in January and February. The VR Plan was available to all interested parties through the VR internet site and the Oregon Workforce Investment Board (OWIB) website. Copies of the initial draft were sent out to an extensive list of interested parties, members of the SRC, members of the OWIB and to our traditional service delivery partners such as the Tribes, Mental Health providers etc. Public hearings occurred in three locations during the month of February. LaGrande, Medford and Salem hosted these sessions with the local Manager in attendance. VR received written feedback from our Workforce Partners, Tribal partners, Centers for Independent Living, and had feedback from Mental Health Programs. Comment was received from individuals as well. All this feedback was reviewed and incorporated into the VR State Plan. (Pages 180-181) Title IV

The funds will be used to provide Supported Employment Services to those adult and transitional age youth with the most significant disabilities. At least 50% these funds will be targeted towards youth with the most significant disabilities who need them to transition to employment.

The Supported Employment Services include job development, job coaching and any extended supports needed. For individuals with a primary disability of intellectual and/or development disability, clients will receive extended services after closure from the Office of Developmental Disabilities. For clients with Mental Health disabilities who receive services from OHA Mental Health programs, extended services are provided by the fidelity based IPS program once the client exits from the Vocational Rehabilitation program. (Page 186) Title IV

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(4)). Describe the designated State agency’s efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other State agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide supported employment services and extended employment services, as applicable, to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities.

Agency response: OCB provides Supported Employment services to individuals with disabilities co-occurring with visual impairment that make long-term supports necessary for the individual's success in maintaining integrated and competitive employment, including developmental disabilities, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and disabilities due to mental health. (Page 218) Title IV

Mental Health Services OCB is committed to collaborating with mental health services throughout Oregon in order to insure collaboration, coordination of services, and mutual understanding of scope and role of each agency in promoting success for individuals who require long-term employment supports.

In addition, although we have no formal agreement in the provision of mental health services, the agency has been able to be effective in the individualized coordination of services on a case by case basis in the event we have a client who is blind who is also a client of that system. (Page 221) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Supplementing Wagner-Peyser funds with state dollars also funds the delivery of enhanced services to the business community. This increased capacity to meet the service needs of employers, helps to improve their bottom—line by lowering recruitment, turnover, and training costs. More businesses are choosing our enhanced service option, as validated by the hundreds of success stories from businesses sharing that the service more than meets their needs and expectations. Our ability to maintain these services is contingent upon receiving state funds in the future. Data on UI claimants suggests the coordination of Title I-IV core programs resources will improve the ability of all customers to return to work. The VR Program will continue to work with the Workforce System in Oregon to increase capacity and access to Workforce opportunities and services for Oregonians with Disabilities. The VR Program will continue to collaborate and coordinate with LWDBs and other partners to increase opportunity and access for VR clients while earnestly and simultaneously trying to help meet the recruitment needs of employers. (Page 31) Title I

Title IV regularly uses evaluations of data and qualitative information to measure the effectiveness of our program. Evaluations completed in the last two years have resulted in such things as: a revamping of our statewide procurement process for job placement service, changes to the job placement service delivery model, training to help staff move clients into plan faster, trainings on specific disability barriers, cross trainings with other agencies to ensure better partnerships, changes to business practices using the LEAN model, and the piloting of some new evidenced —based best practices around transition. An assessment of the Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) program show that it is effective in helping speed claimants return to work and in preventing and detecting unemployment insurance (UI) overpayments. Over the past two years, the RESEA program has helped shorten claims duration, reduce exhaustion rates, and increase detection of potential issues resulting in disqualification or overpayment. (Page 77) Title I

Most UI claimants are required to complete an electronic profile for job matching purposes and attend an orientation with Employment Services staff. Only claimants attached to a closed union, in approved training (including apprenticeship programs), who commute while living out of state, or who have a definite return to work date within 28 days of their lay off date do not have to complete these steps. The orientation includes a review of their electronic profile for completeness and provides an overview of services available to job seekers through WSO centers and partners. Of those claimants, some are selected for a Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (known as REA or RESEA) as part of their orientation. Initial REA/RESEA interviews are conducted in person by ES staff who are co—located with Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) service providers. The REA/RESEA includes an overview of UI eligibility requirements for remaining able, available and actively seeking work. It further provides more customized discussions with each claimant about “next steps” that could assist the person with becoming reemployed sooner as part of a basic reemployment plan. (Page 119) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 81 - 86 of 86

Oregon ICF/IDD Support Services (0375.R04.00)

~~Provides employment path services, supported employment - individual employment support, waiver case management, direct nursing, discovery/career exploration services, environmental safety modifications, family training - conferences and workshops, financial management services, special diets, specialized medical supplies, supported employment - small group employment support, vehicle modifications for individuals w/ID/DD ages 18 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) 2014-2015

~"The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) provides core supported employment professional training through a series of four, 2 day trainings. These trainings help employment professionals meet Oregon’s employment professional core competencies requirement through eight days of in person training. Each of the two-day seminars results in twelve hours of training.The OELN Training Series is now accredited by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE)".
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Work Incentive Network (WIN!) (now part of the activities of the MIG)

Part of the activities of the MIG

“Benefits and Work Incentive Counseling services help people with disabilities make informed decisions about work, benefits and the use of work incentives to achieve their employment goals, as well as helping them navigate the benefits system when they begin working."

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Oregon Administrative Rules Chapter 411 Division 345 Employment Services for Individuals with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities - 07/02/2018

~~“The purposes of the rules in OAR chapter 411, division 345 are to:(1) Effectuate Oregon’s Employment First policy, as described in the State of Oregon Executive Order No. 15-01 and OAR chapter 407, division 025, under which:(a) The employment of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities in competitive integrated employment is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, or other non-work day activities.(b) For individuals who successfully achieve the goal of competitive integrated employment, future person-centered service planning focuses on maintaining employment, maximizing the number of hours an individual works, using the standard of obtaining at least 20 hours of week of work, consistent with the individual’s preferences and interests, and considering additional career or advancement opportunities” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon HB 3063: Relating to Housing for Individuals with Mental Illness - 08/08/2017

“The Housing and Community Services Department, in collaboration with the Oregon Health Authority, shall disburse moneys in the Housing for Mental Health Fund to provide funding for:

(a) The development of community-based housing, including licensed residential treatment facilities, for individuals with mental illness and individuals with substance use disorders;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon SB 777 (ABLE Act) - 08/12/2015

"The Oregon 529 Savings Board shall establish by rule and maintain a qualified ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] program in accordance with the requirements of the ABLE Act. (2) The rules must: (a) Allow a person to make contributions for a taxable year to an ABLE account established for the purpose of meeting the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account..."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Oregon Senate Bill 22 - Employment First - 04/08/2013

The bill details the rights of persons with developmental disabilities who are receiving developmental disability services.  It proclaims that “individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities and society as a whole benefit when the individuals exercise choice and self-determination, living and working in the most integrated community settings appropriate to their needs, with supportive services that are designed and implemented consistent with the choice of the individuals regarding services, providers, goals and activities.”  Moreover it proclaims that, “the employment of individuals with developmental disabilities in fully integrated work settings is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, facility-based employment or day habilitation.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

427.007 OR Policy; Department of Human Services to plan and facilitate community services.

Emphasizes the importance of home and community based services that help to facilitate community integration for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. “Therefore, the Department of Human Services is directed to facilitate the development of appropriate community-based services, including family support, residential facilities, day programs, home care and other necessary support, care and training programs, in an orderly and systematic manner. The role of state-operated hospitals and training centers in Oregon shall be as specialized back-up facilities to a primary system of community-based services for persons with intellectual disabilities or other developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Executive Order Number 19-06 – Establishing the Behavioral Health Advisory Council - 10/18/2019

“Over the last decade, Oregon has made significant strides in transforming and strengthening our overall health care system, but our progress has not been even across all components of the health care delivery system…We have fallen short of adequately addressing the unique needs or Oregonians with serious and complex behavioral health conditions…Oregon experiences some of the highest rates of serious mental illness, substance abuse disorders, and suicide in the country….

The Governor’s Behavioral Health Advisory Council (the “Council”) is established. The Council shall recommend an action plan for the state of Oregon’s behavioral health system that includes concrete actions, policies, and potential investments needed to preserve and improve services and supports for youth and adults with serious mental illness, including those with co-occurring substance use disorders.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Oregon Executive Order 15-01 - Providing employment services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities - 02/02/2015

Supersedes Executive Order 13-04   “This Executive Order revises and supersedes Executive Order 13-04 in order to provide further policy guidance intended to continue the state’s progress in these areas [providing supported employment services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities], including through a substantial reduction in employment in sheltered workshops.  Continue to improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving competitive integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, consistent with their abilities and choices, will benefit individuals with disabilities, their families, our communities, the economy, and the state.”  

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 31 - 34 of 34

OR Employment First

This web page, housed by the Oregon Department of Human Services, contains information on the Oregon Employment first initiative. It contains information for job seekers, families and employers.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Human Services, Vocational Rehabilitation Services

The Department of Human Services vocational rehabilitation services contains definitions and descriptions for employment services including job assessments, assistive technology, training and technological assistance, community rehabilitation programs and customized employment, among many other services.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Planning My Way to Work: A Transition Guide for Student with Disabilities Leaving High School

“This manual is intended to: Help you make your way through the transition process; Understand your rights, services and resources that may help you and your family; Provide information to help you understand complex adult service systems; Highlight that you direct your own transition; Reinforce that you and your team design your transition just for you; and Identify your work and other adult life goals and a plan to achieve those goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Employment First Central Oregon- Members - 05/12/2019

~~This page has information on the member organizations that are a part of Employment First Central Oregon

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

A Personal Guide to Community Employment - 04/02/2019

~~“OSAC, a statewide nonprofit organization, is led by people with developmental disabilities. We believe that with high expectations, appropriate supports and the right job match, people can get competitive integrated employment – or a community job. At a community job, a person:•Works full or part-time;•Earns minimum wage or higher; and•Works with coworkers without disabilities” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding Developmental Disabilities Services Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/30/2016

“,,,IDDS adoption of and VR endorsement of the “Employment First Policy” for working age adults with developmental disabilities”   “This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services.  This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of the MOUR is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and rthe Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 115-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society. “  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding: Developmental Disabilities Services and Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/28/2016

“This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services. This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of this MOU is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and the Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 15-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding on Transition of Students with Disabilities to the Workforce - 02/02/2015

“Together with Executive Order No.15-01, this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) recognizes that, while the State cannot guarantee jobs, Oregon starts with the presumption that everyone can be employed in an integrated setting in a community-based job…Oregon is not guaranteeing anyone a job, but with significant additional resources, Oregon s optimistic that all persons with IDD will have an opportunity to obtain integrated employment.”   “Vision: Through strong agency collaboration, youth with disabilities will transition into competitive integrated employment or post-secondary education/ training.”    MOU Partners Include: Office of Developmental Disabilities Services Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Services Oregon Department of Education Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Cooperative Agreement Between the Oregon Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education - 12/01/2014

“The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to set forth the commitments of the ODE and VR to cooperate in activities leading to a successful transition for students with disabilities from a free and appropriate public education to postsecondary career-related training and employment activities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Youth Transition Program

~~“Established in 1990, the Oregon Youth Transition Program (YTP) is a collaborative partnership between the office of Vocational Rehabilitation, Oregon Department of Education, and the University of Oregon. It is funded by Vocational Rehabilitation every two-years through competitive grants to local school districts. The purpose of the YTP is to prepare students with disabilities for employment or career related postsecondary education or training through the provision of a comprehensive array of pre-employment transition activities and supports. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First: Capacity Building and Training and Technical Assistance Strategic Plan 2014-2015

The mission of this strategic plan is to, “To improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving integrated employment for individuals experiencing IDD, consistent with their abilities and choices. To improve Oregon’s employment services through innovation, best practices, and increased capacity, with the outcome of achieving integrated employment services for all individuals experiencing intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Developmental Disabilities Worker’s Guide - 08/27/2018

~~“SPPC services are available to eligible individuals – up to 20 hours each month – as stand-alone attendant/personal care services and related supports, or in combination with the Community First Choice Option/K Plan services.  Ingeneral, when the individual has minimalsupport needs and most of those needs are being met with alternative resources, including natural support, and only need minimal hours of paid-support, SPPC services may be an appropriate option.  “ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Oregon Innovation Grant Awardees - 07/14/2017

“The Oregon Legislature awarded a Policy Option Package in the 2015-17 session for the Department of Human Services (DHS) to fund innovative Employment First projects to increase capacity throughout the state.

The purpose of these grants is to expand efforts to increase competitive integrated employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). We are pleased to award more than 20 organizations throughout Oregon with innovation grants. Congratulations to the providers, family organizations, and case management entities that were awarded grants for innovative projects starting June 2017.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Project ACCESS - 09/14/2015

“The purpose of Project Access is to establish, implement, and evaluate a multi-level interagency transition model in the state of Oregon. The overall goal of the project is to improve and extend transition services to a greater number of youth with disabilities through a model program that brings vocational rehabilitation counselors (VRC's) into high school settings.”

“The model is a collaborative effort between Oregon's Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), public high schools in three Oregon school districts, and researchers at the University of Oregon.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ticket to Work Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - Integrated Employment Plan (revised 7/2015) - 07/06/2015

“(2010-2011) During this time period VR used resources within its Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIG) Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and other available resources to support of a variety of Employment First related activities including: Co-funding for many of the stakeholder and partner gatherings (e.g. Employment First Summit, Meet at the Mountain, stakeholder work groups); Participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN); and Improving access to benefits counseling and planning services such as the Work Incentive Project (WIN); and  Supporting other training and technical assistance activities”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in - 01/01/2012

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Work Incentive Network (WIN!) (now part of the activities of the MIG)

Part of the activities of the MIG

“Benefits and Work Incentive Counseling services help people with disabilities make informed decisions about work, benefits and the use of work incentives to achieve their employment goals, as well as helping them navigate the benefits system when they begin working."

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Oregon Employment First Training Course Descriptions

Content of the document reflects information from multiple state and training agency organizations and is designed as a tool for organizations participating in the Transformation Project for selection of needed training and technical assistance.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) 2014-2015

~"The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) provides core supported employment professional training through a series of four, 2 day trainings. These trainings help employment professionals meet Oregon’s employment professional core competencies requirement through eight days of in person training. Each of the two-day seminars results in twelve hours of training.The OELN Training Series is now accredited by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE)".
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Lane v. Brown Settlement (12-29-2015) - 12/29/2015

~~“Under the Settlement Agreement, Oregon agreed to continue its policy of decreasing the State’s support of sheltered workshops for people with I/DD in Oregon, and expanding the availability of supported employment services that allow individuals with I/DD the opportunity to work in competitive integrated employment settings.  The Settlement Agreement provides relief to two target populations – (1) adults with I/DD who are 21 years old or older and worked in a sheltered workshop on or after January 25, 2012 (sheltered workshop target population), and (2) transition-age youth with I/DD between the ages of 14 and 24 who are found eligible for services from the State’s Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) (transition-age target population)”

 

Systems
  • Other

Lane v. Kitzhaber, 12-CV-00138, (D. OR 2012) - 05/22/2013

“On May 22, 2013, the Court granted the United States' March 27 Motion to Intervene in a pending class action lawsuit against the State of Oregon. The United States' accompanying Complaint in Intervention alleges violations of Title II of the ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act for unnecessarily segregating individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in sheltered workshops when they could be served in integrated employment settings.”

  “Prior to requesting intervention the United States filed on April 20, 2012, a Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs Regarding Defendants' Motion to Dismiss.  The United States argued that Title II and the integration regulation apply to all services, programs, and activities of a public entity, including segregated, non-residential employment settings such as sheltered workshops.”    “On June 18, 2012, the United States filed a second Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs' Motion for Class Certification. In its Statement of Interest, the United States urged the Court to uphold class certification for a plaintiff class of thousands of individuals in, or referred to, Oregon sheltered workshops.”   
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - From the Department of Justice Findings Letter (2012) - 06/29/2012

“We have concluded that the State is failing to provide employment and vocational services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the most  integrated setting appropriate to their needs, in violation of the ADA.  The State plans, structures, and administers its system of providing employment and vocational services in a manner that delivers such services primarily in segregated sheltered workshops, rather than in integrated community employment.  Sheltered workshops segregate individuals from the community and provide little or no opportunity to interact with persons without disabilities, other than paid staff…  most persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving employment and vocational services from the state remain unnecessarily – and often indefinitely – confined to segregated sheltered workshops..”    
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - Staley v. Kitzhaber 2000 - 01/14/2000

“The lawsuit was the result of years of frustration in waiting for appropriate, adequate services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities, and their families… The lawsuit alleges that the State of Oregon failed to provide services in the most integrated possible setting to adults with mental retardation and/or developmental disabilities eligible for placement in an ICF/MR (intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded) and that individuals with developmental disabilities are entitled to receive Medicaid-Funded services with reasonable promptness.”

“This agreement is intended to provide relief to not only the plaintiffs but also to all other similarly situated individuals with developmental disabilities eligible to receive services under the federal Medicaid program.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Support Services Waiver (Brokerage)

Provides “Respite; Homemaker; Supported Employment Services; Environmental Accessibility Adaptations; Non-Medical Transportation; Chore Service; Personal Emergency Response Systems; Family Training; PT/OT/Speech; Special Diets; Specialized Supports; Support Services Brokerages; Emergent Services; Community Inclusion; Community Living; Specialized Medical Equipment.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon ICF/IDD Support Services (0375.R04.00)

~~Provides employment path services, supported employment - individual employment support, waiver case management, direct nursing, discovery/career exploration services, environmental safety modifications, family training - conferences and workshops, financial management services, special diets, specialized medical supplies, supported employment - small group employment support, vehicle modifications for individuals w/ID/DD ages 18 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The Beaver State of Oregon believes that "Things Look Different Here" when it comes to creating innovative employment options for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oregon’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2017 to 2018
4,190,713
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.24%
Change from
2017 to 2018
295,114
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
10.77%
Change from
2017 to 2018
122,184
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
8.72%
Change from
2017 to 2018
41.40%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.43%
Change from
2017 to 2018
78.38%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 4,093,465 4,142,776 4,190,713
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 303,115 288,493 295,114
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 118,914 109,027 122,184
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,696,553 1,751,754 1,768,886
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.23% 37.79% 41.40%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.91% 78.04% 78.38%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90% 4.10% 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.80% 20.70% 21.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.20% 12.00% 11.20%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 298,208 289,157 292,709
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 296,968 283,759 288,752
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 523,359 505,721 509,538
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,151 10,873 11,116
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 46,866 39,234 40,709
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,629 9,991 9,205
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 13,981 14,137 13,553
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,678 1,037 770
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,138 24,617 26,131
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 8,240 6,540 11,148

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,806 4,951 4,900
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.10% 6.20% 6.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 108,974 107,703 105,296

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 7,857 11,607 15,659
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 18,564 24,671 30,533
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 20,659 39,390 49,752
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.00% 29.50% 31.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10% 2.40% 3.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.30% 1.70%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,982 2,261 2,445
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 875 1,206 1,270
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 16,874 15,839 15,471
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6,910 3,689 3,819
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2,765 1,637 1,815
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 40.00% 44.00% 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 70.36 40.63 45.05

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,583
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 28 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 719 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,031 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,402 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 874 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 529 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 37.90% 39.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,378 4,072 4,130
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 167,800 168,828 167,485
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 351 737 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 424 686 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $26,199,000 $32,691,000 $40,054,369
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $18,824,000 $15,891,000 $10,847,560
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $20,516,000 $20,322,000 $18,613,806
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $10,816,000 $11,632,000 $13,164,718
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 49.00% 56.00% 57.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,617 3,831 4,228
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,210 2,572 1,785
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,466 3,411 3,207
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 59.40 107.40 109.54

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.37% 73.49% 73.66%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.15% 9.90% 9.84%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.19% 1.20% 1.44%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 83.24% 79.73% 83.94%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.41% 24.56% 22.82%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.52% 60.46% 61.99%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.24% 74.59% 74.20%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.11% 35.90% 39.17%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,723,537
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,680
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 8,299
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 289,705
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 298,004
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 308
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 327
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,095,598
AbilityOne wages (services). $97,396

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 27 15 10
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 29 16 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,339 1,211 675
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,341 1,212 676

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~VR works closely with other State agencies whose populations benefit from VR Supported Employment (SE) Services. VR, the Department of Education, and the Office of Developmental Disability Services work together with the State’s Employment First program to ensure that individuals who experience Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities receive coordinated and sequenced services that meet their employment needs. This multi—agency collaboration operates under the guidance of Executive Order 15—01 and the Lane v. Brown Settlement, actively working to ensure that policies and services are aligned in a way that makes sense for transition age students as well as adults seeking services. VR has a close relationships with OHA Behavioral health programs to ensure that individuals who access VR’s services who are also working with Mental Health Programs across the state get access to quality Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) Services. VR continues our collaboration with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) who oversees the fidelity of the 37 programs that currently offer IPS services throughout the state. VR continues to work with OSECE to expand the availability of these services across the state. In addition to aligning policies and service sequences, VR is working with OHA Behavioral Health and ODDS to ensure that our certification requirements for service providers are in alignment. VR initiated a new Job Placement Services contract in 2015. Now, joint certification and coordinated training makes it easier for providers of Job Placement and Support Services who are funded by VR to continue to provide employment support services to clients when hand—offs occur between agencies. VR currently has more than 200 providers under contract in our new Job Placement Services Contract. In 2017, VR created training for Job Placement Contractors, with OSECE and ODDS participating in development and in presentation of the pilot. A monthly schedule of that training is planned for 2018 in multiple locations where VR wants to increase capacity. VR is establishing a system to identify areas of the state where capacity issues exist. Recruitment of providers in these areas continues to be a priority moving forward. A pilot that would measure the effectiveness of a rural transportation rate change is planned for 2018-2019. VR and ODDS, with the Home Care Commission as the training entity, are increasing job coach capacity through use of Personal Care Attendants. Additionally, VR is working with several community colleges to explore the possibility of a career pathway program that will train future service providers in a curriculum jointly developed with these community colleges. (Page 157) Title IV

VR and Oregon Department of Developmental Disability Services have refocused their work together over the last couple of years to achieve the outcomes set forth in Executive order 13-04, which was updated in Executive Order 15-01. These Executive Orders emphasize with more clarity the State’s Employment First Policy. Additionally, the State of Oregon has recently settled a lawsuit that calls for increased integrated employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. VR, ODDS, and the I/DD service delivery system have a working relationship that shares information, leverages and braids funding, and encourages the joint case management of joint clients. Moving forward VR will continue to work with ODDS and I/DD service delivery system as well as the Department of Education to increase our collaboration to maximize funding, streamline processes, and meet the competitive and integrated employment goals of joint clients.

Over the last year VR, ODE and ODDS have:
• Hired staff specialists who serve individuals with I/DD. These three groups of regional staff meet regularly; co-train other agency staff; and, co-develop tools and strategies to provide services that are consistent and reflect best practices • Have established collaborative training regarding consistency and quality in curricula used for VR, ODDS and ODE staff throughout Oregon; accomplished through: o Agency conferences (VR In-Service, DD Case Management Conference, and ODE Regional Transition Conferences) used mixed groups of staff and cross training techniques to further collaborative training goals o VR, DD, and school transition (ODE) staff training on varied topics, presented regionally to groups consisting of staff from all three agencies o Staff are consistently co-trained by specialists from the three agencies • Ongoing and regularly scheduled meetings lead to collaborative actions by Office of Developmental Disabilities (ODDS), VR and Oregon Department of Education (ODE): o Employment First Steering Committee meetings direct the overall work of the following collaborative meetings. This committee is co-led by VR and ODDS Administrators o Policy and Innovation meetings are co-led by VR staff and DD Staff to facilitate these collaborative actions: • The three agencies review and discuss all new or newly revised policy to assure alignment across agencies • Each agency sends policy transmittals to their regional and community staff when another of them adopts new or newly revised policy o Education and Transition meetings discuss pertinent issues for students who have transition plans including those receiving Pre-Vocational Services; facilitating these collaborative actions: • A jointly held goal of seamless transition for: students with transition plans, students in transition programs, and post high school students • Examination of agency procedures, leading to: development of tools and strategies for use by field staff; and referral to the Policy Work Stream for potential policy revision or development o Training and Technical Assistance meetings address issues of staff and vendor training to facilitate: • Increased numbers of vendors shared across agencies • Increased knowledge and skill (competency) of agency staff and vendors o Quality Assurance is a cross-agency group that evaluates collaborative outcomes providing a means to assess collaborative efforts. (Pages 159-160) Title IV

Feedback on Community Partner Relationships • Communication. Stakeholders felt communication with community partners was lacking. • Primary partnerships. Participants most commonly work with mental health, IDD, education, and aging and disability providers (in addition to WorkSource). • Individual Placement and Support. The Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model used with people with mental illness is cited as a best practice, which has supported effective partnership between vocational rehabilitation and mental health providers. • Employment First. The Employment First initiative has facilitated increased collaboration between vocational rehabilitation, the education system, and IDD providers to support people with IDD in finding employment. • IDD system collaboration challenges. Collaboration with IDD system partners has improved, but stakeholder proposed opportunities to address ongoing challenges, including reconciling Employment First and individual choice, sheltered workshop closures and limited employment pathway options, discovery requirements, and contract differences. Feedback on WorkSource Relationships • The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act has required additional collaboration with the broader Oregon workforce system. Local leadership teams, including vocational rehabilitation, are working on how to connect more people to workforce services throughout the health and human services infrastructure. Vocational rehabilitation is getting additional referrals as a result of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act collaboration. (Page 173) Title IV

The Oregon Department of Education is another central partner in Employment First partnerships. The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act is also creating changes in transition service delivery for students with disabilities through preemployment transition services. A subsequent section discusses the youth transition service system in depth. • Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation works closely with Oregon’s community colleges on transition and service coordination issues. Additionally, community colleges help to train vocational rehabilitation service providers (job developers and coaches). Vocational rehabilitation is also working with community colleges as a part of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act to increase opportunities for people with disabilities to gain skills and credentials. Participant focus group attendees discussed taking classes and participating in clubs and business development centers at local community colleges, and how well their vocational rehabilitation counselors worked with the colleges to support their participation. Feedback on Self-Sufficiency Office • Oregon’s Self-Sufficiency Offices connect individuals to food benefits (Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash benefits, child care assistance, and refugee services. People with disabilities can also access food and nutrition services through their local Seniors and People with Disabilities Program, which is often an Aging and People with Disabilities program. (Page 174) Title IV

Participant survey respondents were asked to indicate which vocational rehabilitation partners they receive services from. Almost half did not work with listed community partners. The most commonly identified partner was WorkSource Oregon, following by community mental health programs, Developmental Disability Services, and Aging and People with Disabilities services. Surveyed vocational rehabilitation staff were asked to select up to three community partners with whom Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation has the strongest relationships as well as three whose relationship needs improvement. The figure below shows responses ordered by perception of partnership strength, highest to lowest. The three partnerships seen as strongest are 1) vocational rehabilitation contracted vendors; 2) developmental disabilities services; and 3) community mental health programs. Staff noted a wide array of partnerships needing improvement, with local businesses and employers, self-sufficiency, employment department, and parole and probation department topping the list. Community partners observed an increasing emphasis by Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation on working as part of a broader team, including individuals with disabilities, families, schools, employers, and other service providers. Stakeholders particularly noted increasing teamwork and associated positive outcomes around youth transition, Employment First, and Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act initiatives. Staff and partner survey respondents were also asked why the vocational needs of people with disabilities were unmet by service providers. (Page 176) Title IV

Transition Network Facilitators (TNF) Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation and the Oregon Department of Education operate a cooperative agreement to blend funding for nine regional transition network facilitators as a part of the settlement of the Lane v. Brown lawsuit and the resulting Governor’s Executive Order (No. 15-01) to improve Oregon’s systems providing employment services for students with disabilities. Transition network facilitators collaborate with vocational rehabilitation and schools as well as local businesses/employers and others to implement Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Employment First goals of improving transition outcomes for youth. Transition network facilitators are working to create an equitable, sustainable, simplified system, aligned across agencies that reduces redundancies. Interviewees spoke of their role as helping to support students, teachers, families and districts by providing support and information about life after school for people with disabilities. Facilitators connect students to IDD, Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation, Social Security, and other services that can help to create a seamless transition from school to adulthood. Facilitators work more at a systems level than on an individual level. However, facilitators spoke about doing more with schools that do not have Youth Transition Program grants or specialists. Five percent (26 of 396) of vocational rehabilitation participant survey respondents have worked with a Transition Network Facilitator. This small percentage makes sense because this is a relatively new role in Oregon, and one that works more with programs than with individual students. (Page 178) Title IV

(1) Establish quarterly review of caseloads to ensure equitable access and outcomes (2) Establish local plans for community outreach when underserved or underrepresented populations are identified (3) Partner with agencies that provide culturally specific service (4) Continue working with Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation programs to ensure access to joint case management and culturally appropriate services (5) Convene cross agency workgroup to address the needs of underserved populations in the workforce system as a whole. An example is the recently expanded DHS Workforce Roundtable that includes VR (Policy, YTP, youth transition. Business outreach), SSP, Home Care Commission, Child Welfare (young adult transition), Employment First, SNAP/TANF (workforce coordinator) and APD. (Page 188) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~Local state agency branch and field office managers from core and mandatory partners will work with their LWBs to ensure that those receiving public assistance, low—income individuals, and those who are basic skills deficient are included in local WIOA plans and that they have a voice in the system. The agencies will work to find a way to market WIOA services to the above categories of individuals to ensure that they are aware of services and that they may use their classification to ensure priority of service. Staff at the WorkSource Oregon centers and Affiliate Sites will be trained to understand that upon discovery that an individual belongs to a priority category that priority of service will be explained to that individual. Basic skills deficient individuals can be identified through Initial Skills Review testing in the WorkSource Oregon centers, through AccuVision (soft skills) testing, and the National Career Readiness Certificate. Basic skills deficient individuals can be identified for priority of service and can be expedited into job search and occupational skills training programs. (Page 53) Title I

The agencies will continue to provide services to individuals with barriers to employment and to locally outreach to them, as funds permit, to ensure that they are aware of services and that they may use their classification to ensure priority of service. Perhaps more importantly, Oregon is continuing to expand coordination between state agencies who already serve individuals with barriers to employment, thus allowing easier identification and access to these populations. Expanded coordination with programs serving disabled (Vocational Rehabilitation), low-income (TANF and SNAP) and ex-inmates (Corrections) are examples. Staff at the WSO centers and affiliate sites will be trained to understand that upon discovery that an individual belongs to a priority category, priority of service will be explained to that individual. (Pages 55-56) Title I

OCB also uses this RFA process for vendors who provide services such as Rehabilitation Teaching, Orientation & Mobility and Assistive Technology training. Prior to permitting direct-unsupervised access with agency participants, including supported employment participants, all vendors/providers of services are required to complete and pass background checks. In requiring both the technical qualification process and the criminal background check of providers, OCB has taken the necessary steps to ensure that when agency participants choose to utilize community providers, they can count on safety and quality services for our clients.

In addition, the OCB is included in the Integrated Work Plan for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. The Oregon Department of Human Services (OHS) along with its many partners and stakeholders, strives to support the choices of individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families within local communities by promoting and providing services that are person-centered and directed, flexible, inclusive and supportive of the discovery and development of each individual's unique gifts, talents and abilities. Oregon is committed to work toward service options that ensure people with I/DD have the opportunity to live lives that are fulfilling and meaningful. (Page 219) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Strengthening the framework for partnering by developing and implementing processes will make it easier for state agencies, local boards and other workforce organizations to work together and better understand each other’s services. This process will help to underline current policies that both help and hinder collaboration and will inform future policy—making decisions to support integration. More effective partnering includes state and local workforce organizations leveraging resources, whether those resources are in the form of data, funds, or staff. As resources become scarcer, partnering will help to stretch them further to impact the outcomes of all participating organizations. Financial, institutional, political and other barriers to effective partnering will be reviewed and revised to minimize their effect on partnerships. (Page 41) Title I

VR knows that given the needs of our clients, a robust employer engagement model is required to be successful. VR continues to use Job Placement contractors to identify individual employment, assessment, and training opportunities for those who require those services to become employed. Additionally, VR strives to expand the base of employers who work with our clients who do not require individualized outreach to employers. By leveraging opportunities with other workforce partners, VR believes that it can increase employment opportunities for Oregonians with disabilities and begin to change perceptions associated with individuals with disabilities in the workforce. Oregon VR has one fulltime business engagement specialists located in the central administration office that supports each of the local branch offices in activates detailed below. VR will: • partner with the local Employment Department Business Teams to coordinate employment services, • partner with the local workforce development boards (LWDB) to coordinate employer engagement activities, • provide information to VR staff regarding apprenticeship programs and processes. • partner with local mental health providers in coordinating employment services • continue to partner with Oregon Commission of the Blind on employment services, • participate and coordinate local employer recruitment events and job fairs, • contract with providers to provide local employer engagement events and activities for individuals with disabilities, • contract with providers to and other providers • provide Job Developer Orientation Training (JDOT) or another VR approved Job Developer training to contracted job placement and partner providers, • establish local MOU’s with federal business contractor. (Page 158) Title I

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~At application, the majority of VR program clients are already receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits as a result of legal blindness. During development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), the OCB explores the client’s vocational goals and income needs, and commensurate with their skills, strengths and previous work experience jointly sets employment goals. For client’s targeting employment with earnings above the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level, the OCB utilizes the Ticket to Work program for cost reimbursement upon 9 months of successful employment at or above SGA level earnings. (Page 22) Title I

3.4 Rethink and restructure training and skill development to include innovative and effective work—based learning and apprenticeship models and to accelerate training.
Effective training often must go beyond classroom training to address all types of learners and provide hands—on experiences. Work—based learning and other innovative strategies that can help individuals understand more clearly what it is like to work in a certain industry or company are important to both improve learning outcomes and to help individuals with career exploration.
Goal 4: Create and develop talent by providing young people with information and experiences that engage their interests, spur further career development, and connect to Oregon employers. (Page 39) Title I

Goal 3 of the OWIB Strategic Plan is about investing in Oregonians to build in—demand skills, match training and job seekers to opportunities, and accelerate career momentum. Strategy 3.4 focuses on rethinking and restructuring training and skill development to include innovative and effective work—based learning and apprenticeship models and to accelerate training. This work will require engagement with the community colleges, and other training providers to build responsive and effective training models.

Effective training often must go beyond classroom training to address all types of learners and provide hands—on experiences. Work—based learning and other innovative strategies that can help individuals understand more clearly what it is like to work in a certain industry or company are important to both improve learning outcomes and to help individuals with career exploration. (Page 61) Title I

Targeting Resources for Occupational Training
Staff will develop and deploy a training program to educate staff in WorkSource Oregon centers and agency central offices about structured work—based learning, which includes registered apprenticeship. The training program will help all workforce partners understand the different training options that employers and individuals can access through the workforce system and each of their defining characteristics. The training will also teach staff how to identify an apprenticeable occupation, the characteristics of a good apprentice, and how to refer both individuals and employers to structured work—based learning training programs, certificates and credentials. The training program will help WorkSource Oregon staff understand the value of registered apprenticeship and structured work based learning, which will enable them to share the information broadly with employers and other service delivery partners. (Pages 64-65) Title I

Effective training often must go beyond classroom training to address all types of learners and provide hands—on experiences. Work—based learning and other innovative strategies that can help individuals understand more clearly what it is like to work in a certain industry or company are important to both improve learning outcomes and to help individuals with career exploration.
Provide Technical Assistance/Incentives to Support Adoption of Work—Based Learning Models
The system will build coalitions and relationships with industry and community partners to create and expand registered apprenticeship programs through two apprenticeship focused positions at OED and the Oregon Department of Education (ODE). OED will partner with local workforce boards to ensure that technical assistance and support for new apprenticeship programs are aligned with industry need and local sector strategies. ODE will partner with secondary and post—secondary institutions and community partners to increase the opportunities for youth to transition from high school into an apprenticeship or a pre—apprenticeship program. (Page 65) Title I

INPUT 2: SRC recognizes the extensive work VR staff have done to expand the Youth Transition Program and improve on the outcome of VR services for youth with disabilities. RECOMMENDATION: SRC would encourage the development of data sharing with the Oregon Department of Education on Indicators 13 and 14. We submit that the data could be helpful for VR counselors who are working with youth with disabilities, 16 years of age and older, in knowing how to help youth in transition better prepare for post-secondary life, (Indicator 13), and how successful youth have become as a result of VR intervention, i.e. was the youth employed in an appropriate career selection developed in the IPE (Indicator 14). (Pages 147-148) Title I

• Instruction on vocational, independent living and social skills. • Career development activities. • Collaboration with the local VR office to arrange for the provision of pre— employment transition services for all students with disabilities, in need of such services, without regard to the type of disability. YTP provides the five required Pre-Employment Transition Services directly to potentially eligible students with disabilities when requested. Depending on the type of request YTP may provide one, multiple or all five of the required Pre-ETS: job exploration counseling; work-based learning experiences; counseling on postsecondary educational opportunities; workplace readiness training; and instruction in self-advocacy. Oregon VR considers these students as “reportable individuals” and reports them in our quarterly 911 report. In the event that there are existing services available within the local educational agency that can meet the students need in the area of Pre-Employment Transition Services YTP may refer students to those existing services. Oregon VR does not consider students that only receive Information and Referral services from YTP as “reportable individuals” and therefore does not report them in our quarterly 911 report. YTP will not reduce the partnering school district’s obligation under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act to provide or pay for any transition services that are also considered special education or related services and that are necessary for ensuring a free appropriate public education. • Exposure and connections to paid employment. (Page 151) Title I

YTP Transition Specialists, TNFs, and school transition staff members partner with local VR offices and VR Counselors to coordinate the development and implementation of individualized education programs. When a student is determined eligible for VR services, he or she works with a school transition specialist and a vocational rehabilitation counselor to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that reflects the interests, strengths, and abilities of the student, and which addresses the barriers to training or employment outcomes for the student. VR is serving all eligible individuals and is not utilizing an Order of Selection waitlist. Should it be necessary for VR to reinstitute an Order of Selection, the scope of VR services and expected employment outcomes for all individuals served by VR, including YTP students, will be modified to comply with VR’s Order of Selection. (Page 155) Title I

A primary effort of VR and OHA Behavioral Health Programs has been development and expansion of evidence-based supported employment services by increasing the number of county mental health organizations providing such services and meeting fidelity standards. VR continues to partner with and utilize the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. As of the end of Program Year 2017, 37 community mental health programs and 35 out of 36 counties are providing IPS. With the inclusion of IPS into Oregon’s OARs, evidence-based supported employment services continue to expand across Oregon.

Additionally, VR supports and collaborates with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance in assisting young people with psychiatric disabilities by assisting them in obtaining or maintaining employment (an evidence-based practice, which is effective in reducing the onset and symptoms of mental illness). In partnership with Portland State University, VR helped create a center for excellence that provides ongoing technical assistance to EASA programs throughout the state.

VR will continue to focus on Mental Health supported employment outcomes, the quality of the outcomes, the skills of employment service providers and the capacity of community rehabilitation programs and providers. Oregon VR has reviewed potential participation with the Supported Education process that is now increasingly being utilized by many IPS providers. There are now 83 Mental Health IPS employment specialist across the State. (Pages160- 161) Title IV

Program staff and community partners were also asked to identify strategies to serve under and unserved populations. Increased staff was the strategy identified by the greatest share of program staff (63 percent), and increased transportation options was identified by the greatest share of community partners (63 percent). More interactions with the community, and providing more job skills development training were identified as strategies to serve unserved populations by more than a majority of both program staff and community partners. Almost half of all staff (48 percent) and 57 percent of community partners felt that staff training to work on specialty caseloads would help serve under and unserved participants. More than half of community partner respondents also cited improving interagency collaboration and public awareness campaign key strategies for serving under or unserved populations. Underserved and Unserved Youth with Disabilities Despite the many strengths of Oregon’s youth transition work, some youth are underserved or fall through the cracks. A quarter (25 percent, or 18) of vocational rehabilitation staff and a third (33 percent, or 31) of vocational rehabilitation community partners felt that people between the ages of 16 to 21 are underserved by vocational rehabilitation services. Interviewees discussed varying reasons for this. Some students don’t choose to participate in transition services while in school, do not have a YTP program available to them, or do not have a disability focused on by their school’s transition services. If those students take a break between school and connecting to vocational rehabilitation services, they have often lost and need to be re-taught the structures, routines and soft skills obtained through school attendance. Sometimes the gap between graduation and vocational rehabilitation participation is not a student’s choice, but rather the result of high vocational rehabilitation caseloads causing backlogs. Stakeholders suggest increased collaboration with programs serving out of school youth to improve outcomes for this population. Additionally, some staff expressed a desire to be involved with students earlier in their school careers, and to have more communication including increased involvement at individualized education program (IEP) meetings. Interviewees and focus group participants discussed limited connection between contracted job developers and students in transition seeking employment. Some stakeholders discussed this as an educator’s or a youth transition program counselor’s responsibility. Participating contractors were looking for guidance in how to formally provide services to this population. (Pages 171- 172) Title IV

Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation is making additional investments in pre-employment transition services through the following partnerships: • Silver Falls Came LEAD (Leadership Empowerment Advocacy Development). Students with disabilities participate in leadership academies, focused on job exploration, work-based learning experiences, postsecondary education counseling, workplace readiness training, and self-advocacy instruction. • AntFarm. Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation partners with AntFarm to provide work experiences in gardening and farming. • Worksystems, Inc. Students receive work experiences in Washington and Multnomah counties with public and private employers. • Motivational Enhancement Group Intervention interviewing. Students gain self-advocacy skills through a collaborative, goal-oriented style of communication. (Page 178) Title IV

2. Increase capacity and resources to provide enhanced levels of service to Oregonians with Disabilities a. Assist the workforce system with increasing its capacity and capability to serve Oregonians with Disabilities i. Convene cross agency workgroup to address the needs of underserved populations in the workforce system as a whole ii. Provide training to workforce partners on working with individuals with disabilities iii. Work with other agencies who work with clients with barriers to employment to address common access issues in the workforce system iv. Work with local workforce boards to ensure that programmatic access issues are identified and addressed b. Restructure the VR service delivery model to comply with state contracting requirements and be outcome driven i. Continue transition to newly structured pay-for-performance Job Placement Services Contract which includes a third track for individuals with the most significantly disabilities. These individuals require addition services that are were not funded appropriately in our traditional supported employment track. ii. Create contracts with clear minimum qualifications, scope of work, and cost structure for all personal services to ensure high quality and consistent services statewide c. Expand the availability of Vendor and Partner services that meet the needs of Oregonians with disabilities, including those requiring supported employment services i. Develop a community college based Career Pathway to develop job placement professionals and job coaches in the community ii. Identify areas of limited service availability, including supported employment services, and develop and implement recruitment and solicitation plans iii. Work with providers of sheltered and subminimum wage employment to transition to the integration of their clients into competitive and integrated employment in their respective communities. 3. Improve the performance of the VR program with respect to the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA. a. Increase staff knowledge of the labor market i. Encourage branch level engagement with regional economists and workforce analysts to educate staff on local labor market issues ii. Work with Local Workforce Development Boards to engage with local sector strategies and pursue high wage, high demand work opportunities. b. Expand opportunities for skill gain and credentialing i. Identify and access local skill upgrading opportunities within the Local Workforce Areas (LWA) ii. Partner with community college Disability Service Offices (DSO) to increase access to existing credentialing programs iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability c. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs i. Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities i. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns ii. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity iii. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon. (Page 182-183) Title IV

Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability 3. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs a. Use labor market information to create work—based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs b. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level c. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. 4. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work—based learning opportunities a. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide b. Implement a progressive employment model c. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams d. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities e. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets f. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers 5. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities a. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns b. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity c. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon The Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Program is an active participant in the implementation of the WIOA. (Pages 189) Title IV

Partner with community college Disability Service Offices (DSO) to increase access to existing credentialing programs iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability c. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs i. Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities. (Pages 194) Title IV

VR’s SE program continues to provide opportunities for individuals of all ages with the most significant disabilities to achieve competitive integrated employment with ongoing support provided by a variety of partners. These same individuals are those for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred. VR provides a continuum of SE services in partnership with other human services agencies and programs that persons with the most significant disabilities need to develop, maintain and advance in competitive employment. VR continues to work closely with other state programs, local governmental units, community—based organizations and groups to develop, refine and expand the availability of SE services throughout Oregon. During FFY 15 VR revamped our pay for performance Job Placement Services Contracts that provides Job Placement, Job Coaching, and Retention services. VR currently has over 200 contracts in place to provide job placement statewide. These contracts give VR the ability to pay for placement services in three tiers based on the significance of the functional limitation that the client experiences. Tiers two and three focus on clients who require SE services in order to be successful in the labor market. In FFY 2017, VR provided SE services to 3,922 individuals with significant disabilities, including persons with psychiatric disabilities, intellectual and/or developmental disabilities or traumatic brain injuries. During this same period, 727 individuals who received SE services entered into competitive integrated employment, and 2,517 individuals continued to participate in their SE IPEs. (Page 196) Title IV

Clients and employer are satisfied with placements. Historically, VR has partnered with OHA Behavioral Health Programs in promoting Individualized Placement and Support (IPS), an evidence—based SE model. Quality of these programs is assessed through compliance with a scale, which measures the ‘fidelity’ or the degree to which a program is being implemented in accordance the evidence based fidelity model developed after extensive research from Dartmouth College. Some of the measures used in the IPS fidelity scales are the kinds of employment outcomes participants are obtaining; the degree of collaboration with vocational rehabilitation; availability of rapid job search and evidence of consumer choice. VR maintains quality SE outcomes through ongoing collaboration with mental health providers on the local level and OHA Mental Health Programs central office staff. Supported employment is integrated into the array of services and programs available to Oregonians with disabilities, including Oregon’s mental health and developmental disability service systems. Success in SE requires a partnership among the responsible state and community programs, other service providers, consumers and families, advocacy organizations, employers and others. Long— term success continues to depend on the availability of funding for follow—along SE services. VR utilizes Title VI, Part B and Title I funds for the time—limited services necessary for an individual to stabilize in a community—based job. Services that may be part of a SE IPE include: • Person centered planning • Community—based assessment • Job development • Job placement • On—site training for worker and/or coworkers • Long—term support development • Other services and goods • Post—employment services The specific type, level and location of ongoing supports provided to an individual are based upon his or her needs and those of the employer. Ongoing support may be provided by a variety of public and/or private sector resources including: • OHA Behavioral Health Programs and community mental health programs • DDS community supports • County developmental disability case managers and developmental disability service brokerages • Social Security work incentives • Employer—provided reasonable accommodations • Natural supports • Family or community sponsorship • By VR, for youth with the most significant disabilities who: need extended support services; are not currently eligible for extended support services from any other known source; are 23 or younger; and, have an annually amended and approved IPE to include VR extended support services; and, for no longer than a total of 4 Yrs. (Page 197) Title IV

There is active information sharing and coordinated planning between OCB and regional programs, OVRS, education and health care organizations throughout the state. Partners join in planning outreach efforts, coordinate referral of potentially eligible youth for VR, and implement process improvements for assessment & training statewide in the areas of daily living skills, orientation and mobility/cane travel, communication skills, technology, vocational aptitudes, interpersonal /social skills, and academic preparation for transition-age youth.
Ages 14 - 21 OCB's application for vocational rehabilitation services generally begins around age 16 (as early as age 14), and requires the development of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for all students within 90 days of eligibility, which matches the timeline for adult services.
In addition, the Oregon Commission for the Blind has an Interagency Agreement with the Oregon Department of Education. (Page 214) Title IV

Oregon Department of Education will assist local education agencies, Oregon School for the Deaf and community colleges in accessing the services provided by OCB, which can be requested to aid in the transition to employment services, serve as a liaison between the parties, Encourage the screening, identifying and referring of potential clients to OCB to provide a continuum of appropriate procedures and services, identify methods to coordinate the IEP with the IPE, provide information related to the availability of public education programs, facilitate the availability of diagnostic and evaluative information to the Commission for the Blind relevant to the determination of eligibility. (Page 215) Title IV

OCB is able to develop relationships with youth who are blind/visually impaired and parents, providing a vocational context within IEP and 504 Planning & Implementation Team discussions and ensuring an important link to identifying the individualized skills needing to be addressed in order for the youth to be prepared for adult life after graduation.
OCB transition counselors provide youth with counseling/services/programs to aid in preparation for transitioning to post-high school/college/employment. Individuals who are blind/low vision who have early exposure to adaptive skills training, vocational exploration and active socialization have a head start to becoming functional, employed and fully integrated adults. The OCB knows not all learning can take place in the classroom, and therefor offers Summer Work Experience Programs (SWEP) to complement the learning that is available through the public education system. These pre-employment transition programs serve to give each participant a safe environment to discover their vocational aptitudes, develop confidence in adaptive skills and encourage self-advocacy and independence. These pre-employment transition programs (offered in the Summer) are a key to the agency's success in quality of employment outcomes for students with vision loss. (Page 216) Title IV

Coordination of professional development under IDEA Agency staff who work with transition-age youth coordinate transition activities throughout Oregon to teachers of the visually impaired and other Special Education personnel. These staff work with regional staff to ensure customers receive services and information necessary to facilitate a smooth transition from high school to adult services. Based on assessments and training provided by OCB, OCB staff provide recommendations and information to regional programs, parents and students about vocational rehabilitation services including availability, referral, and eligibility requirements that support a coordinated transition plan from high school to post-school services.
Consultation is also provided as early as necessary to special education staff regarding IEP planning and development. OCB staff shares data and reports relevant to program development and planning. (Page 227) Title IV

If the assessment shows that the student will require ongoing support to sustain acceptable work performance and maintain employment, supported employment is included in the services to be provided in the IPE. The IPE includes collaboration and funding from other agencies or organizations that assist by providing the ongoing support services required. All services provided by the Commission for the Blind are time limited unless the eligible individual and the counselor jointly agree that additional time is required to reach the IPE goal and the individual is progressing toward that goal. (Page 239) Title IV

The Oregon Commission for the Blind uses its Title VI, Part B funds to provide supported employment services to eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities for whom competitive employment in an integrated setting is their current vocational goal. These clients, because of the nature of their disability, often require extensive services in order to be successful. Specialized placement assistance, lengthened training periods and planning for ongoing support is required in order for clients to be successful. All of the funds are used for individual case costs. Our approach for supported employment services is as follows: If an individual's goal is to pursue an employment outcome in an integrated setting, an IPE will be developed in accordance with the individual's strengths, interests, resources, priorities, and informed choice. Services are purchased on a fee-for service basis from providers within the community. Careful job analysis and intensive one to one training are provided. (Page 246) Title IV

The Oregon Commission for the Blind will continue to leverage IGAs with partners/regional programs throughout the state to meet the needs of students with the most significant disabilities. The OCB is committed to working alongside DHS/DD/ID providers to insure that each student is surrounded with a qualified team of professionals to assist him/her towards their IPE. (Page 248) Title IV
The OCB will continue to provide its array of services/programs and paid work experiences to students with vision loss/blindness. OCB will continue to organize and manage our two paid summer work experience programs (in Salem and Portland) for eligible students age 16+, and will expand the program and staffing to provide more paid work experience and pre- employment transition service opportunities throughout the year.
o The OCB will continue to nurture the relationships with business that support these work opportunities for students who are blind.
o The OCB will continue to build relationships and participate in IEP meetings with school districts, teachers of the visually impaired, students and families throughout the state.
o The OCB will explore methods for supporting work experience for students with visual disability more locally across the state and more broadly throughout the year outside of summer programs.
o The OCB is also exploring new methods for providing pre- employment transition services to students with visual disability, focusing in particular upon the adaptive and soft skills necessary to succeed in an adult workplace. (Page 257) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~AEFLA-funded Adult-Basic-Skills Programs work with employers through connections with their colleges’ Career Pathways, Customized Training, Workforce Training, and Occupational Skills Training programs. Another critical partner is VR. The Vocational Rehabilitation program by design contacts the Business and employer community utilizing a client specific approach. VR’s approach of utilizing contracted vendors to job develop for individual clients indicates a different model regarding employer outreach. However, employers also approach the VR offices with Job Opportunities and VR will address a process where these contacts and opportunities can be blended into a Workforce combined business outreach method. (Page 58) Title I

These individuals require addition services that are were not funded appropriately in our traditional supported employment track ii. Create contracts with clear minimum qualifications, scope of work, and cost structure for all personal services to ensure high quality and consistent services statewide c. Expand the availability of Vendor and Partner services that meet the needs of Oregonians with disabilities, including those requiring supported employment services i. Develop a community college based Career Pathway to develop job placement professionals and job coaches in the community ii. Identify areas of limited service availability, including supported employment services, and develop and implement recruitment and solicitation plans iii. Work with providers of sheltered and subminimum wage employment to transition to the integration of their clients into competitive and integrated employment in their respective communities. 3. Improve the performance of the VR program with respect to the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA a. Increase staff knowledge of the labor market i. Encourage branch level engagement with regional economists and workforce analysts to educate staff on local labor market issues ii. Work with Local Workforce Development Boards to engage with local sector strategies and pursue high wage, high demand work opportunities b. Expand opportunities for skill gain and credentialing i. Identify and access local skill upgrading opportunities within the Local Workforce Areas (LWA ii. Partner with community college Disability Service Offices (DSO) to increase access to existing credentialing programs iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability. (Page 194) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The OCB expects participants who are blind, low vision and deaf blind to become fully engaged in the array of workforce services. OCB expects our counseling staff to be active and equal partners among the regional and local workforce partners, where the talents of agency participants can be more effectively matched with business needs through sharing of employment strategies and real time labor market information. OCB expects partner programs to identify shared core- participant job readiness skill needs, and to work with all partners to develop common-need trainings - and share presentation efforts where applicable - to strengthen the skill sets of our agency participants through access to all. OCB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual's aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self- sufficiency. (Pages 259-260) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) continues to establish relationships with private non—profit and for profit entities that are community rehabilitation providers, medical services providers, and providers of other services and supports that are required by VR clients to achieve the goals in their Individualized Plans for Employment. VR staff develop relationships in the community to meet the needs of their client and to provide choice of providers to their clients. Services provided by the community rehabilitation providers, contractors, and vendors include medical and psychological assessments and services, job development and employer services, job coaching and facilitation, accommodations and ergonomics, independent living services to support employment goals, follow up services, and other services especially for individuals with significant disabilities. The cooperative relationship vary from information and referral relationships to fee—for—service and pay for performance relationships. VR follows State of Oregon contractual processes when establishing contracts for services. VR works with and establishes relationships with non—profit organizations to fully utilize the benefits provided through the SSA TTW program. In January 2010, Oregon VR initiated a Ticket to Work shared payment agreement pilot with ten community mental health programs that provide evidence—based mental health supported employment services. These mental health agencies are governed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) who contracts with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) to provide annual programs and technical assistance. These agreements allow Oregon VR to be the Employment Network of record with SSA, partner with the mental health agency to provide dual services to an individual. Once the VR case is closed, the mental health agency continues to support the individual until the support is no longer needed. If the individual works and reaches the SSA TTW wage thresholds, Oregon VR receives TTW payments which in turn are split with the mental health agencies. This pilot evolved into a project that has strengthened the relationship between VR and these participating agencies by providing additional TTW dollars for additional program funding. As of July 2017 we have sixteen agreements in place. We will continue to review our contracts with Private Non Profit organizations and update this section when new contracts are completed. (Pages 156-157) Title IV

Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities i. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns ii. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity iii. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon. (Pages 183)  Title I

a. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide b. Implement a progressive employment model c. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams d. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities e. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets f. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers 5. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities a. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns b. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity c. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon The Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Program is an active participant in the implementation of the WIOA. (Page 189) Title I

Another factor that may indicate significant disability is receipt of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). In order to receive SSI or SSDI an individual must prove that he or she is unable to work. The RSA longitudinal study of the vocational rehabilitation services program found that individuals accepted for services were more likely to exit the program prior to receiving VR services if they were receiving SSI or SSDI at entry. The following data describes the percentage of people receiving public financial assistance at program entry and the associated outcome.
Outcome % of participants who were receiving SSI/SSDI at application:
Exited VR after services without an employment outcome: PY 15: 65%, PY 16: 65%
Exited VR after services with an employment outcome: PY 15: 62%, PY 16: 59%
While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income-dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services.
Commission Services for Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities:
The Commission is reaching those with the most significant disabilities through outreach and by providing individualized services.
The Commission provides post- employment services if the disability changes, the technology on the job has changed, or there is new software and the person needs training on the new software. (Page 230-231) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~VR knows that given the needs of our clients, a robust employer engagement model is required to be successful. VR continues to use Job Placement contractors to identify individual employment, assessment, and training opportunities for those who require those services to become employed. Additionally, VR strives to expand the base of employers who work with our clients who do not require individualized outreach to employers. By leveraging opportunities with other workforce partners, VR believes that it can increase employment opportunities for Oregonians with disabilities and begin to change perceptions associated with individuals with disabilities in the workforce. Oregon VR has one fulltime business engagement specialists located in the central administration office that supports each of the local branch offices in activates detailed below.

VR will:

  • partner with the local Employment Department Business Teams to coordinate employment services,
  • partner with the local workforce development boards (LWDB) to coordinate employer engagement activities,
  • provide information to VR staff regarding apprenticeship programs and processes.
  • partner with local mental health providers in coordinating employment services
  • continue to partner with Oregon Commission of the Blind on employment services,
  • participate and coordinate local employer recruitment events and job fairs,
  • contract with providers to provide local employer engagement events and activities for individuals with disabilities,
  • contract with providers to and other providers
  • provide Job Developer Orientation Training (JDOT) or another VR approved Job Developer training to contracted job placement and partner providers,
  • establish local MOU’s with federal business contractors.
  • provide information to VR staff regarding 503 information, protocols and processes.
  • provide local trainings and resources on disability awareness and accommodations,
  • establish partnerships with local nonprofits that provide employment services,
  • participate in in local area business events to enhance disability awareness,
  • Promote and develop local area internships for individuals with disabilities.

Employer survey respondents were asked to rate the perceived helpfulness of a variety of potential services provided to employers by VR. The survey items with the highest perceived helpfulness reported by respondents to the business survey were:

  • Providing workers with disabilities with the accommodations and supports they need to do the employer’s work;
  • If concerns arise, providing consultation with management, the workers, and co—workers to resolve the concerns;
  • Placing qualified individuals in internships at the business with full reimbursement of the employer’s expenses;
  • Providing training consultation and resources related to the provision of reasonable accommodations; and
  • Finding workers that meet the employer’s workforce needs. (Page 158) Title IV

o Train students in workplace readiness o Provide screening and referral of appropriate youth o Identification of appropriate worksites and task o Provide counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive training opportunities to meet the desired qualification of employers • In the Portland Metro area VR staff are working with health providers Legacy and Providence Health to pilot training and streamlined hiring program for students with disabilities. Students placed in competitive integrated employment with these employers are supported with 12 months of follow along services to ensure stable employment. • VR Contractors are working with business and schools regarding employer engagement models to offer competitive, integrated employment and career exploration opportunities. These trainings include: o Pre— employment trainings with school staff to meet employer needs o Interest inventories with students o Trainings on developing partnership agreements o Trainings on job needs analysis o Marketing school based programs o Pre and post training evaluations for students involved in work experiences. Oregon VR has hired two Pre-Employment Transition Coordinators that are actively working with employers to create paid and unpaid work experiences for students with disabilities. The Pre-Employment Transition Coordinators are also working with employers to develop essential skills profiles for students to identify current work readiness expectations from local employers. (Page159) Title IV

iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability c. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs i. Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities i. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns ii. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity iii. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon. (Page 183) Title IV

Data Collection

1. Increase quality employment outcomes for all Oregonians with disabilities. According to the current data our rehabilitation rate has slightly declined. 2016 rehab rate was 62.3%, and dropped in 2017 to 60.2%. As of the end of December 2nd quarter PY 18 it is 57.5%. We are evaluating why this is occurring. a. Support and accelerate the customer experience to be empowering, effective, and efficient

i. Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process We continue to work towards earlier engagement with our Workforce partners. There are varying degrees of involvement with the 9 Local Workforce Development Boards. Local development activities are continuing between VR and d the Local Workface Development Boards to continue to identify mechanisms to increase earlier engagement.

ii. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies Data sharing agreements are in place with OED (Wagner Peyser) the Department of Education, and various other entities. VR continues to work to develop the technological connections for efficient and timely transfer of Data between Core partners in order to populate our RSA 911 quarterly reports and to utilize the data to see where programmatic adjustments will need to be made.

iii. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process to get clients into plan more quickly. Since 2016 Plan completion we have gotten our clients into plan (or plan extension) more quickly as identified by the following data: SFY 2015 62.0% (we were shifting from 180-day timeline to 90. SFY 2016 77% SFY 2017 84% SFY 2018 Q1 91% SFY 2018 Q2 92% iv. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication This process is still in development. (Page 192) Title IV

Baseline performance metrics are currently being established. Oregon VR achieved the following 116 metrics for PY2015. As Baselines are being established, the program will continue to review our outcomes and the strategies that impact these metrics. Common Performance Measures achieved (July1, 2015-June 30 2016) PY2015 SFY 2016 Percentage rehabilitated 62.30%. Percentage of clients who closed from plan employed during the 2nd quarter following closure. 56.75% Percentage of clients who closed from plan employed during 4th quarter following closure. 54.67% Median quarterly wage at 2nd quarter following closure from the program $3,391.84 Percent of clients employed with same employer during the second and fourth quarters following exit from program 71.64%. (Pages 195-196) Title IV

511

~~OCB believes that all individuals are capable of integrated and competitive work with the right supports in place, and the state has over the years reduced options for sub-minimum wage employment. The new regulations requiring the agency to provide pre-employment transition services for youth with disability before certification for sub-minimum wage work is expected to have little impact on the agency, as this is the direction the state has been moving towards. A challenge for supported employment is that the comparable benefit resources available in Oregon State to provide extended long-term support services are limited. OCB works in collaboration with all available resources and partners on cases that have co-occurring disabling conditions that make long-term supports necessary. The OCB continues to work with employers and other natural supports to identify funding for long-term support services.  (Page 218) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Vets

* Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. The State’s Workforce Development Activities. The Workforce system provides services focused in broad categories: •Enhancing the job skills of Oregon’s workforce. (Page 19) Title I

For example, the VR program is working with the Local Leadership Teams and LWDB’s to have full understanding of the determined Sector Strategies and Sector Partnerships at the local level. As individual VR clients are counselled and address his or her career development, the local sector partnership details and goals are shared with these job seekers with disabilities. These participants can then determine if these sector industries/employment areas, and associated career development, are something the individual client would wish to pursue. Additionally, Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs) partner with the Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI) apprenticeship and On the Job Training (OJT) representatives to ensure that employers are aware of the benefits of hiring a veteran. LVERs also communicate apprenticeship and OJT opportunities for veterans to WorkSource Oregon Business and Employment Specialists and DVOP staff. (Page 58) Title I

The State Veterans Program Coordinator provided the following materials in accordance with the Jobs for Veterans Act, section 4215 of 38 U.S.C. to all WSO centers in order to educate the WorkSource center staff on the roles and responsibilities of Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPs), and Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs), and to ensure that veterans and eligible spouses receive priority of service in all Oregon WorkSource locations: • Priority of Service example tools • Customer workflow diagram example, and • Department of Labor approved Priority of Service Training for Frontline Staff available online via iLearn, Oregon’s interactive training site for all WSO staff and partner staff. The priority of service training materials were disseminated to each WorkSource location in Oregon in order to ensure: • That eligible veterans and eligible spouses receive priority of service in the customer intake process, for training opportunities, referrals to employers and for employment based workshops offered at each OED/WorkSource location. • OED/WorkSource staff can refer special disabled veterans and veterans with barriers to employment to DVOPs for intensive services and case management services. • Each Business and Employment Specialist staff member can provide excellent customer service and core employment services to those veterans that are not eligible to meet with a DVOP. (Page 86) Title I

Mental Health

~~11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer the flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs.

12. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with WIOA section 116) and to monitor program performance.

13. Whether the local area in which the eligible provider is located has a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs. (Page 136) Title I

The Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Program (VR) has developed and maintains cooperative agreements and cooperative relationships where necessary with federal and state agencies not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system. This cooperation includes, but is not limited to the Centers for Independent Living (CILs), Oregon Developmental Disability Services (ODDS), local I/DD brokerages, county service providers, Oregon’s Mental Health Programs (including programs that serve in and out of school youth), the Client Assistance Program (CAP), Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation 121 Programs, Oregon Department of Education (ODE), local school districts, community colleges, Access Technologies Inc. (ATI), and local agencies providing services to our clients. VR strives to have cooperative relationships that streamline referral and service delivery, including joint planning, leverages funds, provide coordinated and non—duplicated services, and maximize the use of wrap around services to ensure success. VR’s goal is to simplify, streamline, and expedite services to clients while maximizing access to services that will help with their success. (Page 152) Title I

A primary effort of VR and OHA Behavioral Health Programs has been development and expansion of evidence-based supported employment services by increasing the number of county mental health organizations providing such services and meeting fidelity standards. VR continues to partner with and utilize the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. As of the end of Program Year 2017, 37 community mental health programs and 35 out of 36 counties are providing IPS. With the inclusion of IPS into Oregon’s OARs, evidence-based supported employment services continue to expand across Oregon. (Page 160) Title I

VR will continue to focus on Mental Health supported employment outcomes, the quality of the outcomes, the skills of employment service providers and the capacity of community rehabilitation programs and providers. Oregon VR has reviewed potential participation with the Supported Education process that is now increasingly being utilized by many IPS providers. There are now 83 Mental Health IPS employment specialist across the State. (Page 161) Title I

Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation collaborates with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance, a statewide effort to provide systematic early psychosis interventions at mental health centers to assist young people with psychiatric disabilities in obtaining or maintaining employment. Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation worked with Addictions and Mental Health and Portland State University to create a center of excellence providing ongoing technical assistance to statewide Early Assessment and Support Alliance programs. Vocational rehabilitation funded four county pilot sites to identify a best practices model to engage youth experiencing a first psychotic episode in accessing vocational rehabilitation and local workforce programs. • Seamless Transition Project. A few organizations are piloting a seamless transition project targeting youth. Similar to Project SEARCH from Cincinnati Community Health, it is a series of rotating internships provided by host businesses to prepare youth with disabilities for employment. (Page 178-179) Title IV

VR and the State Rehabilitation Council have had opportunities over the last year to work together on several aspects of the VR program, policies, procedures, and service delivery. Additionally, VR and SRC worked to jointly develop our State’s goals, priorities and strategies looking forward. The SRC approved the final draft of the VR portion of Section 6 of the Unified State Plan at their February 2016 meeting after a final opportunity to add comments. A comprehensive needs assessment was completed September 23, 2013, a survey was completed by the SRC April 2015 in regards to the VR programs Job Placement Services process and contract, regular case reviews are conducted by the Business and Finance Manager as well as Branch Managers. The results of these reports and activities were taken into account in the development of these goals, priorities, and strategies. The performance measures as defined by the WIOA, and activities necessary to meet the expected outcomes were also taken in to consideration. VR put the Plan up for public comment in January and February. The VR Plan was available to all interested parties through the VR internet site and the Oregon Workforce Investment Board (OWIB) website. Copies of the initial draft were sent out to an extensive list of interested parties, members of the SRC, members of the OWIB and to our traditional service delivery partners such as the Tribes, Mental Health providers etc. Public hearings occurred in three locations during the month of February. LaGrande, Medford and Salem hosted these sessions with the local Manager in attendance. VR received written feedback from our Workforce Partners, Tribal partners, Centers for Independent Living, and had feedback from Mental Health Programs. Comment was received from individuals as well. All this feedback was reviewed and incorporated into the VR State Plan. (Pages 180-181) Title IV

The funds will be used to provide Supported Employment Services to those adult and transitional age youth with the most significant disabilities. At least 50% these funds will be targeted towards youth with the most significant disabilities who need them to transition to employment.

The Supported Employment Services include job development, job coaching and any extended supports needed. For individuals with a primary disability of intellectual and/or development disability, clients will receive extended services after closure from the Office of Developmental Disabilities. For clients with Mental Health disabilities who receive services from OHA Mental Health programs, extended services are provided by the fidelity based IPS program once the client exits from the Vocational Rehabilitation program. (Page 186) Title IV

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(4)). Describe the designated State agency’s efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other State agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide supported employment services and extended employment services, as applicable, to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities.

Agency response: OCB provides Supported Employment services to individuals with disabilities co-occurring with visual impairment that make long-term supports necessary for the individual's success in maintaining integrated and competitive employment, including developmental disabilities, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and disabilities due to mental health. (Page 218) Title IV

Mental Health Services OCB is committed to collaborating with mental health services throughout Oregon in order to insure collaboration, coordination of services, and mutual understanding of scope and role of each agency in promoting success for individuals who require long-term employment supports.

In addition, although we have no formal agreement in the provision of mental health services, the agency has been able to be effective in the individualized coordination of services on a case by case basis in the event we have a client who is blind who is also a client of that system. (Page 221) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Supplementing Wagner-Peyser funds with state dollars also funds the delivery of enhanced services to the business community. This increased capacity to meet the service needs of employers, helps to improve their bottom—line by lowering recruitment, turnover, and training costs. More businesses are choosing our enhanced service option, as validated by the hundreds of success stories from businesses sharing that the service more than meets their needs and expectations. Our ability to maintain these services is contingent upon receiving state funds in the future. Data on UI claimants suggests the coordination of Title I-IV core programs resources will improve the ability of all customers to return to work. The VR Program will continue to work with the Workforce System in Oregon to increase capacity and access to Workforce opportunities and services for Oregonians with Disabilities. The VR Program will continue to collaborate and coordinate with LWDBs and other partners to increase opportunity and access for VR clients while earnestly and simultaneously trying to help meet the recruitment needs of employers. (Page 31) Title I

Title IV regularly uses evaluations of data and qualitative information to measure the effectiveness of our program. Evaluations completed in the last two years have resulted in such things as: a revamping of our statewide procurement process for job placement service, changes to the job placement service delivery model, training to help staff move clients into plan faster, trainings on specific disability barriers, cross trainings with other agencies to ensure better partnerships, changes to business practices using the LEAN model, and the piloting of some new evidenced —based best practices around transition. An assessment of the Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) program show that it is effective in helping speed claimants return to work and in preventing and detecting unemployment insurance (UI) overpayments. Over the past two years, the RESEA program has helped shorten claims duration, reduce exhaustion rates, and increase detection of potential issues resulting in disqualification or overpayment. (Page 77) Title I

Most UI claimants are required to complete an electronic profile for job matching purposes and attend an orientation with Employment Services staff. Only claimants attached to a closed union, in approved training (including apprenticeship programs), who commute while living out of state, or who have a definite return to work date within 28 days of their lay off date do not have to complete these steps. The orientation includes a review of their electronic profile for completeness and provides an overview of services available to job seekers through WSO centers and partners. Of those claimants, some are selected for a Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (known as REA or RESEA) as part of their orientation. Initial REA/RESEA interviews are conducted in person by ES staff who are co—located with Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) service providers. The REA/RESEA includes an overview of UI eligibility requirements for remaining able, available and actively seeking work. It further provides more customized discussions with each claimant about “next steps” that could assist the person with becoming reemployed sooner as part of a basic reemployment plan. (Page 119) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 81 - 86 of 86

Oregon ICF/IDD Support Services (0375.R04.00)

~~Provides employment path services, supported employment - individual employment support, waiver case management, direct nursing, discovery/career exploration services, environmental safety modifications, family training - conferences and workshops, financial management services, special diets, specialized medical supplies, supported employment - small group employment support, vehicle modifications for individuals w/ID/DD ages 18 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) 2014-2015

~"The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) provides core supported employment professional training through a series of four, 2 day trainings. These trainings help employment professionals meet Oregon’s employment professional core competencies requirement through eight days of in person training. Each of the two-day seminars results in twelve hours of training.The OELN Training Series is now accredited by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE)".
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Work Incentive Network (WIN!) (now part of the activities of the MIG)

Part of the activities of the MIG

“Benefits and Work Incentive Counseling services help people with disabilities make informed decisions about work, benefits and the use of work incentives to achieve their employment goals, as well as helping them navigate the benefits system when they begin working."

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Oregon Administrative Rules Chapter 411 Division 345 Employment Services for Individuals with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities - 07/02/2018

~~“The purposes of the rules in OAR chapter 411, division 345 are to:(1) Effectuate Oregon’s Employment First policy, as described in the State of Oregon Executive Order No. 15-01 and OAR chapter 407, division 025, under which:(a) The employment of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities in competitive integrated employment is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, or other non-work day activities.(b) For individuals who successfully achieve the goal of competitive integrated employment, future person-centered service planning focuses on maintaining employment, maximizing the number of hours an individual works, using the standard of obtaining at least 20 hours of week of work, consistent with the individual’s preferences and interests, and considering additional career or advancement opportunities” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon HB 3063: Relating to Housing for Individuals with Mental Illness - 08/08/2017

“The Housing and Community Services Department, in collaboration with the Oregon Health Authority, shall disburse moneys in the Housing for Mental Health Fund to provide funding for:

(a) The development of community-based housing, including licensed residential treatment facilities, for individuals with mental illness and individuals with substance use disorders;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon SB 777 (ABLE Act) - 08/12/2015

"The Oregon 529 Savings Board shall establish by rule and maintain a qualified ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] program in accordance with the requirements of the ABLE Act. (2) The rules must: (a) Allow a person to make contributions for a taxable year to an ABLE account established for the purpose of meeting the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account..."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Oregon Senate Bill 22 - Employment First - 04/08/2013

The bill details the rights of persons with developmental disabilities who are receiving developmental disability services.  It proclaims that “individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities and society as a whole benefit when the individuals exercise choice and self-determination, living and working in the most integrated community settings appropriate to their needs, with supportive services that are designed and implemented consistent with the choice of the individuals regarding services, providers, goals and activities.”  Moreover it proclaims that, “the employment of individuals with developmental disabilities in fully integrated work settings is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, facility-based employment or day habilitation.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

427.007 OR Policy; Department of Human Services to plan and facilitate community services.

Emphasizes the importance of home and community based services that help to facilitate community integration for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. “Therefore, the Department of Human Services is directed to facilitate the development of appropriate community-based services, including family support, residential facilities, day programs, home care and other necessary support, care and training programs, in an orderly and systematic manner. The role of state-operated hospitals and training centers in Oregon shall be as specialized back-up facilities to a primary system of community-based services for persons with intellectual disabilities or other developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Executive Order Number 19-06 – Establishing the Behavioral Health Advisory Council - 10/18/2019

“Over the last decade, Oregon has made significant strides in transforming and strengthening our overall health care system, but our progress has not been even across all components of the health care delivery system…We have fallen short of adequately addressing the unique needs or Oregonians with serious and complex behavioral health conditions…Oregon experiences some of the highest rates of serious mental illness, substance abuse disorders, and suicide in the country….

The Governor’s Behavioral Health Advisory Council (the “Council”) is established. The Council shall recommend an action plan for the state of Oregon’s behavioral health system that includes concrete actions, policies, and potential investments needed to preserve and improve services and supports for youth and adults with serious mental illness, including those with co-occurring substance use disorders.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Oregon Executive Order 15-01 - Providing employment services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities - 02/02/2015

Supersedes Executive Order 13-04   “This Executive Order revises and supersedes Executive Order 13-04 in order to provide further policy guidance intended to continue the state’s progress in these areas [providing supported employment services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities], including through a substantial reduction in employment in sheltered workshops.  Continue to improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving competitive integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, consistent with their abilities and choices, will benefit individuals with disabilities, their families, our communities, the economy, and the state.”  

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 31 - 34 of 34

OR Employment First

This web page, housed by the Oregon Department of Human Services, contains information on the Oregon Employment first initiative. It contains information for job seekers, families and employers.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Human Services, Vocational Rehabilitation Services

The Department of Human Services vocational rehabilitation services contains definitions and descriptions for employment services including job assessments, assistive technology, training and technological assistance, community rehabilitation programs and customized employment, among many other services.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Planning My Way to Work: A Transition Guide for Student with Disabilities Leaving High School

“This manual is intended to: Help you make your way through the transition process; Understand your rights, services and resources that may help you and your family; Provide information to help you understand complex adult service systems; Highlight that you direct your own transition; Reinforce that you and your team design your transition just for you; and Identify your work and other adult life goals and a plan to achieve those goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Employment First Central Oregon- Members - 05/12/2019

~~This page has information on the member organizations that are a part of Employment First Central Oregon

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

A Personal Guide to Community Employment - 04/02/2019

~~“OSAC, a statewide nonprofit organization, is led by people with developmental disabilities. We believe that with high expectations, appropriate supports and the right job match, people can get competitive integrated employment – or a community job. At a community job, a person:•Works full or part-time;•Earns minimum wage or higher; and•Works with coworkers without disabilities” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding Developmental Disabilities Services Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/30/2016

“,,,IDDS adoption of and VR endorsement of the “Employment First Policy” for working age adults with developmental disabilities”   “This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services.  This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of the MOUR is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and rthe Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 115-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society. “  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding: Developmental Disabilities Services and Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/28/2016

“This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services. This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of this MOU is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and the Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 15-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding on Transition of Students with Disabilities to the Workforce - 02/02/2015

“Together with Executive Order No.15-01, this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) recognizes that, while the State cannot guarantee jobs, Oregon starts with the presumption that everyone can be employed in an integrated setting in a community-based job…Oregon is not guaranteeing anyone a job, but with significant additional resources, Oregon s optimistic that all persons with IDD will have an opportunity to obtain integrated employment.”   “Vision: Through strong agency collaboration, youth with disabilities will transition into competitive integrated employment or post-secondary education/ training.”    MOU Partners Include: Office of Developmental Disabilities Services Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Services Oregon Department of Education Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Cooperative Agreement Between the Oregon Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education - 12/01/2014

“The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to set forth the commitments of the ODE and VR to cooperate in activities leading to a successful transition for students with disabilities from a free and appropriate public education to postsecondary career-related training and employment activities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Youth Transition Program

~~“Established in 1990, the Oregon Youth Transition Program (YTP) is a collaborative partnership between the office of Vocational Rehabilitation, Oregon Department of Education, and the University of Oregon. It is funded by Vocational Rehabilitation every two-years through competitive grants to local school districts. The purpose of the YTP is to prepare students with disabilities for employment or career related postsecondary education or training through the provision of a comprehensive array of pre-employment transition activities and supports. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First: Capacity Building and Training and Technical Assistance Strategic Plan 2014-2015

The mission of this strategic plan is to, “To improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving integrated employment for individuals experiencing IDD, consistent with their abilities and choices. To improve Oregon’s employment services through innovation, best practices, and increased capacity, with the outcome of achieving integrated employment services for all individuals experiencing intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Developmental Disabilities Worker’s Guide - 08/27/2018

~~“SPPC services are available to eligible individuals – up to 20 hours each month – as stand-alone attendant/personal care services and related supports, or in combination with the Community First Choice Option/K Plan services.  Ingeneral, when the individual has minimalsupport needs and most of those needs are being met with alternative resources, including natural support, and only need minimal hours of paid-support, SPPC services may be an appropriate option.  “ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Oregon Innovation Grant Awardees - 07/14/2017

“The Oregon Legislature awarded a Policy Option Package in the 2015-17 session for the Department of Human Services (DHS) to fund innovative Employment First projects to increase capacity throughout the state.

The purpose of these grants is to expand efforts to increase competitive integrated employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). We are pleased to award more than 20 organizations throughout Oregon with innovation grants. Congratulations to the providers, family organizations, and case management entities that were awarded grants for innovative projects starting June 2017.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Project ACCESS - 09/14/2015

“The purpose of Project Access is to establish, implement, and evaluate a multi-level interagency transition model in the state of Oregon. The overall goal of the project is to improve and extend transition services to a greater number of youth with disabilities through a model program that brings vocational rehabilitation counselors (VRC's) into high school settings.”

“The model is a collaborative effort between Oregon's Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), public high schools in three Oregon school districts, and researchers at the University of Oregon.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ticket to Work Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - Integrated Employment Plan (revised 7/2015) - 07/06/2015

“(2010-2011) During this time period VR used resources within its Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIG) Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and other available resources to support of a variety of Employment First related activities including: Co-funding for many of the stakeholder and partner gatherings (e.g. Employment First Summit, Meet at the Mountain, stakeholder work groups); Participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN); and Improving access to benefits counseling and planning services such as the Work Incentive Project (WIN); and  Supporting other training and technical assistance activities”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in - 01/01/2012

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Work Incentive Network (WIN!) (now part of the activities of the MIG)

Part of the activities of the MIG

“Benefits and Work Incentive Counseling services help people with disabilities make informed decisions about work, benefits and the use of work incentives to achieve their employment goals, as well as helping them navigate the benefits system when they begin working."

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Oregon Employment First Training Course Descriptions

Content of the document reflects information from multiple state and training agency organizations and is designed as a tool for organizations participating in the Transformation Project for selection of needed training and technical assistance.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) 2014-2015

~"The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) provides core supported employment professional training through a series of four, 2 day trainings. These trainings help employment professionals meet Oregon’s employment professional core competencies requirement through eight days of in person training. Each of the two-day seminars results in twelve hours of training.The OELN Training Series is now accredited by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE)".
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Lane v. Brown Settlement (12-29-2015) - 12/29/2015

~~“Under the Settlement Agreement, Oregon agreed to continue its policy of decreasing the State’s support of sheltered workshops for people with I/DD in Oregon, and expanding the availability of supported employment services that allow individuals with I/DD the opportunity to work in competitive integrated employment settings.  The Settlement Agreement provides relief to two target populations – (1) adults with I/DD who are 21 years old or older and worked in a sheltered workshop on or after January 25, 2012 (sheltered workshop target population), and (2) transition-age youth with I/DD between the ages of 14 and 24 who are found eligible for services from the State’s Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) (transition-age target population)”

 

Systems
  • Other

Lane v. Kitzhaber, 12-CV-00138, (D. OR 2012) - 05/22/2013

“On May 22, 2013, the Court granted the United States' March 27 Motion to Intervene in a pending class action lawsuit against the State of Oregon. The United States' accompanying Complaint in Intervention alleges violations of Title II of the ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act for unnecessarily segregating individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in sheltered workshops when they could be served in integrated employment settings.”

  “Prior to requesting intervention the United States filed on April 20, 2012, a Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs Regarding Defendants' Motion to Dismiss.  The United States argued that Title II and the integration regulation apply to all services, programs, and activities of a public entity, including segregated, non-residential employment settings such as sheltered workshops.”    “On June 18, 2012, the United States filed a second Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs' Motion for Class Certification. In its Statement of Interest, the United States urged the Court to uphold class certification for a plaintiff class of thousands of individuals in, or referred to, Oregon sheltered workshops.”   
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - From the Department of Justice Findings Letter (2012) - 06/29/2012

“We have concluded that the State is failing to provide employment and vocational services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the most  integrated setting appropriate to their needs, in violation of the ADA.  The State plans, structures, and administers its system of providing employment and vocational services in a manner that delivers such services primarily in segregated sheltered workshops, rather than in integrated community employment.  Sheltered workshops segregate individuals from the community and provide little or no opportunity to interact with persons without disabilities, other than paid staff…  most persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving employment and vocational services from the state remain unnecessarily – and often indefinitely – confined to segregated sheltered workshops..”    
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - Staley v. Kitzhaber 2000 - 01/14/2000

“The lawsuit was the result of years of frustration in waiting for appropriate, adequate services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities, and their families… The lawsuit alleges that the State of Oregon failed to provide services in the most integrated possible setting to adults with mental retardation and/or developmental disabilities eligible for placement in an ICF/MR (intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded) and that individuals with developmental disabilities are entitled to receive Medicaid-Funded services with reasonable promptness.”

“This agreement is intended to provide relief to not only the plaintiffs but also to all other similarly situated individuals with developmental disabilities eligible to receive services under the federal Medicaid program.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 13 of 13

Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Support Services Waiver (Brokerage)

Provides “Respite; Homemaker; Supported Employment Services; Environmental Accessibility Adaptations; Non-Medical Transportation; Chore Service; Personal Emergency Response Systems; Family Training; PT/OT/Speech; Special Diets; Specialized Supports; Support Services Brokerages; Emergent Services; Community Inclusion; Community Living; Specialized Medical Equipment.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon ICF/IDD Support Services (0375.R04.00)

~~Provides employment path services, supported employment - individual employment support, waiver case management, direct nursing, discovery/career exploration services, environmental safety modifications, family training - conferences and workshops, financial management services, special diets, specialized medical supplies, supported employment - small group employment support, vehicle modifications for individuals w/ID/DD ages 18 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The Beaver State of Oregon believes that "Things Look Different Here" when it comes to creating innovative employment options for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oregon’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2017 to 2018
4,190,713
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.24%
Change from
2017 to 2018
295,114
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
10.77%
Change from
2017 to 2018
122,184
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
8.72%
Change from
2017 to 2018
41.40%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.43%
Change from
2017 to 2018
78.38%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 4,093,465 4,142,776 4,190,713
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 303,115 288,493 295,114
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 118,914 109,027 122,184
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,696,553 1,751,754 1,768,886
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 39.23% 37.79% 41.40%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.91% 78.04% 78.38%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.90% 4.10% 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 19.80% 20.70% 21.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.20% 12.00% 11.20%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 298,208 289,157 292,709
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 296,968 283,759 288,752
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 523,359 505,721 509,538
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,151 10,873 11,116
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 46,866 39,234 40,709
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,629 9,991 9,205
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 13,981 14,137 13,553
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,678 1,037 770
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,138 24,617 26,131
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 8,240 6,540 11,148

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,806 4,951 4,900
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.10% 6.20% 6.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 108,974 107,703 105,296

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 7,857 11,607 15,659
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 18,564 24,671 30,533
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 20,659 39,390 49,752
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 38.00% 29.50% 31.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10% 2.40% 3.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.40% 1.30% 1.70%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,982 2,261 2,445
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 875 1,206 1,270
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 16,874 15,839 15,471
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6,910 3,689 3,819
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2,765 1,637 1,815
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 40.00% 44.00% 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 70.36 40.63 45.05

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,583
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 28 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 719 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,031 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,402 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 874 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 529 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 37.90% 39.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 3,378 4,072 4,130
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 167,800 168,828 167,485
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 351 737 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 424 686 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $26,199,000 $32,691,000 $40,054,369
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $18,824,000 $15,891,000 $10,847,560
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $20,516,000 $20,322,000 $18,613,806
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $10,816,000 $11,632,000 $13,164,718
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 49.00% 56.00% 57.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,617 3,831 4,228
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,210 2,572 1,785
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,466 3,411 3,207
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 59.40 107.40 109.54

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.37% 73.49% 73.66%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.15% 9.90% 9.84%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.19% 1.20% 1.44%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 83.24% 79.73% 83.94%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.41% 24.56% 22.82%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 59.52% 60.46% 61.99%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.24% 74.59% 74.20%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.11% 35.90% 39.17%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,723,537
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,680
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 8,299
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 289,705
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 298,004
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 308
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 327
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,095,598
AbilityOne wages (services). $97,396

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 27 15 10
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 29 16 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,339 1,211 675
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,341 1,212 676

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~VR works closely with other State agencies whose populations benefit from VR Supported Employment (SE) Services. VR, the Department of Education, and the Office of Developmental Disability Services work together with the State’s Employment First program to ensure that individuals who experience Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities receive coordinated and sequenced services that meet their employment needs. This multi—agency collaboration operates under the guidance of Executive Order 15—01 and the Lane v. Brown Settlement, actively working to ensure that policies and services are aligned in a way that makes sense for transition age students as well as adults seeking services. VR has a close relationships with OHA Behavioral health programs to ensure that individuals who access VR’s services who are also working with Mental Health Programs across the state get access to quality Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) Services. VR continues our collaboration with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) who oversees the fidelity of the 37 programs that currently offer IPS services throughout the state. VR continues to work with OSECE to expand the availability of these services across the state. In addition to aligning policies and service sequences, VR is working with OHA Behavioral Health and ODDS to ensure that our certification requirements for service providers are in alignment. VR initiated a new Job Placement Services contract in 2015. Now, joint certification and coordinated training makes it easier for providers of Job Placement and Support Services who are funded by VR to continue to provide employment support services to clients when hand—offs occur between agencies. VR currently has more than 200 providers under contract in our new Job Placement Services Contract. In 2017, VR created training for Job Placement Contractors, with OSECE and ODDS participating in development and in presentation of the pilot. A monthly schedule of that training is planned for 2018 in multiple locations where VR wants to increase capacity. VR is establishing a system to identify areas of the state where capacity issues exist. Recruitment of providers in these areas continues to be a priority moving forward. A pilot that would measure the effectiveness of a rural transportation rate change is planned for 2018-2019. VR and ODDS, with the Home Care Commission as the training entity, are increasing job coach capacity through use of Personal Care Attendants. Additionally, VR is working with several community colleges to explore the possibility of a career pathway program that will train future service providers in a curriculum jointly developed with these community colleges. (Page 157) Title IV

VR and Oregon Department of Developmental Disability Services have refocused their work together over the last couple of years to achieve the outcomes set forth in Executive order 13-04, which was updated in Executive Order 15-01. These Executive Orders emphasize with more clarity the State’s Employment First Policy. Additionally, the State of Oregon has recently settled a lawsuit that calls for increased integrated employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. VR, ODDS, and the I/DD service delivery system have a working relationship that shares information, leverages and braids funding, and encourages the joint case management of joint clients. Moving forward VR will continue to work with ODDS and I/DD service delivery system as well as the Department of Education to increase our collaboration to maximize funding, streamline processes, and meet the competitive and integrated employment goals of joint clients.

Over the last year VR, ODE and ODDS have:
• Hired staff specialists who serve individuals with I/DD. These three groups of regional staff meet regularly; co-train other agency staff; and, co-develop tools and strategies to provide services that are consistent and reflect best practices • Have established collaborative training regarding consistency and quality in curricula used for VR, ODDS and ODE staff throughout Oregon; accomplished through: o Agency conferences (VR In-Service, DD Case Management Conference, and ODE Regional Transition Conferences) used mixed groups of staff and cross training techniques to further collaborative training goals o VR, DD, and school transition (ODE) staff training on varied topics, presented regionally to groups consisting of staff from all three agencies o Staff are consistently co-trained by specialists from the three agencies • Ongoing and regularly scheduled meetings lead to collaborative actions by Office of Developmental Disabilities (ODDS), VR and Oregon Department of Education (ODE): o Employment First Steering Committee meetings direct the overall work of the following collaborative meetings. This committee is co-led by VR and ODDS Administrators o Policy and Innovation meetings are co-led by VR staff and DD Staff to facilitate these collaborative actions: • The three agencies review and discuss all new or newly revised policy to assure alignment across agencies • Each agency sends policy transmittals to their regional and community staff when another of them adopts new or newly revised policy o Education and Transition meetings discuss pertinent issues for students who have transition plans including those receiving Pre-Vocational Services; facilitating these collaborative actions: • A jointly held goal of seamless transition for: students with transition plans, students in transition programs, and post high school students • Examination of agency procedures, leading to: development of tools and strategies for use by field staff; and referral to the Policy Work Stream for potential policy revision or development o Training and Technical Assistance meetings address issues of staff and vendor training to facilitate: • Increased numbers of vendors shared across agencies • Increased knowledge and skill (competency) of agency staff and vendors o Quality Assurance is a cross-agency group that evaluates collaborative outcomes providing a means to assess collaborative efforts. (Pages 159-160) Title IV

Feedback on Community Partner Relationships • Communication. Stakeholders felt communication with community partners was lacking. • Primary partnerships. Participants most commonly work with mental health, IDD, education, and aging and disability providers (in addition to WorkSource). • Individual Placement and Support. The Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model used with people with mental illness is cited as a best practice, which has supported effective partnership between vocational rehabilitation and mental health providers. • Employment First. The Employment First initiative has facilitated increased collaboration between vocational rehabilitation, the education system, and IDD providers to support people with IDD in finding employment. • IDD system collaboration challenges. Collaboration with IDD system partners has improved, but stakeholder proposed opportunities to address ongoing challenges, including reconciling Employment First and individual choice, sheltered workshop closures and limited employment pathway options, discovery requirements, and contract differences. Feedback on WorkSource Relationships • The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act has required additional collaboration with the broader Oregon workforce system. Local leadership teams, including vocational rehabilitation, are working on how to connect more people to workforce services throughout the health and human services infrastructure. Vocational rehabilitation is getting additional referrals as a result of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act collaboration. (Page 173) Title IV

The Oregon Department of Education is another central partner in Employment First partnerships. The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act is also creating changes in transition service delivery for students with disabilities through preemployment transition services. A subsequent section discusses the youth transition service system in depth. • Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation works closely with Oregon’s community colleges on transition and service coordination issues. Additionally, community colleges help to train vocational rehabilitation service providers (job developers and coaches). Vocational rehabilitation is also working with community colleges as a part of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act to increase opportunities for people with disabilities to gain skills and credentials. Participant focus group attendees discussed taking classes and participating in clubs and business development centers at local community colleges, and how well their vocational rehabilitation counselors worked with the colleges to support their participation. Feedback on Self-Sufficiency Office • Oregon’s Self-Sufficiency Offices connect individuals to food benefits (Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash benefits, child care assistance, and refugee services. People with disabilities can also access food and nutrition services through their local Seniors and People with Disabilities Program, which is often an Aging and People with Disabilities program. (Page 174) Title IV

Participant survey respondents were asked to indicate which vocational rehabilitation partners they receive services from. Almost half did not work with listed community partners. The most commonly identified partner was WorkSource Oregon, following by community mental health programs, Developmental Disability Services, and Aging and People with Disabilities services. Surveyed vocational rehabilitation staff were asked to select up to three community partners with whom Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation has the strongest relationships as well as three whose relationship needs improvement. The figure below shows responses ordered by perception of partnership strength, highest to lowest. The three partnerships seen as strongest are 1) vocational rehabilitation contracted vendors; 2) developmental disabilities services; and 3) community mental health programs. Staff noted a wide array of partnerships needing improvement, with local businesses and employers, self-sufficiency, employment department, and parole and probation department topping the list. Community partners observed an increasing emphasis by Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation on working as part of a broader team, including individuals with disabilities, families, schools, employers, and other service providers. Stakeholders particularly noted increasing teamwork and associated positive outcomes around youth transition, Employment First, and Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act initiatives. Staff and partner survey respondents were also asked why the vocational needs of people with disabilities were unmet by service providers. (Page 176) Title IV

Transition Network Facilitators (TNF) Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation and the Oregon Department of Education operate a cooperative agreement to blend funding for nine regional transition network facilitators as a part of the settlement of the Lane v. Brown lawsuit and the resulting Governor’s Executive Order (No. 15-01) to improve Oregon’s systems providing employment services for students with disabilities. Transition network facilitators collaborate with vocational rehabilitation and schools as well as local businesses/employers and others to implement Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Employment First goals of improving transition outcomes for youth. Transition network facilitators are working to create an equitable, sustainable, simplified system, aligned across agencies that reduces redundancies. Interviewees spoke of their role as helping to support students, teachers, families and districts by providing support and information about life after school for people with disabilities. Facilitators connect students to IDD, Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation, Social Security, and other services that can help to create a seamless transition from school to adulthood. Facilitators work more at a systems level than on an individual level. However, facilitators spoke about doing more with schools that do not have Youth Transition Program grants or specialists. Five percent (26 of 396) of vocational rehabilitation participant survey respondents have worked with a Transition Network Facilitator. This small percentage makes sense because this is a relatively new role in Oregon, and one that works more with programs than with individual students. (Page 178) Title IV

(1) Establish quarterly review of caseloads to ensure equitable access and outcomes (2) Establish local plans for community outreach when underserved or underrepresented populations are identified (3) Partner with agencies that provide culturally specific service (4) Continue working with Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation programs to ensure access to joint case management and culturally appropriate services (5) Convene cross agency workgroup to address the needs of underserved populations in the workforce system as a whole. An example is the recently expanded DHS Workforce Roundtable that includes VR (Policy, YTP, youth transition. Business outreach), SSP, Home Care Commission, Child Welfare (young adult transition), Employment First, SNAP/TANF (workforce coordinator) and APD. (Page 188) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~Local state agency branch and field office managers from core and mandatory partners will work with their LWBs to ensure that those receiving public assistance, low—income individuals, and those who are basic skills deficient are included in local WIOA plans and that they have a voice in the system. The agencies will work to find a way to market WIOA services to the above categories of individuals to ensure that they are aware of services and that they may use their classification to ensure priority of service. Staff at the WorkSource Oregon centers and Affiliate Sites will be trained to understand that upon discovery that an individual belongs to a priority category that priority of service will be explained to that individual. Basic skills deficient individuals can be identified through Initial Skills Review testing in the WorkSource Oregon centers, through AccuVision (soft skills) testing, and the National Career Readiness Certificate. Basic skills deficient individuals can be identified for priority of service and can be expedited into job search and occupational skills training programs. (Page 53) Title I

The agencies will continue to provide services to individuals with barriers to employment and to locally outreach to them, as funds permit, to ensure that they are aware of services and that they may use their classification to ensure priority of service. Perhaps more importantly, Oregon is continuing to expand coordination between state agencies who already serve individuals with barriers to employment, thus allowing easier identification and access to these populations. Expanded coordination with programs serving disabled (Vocational Rehabilitation), low-income (TANF and SNAP) and ex-inmates (Corrections) are examples. Staff at the WSO centers and affiliate sites will be trained to understand that upon discovery that an individual belongs to a priority category, priority of service will be explained to that individual. (Pages 55-56) Title I

OCB also uses this RFA process for vendors who provide services such as Rehabilitation Teaching, Orientation & Mobility and Assistive Technology training. Prior to permitting direct-unsupervised access with agency participants, including supported employment participants, all vendors/providers of services are required to complete and pass background checks. In requiring both the technical qualification process and the criminal background check of providers, OCB has taken the necessary steps to ensure that when agency participants choose to utilize community providers, they can count on safety and quality services for our clients.

In addition, the OCB is included in the Integrated Work Plan for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. The Oregon Department of Human Services (OHS) along with its many partners and stakeholders, strives to support the choices of individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families within local communities by promoting and providing services that are person-centered and directed, flexible, inclusive and supportive of the discovery and development of each individual's unique gifts, talents and abilities. Oregon is committed to work toward service options that ensure people with I/DD have the opportunity to live lives that are fulfilling and meaningful. (Page 219) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Strengthening the framework for partnering by developing and implementing processes will make it easier for state agencies, local boards and other workforce organizations to work together and better understand each other’s services. This process will help to underline current policies that both help and hinder collaboration and will inform future policy—making decisions to support integration. More effective partnering includes state and local workforce organizations leveraging resources, whether those resources are in the form of data, funds, or staff. As resources become scarcer, partnering will help to stretch them further to impact the outcomes of all participating organizations. Financial, institutional, political and other barriers to effective partnering will be reviewed and revised to minimize their effect on partnerships. (Page 41) Title I

VR knows that given the needs of our clients, a robust employer engagement model is required to be successful. VR continues to use Job Placement contractors to identify individual employment, assessment, and training opportunities for those who require those services to become employed. Additionally, VR strives to expand the base of employers who work with our clients who do not require individualized outreach to employers. By leveraging opportunities with other workforce partners, VR believes that it can increase employment opportunities for Oregonians with disabilities and begin to change perceptions associated with individuals with disabilities in the workforce. Oregon VR has one fulltime business engagement specialists located in the central administration office that supports each of the local branch offices in activates detailed below. VR will: • partner with the local Employment Department Business Teams to coordinate employment services, • partner with the local workforce development boards (LWDB) to coordinate employer engagement activities, • provide information to VR staff regarding apprenticeship programs and processes. • partner with local mental health providers in coordinating employment services • continue to partner with Oregon Commission of the Blind on employment services, • participate and coordinate local employer recruitment events and job fairs, • contract with providers to provide local employer engagement events and activities for individuals with disabilities, • contract with providers to and other providers • provide Job Developer Orientation Training (JDOT) or another VR approved Job Developer training to contracted job placement and partner providers, • establish local MOU’s with federal business contractor. (Page 158) Title I

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~At application, the majority of VR program clients are already receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits as a result of legal blindness. During development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), the OCB explores the client’s vocational goals and income needs, and commensurate with their skills, strengths and previous work experience jointly sets employment goals. For client’s targeting employment with earnings above the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level, the OCB utilizes the Ticket to Work program for cost reimbursement upon 9 months of successful employment at or above SGA level earnings. (Page 22) Title I

3.4 Rethink and restructure training and skill development to include innovative and effective work—based learning and apprenticeship models and to accelerate training.
Effective training often must go beyond classroom training to address all types of learners and provide hands—on experiences. Work—based learning and other innovative strategies that can help individuals understand more clearly what it is like to work in a certain industry or company are important to both improve learning outcomes and to help individuals with career exploration.
Goal 4: Create and develop talent by providing young people with information and experiences that engage their interests, spur further career development, and connect to Oregon employers. (Page 39) Title I

Goal 3 of the OWIB Strategic Plan is about investing in Oregonians to build in—demand skills, match training and job seekers to opportunities, and accelerate career momentum. Strategy 3.4 focuses on rethinking and restructuring training and skill development to include innovative and effective work—based learning and apprenticeship models and to accelerate training. This work will require engagement with the community colleges, and other training providers to build responsive and effective training models.

Effective training often must go beyond classroom training to address all types of learners and provide hands—on experiences. Work—based learning and other innovative strategies that can help individuals understand more clearly what it is like to work in a certain industry or company are important to both improve learning outcomes and to help individuals with career exploration. (Page 61) Title I

Targeting Resources for Occupational Training
Staff will develop and deploy a training program to educate staff in WorkSource Oregon centers and agency central offices about structured work—based learning, which includes registered apprenticeship. The training program will help all workforce partners understand the different training options that employers and individuals can access through the workforce system and each of their defining characteristics. The training will also teach staff how to identify an apprenticeable occupation, the characteristics of a good apprentice, and how to refer both individuals and employers to structured work—based learning training programs, certificates and credentials. The training program will help WorkSource Oregon staff understand the value of registered apprenticeship and structured work based learning, which will enable them to share the information broadly with employers and other service delivery partners. (Pages 64-65) Title I

Effective training often must go beyond classroom training to address all types of learners and provide hands—on experiences. Work—based learning and other innovative strategies that can help individuals understand more clearly what it is like to work in a certain industry or company are important to both improve learning outcomes and to help individuals with career exploration.
Provide Technical Assistance/Incentives to Support Adoption of Work—Based Learning Models
The system will build coalitions and relationships with industry and community partners to create and expand registered apprenticeship programs through two apprenticeship focused positions at OED and the Oregon Department of Education (ODE). OED will partner with local workforce boards to ensure that technical assistance and support for new apprenticeship programs are aligned with industry need and local sector strategies. ODE will partner with secondary and post—secondary institutions and community partners to increase the opportunities for youth to transition from high school into an apprenticeship or a pre—apprenticeship program. (Page 65) Title I

INPUT 2: SRC recognizes the extensive work VR staff have done to expand the Youth Transition Program and improve on the outcome of VR services for youth with disabilities. RECOMMENDATION: SRC would encourage the development of data sharing with the Oregon Department of Education on Indicators 13 and 14. We submit that the data could be helpful for VR counselors who are working with youth with disabilities, 16 years of age and older, in knowing how to help youth in transition better prepare for post-secondary life, (Indicator 13), and how successful youth have become as a result of VR intervention, i.e. was the youth employed in an appropriate career selection developed in the IPE (Indicator 14). (Pages 147-148) Title I

• Instruction on vocational, independent living and social skills. • Career development activities. • Collaboration with the local VR office to arrange for the provision of pre— employment transition services for all students with disabilities, in need of such services, without regard to the type of disability. YTP provides the five required Pre-Employment Transition Services directly to potentially eligible students with disabilities when requested. Depending on the type of request YTP may provide one, multiple or all five of the required Pre-ETS: job exploration counseling; work-based learning experiences; counseling on postsecondary educational opportunities; workplace readiness training; and instruction in self-advocacy. Oregon VR considers these students as “reportable individuals” and reports them in our quarterly 911 report. In the event that there are existing services available within the local educational agency that can meet the students need in the area of Pre-Employment Transition Services YTP may refer students to those existing services. Oregon VR does not consider students that only receive Information and Referral services from YTP as “reportable individuals” and therefore does not report them in our quarterly 911 report. YTP will not reduce the partnering school district’s obligation under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act to provide or pay for any transition services that are also considered special education or related services and that are necessary for ensuring a free appropriate public education. • Exposure and connections to paid employment. (Page 151) Title I

YTP Transition Specialists, TNFs, and school transition staff members partner with local VR offices and VR Counselors to coordinate the development and implementation of individualized education programs. When a student is determined eligible for VR services, he or she works with a school transition specialist and a vocational rehabilitation counselor to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that reflects the interests, strengths, and abilities of the student, and which addresses the barriers to training or employment outcomes for the student. VR is serving all eligible individuals and is not utilizing an Order of Selection waitlist. Should it be necessary for VR to reinstitute an Order of Selection, the scope of VR services and expected employment outcomes for all individuals served by VR, including YTP students, will be modified to comply with VR’s Order of Selection. (Page 155) Title I

A primary effort of VR and OHA Behavioral Health Programs has been development and expansion of evidence-based supported employment services by increasing the number of county mental health organizations providing such services and meeting fidelity standards. VR continues to partner with and utilize the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. As of the end of Program Year 2017, 37 community mental health programs and 35 out of 36 counties are providing IPS. With the inclusion of IPS into Oregon’s OARs, evidence-based supported employment services continue to expand across Oregon.

Additionally, VR supports and collaborates with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance in assisting young people with psychiatric disabilities by assisting them in obtaining or maintaining employment (an evidence-based practice, which is effective in reducing the onset and symptoms of mental illness). In partnership with Portland State University, VR helped create a center for excellence that provides ongoing technical assistance to EASA programs throughout the state.

VR will continue to focus on Mental Health supported employment outcomes, the quality of the outcomes, the skills of employment service providers and the capacity of community rehabilitation programs and providers. Oregon VR has reviewed potential participation with the Supported Education process that is now increasingly being utilized by many IPS providers. There are now 83 Mental Health IPS employment specialist across the State. (Pages160- 161) Title IV

Program staff and community partners were also asked to identify strategies to serve under and unserved populations. Increased staff was the strategy identified by the greatest share of program staff (63 percent), and increased transportation options was identified by the greatest share of community partners (63 percent). More interactions with the community, and providing more job skills development training were identified as strategies to serve unserved populations by more than a majority of both program staff and community partners. Almost half of all staff (48 percent) and 57 percent of community partners felt that staff training to work on specialty caseloads would help serve under and unserved participants. More than half of community partner respondents also cited improving interagency collaboration and public awareness campaign key strategies for serving under or unserved populations. Underserved and Unserved Youth with Disabilities Despite the many strengths of Oregon’s youth transition work, some youth are underserved or fall through the cracks. A quarter (25 percent, or 18) of vocational rehabilitation staff and a third (33 percent, or 31) of vocational rehabilitation community partners felt that people between the ages of 16 to 21 are underserved by vocational rehabilitation services. Interviewees discussed varying reasons for this. Some students don’t choose to participate in transition services while in school, do not have a YTP program available to them, or do not have a disability focused on by their school’s transition services. If those students take a break between school and connecting to vocational rehabilitation services, they have often lost and need to be re-taught the structures, routines and soft skills obtained through school attendance. Sometimes the gap between graduation and vocational rehabilitation participation is not a student’s choice, but rather the result of high vocational rehabilitation caseloads causing backlogs. Stakeholders suggest increased collaboration with programs serving out of school youth to improve outcomes for this population. Additionally, some staff expressed a desire to be involved with students earlier in their school careers, and to have more communication including increased involvement at individualized education program (IEP) meetings. Interviewees and focus group participants discussed limited connection between contracted job developers and students in transition seeking employment. Some stakeholders discussed this as an educator’s or a youth transition program counselor’s responsibility. Participating contractors were looking for guidance in how to formally provide services to this population. (Pages 171- 172) Title IV

Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation is making additional investments in pre-employment transition services through the following partnerships: • Silver Falls Came LEAD (Leadership Empowerment Advocacy Development). Students with disabilities participate in leadership academies, focused on job exploration, work-based learning experiences, postsecondary education counseling, workplace readiness training, and self-advocacy instruction. • AntFarm. Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation partners with AntFarm to provide work experiences in gardening and farming. • Worksystems, Inc. Students receive work experiences in Washington and Multnomah counties with public and private employers. • Motivational Enhancement Group Intervention interviewing. Students gain self-advocacy skills through a collaborative, goal-oriented style of communication. (Page 178) Title IV

2. Increase capacity and resources to provide enhanced levels of service to Oregonians with Disabilities a. Assist the workforce system with increasing its capacity and capability to serve Oregonians with Disabilities i. Convene cross agency workgroup to address the needs of underserved populations in the workforce system as a whole ii. Provide training to workforce partners on working with individuals with disabilities iii. Work with other agencies who work with clients with barriers to employment to address common access issues in the workforce system iv. Work with local workforce boards to ensure that programmatic access issues are identified and addressed b. Restructure the VR service delivery model to comply with state contracting requirements and be outcome driven i. Continue transition to newly structured pay-for-performance Job Placement Services Contract which includes a third track for individuals with the most significantly disabilities. These individuals require addition services that are were not funded appropriately in our traditional supported employment track. ii. Create contracts with clear minimum qualifications, scope of work, and cost structure for all personal services to ensure high quality and consistent services statewide c. Expand the availability of Vendor and Partner services that meet the needs of Oregonians with disabilities, including those requiring supported employment services i. Develop a community college based Career Pathway to develop job placement professionals and job coaches in the community ii. Identify areas of limited service availability, including supported employment services, and develop and implement recruitment and solicitation plans iii. Work with providers of sheltered and subminimum wage employment to transition to the integration of their clients into competitive and integrated employment in their respective communities. 3. Improve the performance of the VR program with respect to the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA. a. Increase staff knowledge of the labor market i. Encourage branch level engagement with regional economists and workforce analysts to educate staff on local labor market issues ii. Work with Local Workforce Development Boards to engage with local sector strategies and pursue high wage, high demand work opportunities. b. Expand opportunities for skill gain and credentialing i. Identify and access local skill upgrading opportunities within the Local Workforce Areas (LWA) ii. Partner with community college Disability Service Offices (DSO) to increase access to existing credentialing programs iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability c. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs i. Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities i. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns ii. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity iii. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon. (Page 182-183) Title IV

Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability 3. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs a. Use labor market information to create work—based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs b. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level c. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. 4. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work—based learning opportunities a. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide b. Implement a progressive employment model c. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams d. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities e. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets f. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers 5. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities a. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns b. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity c. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon The Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Program is an active participant in the implementation of the WIOA. (Pages 189) Title IV

Partner with community college Disability Service Offices (DSO) to increase access to existing credentialing programs iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability c. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs i. Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities. (Pages 194) Title IV

VR’s SE program continues to provide opportunities for individuals of all ages with the most significant disabilities to achieve competitive integrated employment with ongoing support provided by a variety of partners. These same individuals are those for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred. VR provides a continuum of SE services in partnership with other human services agencies and programs that persons with the most significant disabilities need to develop, maintain and advance in competitive employment. VR continues to work closely with other state programs, local governmental units, community—based organizations and groups to develop, refine and expand the availability of SE services throughout Oregon. During FFY 15 VR revamped our pay for performance Job Placement Services Contracts that provides Job Placement, Job Coaching, and Retention services. VR currently has over 200 contracts in place to provide job placement statewide. These contracts give VR the ability to pay for placement services in three tiers based on the significance of the functional limitation that the client experiences. Tiers two and three focus on clients who require SE services in order to be successful in the labor market. In FFY 2017, VR provided SE services to 3,922 individuals with significant disabilities, including persons with psychiatric disabilities, intellectual and/or developmental disabilities or traumatic brain injuries. During this same period, 727 individuals who received SE services entered into competitive integrated employment, and 2,517 individuals continued to participate in their SE IPEs. (Page 196) Title IV

Clients and employer are satisfied with placements. Historically, VR has partnered with OHA Behavioral Health Programs in promoting Individualized Placement and Support (IPS), an evidence—based SE model. Quality of these programs is assessed through compliance with a scale, which measures the ‘fidelity’ or the degree to which a program is being implemented in accordance the evidence based fidelity model developed after extensive research from Dartmouth College. Some of the measures used in the IPS fidelity scales are the kinds of employment outcomes participants are obtaining; the degree of collaboration with vocational rehabilitation; availability of rapid job search and evidence of consumer choice. VR maintains quality SE outcomes through ongoing collaboration with mental health providers on the local level and OHA Mental Health Programs central office staff. Supported employment is integrated into the array of services and programs available to Oregonians with disabilities, including Oregon’s mental health and developmental disability service systems. Success in SE requires a partnership among the responsible state and community programs, other service providers, consumers and families, advocacy organizations, employers and others. Long— term success continues to depend on the availability of funding for follow—along SE services. VR utilizes Title VI, Part B and Title I funds for the time—limited services necessary for an individual to stabilize in a community—based job. Services that may be part of a SE IPE include: • Person centered planning • Community—based assessment • Job development • Job placement • On—site training for worker and/or coworkers • Long—term support development • Other services and goods • Post—employment services The specific type, level and location of ongoing supports provided to an individual are based upon his or her needs and those of the employer. Ongoing support may be provided by a variety of public and/or private sector resources including: • OHA Behavioral Health Programs and community mental health programs • DDS community supports • County developmental disability case managers and developmental disability service brokerages • Social Security work incentives • Employer—provided reasonable accommodations • Natural supports • Family or community sponsorship • By VR, for youth with the most significant disabilities who: need extended support services; are not currently eligible for extended support services from any other known source; are 23 or younger; and, have an annually amended and approved IPE to include VR extended support services; and, for no longer than a total of 4 Yrs. (Page 197) Title IV

There is active information sharing and coordinated planning between OCB and regional programs, OVRS, education and health care organizations throughout the state. Partners join in planning outreach efforts, coordinate referral of potentially eligible youth for VR, and implement process improvements for assessment & training statewide in the areas of daily living skills, orientation and mobility/cane travel, communication skills, technology, vocational aptitudes, interpersonal /social skills, and academic preparation for transition-age youth.
Ages 14 - 21 OCB's application for vocational rehabilitation services generally begins around age 16 (as early as age 14), and requires the development of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for all students within 90 days of eligibility, which matches the timeline for adult services.
In addition, the Oregon Commission for the Blind has an Interagency Agreement with the Oregon Department of Education. (Page 214) Title IV

Oregon Department of Education will assist local education agencies, Oregon School for the Deaf and community colleges in accessing the services provided by OCB, which can be requested to aid in the transition to employment services, serve as a liaison between the parties, Encourage the screening, identifying and referring of potential clients to OCB to provide a continuum of appropriate procedures and services, identify methods to coordinate the IEP with the IPE, provide information related to the availability of public education programs, facilitate the availability of diagnostic and evaluative information to the Commission for the Blind relevant to the determination of eligibility. (Page 215) Title IV

OCB is able to develop relationships with youth who are blind/visually impaired and parents, providing a vocational context within IEP and 504 Planning & Implementation Team discussions and ensuring an important link to identifying the individualized skills needing to be addressed in order for the youth to be prepared for adult life after graduation.
OCB transition counselors provide youth with counseling/services/programs to aid in preparation for transitioning to post-high school/college/employment. Individuals who are blind/low vision who have early exposure to adaptive skills training, vocational exploration and active socialization have a head start to becoming functional, employed and fully integrated adults. The OCB knows not all learning can take place in the classroom, and therefor offers Summer Work Experience Programs (SWEP) to complement the learning that is available through the public education system. These pre-employment transition programs serve to give each participant a safe environment to discover their vocational aptitudes, develop confidence in adaptive skills and encourage self-advocacy and independence. These pre-employment transition programs (offered in the Summer) are a key to the agency's success in quality of employment outcomes for students with vision loss. (Page 216) Title IV

Coordination of professional development under IDEA Agency staff who work with transition-age youth coordinate transition activities throughout Oregon to teachers of the visually impaired and other Special Education personnel. These staff work with regional staff to ensure customers receive services and information necessary to facilitate a smooth transition from high school to adult services. Based on assessments and training provided by OCB, OCB staff provide recommendations and information to regional programs, parents and students about vocational rehabilitation services including availability, referral, and eligibility requirements that support a coordinated transition plan from high school to post-school services.
Consultation is also provided as early as necessary to special education staff regarding IEP planning and development. OCB staff shares data and reports relevant to program development and planning. (Page 227) Title IV

If the assessment shows that the student will require ongoing support to sustain acceptable work performance and maintain employment, supported employment is included in the services to be provided in the IPE. The IPE includes collaboration and funding from other agencies or organizations that assist by providing the ongoing support services required. All services provided by the Commission for the Blind are time limited unless the eligible individual and the counselor jointly agree that additional time is required to reach the IPE goal and the individual is progressing toward that goal. (Page 239) Title IV

The Oregon Commission for the Blind uses its Title VI, Part B funds to provide supported employment services to eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities for whom competitive employment in an integrated setting is their current vocational goal. These clients, because of the nature of their disability, often require extensive services in order to be successful. Specialized placement assistance, lengthened training periods and planning for ongoing support is required in order for clients to be successful. All of the funds are used for individual case costs. Our approach for supported employment services is as follows: If an individual's goal is to pursue an employment outcome in an integrated setting, an IPE will be developed in accordance with the individual's strengths, interests, resources, priorities, and informed choice. Services are purchased on a fee-for service basis from providers within the community. Careful job analysis and intensive one to one training are provided. (Page 246) Title IV

The Oregon Commission for the Blind will continue to leverage IGAs with partners/regional programs throughout the state to meet the needs of students with the most significant disabilities. The OCB is committed to working alongside DHS/DD/ID providers to insure that each student is surrounded with a qualified team of professionals to assist him/her towards their IPE. (Page 248) Title IV
The OCB will continue to provide its array of services/programs and paid work experiences to students with vision loss/blindness. OCB will continue to organize and manage our two paid summer work experience programs (in Salem and Portland) for eligible students age 16+, and will expand the program and staffing to provide more paid work experience and pre- employment transition service opportunities throughout the year.
o The OCB will continue to nurture the relationships with business that support these work opportunities for students who are blind.
o The OCB will continue to build relationships and participate in IEP meetings with school districts, teachers of the visually impaired, students and families throughout the state.
o The OCB will explore methods for supporting work experience for students with visual disability more locally across the state and more broadly throughout the year outside of summer programs.
o The OCB is also exploring new methods for providing pre- employment transition services to students with visual disability, focusing in particular upon the adaptive and soft skills necessary to succeed in an adult workplace. (Page 257) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~AEFLA-funded Adult-Basic-Skills Programs work with employers through connections with their colleges’ Career Pathways, Customized Training, Workforce Training, and Occupational Skills Training programs. Another critical partner is VR. The Vocational Rehabilitation program by design contacts the Business and employer community utilizing a client specific approach. VR’s approach of utilizing contracted vendors to job develop for individual clients indicates a different model regarding employer outreach. However, employers also approach the VR offices with Job Opportunities and VR will address a process where these contacts and opportunities can be blended into a Workforce combined business outreach method. (Page 58) Title I

These individuals require addition services that are were not funded appropriately in our traditional supported employment track ii. Create contracts with clear minimum qualifications, scope of work, and cost structure for all personal services to ensure high quality and consistent services statewide c. Expand the availability of Vendor and Partner services that meet the needs of Oregonians with disabilities, including those requiring supported employment services i. Develop a community college based Career Pathway to develop job placement professionals and job coaches in the community ii. Identify areas of limited service availability, including supported employment services, and develop and implement recruitment and solicitation plans iii. Work with providers of sheltered and subminimum wage employment to transition to the integration of their clients into competitive and integrated employment in their respective communities. 3. Improve the performance of the VR program with respect to the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA a. Increase staff knowledge of the labor market i. Encourage branch level engagement with regional economists and workforce analysts to educate staff on local labor market issues ii. Work with Local Workforce Development Boards to engage with local sector strategies and pursue high wage, high demand work opportunities b. Expand opportunities for skill gain and credentialing i. Identify and access local skill upgrading opportunities within the Local Workforce Areas (LWA ii. Partner with community college Disability Service Offices (DSO) to increase access to existing credentialing programs iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability. (Page 194) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The OCB expects participants who are blind, low vision and deaf blind to become fully engaged in the array of workforce services. OCB expects our counseling staff to be active and equal partners among the regional and local workforce partners, where the talents of agency participants can be more effectively matched with business needs through sharing of employment strategies and real time labor market information. OCB expects partner programs to identify shared core- participant job readiness skill needs, and to work with all partners to develop common-need trainings - and share presentation efforts where applicable - to strengthen the skill sets of our agency participants through access to all. OCB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual's aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self- sufficiency. (Pages 259-260) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) continues to establish relationships with private non—profit and for profit entities that are community rehabilitation providers, medical services providers, and providers of other services and supports that are required by VR clients to achieve the goals in their Individualized Plans for Employment. VR staff develop relationships in the community to meet the needs of their client and to provide choice of providers to their clients. Services provided by the community rehabilitation providers, contractors, and vendors include medical and psychological assessments and services, job development and employer services, job coaching and facilitation, accommodations and ergonomics, independent living services to support employment goals, follow up services, and other services especially for individuals with significant disabilities. The cooperative relationship vary from information and referral relationships to fee—for—service and pay for performance relationships. VR follows State of Oregon contractual processes when establishing contracts for services. VR works with and establishes relationships with non—profit organizations to fully utilize the benefits provided through the SSA TTW program. In January 2010, Oregon VR initiated a Ticket to Work shared payment agreement pilot with ten community mental health programs that provide evidence—based mental health supported employment services. These mental health agencies are governed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) who contracts with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) to provide annual programs and technical assistance. These agreements allow Oregon VR to be the Employment Network of record with SSA, partner with the mental health agency to provide dual services to an individual. Once the VR case is closed, the mental health agency continues to support the individual until the support is no longer needed. If the individual works and reaches the SSA TTW wage thresholds, Oregon VR receives TTW payments which in turn are split with the mental health agencies. This pilot evolved into a project that has strengthened the relationship between VR and these participating agencies by providing additional TTW dollars for additional program funding. As of July 2017 we have sixteen agreements in place. We will continue to review our contracts with Private Non Profit organizations and update this section when new contracts are completed. (Pages 156-157) Title IV

Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities i. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns ii. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity iii. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon. (Pages 183)  Title I

a. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide b. Implement a progressive employment model c. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams d. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities e. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets f. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers 5. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities a. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns b. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity c. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon The Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Program is an active participant in the implementation of the WIOA. (Page 189) Title I

Another factor that may indicate significant disability is receipt of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). In order to receive SSI or SSDI an individual must prove that he or she is unable to work. The RSA longitudinal study of the vocational rehabilitation services program found that individuals accepted for services were more likely to exit the program prior to receiving VR services if they were receiving SSI or SSDI at entry. The following data describes the percentage of people receiving public financial assistance at program entry and the associated outcome.
Outcome % of participants who were receiving SSI/SSDI at application:
Exited VR after services without an employment outcome: PY 15: 65%, PY 16: 65%
Exited VR after services with an employment outcome: PY 15: 62%, PY 16: 59%
While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income-dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services.
Commission Services for Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities:
The Commission is reaching those with the most significant disabilities through outreach and by providing individualized services.
The Commission provides post- employment services if the disability changes, the technology on the job has changed, or there is new software and the person needs training on the new software. (Page 230-231) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~VR knows that given the needs of our clients, a robust employer engagement model is required to be successful. VR continues to use Job Placement contractors to identify individual employment, assessment, and training opportunities for those who require those services to become employed. Additionally, VR strives to expand the base of employers who work with our clients who do not require individualized outreach to employers. By leveraging opportunities with other workforce partners, VR believes that it can increase employment opportunities for Oregonians with disabilities and begin to change perceptions associated with individuals with disabilities in the workforce. Oregon VR has one fulltime business engagement specialists located in the central administration office that supports each of the local branch offices in activates detailed below.

VR will:

  • partner with the local Employment Department Business Teams to coordinate employment services,
  • partner with the local workforce development boards (LWDB) to coordinate employer engagement activities,
  • provide information to VR staff regarding apprenticeship programs and processes.
  • partner with local mental health providers in coordinating employment services
  • continue to partner with Oregon Commission of the Blind on employment services,
  • participate and coordinate local employer recruitment events and job fairs,
  • contract with providers to provide local employer engagement events and activities for individuals with disabilities,
  • contract with providers to and other providers
  • provide Job Developer Orientation Training (JDOT) or another VR approved Job Developer training to contracted job placement and partner providers,
  • establish local MOU’s with federal business contractors.
  • provide information to VR staff regarding 503 information, protocols and processes.
  • provide local trainings and resources on disability awareness and accommodations,
  • establish partnerships with local nonprofits that provide employment services,
  • participate in in local area business events to enhance disability awareness,
  • Promote and develop local area internships for individuals with disabilities.

Employer survey respondents were asked to rate the perceived helpfulness of a variety of potential services provided to employers by VR. The survey items with the highest perceived helpfulness reported by respondents to the business survey were:

  • Providing workers with disabilities with the accommodations and supports they need to do the employer’s work;
  • If concerns arise, providing consultation with management, the workers, and co—workers to resolve the concerns;
  • Placing qualified individuals in internships at the business with full reimbursement of the employer’s expenses;
  • Providing training consultation and resources related to the provision of reasonable accommodations; and
  • Finding workers that meet the employer’s workforce needs. (Page 158) Title IV

o Train students in workplace readiness o Provide screening and referral of appropriate youth o Identification of appropriate worksites and task o Provide counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive training opportunities to meet the desired qualification of employers • In the Portland Metro area VR staff are working with health providers Legacy and Providence Health to pilot training and streamlined hiring program for students with disabilities. Students placed in competitive integrated employment with these employers are supported with 12 months of follow along services to ensure stable employment. • VR Contractors are working with business and schools regarding employer engagement models to offer competitive, integrated employment and career exploration opportunities. These trainings include: o Pre— employment trainings with school staff to meet employer needs o Interest inventories with students o Trainings on developing partnership agreements o Trainings on job needs analysis o Marketing school based programs o Pre and post training evaluations for students involved in work experiences. Oregon VR has hired two Pre-Employment Transition Coordinators that are actively working with employers to create paid and unpaid work experiences for students with disabilities. The Pre-Employment Transition Coordinators are also working with employers to develop essential skills profiles for students to identify current work readiness expectations from local employers. (Page159) Title IV

iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability c. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs i. Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities i. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns ii. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity iii. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon. (Page 183) Title IV

Data Collection

1. Increase quality employment outcomes for all Oregonians with disabilities. According to the current data our rehabilitation rate has slightly declined. 2016 rehab rate was 62.3%, and dropped in 2017 to 60.2%. As of the end of December 2nd quarter PY 18 it is 57.5%. We are evaluating why this is occurring. a. Support and accelerate the customer experience to be empowering, effective, and efficient

i. Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process We continue to work towards earlier engagement with our Workforce partners. There are varying degrees of involvement with the 9 Local Workforce Development Boards. Local development activities are continuing between VR and d the Local Workface Development Boards to continue to identify mechanisms to increase earlier engagement.

ii. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies Data sharing agreements are in place with OED (Wagner Peyser) the Department of Education, and various other entities. VR continues to work to develop the technological connections for efficient and timely transfer of Data between Core partners in order to populate our RSA 911 quarterly reports and to utilize the data to see where programmatic adjustments will need to be made.

iii. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process to get clients into plan more quickly. Since 2016 Plan completion we have gotten our clients into plan (or plan extension) more quickly as identified by the following data: SFY 2015 62.0% (we were shifting from 180-day timeline to 90. SFY 2016 77% SFY 2017 84% SFY 2018 Q1 91% SFY 2018 Q2 92% iv. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication This process is still in development. (Page 192) Title IV

Baseline performance metrics are currently being established. Oregon VR achieved the following 116 metrics for PY2015. As Baselines are being established, the program will continue to review our outcomes and the strategies that impact these metrics. Common Performance Measures achieved (July1, 2015-June 30 2016) PY2015 SFY 2016 Percentage rehabilitated 62.30%. Percentage of clients who closed from plan employed during the 2nd quarter following closure. 56.75% Percentage of clients who closed from plan employed during 4th quarter following closure. 54.67% Median quarterly wage at 2nd quarter following closure from the program $3,391.84 Percent of clients employed with same employer during the second and fourth quarters following exit from program 71.64%. (Pages 195-196) Title IV

511

~~OCB believes that all individuals are capable of integrated and competitive work with the right supports in place, and the state has over the years reduced options for sub-minimum wage employment. The new regulations requiring the agency to provide pre-employment transition services for youth with disability before certification for sub-minimum wage work is expected to have little impact on the agency, as this is the direction the state has been moving towards. A challenge for supported employment is that the comparable benefit resources available in Oregon State to provide extended long-term support services are limited. OCB works in collaboration with all available resources and partners on cases that have co-occurring disabling conditions that make long-term supports necessary. The OCB continues to work with employers and other natural supports to identify funding for long-term support services.  (Page 218) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Vets

* Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. The State’s Workforce Development Activities. The Workforce system provides services focused in broad categories: •Enhancing the job skills of Oregon’s workforce. (Page 19) Title I

For example, the VR program is working with the Local Leadership Teams and LWDB’s to have full understanding of the determined Sector Strategies and Sector Partnerships at the local level. As individual VR clients are counselled and address his or her career development, the local sector partnership details and goals are shared with these job seekers with disabilities. These participants can then determine if these sector industries/employment areas, and associated career development, are something the individual client would wish to pursue. Additionally, Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs) partner with the Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI) apprenticeship and On the Job Training (OJT) representatives to ensure that employers are aware of the benefits of hiring a veteran. LVERs also communicate apprenticeship and OJT opportunities for veterans to WorkSource Oregon Business and Employment Specialists and DVOP staff. (Page 58) Title I

The State Veterans Program Coordinator provided the following materials in accordance with the Jobs for Veterans Act, section 4215 of 38 U.S.C. to all WSO centers in order to educate the WorkSource center staff on the roles and responsibilities of Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPs), and Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs), and to ensure that veterans and eligible spouses receive priority of service in all Oregon WorkSource locations: • Priority of Service example tools • Customer workflow diagram example, and • Department of Labor approved Priority of Service Training for Frontline Staff available online via iLearn, Oregon’s interactive training site for all WSO staff and partner staff. The priority of service training materials were disseminated to each WorkSource location in Oregon in order to ensure: • That eligible veterans and eligible spouses receive priority of service in the customer intake process, for training opportunities, referrals to employers and for employment based workshops offered at each OED/WorkSource location. • OED/WorkSource staff can refer special disabled veterans and veterans with barriers to employment to DVOPs for intensive services and case management services. • Each Business and Employment Specialist staff member can provide excellent customer service and core employment services to those veterans that are not eligible to meet with a DVOP. (Page 86) Title I

Mental Health

~~11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer the flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs.

12. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with WIOA section 116) and to monitor program performance.

13. Whether the local area in which the eligible provider is located has a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs. (Page 136) Title I

The Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Program (VR) has developed and maintains cooperative agreements and cooperative relationships where necessary with federal and state agencies not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system. This cooperation includes, but is not limited to the Centers for Independent Living (CILs), Oregon Developmental Disability Services (ODDS), local I/DD brokerages, county service providers, Oregon’s Mental Health Programs (including programs that serve in and out of school youth), the Client Assistance Program (CAP), Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation 121 Programs, Oregon Department of Education (ODE), local school districts, community colleges, Access Technologies Inc. (ATI), and local agencies providing services to our clients. VR strives to have cooperative relationships that streamline referral and service delivery, including joint planning, leverages funds, provide coordinated and non—duplicated services, and maximize the use of wrap around services to ensure success. VR’s goal is to simplify, streamline, and expedite services to clients while maximizing access to services that will help with their success. (Page 152) Title I

A primary effort of VR and OHA Behavioral Health Programs has been development and expansion of evidence-based supported employment services by increasing the number of county mental health organizations providing such services and meeting fidelity standards. VR continues to partner with and utilize the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. As of the end of Program Year 2017, 37 community mental health programs and 35 out of 36 counties are providing IPS. With the inclusion of IPS into Oregon’s OARs, evidence-based supported employment services continue to expand across Oregon. (Page 160) Title I

VR will continue to focus on Mental Health supported employment outcomes, the quality of the outcomes, the skills of employment service providers and the capacity of community rehabilitation programs and providers. Oregon VR has reviewed potential participation with the Supported Education process that is now increasingly being utilized by many IPS providers. There are now 83 Mental Health IPS employment specialist across the State. (Page 161) Title I

Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation collaborates with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance, a statewide effort to provide systematic early psychosis interventions at mental health centers to assist young people with psychiatric disabilities in obtaining or maintaining employment. Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation worked with Addictions and Mental Health and Portland State University to create a center of excellence providing ongoing technical assistance to statewide Early Assessment and Support Alliance programs. Vocational rehabilitation funded four county pilot sites to identify a best practices model to engage youth experiencing a first psychotic episode in accessing vocational rehabilitation and local workforce programs. • Seamless Transition Project. A few organizations are piloting a seamless transition project targeting youth. Similar to Project SEARCH from Cincinnati Community Health, it is a series of rotating internships provided by host businesses to prepare youth with disabilities for employment. (Page 178-179) Title IV

VR and the State Rehabilitation Council have had opportunities over the last year to work together on several aspects of the VR program, policies, procedures, and service delivery. Additionally, VR and SRC worked to jointly develop our State’s goals, priorities and strategies looking forward. The SRC approved the final draft of the VR portion of Section 6 of the Unified State Plan at their February 2016 meeting after a final opportunity to add comments. A comprehensive needs assessment was completed September 23, 2013, a survey was completed by the SRC April 2015 in regards to the VR programs Job Placement Services process and contract, regular case reviews are conducted by the Business and Finance Manager as well as Branch Managers. The results of these reports and activities were taken into account in the development of these goals, priorities, and strategies. The performance measures as defined by the WIOA, and activities necessary to meet the expected outcomes were also taken in to consideration. VR put the Plan up for public comment in January and February. The VR Plan was available to all interested parties through the VR internet site and the Oregon Workforce Investment Board (OWIB) website. Copies of the initial draft were sent out to an extensive list of interested parties, members of the SRC, members of the OWIB and to our traditional service delivery partners such as the Tribes, Mental Health providers etc. Public hearings occurred in three locations during the month of February. LaGrande, Medford and Salem hosted these sessions with the local Manager in attendance. VR received written feedback from our Workforce Partners, Tribal partners, Centers for Independent Living, and had feedback from Mental Health Programs. Comment was received from individuals as well. All this feedback was reviewed and incorporated into the VR State Plan. (Pages 180-181) Title IV

The funds will be used to provide Supported Employment Services to those adult and transitional age youth with the most significant disabilities. At least 50% these funds will be targeted towards youth with the most significant disabilities who need them to transition to employment.

The Supported Employment Services include job development, job coaching and any extended supports needed. For individuals with a primary disability of intellectual and/or development disability, clients will receive extended services after closure from the Office of Developmental Disabilities. For clients with Mental Health disabilities who receive services from OHA Mental Health programs, extended services are provided by the fidelity based IPS program once the client exits from the Vocational Rehabilitation program. (Page 186) Title IV

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(4)). Describe the designated State agency’s efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other State agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide supported employment services and extended employment services, as applicable, to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities.

Agency response: OCB provides Supported Employment services to individuals with disabilities co-occurring with visual impairment that make long-term supports necessary for the individual's success in maintaining integrated and competitive employment, including developmental disabilities, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and disabilities due to mental health. (Page 218) Title IV

Mental Health Services OCB is committed to collaborating with mental health services throughout Oregon in order to insure collaboration, coordination of services, and mutual understanding of scope and role of each agency in promoting success for individuals who require long-term employment supports.

In addition, although we have no formal agreement in the provision of mental health services, the agency has been able to be effective in the individualized coordination of services on a case by case basis in the event we have a client who is blind who is also a client of that system. (Page 221) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Supplementing Wagner-Peyser funds with state dollars also funds the delivery of enhanced services to the business community. This increased capacity to meet the service needs of employers, helps to improve their bottom—line by lowering recruitment, turnover, and training costs. More businesses are choosing our enhanced service option, as validated by the hundreds of success stories from businesses sharing that the service more than meets their needs and expectations. Our ability to maintain these services is contingent upon receiving state funds in the future. Data on UI claimants suggests the coordination of Title I-IV core programs resources will improve the ability of all customers to return to work. The VR Program will continue to work with the Workforce System in Oregon to increase capacity and access to Workforce opportunities and services for Oregonians with Disabilities. The VR Program will continue to collaborate and coordinate with LWDBs and other partners to increase opportunity and access for VR clients while earnestly and simultaneously trying to help meet the recruitment needs of employers. (Page 31) Title I

Title IV regularly uses evaluations of data and qualitative information to measure the effectiveness of our program. Evaluations completed in the last two years have resulted in such things as: a revamping of our statewide procurement process for job placement service, changes to the job placement service delivery model, training to help staff move clients into plan faster, trainings on specific disability barriers, cross trainings with other agencies to ensure better partnerships, changes to business practices using the LEAN model, and the piloting of some new evidenced —based best practices around transition. An assessment of the Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) program show that it is effective in helping speed claimants return to work and in preventing and detecting unemployment insurance (UI) overpayments. Over the past two years, the RESEA program has helped shorten claims duration, reduce exhaustion rates, and increase detection of potential issues resulting in disqualification or overpayment. (Page 77) Title I

Most UI claimants are required to complete an electronic profile for job matching purposes and attend an orientation with Employment Services staff. Only claimants attached to a closed union, in approved training (including apprenticeship programs), who commute while living out of state, or who have a definite return to work date within 28 days of their lay off date do not have to complete these steps. The orientation includes a review of their electronic profile for completeness and provides an overview of services available to job seekers through WSO centers and partners. Of those claimants, some are selected for a Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (known as REA or RESEA) as part of their orientation. Initial REA/RESEA interviews are conducted in person by ES staff who are co—located with Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) service providers. The REA/RESEA includes an overview of UI eligibility requirements for remaining able, available and actively seeking work. It further provides more customized discussions with each claimant about “next steps” that could assist the person with becoming reemployed sooner as part of a basic reemployment plan. (Page 119) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 81 - 86 of 86

Oregon ICF/IDD Support Services (0375.R04.00)

~~Provides employment path services, supported employment - individual employment support, waiver case management, direct nursing, discovery/career exploration services, environmental safety modifications, family training - conferences and workshops, financial management services, special diets, specialized medical supplies, supported employment - small group employment support, vehicle modifications for individuals w/ID/DD ages 18 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) 2014-2015

~"The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) provides core supported employment professional training through a series of four, 2 day trainings. These trainings help employment professionals meet Oregon’s employment professional core competencies requirement through eight days of in person training. Each of the two-day seminars results in twelve hours of training.The OELN Training Series is now accredited by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE)".
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Work Incentive Network (WIN!) (now part of the activities of the MIG)

Part of the activities of the MIG

“Benefits and Work Incentive Counseling services help people with disabilities make informed decisions about work, benefits and the use of work incentives to achieve their employment goals, as well as helping them navigate the benefits system when they begin working."

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Oregon Administrative Rules Chapter 411 Division 345 Employment Services for Individuals with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities - 07/02/2018

~~“The purposes of the rules in OAR chapter 411, division 345 are to:(1) Effectuate Oregon’s Employment First policy, as described in the State of Oregon Executive Order No. 15-01 and OAR chapter 407, division 025, under which:(a) The employment of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities in competitive integrated employment is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, or other non-work day activities.(b) For individuals who successfully achieve the goal of competitive integrated employment, future person-centered service planning focuses on maintaining employment, maximizing the number of hours an individual works, using the standard of obtaining at least 20 hours of week of work, consistent with the individual’s preferences and interests, and considering additional career or advancement opportunities” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon HB 3063: Relating to Housing for Individuals with Mental Illness - 08/08/2017

“The Housing and Community Services Department, in collaboration with the Oregon Health Authority, shall disburse moneys in the Housing for Mental Health Fund to provide funding for:

(a) The development of community-based housing, including licensed residential treatment facilities, for individuals with mental illness and individuals with substance use disorders;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon SB 777 (ABLE Act) - 08/12/2015

"The Oregon 529 Savings Board shall establish by rule and maintain a qualified ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] program in accordance with the requirements of the ABLE Act. (2) The rules must: (a) Allow a person to make contributions for a taxable year to an ABLE account established for the purpose of meeting the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account..."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Oregon Senate Bill 22 - Employment First - 04/08/2013

The bill details the rights of persons with developmental disabilities who are receiving developmental disability services.  It proclaims that “individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities and society as a whole benefit when the individuals exercise choice and self-determination, living and working in the most integrated community settings appropriate to their needs, with supportive services that are designed and implemented consistent with the choice of the individuals regarding services, providers, goals and activities.”  Moreover it proclaims that, “the employment of individuals with developmental disabilities in fully integrated work settings is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, facility-based employment or day habilitation.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

427.007 OR Policy; Department of Human Services to plan and facilitate community services.

Emphasizes the importance of home and community based services that help to facilitate community integration for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. “Therefore, the Department of Human Services is directed to facilitate the development of appropriate community-based services, including family support, residential facilities, day programs, home care and other necessary support, care and training programs, in an orderly and systematic manner. The role of state-operated hospitals and training centers in Oregon shall be as specialized back-up facilities to a primary system of community-based services for persons with intellectual disabilities or other developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Executive Order Number 19-06 – Establishing the Behavioral Health Advisory Council - 10/18/2019

“Over the last decade, Oregon has made significant strides in transforming and strengthening our overall health care system, but our progress has not been even across all components of the health care delivery system…We have fallen short of adequately addressing the unique needs or Oregonians with serious and complex behavioral health conditions…Oregon experiences some of the highest rates of serious mental illness, substance abuse disorders, and suicide in the country….

The Governor’s Behavioral Health Advisory Council (the “Council”) is established. The Council shall recommend an action plan for the state of Oregon’s behavioral health system that includes concrete actions, policies, and potential investments needed to preserve and improve services and supports for youth and adults with serious mental illness, including those with co-occurring substance use disorders.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Oregon Executive Order 15-01 - Providing employment services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities - 02/02/2015

Supersedes Executive Order 13-04   “This Executive Order revises and supersedes Executive Order 13-04 in order to provide further policy guidance intended to continue the state’s progress in these areas [providing supported employment services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities], including through a substantial reduction in employment in sheltered workshops.  Continue to improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving competitive integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, consistent with their abilities and choices, will benefit individuals with disabilities, their families, our communities, the economy, and the state.”  

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 31 - 34 of 34

OR Employment First

This web page, housed by the Oregon Department of Human Services, contains information on the Oregon Employment first initiative. It contains information for job seekers, families and employers.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Human Services, Vocational Rehabilitation Services

The Department of Human Services vocational rehabilitation services contains definitions and descriptions for employment services including job assessments, assistive technology, training and technological assistance, community rehabilitation programs and customized employment, among many other services.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Planning My Way to Work: A Transition Guide for Student with Disabilities Leaving High School

“This manual is intended to: Help you make your way through the transition process; Understand your rights, services and resources that may help you and your family; Provide information to help you understand complex adult service systems; Highlight that you direct your own transition; Reinforce that you and your team design your transition just for you; and Identify your work and other adult life goals and a plan to achieve those goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
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Employment First Central Oregon- Members - 05/12/2019

~~This page has information on the member organizations that are a part of Employment First Central Oregon

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

A Personal Guide to Community Employment - 04/02/2019

~~“OSAC, a statewide nonprofit organization, is led by people with developmental disabilities. We believe that with high expectations, appropriate supports and the right job match, people can get competitive integrated employment – or a community job. At a community job, a person:•Works full or part-time;•Earns minimum wage or higher; and•Works with coworkers without disabilities” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Memorandum of Understanding Developmental Disabilities Services Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/30/2016

“,,,IDDS adoption of and VR endorsement of the “Employment First Policy” for working age adults with developmental disabilities”   “This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services.  This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of the MOUR is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and rthe Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 115-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society. “  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding: Developmental Disabilities Services and Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/28/2016

“This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services. This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of this MOU is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and the Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 15-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding on Transition of Students with Disabilities to the Workforce - 02/02/2015

“Together with Executive Order No.15-01, this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) recognizes that, while the State cannot guarantee jobs, Oregon starts with the presumption that everyone can be employed in an integrated setting in a community-based job…Oregon is not guaranteeing anyone a job, but with significant additional resources, Oregon s optimistic that all persons with IDD will have an opportunity to obtain integrated employment.”   “Vision: Through strong agency collaboration, youth with disabilities will transition into competitive integrated employment or post-secondary education/ training.”    MOU Partners Include: Office of Developmental Disabilities Services Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Services Oregon Department of Education Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Cooperative Agreement Between the Oregon Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education - 12/01/2014

“The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to set forth the commitments of the ODE and VR to cooperate in activities leading to a successful transition for students with disabilities from a free and appropriate public education to postsecondary career-related training and employment activities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Youth Transition Program

~~“Established in 1990, the Oregon Youth Transition Program (YTP) is a collaborative partnership between the office of Vocational Rehabilitation, Oregon Department of Education, and the University of Oregon. It is funded by Vocational Rehabilitation every two-years through competitive grants to local school districts. The purpose of the YTP is to prepare students with disabilities for employment or career related postsecondary education or training through the provision of a comprehensive array of pre-employment transition activities and supports. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First: Capacity Building and Training and Technical Assistance Strategic Plan 2014-2015

The mission of this strategic plan is to, “To improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving integrated employment for individuals experiencing IDD, consistent with their abilities and choices. To improve Oregon’s employment services through innovation, best practices, and increased capacity, with the outcome of achieving integrated employment services for all individuals experiencing intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
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Developmental Disabilities Worker’s Guide - 08/27/2018

~~“SPPC services are available to eligible individuals – up to 20 hours each month – as stand-alone attendant/personal care services and related supports, or in combination with the Community First Choice Option/K Plan services.  Ingeneral, when the individual has minimalsupport needs and most of those needs are being met with alternative resources, including natural support, and only need minimal hours of paid-support, SPPC services may be an appropriate option.  “ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Oregon Innovation Grant Awardees - 07/14/2017

“The Oregon Legislature awarded a Policy Option Package in the 2015-17 session for the Department of Human Services (DHS) to fund innovative Employment First projects to increase capacity throughout the state.

The purpose of these grants is to expand efforts to increase competitive integrated employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). We are pleased to award more than 20 organizations throughout Oregon with innovation grants. Congratulations to the providers, family organizations, and case management entities that were awarded grants for innovative projects starting June 2017.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Project ACCESS - 09/14/2015

“The purpose of Project Access is to establish, implement, and evaluate a multi-level interagency transition model in the state of Oregon. The overall goal of the project is to improve and extend transition services to a greater number of youth with disabilities through a model program that brings vocational rehabilitation counselors (VRC's) into high school settings.”

“The model is a collaborative effort between Oregon's Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), public high schools in three Oregon school districts, and researchers at the University of Oregon.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ticket to Work Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - Integrated Employment Plan (revised 7/2015) - 07/06/2015

“(2010-2011) During this time period VR used resources within its Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIG) Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and other available resources to support of a variety of Employment First related activities including: Co-funding for many of the stakeholder and partner gatherings (e.g. Employment First Summit, Meet at the Mountain, stakeholder work groups); Participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN); and Improving access to benefits counseling and planning services such as the Work Incentive Project (WIN); and  Supporting other training and technical assistance activities”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in - 01/01/2012

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Work Incentive Network (WIN!) (now part of the activities of the MIG)

Part of the activities of the MIG

“Benefits and Work Incentive Counseling services help people with disabilities make informed decisions about work, benefits and the use of work incentives to achieve their employment goals, as well as helping them navigate the benefits system when they begin working."

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
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Oregon Employment First Training Course Descriptions

Content of the document reflects information from multiple state and training agency organizations and is designed as a tool for organizations participating in the Transformation Project for selection of needed training and technical assistance.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) 2014-2015

~"The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) provides core supported employment professional training through a series of four, 2 day trainings. These trainings help employment professionals meet Oregon’s employment professional core competencies requirement through eight days of in person training. Each of the two-day seminars results in twelve hours of training.The OELN Training Series is now accredited by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE)".
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
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Lane v. Brown Settlement (12-29-2015) - 12/29/2015

~~“Under the Settlement Agreement, Oregon agreed to continue its policy of decreasing the State’s support of sheltered workshops for people with I/DD in Oregon, and expanding the availability of supported employment services that allow individuals with I/DD the opportunity to work in competitive integrated employment settings.  The Settlement Agreement provides relief to two target populations – (1) adults with I/DD who are 21 years old or older and worked in a sheltered workshop on or after January 25, 2012 (sheltered workshop target population), and (2) transition-age youth with I/DD between the ages of 14 and 24 who are found eligible for services from the State’s Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) (transition-age target population)”

 

Systems
  • Other

Lane v. Kitzhaber, 12-CV-00138, (D. OR 2012) - 05/22/2013

“On May 22, 2013, the Court granted the United States' March 27 Motion to Intervene in a pending class action lawsuit against the State of Oregon. The United States' accompanying Complaint in Intervention alleges violations of Title II of the ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act for unnecessarily segregating individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in sheltered workshops when they could be served in integrated employment settings.”

  “Prior to requesting intervention the United States filed on April 20, 2012, a Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs Regarding Defendants' Motion to Dismiss.  The United States argued that Title II and the integration regulation apply to all services, programs, and activities of a public entity, including segregated, non-residential employment settings such as sheltered workshops.”    “On June 18, 2012, the United States filed a second Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs' Motion for Class Certification. In its Statement of Interest, the United States urged the Court to uphold class certification for a plaintiff class of thousands of individuals in, or referred to, Oregon sheltered workshops.”   
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - From the Department of Justice Findings Letter (2012) - 06/29/2012

“We have concluded that the State is failing to provide employment and vocational services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the most  integrated setting appropriate to their needs, in violation of the ADA.  The State plans, structures, and administers its system of providing employment and vocational services in a manner that delivers such services primarily in segregated sheltered workshops, rather than in integrated community employment.  Sheltered workshops segregate individuals from the community and provide little or no opportunity to interact with persons without disabilities, other than paid staff…  most persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving employment and vocational services from the state remain unnecessarily – and often indefinitely – confined to segregated sheltered workshops..”    
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - Staley v. Kitzhaber 2000 - 01/14/2000

“The lawsuit was the result of years of frustration in waiting for appropriate, adequate services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities, and their families… The lawsuit alleges that the State of Oregon failed to provide services in the most integrated possible setting to adults with mental retardation and/or developmental disabilities eligible for placement in an ICF/MR (intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded) and that individuals with developmental disabilities are entitled to receive Medicaid-Funded services with reasonable promptness.”

“This agreement is intended to provide relief to not only the plaintiffs but also to all other similarly situated individuals with developmental disabilities eligible to receive services under the federal Medicaid program.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
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Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Support Services Waiver (Brokerage)

Provides “Respite; Homemaker; Supported Employment Services; Environmental Accessibility Adaptations; Non-Medical Transportation; Chore Service; Personal Emergency Response Systems; Family Training; PT/OT/Speech; Special Diets; Specialized Supports; Support Services Brokerages; Emergent Services; Community Inclusion; Community Living; Specialized Medical Equipment.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon ICF/IDD Support Services (0375.R04.00)

~~Provides employment path services, supported employment - individual employment support, waiver case management, direct nursing, discovery/career exploration services, environmental safety modifications, family training - conferences and workshops, financial management services, special diets, specialized medical supplies, supported employment - small group employment support, vehicle modifications for individuals w/ID/DD ages 18 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The Beaver State of Oregon believes that "Things Look Different Here" when it comes to creating innovative employment options for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oregon’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
1.14%
Change from
2017 to 2018
4,190,713
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
2.24%
Change from
2017 to 2018
295,114
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
10.77%
Change from
2017 to 2018
122,184
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
8.72%
Change from
2017 to 2018
41.40%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.43%
Change from
2017 to 2018
78.38%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 4,190,713
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 295,114
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 122,184
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,768,886
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 41.40%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.38%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.20%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 21.10%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 11.20%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 292,709
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 288,752
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 509,538
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 11,116
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 40,709
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,205
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 13,553
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 770
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 26,131
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 11,148

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,900
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.10%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 105,296

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 15,659
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 30,533
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 49,752
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 31.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.20%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.70%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,445
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,270
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 15,471
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 3,819
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,815
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 45.05

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,130
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 167,485
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $40,054,369
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $10,847,560
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $18,613,806
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $13,164,718
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 57.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 4,228
Number of people served in facility based work. 1,785
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,207
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 109.54

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.66%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.84%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.44%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 83.94%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.82%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.99%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 74.20%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 39.17%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,723,537
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,680
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 8,299
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 289,705
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 298,004
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 308
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 327
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,095,598
AbilityOne wages (services). $97,396

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 10
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 12
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 675
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 676

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~VR works closely with other State agencies whose populations benefit from VR Supported Employment (SE) Services. VR, the Department of Education, and the Office of Developmental Disability Services work together with the State’s Employment First program to ensure that individuals who experience Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities receive coordinated and sequenced services that meet their employment needs. This multi—agency collaboration operates under the guidance of Executive Order 15—01 and the Lane v. Brown Settlement, actively working to ensure that policies and services are aligned in a way that makes sense for transition age students as well as adults seeking services. VR has a close relationships with OHA Behavioral health programs to ensure that individuals who access VR’s services who are also working with Mental Health Programs across the state get access to quality Individualized Placement and Support (IPS) Services. VR continues our collaboration with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) who oversees the fidelity of the 37 programs that currently offer IPS services throughout the state. VR continues to work with OSECE to expand the availability of these services across the state. In addition to aligning policies and service sequences, VR is working with OHA Behavioral Health and ODDS to ensure that our certification requirements for service providers are in alignment. VR initiated a new Job Placement Services contract in 2015. Now, joint certification and coordinated training makes it easier for providers of Job Placement and Support Services who are funded by VR to continue to provide employment support services to clients when hand—offs occur between agencies. VR currently has more than 200 providers under contract in our new Job Placement Services Contract. In 2017, VR created training for Job Placement Contractors, with OSECE and ODDS participating in development and in presentation of the pilot. A monthly schedule of that training is planned for 2018 in multiple locations where VR wants to increase capacity. VR is establishing a system to identify areas of the state where capacity issues exist. Recruitment of providers in these areas continues to be a priority moving forward. A pilot that would measure the effectiveness of a rural transportation rate change is planned for 2018-2019. VR and ODDS, with the Home Care Commission as the training entity, are increasing job coach capacity through use of Personal Care Attendants. Additionally, VR is working with several community colleges to explore the possibility of a career pathway program that will train future service providers in a curriculum jointly developed with these community colleges. (Page 157) Title IV

VR and Oregon Department of Developmental Disability Services have refocused their work together over the last couple of years to achieve the outcomes set forth in Executive order 13-04, which was updated in Executive Order 15-01. These Executive Orders emphasize with more clarity the State’s Employment First Policy. Additionally, the State of Oregon has recently settled a lawsuit that calls for increased integrated employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. VR, ODDS, and the I/DD service delivery system have a working relationship that shares information, leverages and braids funding, and encourages the joint case management of joint clients. Moving forward VR will continue to work with ODDS and I/DD service delivery system as well as the Department of Education to increase our collaboration to maximize funding, streamline processes, and meet the competitive and integrated employment goals of joint clients.

Over the last year VR, ODE and ODDS have:
• Hired staff specialists who serve individuals with I/DD. These three groups of regional staff meet regularly; co-train other agency staff; and, co-develop tools and strategies to provide services that are consistent and reflect best practices • Have established collaborative training regarding consistency and quality in curricula used for VR, ODDS and ODE staff throughout Oregon; accomplished through: o Agency conferences (VR In-Service, DD Case Management Conference, and ODE Regional Transition Conferences) used mixed groups of staff and cross training techniques to further collaborative training goals o VR, DD, and school transition (ODE) staff training on varied topics, presented regionally to groups consisting of staff from all three agencies o Staff are consistently co-trained by specialists from the three agencies • Ongoing and regularly scheduled meetings lead to collaborative actions by Office of Developmental Disabilities (ODDS), VR and Oregon Department of Education (ODE): o Employment First Steering Committee meetings direct the overall work of the following collaborative meetings. This committee is co-led by VR and ODDS Administrators o Policy and Innovation meetings are co-led by VR staff and DD Staff to facilitate these collaborative actions: • The three agencies review and discuss all new or newly revised policy to assure alignment across agencies • Each agency sends policy transmittals to their regional and community staff when another of them adopts new or newly revised policy o Education and Transition meetings discuss pertinent issues for students who have transition plans including those receiving Pre-Vocational Services; facilitating these collaborative actions: • A jointly held goal of seamless transition for: students with transition plans, students in transition programs, and post high school students • Examination of agency procedures, leading to: development of tools and strategies for use by field staff; and referral to the Policy Work Stream for potential policy revision or development o Training and Technical Assistance meetings address issues of staff and vendor training to facilitate: • Increased numbers of vendors shared across agencies • Increased knowledge and skill (competency) of agency staff and vendors o Quality Assurance is a cross-agency group that evaluates collaborative outcomes providing a means to assess collaborative efforts. (Pages 159-160) Title IV

Feedback on Community Partner Relationships • Communication. Stakeholders felt communication with community partners was lacking. • Primary partnerships. Participants most commonly work with mental health, IDD, education, and aging and disability providers (in addition to WorkSource). • Individual Placement and Support. The Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model used with people with mental illness is cited as a best practice, which has supported effective partnership between vocational rehabilitation and mental health providers. • Employment First. The Employment First initiative has facilitated increased collaboration between vocational rehabilitation, the education system, and IDD providers to support people with IDD in finding employment. • IDD system collaboration challenges. Collaboration with IDD system partners has improved, but stakeholder proposed opportunities to address ongoing challenges, including reconciling Employment First and individual choice, sheltered workshop closures and limited employment pathway options, discovery requirements, and contract differences. Feedback on WorkSource Relationships • The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act has required additional collaboration with the broader Oregon workforce system. Local leadership teams, including vocational rehabilitation, are working on how to connect more people to workforce services throughout the health and human services infrastructure. Vocational rehabilitation is getting additional referrals as a result of Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act collaboration. (Page 173) Title IV

The Oregon Department of Education is another central partner in Employment First partnerships. The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act is also creating changes in transition service delivery for students with disabilities through preemployment transition services. A subsequent section discusses the youth transition service system in depth. • Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation works closely with Oregon’s community colleges on transition and service coordination issues. Additionally, community colleges help to train vocational rehabilitation service providers (job developers and coaches). Vocational rehabilitation is also working with community colleges as a part of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act to increase opportunities for people with disabilities to gain skills and credentials. Participant focus group attendees discussed taking classes and participating in clubs and business development centers at local community colleges, and how well their vocational rehabilitation counselors worked with the colleges to support their participation. Feedback on Self-Sufficiency Office • Oregon’s Self-Sufficiency Offices connect individuals to food benefits (Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash benefits, child care assistance, and refugee services. People with disabilities can also access food and nutrition services through their local Seniors and People with Disabilities Program, which is often an Aging and People with Disabilities program. (Page 174) Title IV

Participant survey respondents were asked to indicate which vocational rehabilitation partners they receive services from. Almost half did not work with listed community partners. The most commonly identified partner was WorkSource Oregon, following by community mental health programs, Developmental Disability Services, and Aging and People with Disabilities services. Surveyed vocational rehabilitation staff were asked to select up to three community partners with whom Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation has the strongest relationships as well as three whose relationship needs improvement. The figure below shows responses ordered by perception of partnership strength, highest to lowest. The three partnerships seen as strongest are 1) vocational rehabilitation contracted vendors; 2) developmental disabilities services; and 3) community mental health programs. Staff noted a wide array of partnerships needing improvement, with local businesses and employers, self-sufficiency, employment department, and parole and probation department topping the list. Community partners observed an increasing emphasis by Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation on working as part of a broader team, including individuals with disabilities, families, schools, employers, and other service providers. Stakeholders particularly noted increasing teamwork and associated positive outcomes around youth transition, Employment First, and Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act initiatives. Staff and partner survey respondents were also asked why the vocational needs of people with disabilities were unmet by service providers. (Page 176) Title IV

Transition Network Facilitators (TNF) Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation and the Oregon Department of Education operate a cooperative agreement to blend funding for nine regional transition network facilitators as a part of the settlement of the Lane v. Brown lawsuit and the resulting Governor’s Executive Order (No. 15-01) to improve Oregon’s systems providing employment services for students with disabilities. Transition network facilitators collaborate with vocational rehabilitation and schools as well as local businesses/employers and others to implement Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Employment First goals of improving transition outcomes for youth. Transition network facilitators are working to create an equitable, sustainable, simplified system, aligned across agencies that reduces redundancies. Interviewees spoke of their role as helping to support students, teachers, families and districts by providing support and information about life after school for people with disabilities. Facilitators connect students to IDD, Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation, Social Security, and other services that can help to create a seamless transition from school to adulthood. Facilitators work more at a systems level than on an individual level. However, facilitators spoke about doing more with schools that do not have Youth Transition Program grants or specialists. Five percent (26 of 396) of vocational rehabilitation participant survey respondents have worked with a Transition Network Facilitator. This small percentage makes sense because this is a relatively new role in Oregon, and one that works more with programs than with individual students. (Page 178) Title IV

(1) Establish quarterly review of caseloads to ensure equitable access and outcomes (2) Establish local plans for community outreach when underserved or underrepresented populations are identified (3) Partner with agencies that provide culturally specific service (4) Continue working with Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation programs to ensure access to joint case management and culturally appropriate services (5) Convene cross agency workgroup to address the needs of underserved populations in the workforce system as a whole. An example is the recently expanded DHS Workforce Roundtable that includes VR (Policy, YTP, youth transition. Business outreach), SSP, Home Care Commission, Child Welfare (young adult transition), Employment First, SNAP/TANF (workforce coordinator) and APD. (Page 188) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~Local state agency branch and field office managers from core and mandatory partners will work with their LWBs to ensure that those receiving public assistance, low—income individuals, and those who are basic skills deficient are included in local WIOA plans and that they have a voice in the system. The agencies will work to find a way to market WIOA services to the above categories of individuals to ensure that they are aware of services and that they may use their classification to ensure priority of service. Staff at the WorkSource Oregon centers and Affiliate Sites will be trained to understand that upon discovery that an individual belongs to a priority category that priority of service will be explained to that individual. Basic skills deficient individuals can be identified through Initial Skills Review testing in the WorkSource Oregon centers, through AccuVision (soft skills) testing, and the National Career Readiness Certificate. Basic skills deficient individuals can be identified for priority of service and can be expedited into job search and occupational skills training programs. (Page 53) Title I

The agencies will continue to provide services to individuals with barriers to employment and to locally outreach to them, as funds permit, to ensure that they are aware of services and that they may use their classification to ensure priority of service. Perhaps more importantly, Oregon is continuing to expand coordination between state agencies who already serve individuals with barriers to employment, thus allowing easier identification and access to these populations. Expanded coordination with programs serving disabled (Vocational Rehabilitation), low-income (TANF and SNAP) and ex-inmates (Corrections) are examples. Staff at the WSO centers and affiliate sites will be trained to understand that upon discovery that an individual belongs to a priority category, priority of service will be explained to that individual. (Pages 55-56) Title I

OCB also uses this RFA process for vendors who provide services such as Rehabilitation Teaching, Orientation & Mobility and Assistive Technology training. Prior to permitting direct-unsupervised access with agency participants, including supported employment participants, all vendors/providers of services are required to complete and pass background checks. In requiring both the technical qualification process and the criminal background check of providers, OCB has taken the necessary steps to ensure that when agency participants choose to utilize community providers, they can count on safety and quality services for our clients.

In addition, the OCB is included in the Integrated Work Plan for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. The Oregon Department of Human Services (OHS) along with its many partners and stakeholders, strives to support the choices of individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families within local communities by promoting and providing services that are person-centered and directed, flexible, inclusive and supportive of the discovery and development of each individual's unique gifts, talents and abilities. Oregon is committed to work toward service options that ensure people with I/DD have the opportunity to live lives that are fulfilling and meaningful. (Page 219) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~Strengthening the framework for partnering by developing and implementing processes will make it easier for state agencies, local boards and other workforce organizations to work together and better understand each other’s services. This process will help to underline current policies that both help and hinder collaboration and will inform future policy—making decisions to support integration. More effective partnering includes state and local workforce organizations leveraging resources, whether those resources are in the form of data, funds, or staff. As resources become scarcer, partnering will help to stretch them further to impact the outcomes of all participating organizations. Financial, institutional, political and other barriers to effective partnering will be reviewed and revised to minimize their effect on partnerships. (Page 41) Title I

VR knows that given the needs of our clients, a robust employer engagement model is required to be successful. VR continues to use Job Placement contractors to identify individual employment, assessment, and training opportunities for those who require those services to become employed. Additionally, VR strives to expand the base of employers who work with our clients who do not require individualized outreach to employers. By leveraging opportunities with other workforce partners, VR believes that it can increase employment opportunities for Oregonians with disabilities and begin to change perceptions associated with individuals with disabilities in the workforce. Oregon VR has one fulltime business engagement specialists located in the central administration office that supports each of the local branch offices in activates detailed below. VR will: • partner with the local Employment Department Business Teams to coordinate employment services, • partner with the local workforce development boards (LWDB) to coordinate employer engagement activities, • provide information to VR staff regarding apprenticeship programs and processes. • partner with local mental health providers in coordinating employment services • continue to partner with Oregon Commission of the Blind on employment services, • participate and coordinate local employer recruitment events and job fairs, • contract with providers to provide local employer engagement events and activities for individuals with disabilities, • contract with providers to and other providers • provide Job Developer Orientation Training (JDOT) or another VR approved Job Developer training to contracted job placement and partner providers, • establish local MOU’s with federal business contractor. (Page 158) Title I

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~At application, the majority of VR program clients are already receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits as a result of legal blindness. During development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), the OCB explores the client’s vocational goals and income needs, and commensurate with their skills, strengths and previous work experience jointly sets employment goals. For client’s targeting employment with earnings above the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level, the OCB utilizes the Ticket to Work program for cost reimbursement upon 9 months of successful employment at or above SGA level earnings. (Page 22) Title I

3.4 Rethink and restructure training and skill development to include innovative and effective work—based learning and apprenticeship models and to accelerate training.
Effective training often must go beyond classroom training to address all types of learners and provide hands—on experiences. Work—based learning and other innovative strategies that can help individuals understand more clearly what it is like to work in a certain industry or company are important to both improve learning outcomes and to help individuals with career exploration.
Goal 4: Create and develop talent by providing young people with information and experiences that engage their interests, spur further career development, and connect to Oregon employers. (Page 39) Title I

Goal 3 of the OWIB Strategic Plan is about investing in Oregonians to build in—demand skills, match training and job seekers to opportunities, and accelerate career momentum. Strategy 3.4 focuses on rethinking and restructuring training and skill development to include innovative and effective work—based learning and apprenticeship models and to accelerate training. This work will require engagement with the community colleges, and other training providers to build responsive and effective training models.

Effective training often must go beyond classroom training to address all types of learners and provide hands—on experiences. Work—based learning and other innovative strategies that can help individuals understand more clearly what it is like to work in a certain industry or company are important to both improve learning outcomes and to help individuals with career exploration. (Page 61) Title I

Targeting Resources for Occupational Training
Staff will develop and deploy a training program to educate staff in WorkSource Oregon centers and agency central offices about structured work—based learning, which includes registered apprenticeship. The training program will help all workforce partners understand the different training options that employers and individuals can access through the workforce system and each of their defining characteristics. The training will also teach staff how to identify an apprenticeable occupation, the characteristics of a good apprentice, and how to refer both individuals and employers to structured work—based learning training programs, certificates and credentials. The training program will help WorkSource Oregon staff understand the value of registered apprenticeship and structured work based learning, which will enable them to share the information broadly with employers and other service delivery partners. (Pages 64-65) Title I

Effective training often must go beyond classroom training to address all types of learners and provide hands—on experiences. Work—based learning and other innovative strategies that can help individuals understand more clearly what it is like to work in a certain industry or company are important to both improve learning outcomes and to help individuals with career exploration.
Provide Technical Assistance/Incentives to Support Adoption of Work—Based Learning Models
The system will build coalitions and relationships with industry and community partners to create and expand registered apprenticeship programs through two apprenticeship focused positions at OED and the Oregon Department of Education (ODE). OED will partner with local workforce boards to ensure that technical assistance and support for new apprenticeship programs are aligned with industry need and local sector strategies. ODE will partner with secondary and post—secondary institutions and community partners to increase the opportunities for youth to transition from high school into an apprenticeship or a pre—apprenticeship program. (Page 65) Title I

INPUT 2: SRC recognizes the extensive work VR staff have done to expand the Youth Transition Program and improve on the outcome of VR services for youth with disabilities. RECOMMENDATION: SRC would encourage the development of data sharing with the Oregon Department of Education on Indicators 13 and 14. We submit that the data could be helpful for VR counselors who are working with youth with disabilities, 16 years of age and older, in knowing how to help youth in transition better prepare for post-secondary life, (Indicator 13), and how successful youth have become as a result of VR intervention, i.e. was the youth employed in an appropriate career selection developed in the IPE (Indicator 14). (Pages 147-148) Title I

• Instruction on vocational, independent living and social skills. • Career development activities. • Collaboration with the local VR office to arrange for the provision of pre— employment transition services for all students with disabilities, in need of such services, without regard to the type of disability. YTP provides the five required Pre-Employment Transition Services directly to potentially eligible students with disabilities when requested. Depending on the type of request YTP may provide one, multiple or all five of the required Pre-ETS: job exploration counseling; work-based learning experiences; counseling on postsecondary educational opportunities; workplace readiness training; and instruction in self-advocacy. Oregon VR considers these students as “reportable individuals” and reports them in our quarterly 911 report. In the event that there are existing services available within the local educational agency that can meet the students need in the area of Pre-Employment Transition Services YTP may refer students to those existing services. Oregon VR does not consider students that only receive Information and Referral services from YTP as “reportable individuals” and therefore does not report them in our quarterly 911 report. YTP will not reduce the partnering school district’s obligation under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act to provide or pay for any transition services that are also considered special education or related services and that are necessary for ensuring a free appropriate public education. • Exposure and connections to paid employment. (Page 151) Title I

YTP Transition Specialists, TNFs, and school transition staff members partner with local VR offices and VR Counselors to coordinate the development and implementation of individualized education programs. When a student is determined eligible for VR services, he or she works with a school transition specialist and a vocational rehabilitation counselor to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that reflects the interests, strengths, and abilities of the student, and which addresses the barriers to training or employment outcomes for the student. VR is serving all eligible individuals and is not utilizing an Order of Selection waitlist. Should it be necessary for VR to reinstitute an Order of Selection, the scope of VR services and expected employment outcomes for all individuals served by VR, including YTP students, will be modified to comply with VR’s Order of Selection. (Page 155) Title I

A primary effort of VR and OHA Behavioral Health Programs has been development and expansion of evidence-based supported employment services by increasing the number of county mental health organizations providing such services and meeting fidelity standards. VR continues to partner with and utilize the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. As of the end of Program Year 2017, 37 community mental health programs and 35 out of 36 counties are providing IPS. With the inclusion of IPS into Oregon’s OARs, evidence-based supported employment services continue to expand across Oregon.

Additionally, VR supports and collaborates with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance in assisting young people with psychiatric disabilities by assisting them in obtaining or maintaining employment (an evidence-based practice, which is effective in reducing the onset and symptoms of mental illness). In partnership with Portland State University, VR helped create a center for excellence that provides ongoing technical assistance to EASA programs throughout the state.

VR will continue to focus on Mental Health supported employment outcomes, the quality of the outcomes, the skills of employment service providers and the capacity of community rehabilitation programs and providers. Oregon VR has reviewed potential participation with the Supported Education process that is now increasingly being utilized by many IPS providers. There are now 83 Mental Health IPS employment specialist across the State. (Pages160- 161) Title IV

Program staff and community partners were also asked to identify strategies to serve under and unserved populations. Increased staff was the strategy identified by the greatest share of program staff (63 percent), and increased transportation options was identified by the greatest share of community partners (63 percent). More interactions with the community, and providing more job skills development training were identified as strategies to serve unserved populations by more than a majority of both program staff and community partners. Almost half of all staff (48 percent) and 57 percent of community partners felt that staff training to work on specialty caseloads would help serve under and unserved participants. More than half of community partner respondents also cited improving interagency collaboration and public awareness campaign key strategies for serving under or unserved populations. Underserved and Unserved Youth with Disabilities Despite the many strengths of Oregon’s youth transition work, some youth are underserved or fall through the cracks. A quarter (25 percent, or 18) of vocational rehabilitation staff and a third (33 percent, or 31) of vocational rehabilitation community partners felt that people between the ages of 16 to 21 are underserved by vocational rehabilitation services. Interviewees discussed varying reasons for this. Some students don’t choose to participate in transition services while in school, do not have a YTP program available to them, or do not have a disability focused on by their school’s transition services. If those students take a break between school and connecting to vocational rehabilitation services, they have often lost and need to be re-taught the structures, routines and soft skills obtained through school attendance. Sometimes the gap between graduation and vocational rehabilitation participation is not a student’s choice, but rather the result of high vocational rehabilitation caseloads causing backlogs. Stakeholders suggest increased collaboration with programs serving out of school youth to improve outcomes for this population. Additionally, some staff expressed a desire to be involved with students earlier in their school careers, and to have more communication including increased involvement at individualized education program (IEP) meetings. Interviewees and focus group participants discussed limited connection between contracted job developers and students in transition seeking employment. Some stakeholders discussed this as an educator’s or a youth transition program counselor’s responsibility. Participating contractors were looking for guidance in how to formally provide services to this population. (Pages 171- 172) Title IV

Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation is making additional investments in pre-employment transition services through the following partnerships: • Silver Falls Came LEAD (Leadership Empowerment Advocacy Development). Students with disabilities participate in leadership academies, focused on job exploration, work-based learning experiences, postsecondary education counseling, workplace readiness training, and self-advocacy instruction. • AntFarm. Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation partners with AntFarm to provide work experiences in gardening and farming. • Worksystems, Inc. Students receive work experiences in Washington and Multnomah counties with public and private employers. • Motivational Enhancement Group Intervention interviewing. Students gain self-advocacy skills through a collaborative, goal-oriented style of communication. (Page 178) Title IV

2. Increase capacity and resources to provide enhanced levels of service to Oregonians with Disabilities a. Assist the workforce system with increasing its capacity and capability to serve Oregonians with Disabilities i. Convene cross agency workgroup to address the needs of underserved populations in the workforce system as a whole ii. Provide training to workforce partners on working with individuals with disabilities iii. Work with other agencies who work with clients with barriers to employment to address common access issues in the workforce system iv. Work with local workforce boards to ensure that programmatic access issues are identified and addressed b. Restructure the VR service delivery model to comply with state contracting requirements and be outcome driven i. Continue transition to newly structured pay-for-performance Job Placement Services Contract which includes a third track for individuals with the most significantly disabilities. These individuals require addition services that are were not funded appropriately in our traditional supported employment track. ii. Create contracts with clear minimum qualifications, scope of work, and cost structure for all personal services to ensure high quality and consistent services statewide c. Expand the availability of Vendor and Partner services that meet the needs of Oregonians with disabilities, including those requiring supported employment services i. Develop a community college based Career Pathway to develop job placement professionals and job coaches in the community ii. Identify areas of limited service availability, including supported employment services, and develop and implement recruitment and solicitation plans iii. Work with providers of sheltered and subminimum wage employment to transition to the integration of their clients into competitive and integrated employment in their respective communities. 3. Improve the performance of the VR program with respect to the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA. a. Increase staff knowledge of the labor market i. Encourage branch level engagement with regional economists and workforce analysts to educate staff on local labor market issues ii. Work with Local Workforce Development Boards to engage with local sector strategies and pursue high wage, high demand work opportunities. b. Expand opportunities for skill gain and credentialing i. Identify and access local skill upgrading opportunities within the Local Workforce Areas (LWA) ii. Partner with community college Disability Service Offices (DSO) to increase access to existing credentialing programs iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability c. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs i. Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities i. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns ii. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity iii. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon. (Page 182-183) Title IV

Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability 3. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs a. Use labor market information to create work—based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs b. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level c. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. 4. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work—based learning opportunities a. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide b. Implement a progressive employment model c. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams d. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities e. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets f. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers 5. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities a. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns b. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity c. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon The Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Program is an active participant in the implementation of the WIOA. (Pages 189) Title IV

Partner with community college Disability Service Offices (DSO) to increase access to existing credentialing programs iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability c. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs i. Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities. (Pages 194) Title IV

VR’s SE program continues to provide opportunities for individuals of all ages with the most significant disabilities to achieve competitive integrated employment with ongoing support provided by a variety of partners. These same individuals are those for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred. VR provides a continuum of SE services in partnership with other human services agencies and programs that persons with the most significant disabilities need to develop, maintain and advance in competitive employment. VR continues to work closely with other state programs, local governmental units, community—based organizations and groups to develop, refine and expand the availability of SE services throughout Oregon. During FFY 15 VR revamped our pay for performance Job Placement Services Contracts that provides Job Placement, Job Coaching, and Retention services. VR currently has over 200 contracts in place to provide job placement statewide. These contracts give VR the ability to pay for placement services in three tiers based on the significance of the functional limitation that the client experiences. Tiers two and three focus on clients who require SE services in order to be successful in the labor market. In FFY 2017, VR provided SE services to 3,922 individuals with significant disabilities, including persons with psychiatric disabilities, intellectual and/or developmental disabilities or traumatic brain injuries. During this same period, 727 individuals who received SE services entered into competitive integrated employment, and 2,517 individuals continued to participate in their SE IPEs. (Page 196) Title IV

Clients and employer are satisfied with placements. Historically, VR has partnered with OHA Behavioral Health Programs in promoting Individualized Placement and Support (IPS), an evidence—based SE model. Quality of these programs is assessed through compliance with a scale, which measures the ‘fidelity’ or the degree to which a program is being implemented in accordance the evidence based fidelity model developed after extensive research from Dartmouth College. Some of the measures used in the IPS fidelity scales are the kinds of employment outcomes participants are obtaining; the degree of collaboration with vocational rehabilitation; availability of rapid job search and evidence of consumer choice. VR maintains quality SE outcomes through ongoing collaboration with mental health providers on the local level and OHA Mental Health Programs central office staff. Supported employment is integrated into the array of services and programs available to Oregonians with disabilities, including Oregon’s mental health and developmental disability service systems. Success in SE requires a partnership among the responsible state and community programs, other service providers, consumers and families, advocacy organizations, employers and others. Long— term success continues to depend on the availability of funding for follow—along SE services. VR utilizes Title VI, Part B and Title I funds for the time—limited services necessary for an individual to stabilize in a community—based job. Services that may be part of a SE IPE include: • Person centered planning • Community—based assessment • Job development • Job placement • On—site training for worker and/or coworkers • Long—term support development • Other services and goods • Post—employment services The specific type, level and location of ongoing supports provided to an individual are based upon his or her needs and those of the employer. Ongoing support may be provided by a variety of public and/or private sector resources including: • OHA Behavioral Health Programs and community mental health programs • DDS community supports • County developmental disability case managers and developmental disability service brokerages • Social Security work incentives • Employer—provided reasonable accommodations • Natural supports • Family or community sponsorship • By VR, for youth with the most significant disabilities who: need extended support services; are not currently eligible for extended support services from any other known source; are 23 or younger; and, have an annually amended and approved IPE to include VR extended support services; and, for no longer than a total of 4 Yrs. (Page 197) Title IV

There is active information sharing and coordinated planning between OCB and regional programs, OVRS, education and health care organizations throughout the state. Partners join in planning outreach efforts, coordinate referral of potentially eligible youth for VR, and implement process improvements for assessment & training statewide in the areas of daily living skills, orientation and mobility/cane travel, communication skills, technology, vocational aptitudes, interpersonal /social skills, and academic preparation for transition-age youth.
Ages 14 - 21 OCB's application for vocational rehabilitation services generally begins around age 16 (as early as age 14), and requires the development of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for all students within 90 days of eligibility, which matches the timeline for adult services.
In addition, the Oregon Commission for the Blind has an Interagency Agreement with the Oregon Department of Education. (Page 214) Title IV

Oregon Department of Education will assist local education agencies, Oregon School for the Deaf and community colleges in accessing the services provided by OCB, which can be requested to aid in the transition to employment services, serve as a liaison between the parties, Encourage the screening, identifying and referring of potential clients to OCB to provide a continuum of appropriate procedures and services, identify methods to coordinate the IEP with the IPE, provide information related to the availability of public education programs, facilitate the availability of diagnostic and evaluative information to the Commission for the Blind relevant to the determination of eligibility. (Page 215) Title IV

OCB is able to develop relationships with youth who are blind/visually impaired and parents, providing a vocational context within IEP and 504 Planning & Implementation Team discussions and ensuring an important link to identifying the individualized skills needing to be addressed in order for the youth to be prepared for adult life after graduation.
OCB transition counselors provide youth with counseling/services/programs to aid in preparation for transitioning to post-high school/college/employment. Individuals who are blind/low vision who have early exposure to adaptive skills training, vocational exploration and active socialization have a head start to becoming functional, employed and fully integrated adults. The OCB knows not all learning can take place in the classroom, and therefor offers Summer Work Experience Programs (SWEP) to complement the learning that is available through the public education system. These pre-employment transition programs serve to give each participant a safe environment to discover their vocational aptitudes, develop confidence in adaptive skills and encourage self-advocacy and independence. These pre-employment transition programs (offered in the Summer) are a key to the agency's success in quality of employment outcomes for students with vision loss. (Page 216) Title IV

Coordination of professional development under IDEA Agency staff who work with transition-age youth coordinate transition activities throughout Oregon to teachers of the visually impaired and other Special Education personnel. These staff work with regional staff to ensure customers receive services and information necessary to facilitate a smooth transition from high school to adult services. Based on assessments and training provided by OCB, OCB staff provide recommendations and information to regional programs, parents and students about vocational rehabilitation services including availability, referral, and eligibility requirements that support a coordinated transition plan from high school to post-school services.
Consultation is also provided as early as necessary to special education staff regarding IEP planning and development. OCB staff shares data and reports relevant to program development and planning. (Page 227) Title IV

If the assessment shows that the student will require ongoing support to sustain acceptable work performance and maintain employment, supported employment is included in the services to be provided in the IPE. The IPE includes collaboration and funding from other agencies or organizations that assist by providing the ongoing support services required. All services provided by the Commission for the Blind are time limited unless the eligible individual and the counselor jointly agree that additional time is required to reach the IPE goal and the individual is progressing toward that goal. (Page 239) Title IV

The Oregon Commission for the Blind uses its Title VI, Part B funds to provide supported employment services to eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities for whom competitive employment in an integrated setting is their current vocational goal. These clients, because of the nature of their disability, often require extensive services in order to be successful. Specialized placement assistance, lengthened training periods and planning for ongoing support is required in order for clients to be successful. All of the funds are used for individual case costs. Our approach for supported employment services is as follows: If an individual's goal is to pursue an employment outcome in an integrated setting, an IPE will be developed in accordance with the individual's strengths, interests, resources, priorities, and informed choice. Services are purchased on a fee-for service basis from providers within the community. Careful job analysis and intensive one to one training are provided. (Page 246) Title IV

The Oregon Commission for the Blind will continue to leverage IGAs with partners/regional programs throughout the state to meet the needs of students with the most significant disabilities. The OCB is committed to working alongside DHS/DD/ID providers to insure that each student is surrounded with a qualified team of professionals to assist him/her towards their IPE. (Page 248) Title IV
The OCB will continue to provide its array of services/programs and paid work experiences to students with vision loss/blindness. OCB will continue to organize and manage our two paid summer work experience programs (in Salem and Portland) for eligible students age 16+, and will expand the program and staffing to provide more paid work experience and pre- employment transition service opportunities throughout the year.
o The OCB will continue to nurture the relationships with business that support these work opportunities for students who are blind.
o The OCB will continue to build relationships and participate in IEP meetings with school districts, teachers of the visually impaired, students and families throughout the state.
o The OCB will explore methods for supporting work experience for students with visual disability more locally across the state and more broadly throughout the year outside of summer programs.
o The OCB is also exploring new methods for providing pre- employment transition services to students with visual disability, focusing in particular upon the adaptive and soft skills necessary to succeed in an adult workplace. (Page 257) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~AEFLA-funded Adult-Basic-Skills Programs work with employers through connections with their colleges’ Career Pathways, Customized Training, Workforce Training, and Occupational Skills Training programs. Another critical partner is VR. The Vocational Rehabilitation program by design contacts the Business and employer community utilizing a client specific approach. VR’s approach of utilizing contracted vendors to job develop for individual clients indicates a different model regarding employer outreach. However, employers also approach the VR offices with Job Opportunities and VR will address a process where these contacts and opportunities can be blended into a Workforce combined business outreach method. (Page 58) Title I

These individuals require addition services that are were not funded appropriately in our traditional supported employment track ii. Create contracts with clear minimum qualifications, scope of work, and cost structure for all personal services to ensure high quality and consistent services statewide c. Expand the availability of Vendor and Partner services that meet the needs of Oregonians with disabilities, including those requiring supported employment services i. Develop a community college based Career Pathway to develop job placement professionals and job coaches in the community ii. Identify areas of limited service availability, including supported employment services, and develop and implement recruitment and solicitation plans iii. Work with providers of sheltered and subminimum wage employment to transition to the integration of their clients into competitive and integrated employment in their respective communities. 3. Improve the performance of the VR program with respect to the performance accountability measures under section 116 of WIOA a. Increase staff knowledge of the labor market i. Encourage branch level engagement with regional economists and workforce analysts to educate staff on local labor market issues ii. Work with Local Workforce Development Boards to engage with local sector strategies and pursue high wage, high demand work opportunities b. Expand opportunities for skill gain and credentialing i. Identify and access local skill upgrading opportunities within the Local Workforce Areas (LWA ii. Partner with community college Disability Service Offices (DSO) to increase access to existing credentialing programs iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability. (Page 194) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The OCB expects participants who are blind, low vision and deaf blind to become fully engaged in the array of workforce services. OCB expects our counseling staff to be active and equal partners among the regional and local workforce partners, where the talents of agency participants can be more effectively matched with business needs through sharing of employment strategies and real time labor market information. OCB expects partner programs to identify shared core- participant job readiness skill needs, and to work with all partners to develop common-need trainings - and share presentation efforts where applicable - to strengthen the skill sets of our agency participants through access to all. OCB expects that the new partnership will make our staff and agency participants more informed beneficiaries of relevant targeted workforce vocational training and apprenticeship opportunities towards gaining higher skills that match an individual's aptitude despite visual disability, and thereby securing higher wages and greater self- sufficiency. (Pages 259-260) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) continues to establish relationships with private non—profit and for profit entities that are community rehabilitation providers, medical services providers, and providers of other services and supports that are required by VR clients to achieve the goals in their Individualized Plans for Employment. VR staff develop relationships in the community to meet the needs of their client and to provide choice of providers to their clients. Services provided by the community rehabilitation providers, contractors, and vendors include medical and psychological assessments and services, job development and employer services, job coaching and facilitation, accommodations and ergonomics, independent living services to support employment goals, follow up services, and other services especially for individuals with significant disabilities. The cooperative relationship vary from information and referral relationships to fee—for—service and pay for performance relationships. VR follows State of Oregon contractual processes when establishing contracts for services. VR works with and establishes relationships with non—profit organizations to fully utilize the benefits provided through the SSA TTW program. In January 2010, Oregon VR initiated a Ticket to Work shared payment agreement pilot with ten community mental health programs that provide evidence—based mental health supported employment services. These mental health agencies are governed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) who contracts with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) to provide annual programs and technical assistance. These agreements allow Oregon VR to be the Employment Network of record with SSA, partner with the mental health agency to provide dual services to an individual. Once the VR case is closed, the mental health agency continues to support the individual until the support is no longer needed. If the individual works and reaches the SSA TTW wage thresholds, Oregon VR receives TTW payments which in turn are split with the mental health agencies. This pilot evolved into a project that has strengthened the relationship between VR and these participating agencies by providing additional TTW dollars for additional program funding. As of July 2017 we have sixteen agreements in place. We will continue to review our contracts with Private Non Profit organizations and update this section when new contracts are completed. (Pages 156-157) Title IV

Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities i. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns ii. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity iii. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon. (Pages 183)  Title I

a. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide b. Implement a progressive employment model c. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams d. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities e. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets f. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers 5. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities a. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns b. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity c. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon The Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Program is an active participant in the implementation of the WIOA. (Page 189) Title I

Another factor that may indicate significant disability is receipt of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). In order to receive SSI or SSDI an individual must prove that he or she is unable to work. The RSA longitudinal study of the vocational rehabilitation services program found that individuals accepted for services were more likely to exit the program prior to receiving VR services if they were receiving SSI or SSDI at entry. The following data describes the percentage of people receiving public financial assistance at program entry and the associated outcome.
Outcome % of participants who were receiving SSI/SSDI at application:
Exited VR after services without an employment outcome: PY 15: 65%, PY 16: 65%
Exited VR after services with an employment outcome: PY 15: 62%, PY 16: 59%
While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income-dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services.
Commission Services for Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities:
The Commission is reaching those with the most significant disabilities through outreach and by providing individualized services.
The Commission provides post- employment services if the disability changes, the technology on the job has changed, or there is new software and the person needs training on the new software. (Page 230-231) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~VR knows that given the needs of our clients, a robust employer engagement model is required to be successful. VR continues to use Job Placement contractors to identify individual employment, assessment, and training opportunities for those who require those services to become employed. Additionally, VR strives to expand the base of employers who work with our clients who do not require individualized outreach to employers. By leveraging opportunities with other workforce partners, VR believes that it can increase employment opportunities for Oregonians with disabilities and begin to change perceptions associated with individuals with disabilities in the workforce. Oregon VR has one fulltime business engagement specialists located in the central administration office that supports each of the local branch offices in activates detailed below.

VR will:

  • partner with the local Employment Department Business Teams to coordinate employment services,
  • partner with the local workforce development boards (LWDB) to coordinate employer engagement activities,
  • provide information to VR staff regarding apprenticeship programs and processes.
  • partner with local mental health providers in coordinating employment services
  • continue to partner with Oregon Commission of the Blind on employment services,
  • participate and coordinate local employer recruitment events and job fairs,
  • contract with providers to provide local employer engagement events and activities for individuals with disabilities,
  • contract with providers to and other providers
  • provide Job Developer Orientation Training (JDOT) or another VR approved Job Developer training to contracted job placement and partner providers,
  • establish local MOU’s with federal business contractors.
  • provide information to VR staff regarding 503 information, protocols and processes.
  • provide local trainings and resources on disability awareness and accommodations,
  • establish partnerships with local nonprofits that provide employment services,
  • participate in in local area business events to enhance disability awareness,
  • Promote and develop local area internships for individuals with disabilities.

Employer survey respondents were asked to rate the perceived helpfulness of a variety of potential services provided to employers by VR. The survey items with the highest perceived helpfulness reported by respondents to the business survey were:

  • Providing workers with disabilities with the accommodations and supports they need to do the employer’s work;
  • If concerns arise, providing consultation with management, the workers, and co—workers to resolve the concerns;
  • Placing qualified individuals in internships at the business with full reimbursement of the employer’s expenses;
  • Providing training consultation and resources related to the provision of reasonable accommodations; and
  • Finding workers that meet the employer’s workforce needs. (Page 158) Title IV

o Train students in workplace readiness o Provide screening and referral of appropriate youth o Identification of appropriate worksites and task o Provide counseling on opportunities for enrollment in comprehensive training opportunities to meet the desired qualification of employers • In the Portland Metro area VR staff are working with health providers Legacy and Providence Health to pilot training and streamlined hiring program for students with disabilities. Students placed in competitive integrated employment with these employers are supported with 12 months of follow along services to ensure stable employment. • VR Contractors are working with business and schools regarding employer engagement models to offer competitive, integrated employment and career exploration opportunities. These trainings include: o Pre— employment trainings with school staff to meet employer needs o Interest inventories with students o Trainings on developing partnership agreements o Trainings on job needs analysis o Marketing school based programs o Pre and post training evaluations for students involved in work experiences. Oregon VR has hired two Pre-Employment Transition Coordinators that are actively working with employers to create paid and unpaid work experiences for students with disabilities. The Pre-Employment Transition Coordinators are also working with employers to develop essential skills profiles for students to identify current work readiness expectations from local employers. (Page159) Title IV

iii. Work with employers to establish on-the-job training opportunities iv. Provide opportunities for skill upgrading for individuals who face barriers to work and career advancement based on disability c. Expand opportunities for clients to learn about and enter into higher wage, high demand jobs i. Use labor market information to create work-based learning opportunities at local business who have high wage, high demand jobs ii. Inform clients about training opportunities to prepare them for jobs that are above entry level iii. Encourage clients to access VR services who face disability related barriers to advancement. d. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work-based learning opportunities i. Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide ii. Implement a progressive employment model iii. Create and train local VR employer engagement teams iv. Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities v. Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets vi. Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers e. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities i. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns ii. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity iii. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon. (Page 183) Title IV

Data Collection

1. Increase quality employment outcomes for all Oregonians with disabilities. According to the current data our rehabilitation rate has slightly declined. 2016 rehab rate was 62.3%, and dropped in 2017 to 60.2%. As of the end of December 2nd quarter PY 18 it is 57.5%. We are evaluating why this is occurring. a. Support and accelerate the customer experience to be empowering, effective, and efficient

i. Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process We continue to work towards earlier engagement with our Workforce partners. There are varying degrees of involvement with the 9 Local Workforce Development Boards. Local development activities are continuing between VR and d the Local Workface Development Boards to continue to identify mechanisms to increase earlier engagement.

ii. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies Data sharing agreements are in place with OED (Wagner Peyser) the Department of Education, and various other entities. VR continues to work to develop the technological connections for efficient and timely transfer of Data between Core partners in order to populate our RSA 911 quarterly reports and to utilize the data to see where programmatic adjustments will need to be made.

iii. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process to get clients into plan more quickly. Since 2016 Plan completion we have gotten our clients into plan (or plan extension) more quickly as identified by the following data: SFY 2015 62.0% (we were shifting from 180-day timeline to 90. SFY 2016 77% SFY 2017 84% SFY 2018 Q1 91% SFY 2018 Q2 92% iv. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication This process is still in development. (Page 192) Title IV

Baseline performance metrics are currently being established. Oregon VR achieved the following 116 metrics for PY2015. As Baselines are being established, the program will continue to review our outcomes and the strategies that impact these metrics. Common Performance Measures achieved (July1, 2015-June 30 2016) PY2015 SFY 2016 Percentage rehabilitated 62.30%. Percentage of clients who closed from plan employed during the 2nd quarter following closure. 56.75% Percentage of clients who closed from plan employed during 4th quarter following closure. 54.67% Median quarterly wage at 2nd quarter following closure from the program $3,391.84 Percent of clients employed with same employer during the second and fourth quarters following exit from program 71.64%. (Pages 195-196) Title IV

511

~~OCB believes that all individuals are capable of integrated and competitive work with the right supports in place, and the state has over the years reduced options for sub-minimum wage employment. The new regulations requiring the agency to provide pre-employment transition services for youth with disability before certification for sub-minimum wage work is expected to have little impact on the agency, as this is the direction the state has been moving towards. A challenge for supported employment is that the comparable benefit resources available in Oregon State to provide extended long-term support services are limited. OCB works in collaboration with all available resources and partners on cases that have co-occurring disabling conditions that make long-term supports necessary. The OCB continues to work with employers and other natural supports to identify funding for long-term support services.  (Page 218) Title IV

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Vets

* Required one-stop partners: In addition to the core programs, the following partner programs are required to provide access through the one-stops: Career and Technical Education (Perkins), Community Services Block Grant, Indian and Native American programs, HUD Employment and Training programs, Job Corps, Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program, National Farmworker Jobs program, Senior Community Service Employment program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) (unless the Governor determines TANF will not be a required partner), Trade Adjustment Assistance programs, Unemployment Compensation programs, and YouthBuild. The State’s Workforce Development Activities. The Workforce system provides services focused in broad categories: •Enhancing the job skills of Oregon’s workforce. (Page 19) Title I

For example, the VR program is working with the Local Leadership Teams and LWDB’s to have full understanding of the determined Sector Strategies and Sector Partnerships at the local level. As individual VR clients are counselled and address his or her career development, the local sector partnership details and goals are shared with these job seekers with disabilities. These participants can then determine if these sector industries/employment areas, and associated career development, are something the individual client would wish to pursue. Additionally, Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs) partner with the Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI) apprenticeship and On the Job Training (OJT) representatives to ensure that employers are aware of the benefits of hiring a veteran. LVERs also communicate apprenticeship and OJT opportunities for veterans to WorkSource Oregon Business and Employment Specialists and DVOP staff. (Page 58) Title I

The State Veterans Program Coordinator provided the following materials in accordance with the Jobs for Veterans Act, section 4215 of 38 U.S.C. to all WSO centers in order to educate the WorkSource center staff on the roles and responsibilities of Disabled Veterans Outreach Program Specialists (DVOPs), and Local Veterans Employment Representatives (LVERs), and to ensure that veterans and eligible spouses receive priority of service in all Oregon WorkSource locations: • Priority of Service example tools • Customer workflow diagram example, and • Department of Labor approved Priority of Service Training for Frontline Staff available online via iLearn, Oregon’s interactive training site for all WSO staff and partner staff. The priority of service training materials were disseminated to each WorkSource location in Oregon in order to ensure: • That eligible veterans and eligible spouses receive priority of service in the customer intake process, for training opportunities, referrals to employers and for employment based workshops offered at each OED/WorkSource location. • OED/WorkSource staff can refer special disabled veterans and veterans with barriers to employment to DVOPs for intensive services and case management services. • Each Business and Employment Specialist staff member can provide excellent customer service and core employment services to those veterans that are not eligible to meet with a DVOP. (Page 86) Title I

Mental Health

~~11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer the flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs.

12. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with WIOA section 116) and to monitor program performance.

13. Whether the local area in which the eligible provider is located has a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs. (Page 136) Title I

The Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Program (VR) has developed and maintains cooperative agreements and cooperative relationships where necessary with federal and state agencies not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system. This cooperation includes, but is not limited to the Centers for Independent Living (CILs), Oregon Developmental Disability Services (ODDS), local I/DD brokerages, county service providers, Oregon’s Mental Health Programs (including programs that serve in and out of school youth), the Client Assistance Program (CAP), Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation 121 Programs, Oregon Department of Education (ODE), local school districts, community colleges, Access Technologies Inc. (ATI), and local agencies providing services to our clients. VR strives to have cooperative relationships that streamline referral and service delivery, including joint planning, leverages funds, provide coordinated and non—duplicated services, and maximize the use of wrap around services to ensure success. VR’s goal is to simplify, streamline, and expedite services to clients while maximizing access to services that will help with their success. (Page 152) Title I

A primary effort of VR and OHA Behavioral Health Programs has been development and expansion of evidence-based supported employment services by increasing the number of county mental health organizations providing such services and meeting fidelity standards. VR continues to partner with and utilize the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. As of the end of Program Year 2017, 37 community mental health programs and 35 out of 36 counties are providing IPS. With the inclusion of IPS into Oregon’s OARs, evidence-based supported employment services continue to expand across Oregon. (Page 160) Title I

VR will continue to focus on Mental Health supported employment outcomes, the quality of the outcomes, the skills of employment service providers and the capacity of community rehabilitation programs and providers. Oregon VR has reviewed potential participation with the Supported Education process that is now increasingly being utilized by many IPS providers. There are now 83 Mental Health IPS employment specialist across the State. (Page 161) Title I

Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation collaborates with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance, a statewide effort to provide systematic early psychosis interventions at mental health centers to assist young people with psychiatric disabilities in obtaining or maintaining employment. Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation worked with Addictions and Mental Health and Portland State University to create a center of excellence providing ongoing technical assistance to statewide Early Assessment and Support Alliance programs. Vocational rehabilitation funded four county pilot sites to identify a best practices model to engage youth experiencing a first psychotic episode in accessing vocational rehabilitation and local workforce programs. • Seamless Transition Project. A few organizations are piloting a seamless transition project targeting youth. Similar to Project SEARCH from Cincinnati Community Health, it is a series of rotating internships provided by host businesses to prepare youth with disabilities for employment. (Page 178-179) Title IV

VR and the State Rehabilitation Council have had opportunities over the last year to work together on several aspects of the VR program, policies, procedures, and service delivery. Additionally, VR and SRC worked to jointly develop our State’s goals, priorities and strategies looking forward. The SRC approved the final draft of the VR portion of Section 6 of the Unified State Plan at their February 2016 meeting after a final opportunity to add comments. A comprehensive needs assessment was completed September 23, 2013, a survey was completed by the SRC April 2015 in regards to the VR programs Job Placement Services process and contract, regular case reviews are conducted by the Business and Finance Manager as well as Branch Managers. The results of these reports and activities were taken into account in the development of these goals, priorities, and strategies. The performance measures as defined by the WIOA, and activities necessary to meet the expected outcomes were also taken in to consideration. VR put the Plan up for public comment in January and February. The VR Plan was available to all interested parties through the VR internet site and the Oregon Workforce Investment Board (OWIB) website. Copies of the initial draft were sent out to an extensive list of interested parties, members of the SRC, members of the OWIB and to our traditional service delivery partners such as the Tribes, Mental Health providers etc. Public hearings occurred in three locations during the month of February. LaGrande, Medford and Salem hosted these sessions with the local Manager in attendance. VR received written feedback from our Workforce Partners, Tribal partners, Centers for Independent Living, and had feedback from Mental Health Programs. Comment was received from individuals as well. All this feedback was reviewed and incorporated into the VR State Plan. (Pages 180-181) Title IV

The funds will be used to provide Supported Employment Services to those adult and transitional age youth with the most significant disabilities. At least 50% these funds will be targeted towards youth with the most significant disabilities who need them to transition to employment.

The Supported Employment Services include job development, job coaching and any extended supports needed. For individuals with a primary disability of intellectual and/or development disability, clients will receive extended services after closure from the Office of Developmental Disabilities. For clients with Mental Health disabilities who receive services from OHA Mental Health programs, extended services are provided by the fidelity based IPS program once the client exits from the Vocational Rehabilitation program. (Page 186) Title IV

(Formerly known as Attachment 4.8(b)(4)). Describe the designated State agency’s efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other State agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide supported employment services and extended employment services, as applicable, to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities.

Agency response: OCB provides Supported Employment services to individuals with disabilities co-occurring with visual impairment that make long-term supports necessary for the individual's success in maintaining integrated and competitive employment, including developmental disabilities, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and disabilities due to mental health. (Page 218) Title IV

Mental Health Services OCB is committed to collaborating with mental health services throughout Oregon in order to insure collaboration, coordination of services, and mutual understanding of scope and role of each agency in promoting success for individuals who require long-term employment supports.

In addition, although we have no formal agreement in the provision of mental health services, the agency has been able to be effective in the individualized coordination of services on a case by case basis in the event we have a client who is blind who is also a client of that system. (Page 221) Title IV

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Supplementing Wagner-Peyser funds with state dollars also funds the delivery of enhanced services to the business community. This increased capacity to meet the service needs of employers, helps to improve their bottom—line by lowering recruitment, turnover, and training costs. More businesses are choosing our enhanced service option, as validated by the hundreds of success stories from businesses sharing that the service more than meets their needs and expectations. Our ability to maintain these services is contingent upon receiving state funds in the future. Data on UI claimants suggests the coordination of Title I-IV core programs resources will improve the ability of all customers to return to work. The VR Program will continue to work with the Workforce System in Oregon to increase capacity and access to Workforce opportunities and services for Oregonians with Disabilities. The VR Program will continue to collaborate and coordinate with LWDBs and other partners to increase opportunity and access for VR clients while earnestly and simultaneously trying to help meet the recruitment needs of employers. (Page 31) Title I

Title IV regularly uses evaluations of data and qualitative information to measure the effectiveness of our program. Evaluations completed in the last two years have resulted in such things as: a revamping of our statewide procurement process for job placement service, changes to the job placement service delivery model, training to help staff move clients into plan faster, trainings on specific disability barriers, cross trainings with other agencies to ensure better partnerships, changes to business practices using the LEAN model, and the piloting of some new evidenced —based best practices around transition. An assessment of the Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) program show that it is effective in helping speed claimants return to work and in preventing and detecting unemployment insurance (UI) overpayments. Over the past two years, the RESEA program has helped shorten claims duration, reduce exhaustion rates, and increase detection of potential issues resulting in disqualification or overpayment. (Page 77) Title I

Most UI claimants are required to complete an electronic profile for job matching purposes and attend an orientation with Employment Services staff. Only claimants attached to a closed union, in approved training (including apprenticeship programs), who commute while living out of state, or who have a definite return to work date within 28 days of their lay off date do not have to complete these steps. The orientation includes a review of their electronic profile for completeness and provides an overview of services available to job seekers through WSO centers and partners. Of those claimants, some are selected for a Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (known as REA or RESEA) as part of their orientation. Initial REA/RESEA interviews are conducted in person by ES staff who are co—located with Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) service providers. The REA/RESEA includes an overview of UI eligibility requirements for remaining able, available and actively seeking work. It further provides more customized discussions with each claimant about “next steps” that could assist the person with becoming reemployed sooner as part of a basic reemployment plan. (Page 119) Title I

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 81 - 86 of 86

Oregon ICF/IDD Support Services (0375.R04.00)

~~Provides employment path services, supported employment - individual employment support, waiver case management, direct nursing, discovery/career exploration services, environmental safety modifications, family training - conferences and workshops, financial management services, special diets, specialized medical supplies, supported employment - small group employment support, vehicle modifications for individuals w/ID/DD ages 18 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) 2014-2015

~"The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) provides core supported employment professional training through a series of four, 2 day trainings. These trainings help employment professionals meet Oregon’s employment professional core competencies requirement through eight days of in person training. Each of the two-day seminars results in twelve hours of training.The OELN Training Series is now accredited by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE)".
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Work Incentive Network (WIN!) (now part of the activities of the MIG)

Part of the activities of the MIG

“Benefits and Work Incentive Counseling services help people with disabilities make informed decisions about work, benefits and the use of work incentives to achieve their employment goals, as well as helping them navigate the benefits system when they begin working."

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Oregon Administrative Rules Chapter 411 Division 345 Employment Services for Individuals with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities - 07/02/2018

~~“The purposes of the rules in OAR chapter 411, division 345 are to:(1) Effectuate Oregon’s Employment First policy, as described in the State of Oregon Executive Order No. 15-01 and OAR chapter 407, division 025, under which:(a) The employment of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities in competitive integrated employment is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, or other non-work day activities.(b) For individuals who successfully achieve the goal of competitive integrated employment, future person-centered service planning focuses on maintaining employment, maximizing the number of hours an individual works, using the standard of obtaining at least 20 hours of week of work, consistent with the individual’s preferences and interests, and considering additional career or advancement opportunities” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon HB 3063: Relating to Housing for Individuals with Mental Illness - 08/08/2017

“The Housing and Community Services Department, in collaboration with the Oregon Health Authority, shall disburse moneys in the Housing for Mental Health Fund to provide funding for:

(a) The development of community-based housing, including licensed residential treatment facilities, for individuals with mental illness and individuals with substance use disorders;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon SB 777 (ABLE Act) - 08/12/2015

"The Oregon 529 Savings Board shall establish by rule and maintain a qualified ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] program in accordance with the requirements of the ABLE Act. (2) The rules must: (a) Allow a person to make contributions for a taxable year to an ABLE account established for the purpose of meeting the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account..."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Oregon Senate Bill 22 - Employment First - 04/08/2013

The bill details the rights of persons with developmental disabilities who are receiving developmental disability services.  It proclaims that “individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities and society as a whole benefit when the individuals exercise choice and self-determination, living and working in the most integrated community settings appropriate to their needs, with supportive services that are designed and implemented consistent with the choice of the individuals regarding services, providers, goals and activities.”  Moreover it proclaims that, “the employment of individuals with developmental disabilities in fully integrated work settings is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, facility-based employment or day habilitation.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

427.007 OR Policy; Department of Human Services to plan and facilitate community services.

Emphasizes the importance of home and community based services that help to facilitate community integration for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. “Therefore, the Department of Human Services is directed to facilitate the development of appropriate community-based services, including family support, residential facilities, day programs, home care and other necessary support, care and training programs, in an orderly and systematic manner. The role of state-operated hospitals and training centers in Oregon shall be as specialized back-up facilities to a primary system of community-based services for persons with intellectual disabilities or other developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Executive Order Number 19-06 – Establishing the Behavioral Health Advisory Council - 10/18/2019

“Over the last decade, Oregon has made significant strides in transforming and strengthening our overall health care system, but our progress has not been even across all components of the health care delivery system…We have fallen short of adequately addressing the unique needs or Oregonians with serious and complex behavioral health conditions…Oregon experiences some of the highest rates of serious mental illness, substance abuse disorders, and suicide in the country….

The Governor’s Behavioral Health Advisory Council (the “Council”) is established. The Council shall recommend an action plan for the state of Oregon’s behavioral health system that includes concrete actions, policies, and potential investments needed to preserve and improve services and supports for youth and adults with serious mental illness, including those with co-occurring substance use disorders.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Oregon Executive Order 15-01 - Providing employment services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities - 02/02/2015

Supersedes Executive Order 13-04   “This Executive Order revises and supersedes Executive Order 13-04 in order to provide further policy guidance intended to continue the state’s progress in these areas [providing supported employment services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities], including through a substantial reduction in employment in sheltered workshops.  Continue to improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving competitive integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, consistent with their abilities and choices, will benefit individuals with disabilities, their families, our communities, the economy, and the state.”  

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 31 - 34 of 34

OR Employment First

This web page, housed by the Oregon Department of Human Services, contains information on the Oregon Employment first initiative. It contains information for job seekers, families and employers.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Department of Human Services, Vocational Rehabilitation Services

The Department of Human Services vocational rehabilitation services contains definitions and descriptions for employment services including job assessments, assistive technology, training and technological assistance, community rehabilitation programs and customized employment, among many other services.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Planning My Way to Work: A Transition Guide for Student with Disabilities Leaving High School

“This manual is intended to: Help you make your way through the transition process; Understand your rights, services and resources that may help you and your family; Provide information to help you understand complex adult service systems; Highlight that you direct your own transition; Reinforce that you and your team design your transition just for you; and Identify your work and other adult life goals and a plan to achieve those goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Employment First Central Oregon- Members - 05/12/2019

~~This page has information on the member organizations that are a part of Employment First Central Oregon

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

A Personal Guide to Community Employment -