Oregon

States - Big Screen

The Beaver State of Oregon believes that "Things Look Different Here" when it comes to creating innovative employment options for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oregon’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.19%
Change from
2016 to 2017
4,142,776
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
288,493
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-9.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
109,027
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
37.79%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.45%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.04%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 4,028,977 4,093,465 4,142,776
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 320,586 303,115 288,493
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 121,155 118,914 109,027
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,646,699 1,696,553 1,751,754
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 37.79% 39.23% 37.79%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.22% 76.91% 78.04%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.60% 4.90% 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.40% 19.80% 20.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.10% 12.20% 12.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 299,421 298,208 289,157
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 305,954 296,968 283,759
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 536,463 523,359 505,721
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 10,487 11,151 10,873
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 43,966 46,866 39,234
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,203 9,629 9,991
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 13,604 13,981 14,137
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,320 1,678 1,037
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 26,984 27,138 24,617
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,314 8,240 6,540

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,736 4,806 4,951
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.10% 6.10% 6.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 109,815 108,974 107,703

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 14,588 7,857 11,607
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 36,542 18,564 24,671
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 66,459 20,659 39,390
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.00% 38.00% 29.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.40% 3.10% 2.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.00% 1.40% 1.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 23.00% N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,563 1,982 2,261
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 676 875 1,206
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 14,806 N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 16,874 15,839 15,471
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6,910 3,689 3,819
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2,765 1,637 1,815
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 40.00% 44.00% 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 70.36 40.63 45.05

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,181
4,583
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 31 28 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 628 719 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,003 1,031 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,243 1,402 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 797 874 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 479 529 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 35.10% 37.90% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,404 3,378 4,072
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 166,352 167,800 168,828
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 265 351 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 305 424 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,015,000 $26,199,000 $32,691,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $24,453,000 $18,824,000 $15,891,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $26,347,000 $20,516,000 $20,322,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $31,979,000 $10,816,000 $11,632,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 32.00% 49.00% 56.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,499 3,617 3,831
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,671 3,210 2,572
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 2,690 3,466 3,411
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 89.40 59.40 107.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 72.92% 73.37% 73.49%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.57% 10.15% 9.90%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.42% 1.19% 1.20%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 76.24% 83.24% 79.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.37% 24.41% 24.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 56.40% 59.52% 60.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 71.34% 73.24% 74.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.03% 35.11% 35.90%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,723,537
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,680
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 8,299
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 289,705
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 298,004
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 308
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 327
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,095,598
AbilityOne wages (services). $97,396

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 27 15 9
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 29 16 10
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,339 1,211 657
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,341 1,212 657

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

VR works closely with other State agencies whose populations benefit from VR Supported Employment (SE) Services. VR, the Department of Education, and the Office of Developmental Disability Services work together with the State’s Employment First program to ensure that individuals who experience Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities receive coordinated and sequenced services that meet their employment needs. This multi–agency collaboration operates under the guidance of Executive Order 15–01 and actively works to ensure that policies and services are aligned in a way that makes sense for transition age students as well as adults seeking services (Page 187)

VR and Oregon Department of Developmental Disability Services have refocused their work together over the last couple of years to achieve the outcomes set forth in Executive order 13–04, which was updated in Executive Order 15–01. These Executive Orders emphasize with more clarity the State’s Employment First Policy. Additionally, the State of Oregon has recently settled a lawsuit that calls for increased integrated employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. VR, ODDS, and the I/DD service delivery system have a working relationship that shares information, leverages and braids funding, and encourages the joint case management of joint clients. Moving forward VR will continue to work with ODDS and I/DD service delivery system as well as the Department of Education to increase our collaboration to maximize funding, streamline processes, and meet the competitive and integrated employment goals of joint clients. (Page 190)

  • Hired staff specialists who serve individuals with I/DD. These three groups of regional staff meet regularly; co–train other agency staff; and, co–develop tools and strategies to provide services that are consistent and reflect best practices
  • Have established collaborative training regarding consistency and quality in curricula used for VR, ODDS and ODE staff throughout Oregon; accomplished through:
    • Agency conferences (VR In–Service, DD Case Management Conference, and ODE Regional Transition Conferences) used mixed groups of staff and cross training techniques to further collaborative training goals
    • VR, DD, and school transition (ODE) staff training on varied topics, presented regionally to groups consisting of staff from all three agencies
    • Staff are consistently co–trained by specialists from the three agencies
  • Ongoing and regularly scheduled meetings lead to collaborative actions by Office of Developmental Disabilities (ODDS), VR and Oregon Department of Education (ODE):
    • Employment First Steering Committee meetings direct the overall work of the following collaborative meetings. This committee is co–led by VR and ODDS Administrators
    • Policy and Innovation meetings are co–led by VR staff and DD Staff to facilitate these collaborative actions:
  • The three agencies review and discuss all new or newly revised policy to assure alignment across agencies
  • Each agency sends policy transmittals to their regional and community staff when another of them adopts new or newly revised policy
    • Education and Transition meetings discuss pertinent issues for students who have transition plans including those receiving Pre–Vocational Services; facilitating these collaborative actions:
  • A jointly held goal of seamless transition for: students with transition plans, students in transition programs. (Page 190)

The Oregon Legislature has the sole authority to establish the type and number of state government positions, including VR positions. Over the last two biennium the legislature approved 14 new VRC positions to help support statewide Employment First initiatives. (Page 192)

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

School to Work Transition

At application, the majority of VR program clients are already receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits as a result of legal blindness. During development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), the OCB explores the client’s vocational goals and income needs, and commensurate with their skills, strengths and previous work experience jointly sets employment goals. For client’s targeting employment with earnings above the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level, the OCB utilizes the Ticket to Work program for cost reimbursement upon 9 months of successful employment at or above SGA level earnings.  (Page 27)

Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities 

  1. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns
  2. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity
  3. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon  (Page 206)
  4. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work–based learning opportunities 
  • Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide
  • Implement a progressive employment model
  • Create and train local VR employer engagement teams
  • Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities
  • Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets
  • Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers 

       5. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities

  • Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns
  • Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity
  • Continue to partner with the Work Inc. (Page 219)

While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income–dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services. Commission Services for Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities The Commission is reaching those with the most significant disabilities through outreach and by providing individualized services. (Page 261)

Outcome % of participants who were receiving SSI/SSDI at application*

  • Exited VR before services began 55%
  • Exited VR without an employment outcome, after services 60%
  • Exited VR with a noncompetitive employment outcome 62%
  • Exited VR with a competitive employment outcome 46% 

*   Note: Commission data is cumulative 2009–2013. While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income–dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services. (Page 301)

Career Pathways

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) requests a continuation of its waiver of state–wideness for its Youth Transition Program (YTP). Through this program, transition age youth with disabilities are provided with enhanced activities and services that lead to employment or career–related postsecondary education or training. YTP has two distinct but interconnected goals. The first is to improve post–school transition outcomes for youth with disabilities by preparing them for employment, postsecondary education or training, and independent living. The second is to increase capacity and foster positive systems change in schools and other agencies in assisting youth with disabilities in moving from school to work. (Page 178)

Our goals for the program for FFY 16 include:

  1. Coordinate the Summer Work Experience Program for students who require ongoing supports in partnership with the Department of Education
  2. Partner with the education team that will support students who are leaving secondary school programs to develop a transition plan for school to work
  3. Continue to outreach to the deaf–blind community
  4. Coordinate with community resources to maximize comparable benefits and improve services for our clients
  5. Grow the number of individuals served in the program and focus on positive outcomes in integrated settings with supports 

In addition: OCB will provide SE extended services after placement for up to 4 years for individuals not covered by alternative programs or funding. (Page 281)

Progress: The agency attended individualized transition plan meetings for all Supported Employment students exiting the schools in order to provide seamless services to students exiting the school system. (Page 296)

Goal 2: Partner with the education team that will support Supported Employment students who are leaving secondary school programs to develop a transition plan for school to work Progress: The agency attended individualized transition plan meetings for all Supported Employment students exiting the schools in order to provide seamless services to students exiting the school system. (Page 298-299)

Work Incentives & Benefits

Overall, the development and expansion of credit–bearing Career Pathways certificates across the 17 community colleges has been a key strategy for enhancing the training and job skills of Oregon’s workforce. Currently, the community colleges offer more than 400 Career Pathway certificate programs. These certificates are defined in Oregon statute as being 15 – 44 credit certificates that are completely contained within an Associate of Applied Science degree or one–year certificate. This means a working learner can continue to make progress toward a higher level credential without losing time or money having to take classes that are required in the higher level credential but different from those in the Career Pathway certificate. (Page 32)

AEFLA-funded Adult-Basic-Skills Programs work with employers through connections with their colleges’ Career Pathways, Customized Training, Workforce Training, and Occupational Skills Training programs. Another critical partner is VR. The Vocational Rehabilitation program by design contacts the Business and employer community utilizing a client specific approach. VR’s approach of utilizing contracted vendors to job develop for individual clients indicates a different model regarding employer outreach. However, employers also approach the VR offices with Job Opportunities and VR will address a process where these contacts and opportunities can be blended into a Workforce combined business outreach method. (Page 69)

9. Whether the eligible provider’s activities are delivered by well-trained instructors, counselors and administrators who meet any minimum qualifications established by the State, where applicable, and who have access to high quality professional development, including through electronic means.

10. Whether the eligible provider coordinates with other available education, training and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce development boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries in the development of career pathways.

11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer the flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs. (Page 160)

Employer/ Business

Oregon VR initiated a Ticket to Work shared payment agreement pilot with ten community mental health programs that provide evidence–based mental health supported employment services. These mental health agencies are governed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) who contracts with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) to provide annual programs and technical assistance. These agreements allow Oregon VR to be the Employment Network of record with SSA, partner with the mental health agency to provide dual services to an individual. Once the VR case is closed, the mental health agency continues to support the individual until the support is no longer needed. If the individual works and reaches the SSA TTW wage thresholds, Oregon VR receives TTW payments which in turn are split with the mental health agencies. This pilot evolved into a project that has strengthened the relationship between VR and these participating agencies by providing additional TTW dollars for additional program funding. As of July 2015 we have sixteen agreements in place. (Page 186)

511

State Operating Systems 

State operating systems to support implementation of the state’s strategies are primarily divided into three categories: 

  • Labor Market Information
  • Data Collection and Reporting Systems
  • Operations and Management Systems 

Labor Market Information 

The Oregon Employment Department’s Workforce and Economic Research Division provides accurate, reliable, and timely information about Oregon’s state and local labor markets. The division’s goal is to provide quality information that helps our customers make informed choices. Workforce development policy makers are a key research customer group, particularly serving the labor market information needs of state and local workforce development boards.

The division’s efforts focus on direct employer surveys, information from tax records, analysis of the data, and dissemination through publications, presentations, and responses to customer requests. Most labor market information is available on–line allowing staff more time to focus on custom analysis and answering challenging questions about the labor market. (All of Page 79 )

OWIB has established a goal and five strategies around creating a customer–centric, easy to access workforce system, including developing accountability mechanisms focused on results. The state board will assist the Governor by continuing to focus on system results and the needs or impediments to both measuring and improving the results for individuals and employers. Alignment of technology and data systems across the partner programs and agencies are the key to creating such a system and accountability mechanisms. (Page 99)

  • Support for the development of instructional content and models for career pathways;
  • Potential revision of OPABS and expansion of I–BEST and VESL models that integrate education and training;
  • Technical assistance to eligible providers on strategies to achieve negotiated targets on the primary indicators of performance;
  • Exploration of a standardized adult education and literacy orientation process with identified learning outcomes; and
  • Support for changes required to meet WIOA data collection and reporting requirements. (Page 167)

In the coming year, Oregon Adult Learning Standards trainers will also be able to track how Institute participants are implementing the Learning Standards in their classrooms and at a programmatic level. The State will continue to review evidence of implementation, e.g., course outlines, lesson plans, and classroom observation, as other training opportunities in Learning Standards, data collection and use, English language acquisition, and other topics in order to ensure the quality of professional development. (Page 168)Through the data collection efforts, researchers solicited information from four primary stakeholder groups:

  • potential, actual, or former consumers of VR services located throughout the state;
  • representatives of organizations that provide services to individuals who are potential, actual, or former consumers of VR services;
  • VR staff; and
  • representatives of businesses

The approach was designed to capture input from a variety of perspectives in order to acquire a sense of the multi-faceted needs of persons with disabilities in the state. Responses to the individual survey reflect the opinions of current and former clients of VR including individuals who had not yet developed a rehabilitation plan, individuals with active rehabilitation plans, and individuals whose cases had been closed. Efforts were made to gather information pertinent to un-served and under-served populations through inquiries with individuals who serve a broad range of persons with disabilities in the state (whether they are affiliated with VR or not). Likewise, the VR staff members that participated in key informant interviews, focus groups and surveys serve individuals with disabilities representing a broad range of backgrounds and experiences. Efforts were made to solicit responses from businesses reflecting the opinions of employers representing a variety of industries. (Page 199)

Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process ii. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies iii. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process in order to get clients into plan more quickly iv. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication v. Work with Lean Coordinator to identify opportunities for greater efficiencies in service delivery and policy that can be addressed. (Page 204)

The methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities: 

  1. Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process
  2. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies
  3. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process in order to get clients into plan more quickly
  4. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication
  5. Work with LEAN Coordinator to identify opportunities for greater efficiencies in service delivery and policy that can be addressed. (Page 212)
Mental Health

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability or implementation. (Page 114)

Displaying 81 - 83 of 83

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Oregon Administrative Rules Chapter 411 Division 345 Employment Services for Individuals with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities - 07/02/2018

~~“The purposes of the rules in OAR chapter 411, division 345 are to:(1) Effectuate Oregon’s Employment First policy, as described in the State of Oregon Executive Order No. 15-01 and OAR chapter 407, division 025, under which:(a) The employment of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities in competitive integrated employment is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, or other non-work day activities.(b) For individuals who successfully achieve the goal of competitive integrated employment, future person-centered service planning focuses on maintaining employment, maximizing the number of hours an individual works, using the standard of obtaining at least 20 hours of week of work, consistent with the individual’s preferences and interests, and considering additional career or advancement opportunities” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon HB 3063: Relating to Housing for Individuals with Mental Illness - 08/08/2017

“The Housing and Community Services Department, in collaboration with the Oregon Health Authority, shall disburse moneys in the Housing for Mental Health Fund to provide funding for:

(a) The development of community-based housing, including licensed residential treatment facilities, for individuals with mental illness and individuals with substance use disorders;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon SB 777 (ABLE Act) - 08/12/2015

"The Oregon 529 Savings Board shall establish by rule and maintain a qualified ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] program in accordance with the requirements of the ABLE Act. (2) The rules must: (a) Allow a person to make contributions for a taxable year to an ABLE account established for the purpose of meeting the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account..."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Oregon Senate Bill 22 - Employment First - 04/08/2013

The bill details the rights of persons with developmental disabilities who are receiving developmental disability services.  It proclaims that “individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities and society as a whole benefit when the individuals exercise choice and self-determination, living and working in the most integrated community settings appropriate to their needs, with supportive services that are designed and implemented consistent with the choice of the individuals regarding services, providers, goals and activities.”  Moreover it proclaims that, “the employment of individuals with developmental disabilities in fully integrated work settings is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, facility-based employment or day habilitation.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

427.007 OR Policy; Department of Human Services to plan and facilitate community services.

Emphasizes the importance of home and community based services that help to facilitate community integration for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. “Therefore, the Department of Human Services is directed to facilitate the development of appropriate community-based services, including family support, residential facilities, day programs, home care and other necessary support, care and training programs, in an orderly and systematic manner. The role of state-operated hospitals and training centers in Oregon shall be as specialized back-up facilities to a primary system of community-based services for persons with intellectual disabilities or other developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oregon Executive Order 15-01 - Providing employment services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities - 02/02/2015

Supersedes Executive Order 13-04   “This Executive Order revises and supersedes Executive Order 13-04 in order to provide further policy guidance intended to continue the state’s progress in these areas [providing supported employment services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities], including through a substantial reduction in employment in sheltered workshops.  Continue to improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving competitive integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, consistent with their abilities and choices, will benefit individuals with disabilities, their families, our communities, the economy, and the state.”  

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 31 - 32 of 32

Planning My Way to Work: A Transition Guide for Student with Disabilities Leaving High School

“This manual is intended to: Help you make your way through the transition process; Understand your rights, services and resources that may help you and your family; Provide information to help you understand complex adult service systems; Highlight that you direct your own transition; Reinforce that you and your team design your transition just for you; and Identify your work and other adult life goals and a plan to achieve those goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Memorandum of Understanding Developmental Disabilities Services Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/30/2016

“,,,IDDS adoption of and VR endorsement of the “Employment First Policy” for working age adults with developmental disabilities”   “This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services.  This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of the MOUR is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and rthe Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 115-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society. “  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding: Developmental Disabilities Services and Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/28/2016

“This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services. This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of this MOU is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and the Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 15-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding on Transition of Students with Disabilities to the Workforce - 02/02/2015

“Together with Executive Order No.15-01, this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) recognizes that, while the State cannot guarantee jobs, Oregon starts with the presumption that everyone can be employed in an integrated setting in a community-based job…Oregon is not guaranteeing anyone a job, but with significant additional resources, Oregon s optimistic that all persons with IDD will have an opportunity to obtain integrated employment.”   “Vision: Through strong agency collaboration, youth with disabilities will transition into competitive integrated employment or post-secondary education/ training.”    MOU Partners Include: Office of Developmental Disabilities Services Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Services Oregon Department of Education Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Cooperative Agreement Between the Oregon Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education - 12/01/2014

“The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to set forth the commitments of the ODE and VR to cooperate in activities leading to a successful transition for students with disabilities from a free and appropriate public education to postsecondary career-related training and employment activities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding on Transition of Students with Disabilities to the Workforce (August 2011) - 08/01/2011

"The general purpose of this MOU is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education that creates the initiative entitled, "Integrated, Continuous Transition Services for Students with Developmental Disabilities: A Pathway to Employment.” The specific purpose is to outline mutual goals, strategies, actions and responsibilities that staff of-the parties will endorse and conduct to accomplish the desired objectives(s).”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Youth Transition Program

~~“Established in 1990, the Oregon Youth Transition Program (YTP) is a collaborative partnership between the office of Vocational Rehabilitation, Oregon Department of Education, and the University of Oregon. It is funded by Vocational Rehabilitation every two-years through competitive grants to local school districts. The purpose of the YTP is to prepare students with disabilities for employment or career related postsecondary education or training through the provision of a comprehensive array of pre-employment transition activities and supports. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First: Capacity Building and Training and Technical Assistance Strategic Plan 2014-2015

The mission of this strategic plan is to, “To improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving integrated employment for individuals experiencing IDD, consistent with their abilities and choices. To improve Oregon’s employment services through innovation, best practices, and increased capacity, with the outcome of achieving integrated employment services for all individuals experiencing intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Developmental Disabilities Worker’s Guide - 08/27/2018

~~“SPPC services are available to eligible individuals – up to 20 hours each month – as stand-alone attendant/personal care services and related supports, or in combination with the Community First Choice Option/K Plan services.  Ingeneral, when the individual has minimalsupport needs and most of those needs are being met with alternative resources, including natural support, and only need minimal hours of paid-support, SPPC services may be an appropriate option.  “ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Oregon Innovation Grant Awardees - 07/14/2017

“The Oregon Legislature awarded a Policy Option Package in the 2015-17 session for the Department of Human Services (DHS) to fund innovative Employment First projects to increase capacity throughout the state.

The purpose of these grants is to expand efforts to increase competitive integrated employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). We are pleased to award more than 20 organizations throughout Oregon with innovation grants. Congratulations to the providers, family organizations, and case management entities that were awarded grants for innovative projects starting June 2017.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Project ACCESS - 09/14/2015

“The purpose of Project Access is to establish, implement, and evaluate a multi-level interagency transition model in the state of Oregon. The overall goal of the project is to improve and extend transition services to a greater number of youth with disabilities through a model program that brings vocational rehabilitation counselors (VRC's) into high school settings.”

“The model is a collaborative effort between Oregon's Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), public high schools in three Oregon school districts, and researchers at the University of Oregon.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ticket to Work Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - Integrated Employment Plan (revised 7/2015) - 07/06/2015

“(2010-2011) During this time period VR used resources within its Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIG) Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and other available resources to support of a variety of Employment First related activities including: Co-funding for many of the stakeholder and partner gatherings (e.g. Employment First Summit, Meet at the Mountain, stakeholder work groups); Participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN); and Improving access to benefits counseling and planning services such as the Work Incentive Project (WIN); and  Supporting other training and technical assistance activities”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in - 01/01/2012

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Work Incentive Network (WIN!) (now part of the activities of the MIG)

Part of the activities of the MIG

“Benefits and Work Incentive Counseling services help people with disabilities make informed decisions about work, benefits and the use of work incentives to achieve their employment goals, as well as helping them navigate the benefits system when they begin working."

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Oregon Employment First Training Course Descriptions

Content of the document reflects information from multiple state and training agency organizations and is designed as a tool for organizations participating in the Transformation Project for selection of needed training and technical assistance.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) 2014-2015

~"The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) provides core supported employment professional training through a series of four, 2 day trainings. These trainings help employment professionals meet Oregon’s employment professional core competencies requirement through eight days of in person training. Each of the two-day seminars results in twelve hours of training.The OELN Training Series is now accredited by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE)".
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Lane v. Brown Settlement (12-29-2015) - 12/29/2015

~~“Under the Settlement Agreement, Oregon agreed to continue its policy of decreasing the State’s support of sheltered workshops for people with I/DD in Oregon, and expanding the availability of supported employment services that allow individuals with I/DD the opportunity to work in competitive integrated employment settings.  The Settlement Agreement provides relief to two target populations – (1) adults with I/DD who are 21 years old or older and worked in a sheltered workshop on or after January 25, 2012 (sheltered workshop target population), and (2) transition-age youth with I/DD between the ages of 14 and 24 who are found eligible for services from the State’s Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) (transition-age target population)”

 

Systems
  • Other

Lane v. Kitzhaber, 12-CV-00138, (D. OR 2012) - 05/22/2013

“On May 22, 2013, the Court granted the United States' March 27 Motion to Intervene in a pending class action lawsuit against the State of Oregon. The United States' accompanying Complaint in Intervention alleges violations of Title II of the ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act for unnecessarily segregating individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in sheltered workshops when they could be served in integrated employment settings.”

  “Prior to requesting intervention the United States filed on April 20, 2012, a Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs Regarding Defendants' Motion to Dismiss.  The United States argued that Title II and the integration regulation apply to all services, programs, and activities of a public entity, including segregated, non-residential employment settings such as sheltered workshops.”    “On June 18, 2012, the United States filed a second Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs' Motion for Class Certification. In its Statement of Interest, the United States urged the Court to uphold class certification for a plaintiff class of thousands of individuals in, or referred to, Oregon sheltered workshops.”   
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - From the Department of Justice Findings Letter (2012) - 06/29/2012

“We have concluded that the State is failing to provide employment and vocational services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the most  integrated setting appropriate to their needs, in violation of the ADA.  The State plans, structures, and administers its system of providing employment and vocational services in a manner that delivers such services primarily in segregated sheltered workshops, rather than in integrated community employment.  Sheltered workshops segregate individuals from the community and provide little or no opportunity to interact with persons without disabilities, other than paid staff…  most persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving employment and vocational services from the state remain unnecessarily – and often indefinitely – confined to segregated sheltered workshops..”    
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - Staley v. Kitzhaber 2000 - 01/14/2000

“The lawsuit was the result of years of frustration in waiting for appropriate, adequate services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities, and their families… The lawsuit alleges that the State of Oregon failed to provide services in the most integrated possible setting to adults with mental retardation and/or developmental disabilities eligible for placement in an ICF/MR (intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded) and that individuals with developmental disabilities are entitled to receive Medicaid-Funded services with reasonable promptness.”

“This agreement is intended to provide relief to not only the plaintiffs but also to all other similarly situated individuals with developmental disabilities eligible to receive services under the federal Medicaid program.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

Ticket to Work Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - Integrated Employment Plan (revised 7/2015)

“(2010-2011) During this time period VR used resources within its Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIG) Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and other available resources to support of a variety of Employment First related activities including: Co-funding for many of the stakeholder and partner gatherings (e.g. Employment First Summit, Meet at the Mountain, stakeholder work groups); Participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN); and Improving access to benefits counseling and planning services such as the Work Incentive Project (WIN); and  Supporting other training and technical assistance activities”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Support Services Waiver (Brokerage)

Provides “Respite; Homemaker; Supported Employment Services; Environmental Accessibility Adaptations; Non-Medical Transportation; Chore Service; Personal Emergency Response Systems; Family Training; PT/OT/Speech; Special Diets; Specialized Supports; Support Services Brokerages; Emergent Services; Community Inclusion; Community Living; Specialized Medical Equipment.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon ICF/IDD Support Services (0375.R03.00)

~~Provides employment path services, supported employment - individual employment support, waiver case management, direct nursing, discovery/career exploration services, environmental safety modifications, family training - conferences and workshops, financial management services, special diets, specialized medical supplies, supported employment - small group employment support, vehicle modifications for individuals w/ID/DD ages 18 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The Beaver State of Oregon believes that "Things Look Different Here" when it comes to creating innovative employment options for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oregon’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.19%
Change from
2016 to 2017
4,142,776
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
288,493
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-9.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
109,027
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
37.79%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.45%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.04%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 4,028,977 4,093,465 4,142,776
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 320,586 303,115 288,493
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 121,155 118,914 109,027
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,646,699 1,696,553 1,751,754
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 37.79% 39.23% 37.79%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.22% 76.91% 78.04%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.60% 4.90% 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.40% 19.80% 20.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.10% 12.20% 12.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 299,421 298,208 289,157
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 305,954 296,968 283,759
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 536,463 523,359 505,721
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 10,487 11,151 10,873
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 43,966 46,866 39,234
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,203 9,629 9,991
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 13,604 13,981 14,137
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,320 1,678 1,037
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 26,984 27,138 24,617
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,314 8,240 6,540

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,736 4,806 4,951
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.10% 6.10% 6.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 109,815 108,974 107,703

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 14,588 7,857 11,607
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 36,542 18,564 24,671
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 66,459 20,659 39,390
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.00% 38.00% 29.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.40% 3.10% 2.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.00% 1.40% 1.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 23.00% N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,563 1,982 2,261
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 676 875 1,206
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 14,806 N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 16,874 15,839 15,471
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6,910 3,689 3,819
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2,765 1,637 1,815
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 40.00% 44.00% 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 70.36 40.63 45.05

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,181
4,583
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 31 28 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 628 719 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,003 1,031 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,243 1,402 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 797 874 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 479 529 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 35.10% 37.90% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,404 3,378 4,072
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 166,352 167,800 168,828
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 265 351 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 305 424 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,015,000 $26,199,000 $32,691,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $24,453,000 $18,824,000 $15,891,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $26,347,000 $20,516,000 $20,322,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $31,979,000 $10,816,000 $11,632,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 32.00% 49.00% 56.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,499 3,617 3,831
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,671 3,210 2,572
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 2,690 3,466 3,411
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 89.40 59.40 107.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 72.92% 73.37% 73.49%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.57% 10.15% 9.90%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.42% 1.19% 1.20%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 76.24% 83.24% 79.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.37% 24.41% 24.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 56.40% 59.52% 60.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 71.34% 73.24% 74.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.03% 35.11% 35.90%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,723,537
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,680
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 8,299
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 289,705
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 298,004
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 308
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 327
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,095,598
AbilityOne wages (services). $97,396

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 27 15 9
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 29 16 10
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,339 1,211 657
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,341 1,212 657

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

VR works closely with other State agencies whose populations benefit from VR Supported Employment (SE) Services. VR, the Department of Education, and the Office of Developmental Disability Services work together with the State’s Employment First program to ensure that individuals who experience Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities receive coordinated and sequenced services that meet their employment needs. This multi–agency collaboration operates under the guidance of Executive Order 15–01 and actively works to ensure that policies and services are aligned in a way that makes sense for transition age students as well as adults seeking services (Page 187)

VR and Oregon Department of Developmental Disability Services have refocused their work together over the last couple of years to achieve the outcomes set forth in Executive order 13–04, which was updated in Executive Order 15–01. These Executive Orders emphasize with more clarity the State’s Employment First Policy. Additionally, the State of Oregon has recently settled a lawsuit that calls for increased integrated employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. VR, ODDS, and the I/DD service delivery system have a working relationship that shares information, leverages and braids funding, and encourages the joint case management of joint clients. Moving forward VR will continue to work with ODDS and I/DD service delivery system as well as the Department of Education to increase our collaboration to maximize funding, streamline processes, and meet the competitive and integrated employment goals of joint clients. (Page 190)

  • Hired staff specialists who serve individuals with I/DD. These three groups of regional staff meet regularly; co–train other agency staff; and, co–develop tools and strategies to provide services that are consistent and reflect best practices
  • Have established collaborative training regarding consistency and quality in curricula used for VR, ODDS and ODE staff throughout Oregon; accomplished through:
    • Agency conferences (VR In–Service, DD Case Management Conference, and ODE Regional Transition Conferences) used mixed groups of staff and cross training techniques to further collaborative training goals
    • VR, DD, and school transition (ODE) staff training on varied topics, presented regionally to groups consisting of staff from all three agencies
    • Staff are consistently co–trained by specialists from the three agencies
  • Ongoing and regularly scheduled meetings lead to collaborative actions by Office of Developmental Disabilities (ODDS), VR and Oregon Department of Education (ODE):
    • Employment First Steering Committee meetings direct the overall work of the following collaborative meetings. This committee is co–led by VR and ODDS Administrators
    • Policy and Innovation meetings are co–led by VR staff and DD Staff to facilitate these collaborative actions:
  • The three agencies review and discuss all new or newly revised policy to assure alignment across agencies
  • Each agency sends policy transmittals to their regional and community staff when another of them adopts new or newly revised policy
    • Education and Transition meetings discuss pertinent issues for students who have transition plans including those receiving Pre–Vocational Services; facilitating these collaborative actions:
  • A jointly held goal of seamless transition for: students with transition plans, students in transition programs. (Page 190)

The Oregon Legislature has the sole authority to establish the type and number of state government positions, including VR positions. Over the last two biennium the legislature approved 14 new VRC positions to help support statewide Employment First initiatives. (Page 192)

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

School to Work Transition

At application, the majority of VR program clients are already receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits as a result of legal blindness. During development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), the OCB explores the client’s vocational goals and income needs, and commensurate with their skills, strengths and previous work experience jointly sets employment goals. For client’s targeting employment with earnings above the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level, the OCB utilizes the Ticket to Work program for cost reimbursement upon 9 months of successful employment at or above SGA level earnings.  (Page 27)

Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities 

  1. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns
  2. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity
  3. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon  (Page 206)
  4. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work–based learning opportunities 
  • Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide
  • Implement a progressive employment model
  • Create and train local VR employer engagement teams
  • Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities
  • Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets
  • Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers 

       5. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities

  • Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns
  • Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity
  • Continue to partner with the Work Inc. (Page 219)

While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income–dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services. Commission Services for Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities The Commission is reaching those with the most significant disabilities through outreach and by providing individualized services. (Page 261)

Outcome % of participants who were receiving SSI/SSDI at application*

  • Exited VR before services began 55%
  • Exited VR without an employment outcome, after services 60%
  • Exited VR with a noncompetitive employment outcome 62%
  • Exited VR with a competitive employment outcome 46% 

*   Note: Commission data is cumulative 2009–2013. While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income–dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services. (Page 301)

Career Pathways

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) requests a continuation of its waiver of state–wideness for its Youth Transition Program (YTP). Through this program, transition age youth with disabilities are provided with enhanced activities and services that lead to employment or career–related postsecondary education or training. YTP has two distinct but interconnected goals. The first is to improve post–school transition outcomes for youth with disabilities by preparing them for employment, postsecondary education or training, and independent living. The second is to increase capacity and foster positive systems change in schools and other agencies in assisting youth with disabilities in moving from school to work. (Page 178)

Our goals for the program for FFY 16 include:

  1. Coordinate the Summer Work Experience Program for students who require ongoing supports in partnership with the Department of Education
  2. Partner with the education team that will support students who are leaving secondary school programs to develop a transition plan for school to work
  3. Continue to outreach to the deaf–blind community
  4. Coordinate with community resources to maximize comparable benefits and improve services for our clients
  5. Grow the number of individuals served in the program and focus on positive outcomes in integrated settings with supports 

In addition: OCB will provide SE extended services after placement for up to 4 years for individuals not covered by alternative programs or funding. (Page 281)

Progress: The agency attended individualized transition plan meetings for all Supported Employment students exiting the schools in order to provide seamless services to students exiting the school system. (Page 296)

Goal 2: Partner with the education team that will support Supported Employment students who are leaving secondary school programs to develop a transition plan for school to work Progress: The agency attended individualized transition plan meetings for all Supported Employment students exiting the schools in order to provide seamless services to students exiting the school system. (Page 298-299)

Work Incentives & Benefits

Overall, the development and expansion of credit–bearing Career Pathways certificates across the 17 community colleges has been a key strategy for enhancing the training and job skills of Oregon’s workforce. Currently, the community colleges offer more than 400 Career Pathway certificate programs. These certificates are defined in Oregon statute as being 15 – 44 credit certificates that are completely contained within an Associate of Applied Science degree or one–year certificate. This means a working learner can continue to make progress toward a higher level credential without losing time or money having to take classes that are required in the higher level credential but different from those in the Career Pathway certificate. (Page 32)

AEFLA-funded Adult-Basic-Skills Programs work with employers through connections with their colleges’ Career Pathways, Customized Training, Workforce Training, and Occupational Skills Training programs. Another critical partner is VR. The Vocational Rehabilitation program by design contacts the Business and employer community utilizing a client specific approach. VR’s approach of utilizing contracted vendors to job develop for individual clients indicates a different model regarding employer outreach. However, employers also approach the VR offices with Job Opportunities and VR will address a process where these contacts and opportunities can be blended into a Workforce combined business outreach method. (Page 69)

9. Whether the eligible provider’s activities are delivered by well-trained instructors, counselors and administrators who meet any minimum qualifications established by the State, where applicable, and who have access to high quality professional development, including through electronic means.

10. Whether the eligible provider coordinates with other available education, training and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce development boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries in the development of career pathways.

11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer the flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs. (Page 160)

Employer/ Business

Oregon VR initiated a Ticket to Work shared payment agreement pilot with ten community mental health programs that provide evidence–based mental health supported employment services. These mental health agencies are governed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) who contracts with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) to provide annual programs and technical assistance. These agreements allow Oregon VR to be the Employment Network of record with SSA, partner with the mental health agency to provide dual services to an individual. Once the VR case is closed, the mental health agency continues to support the individual until the support is no longer needed. If the individual works and reaches the SSA TTW wage thresholds, Oregon VR receives TTW payments which in turn are split with the mental health agencies. This pilot evolved into a project that has strengthened the relationship between VR and these participating agencies by providing additional TTW dollars for additional program funding. As of July 2015 we have sixteen agreements in place. (Page 186)

511

State Operating Systems 

State operating systems to support implementation of the state’s strategies are primarily divided into three categories: 

  • Labor Market Information
  • Data Collection and Reporting Systems
  • Operations and Management Systems 

Labor Market Information 

The Oregon Employment Department’s Workforce and Economic Research Division provides accurate, reliable, and timely information about Oregon’s state and local labor markets. The division’s goal is to provide quality information that helps our customers make informed choices. Workforce development policy makers are a key research customer group, particularly serving the labor market information needs of state and local workforce development boards.

The division’s efforts focus on direct employer surveys, information from tax records, analysis of the data, and dissemination through publications, presentations, and responses to customer requests. Most labor market information is available on–line allowing staff more time to focus on custom analysis and answering challenging questions about the labor market. (All of Page 79 )

OWIB has established a goal and five strategies around creating a customer–centric, easy to access workforce system, including developing accountability mechanisms focused on results. The state board will assist the Governor by continuing to focus on system results and the needs or impediments to both measuring and improving the results for individuals and employers. Alignment of technology and data systems across the partner programs and agencies are the key to creating such a system and accountability mechanisms. (Page 99)

  • Support for the development of instructional content and models for career pathways;
  • Potential revision of OPABS and expansion of I–BEST and VESL models that integrate education and training;
  • Technical assistance to eligible providers on strategies to achieve negotiated targets on the primary indicators of performance;
  • Exploration of a standardized adult education and literacy orientation process with identified learning outcomes; and
  • Support for changes required to meet WIOA data collection and reporting requirements. (Page 167)

In the coming year, Oregon Adult Learning Standards trainers will also be able to track how Institute participants are implementing the Learning Standards in their classrooms and at a programmatic level. The State will continue to review evidence of implementation, e.g., course outlines, lesson plans, and classroom observation, as other training opportunities in Learning Standards, data collection and use, English language acquisition, and other topics in order to ensure the quality of professional development. (Page 168)Through the data collection efforts, researchers solicited information from four primary stakeholder groups:

  • potential, actual, or former consumers of VR services located throughout the state;
  • representatives of organizations that provide services to individuals who are potential, actual, or former consumers of VR services;
  • VR staff; and
  • representatives of businesses

The approach was designed to capture input from a variety of perspectives in order to acquire a sense of the multi-faceted needs of persons with disabilities in the state. Responses to the individual survey reflect the opinions of current and former clients of VR including individuals who had not yet developed a rehabilitation plan, individuals with active rehabilitation plans, and individuals whose cases had been closed. Efforts were made to gather information pertinent to un-served and under-served populations through inquiries with individuals who serve a broad range of persons with disabilities in the state (whether they are affiliated with VR or not). Likewise, the VR staff members that participated in key informant interviews, focus groups and surveys serve individuals with disabilities representing a broad range of backgrounds and experiences. Efforts were made to solicit responses from businesses reflecting the opinions of employers representing a variety of industries. (Page 199)

Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process ii. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies iii. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process in order to get clients into plan more quickly iv. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication v. Work with Lean Coordinator to identify opportunities for greater efficiencies in service delivery and policy that can be addressed. (Page 204)

The methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities: 

  1. Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process
  2. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies
  3. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process in order to get clients into plan more quickly
  4. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication
  5. Work with LEAN Coordinator to identify opportunities for greater efficiencies in service delivery and policy that can be addressed. (Page 212)
Mental Health

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability or implementation. (Page 114)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 81 - 83 of 83

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Oregon Administrative Rules Chapter 411 Division 345 Employment Services for Individuals with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities - 07/02/2018

~~“The purposes of the rules in OAR chapter 411, division 345 are to:(1) Effectuate Oregon’s Employment First policy, as described in the State of Oregon Executive Order No. 15-01 and OAR chapter 407, division 025, under which:(a) The employment of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities in competitive integrated employment is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, or other non-work day activities.(b) For individuals who successfully achieve the goal of competitive integrated employment, future person-centered service planning focuses on maintaining employment, maximizing the number of hours an individual works, using the standard of obtaining at least 20 hours of week of work, consistent with the individual’s preferences and interests, and considering additional career or advancement opportunities” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon HB 3063: Relating to Housing for Individuals with Mental Illness - 08/08/2017

“The Housing and Community Services Department, in collaboration with the Oregon Health Authority, shall disburse moneys in the Housing for Mental Health Fund to provide funding for:

(a) The development of community-based housing, including licensed residential treatment facilities, for individuals with mental illness and individuals with substance use disorders;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon SB 777 (ABLE Act) - 08/12/2015

"The Oregon 529 Savings Board shall establish by rule and maintain a qualified ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] program in accordance with the requirements of the ABLE Act. (2) The rules must: (a) Allow a person to make contributions for a taxable year to an ABLE account established for the purpose of meeting the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account..."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Oregon Senate Bill 22 - Employment First - 04/08/2013

The bill details the rights of persons with developmental disabilities who are receiving developmental disability services.  It proclaims that “individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities and society as a whole benefit when the individuals exercise choice and self-determination, living and working in the most integrated community settings appropriate to their needs, with supportive services that are designed and implemented consistent with the choice of the individuals regarding services, providers, goals and activities.”  Moreover it proclaims that, “the employment of individuals with developmental disabilities in fully integrated work settings is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, facility-based employment or day habilitation.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

427.007 OR Policy; Department of Human Services to plan and facilitate community services.

Emphasizes the importance of home and community based services that help to facilitate community integration for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. “Therefore, the Department of Human Services is directed to facilitate the development of appropriate community-based services, including family support, residential facilities, day programs, home care and other necessary support, care and training programs, in an orderly and systematic manner. The role of state-operated hospitals and training centers in Oregon shall be as specialized back-up facilities to a primary system of community-based services for persons with intellectual disabilities or other developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oregon Executive Order 15-01 - Providing employment services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities - 02/02/2015

Supersedes Executive Order 13-04   “This Executive Order revises and supersedes Executive Order 13-04 in order to provide further policy guidance intended to continue the state’s progress in these areas [providing supported employment services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities], including through a substantial reduction in employment in sheltered workshops.  Continue to improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving competitive integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, consistent with their abilities and choices, will benefit individuals with disabilities, their families, our communities, the economy, and the state.”  

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 31 - 32 of 32

Planning My Way to Work: A Transition Guide for Student with Disabilities Leaving High School

“This manual is intended to: Help you make your way through the transition process; Understand your rights, services and resources that may help you and your family; Provide information to help you understand complex adult service systems; Highlight that you direct your own transition; Reinforce that you and your team design your transition just for you; and Identify your work and other adult life goals and a plan to achieve those goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Memorandum of Understanding Developmental Disabilities Services Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/30/2016

“,,,IDDS adoption of and VR endorsement of the “Employment First Policy” for working age adults with developmental disabilities”   “This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services.  This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of the MOUR is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and rthe Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 115-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society. “  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding: Developmental Disabilities Services and Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/28/2016

“This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services. This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of this MOU is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and the Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 15-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding on Transition of Students with Disabilities to the Workforce - 02/02/2015

“Together with Executive Order No.15-01, this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) recognizes that, while the State cannot guarantee jobs, Oregon starts with the presumption that everyone can be employed in an integrated setting in a community-based job…Oregon is not guaranteeing anyone a job, but with significant additional resources, Oregon s optimistic that all persons with IDD will have an opportunity to obtain integrated employment.”   “Vision: Through strong agency collaboration, youth with disabilities will transition into competitive integrated employment or post-secondary education/ training.”    MOU Partners Include: Office of Developmental Disabilities Services Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Services Oregon Department of Education Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Cooperative Agreement Between the Oregon Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education - 12/01/2014

“The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to set forth the commitments of the ODE and VR to cooperate in activities leading to a successful transition for students with disabilities from a free and appropriate public education to postsecondary career-related training and employment activities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding on Transition of Students with Disabilities to the Workforce (August 2011) - 08/01/2011

"The general purpose of this MOU is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education that creates the initiative entitled, "Integrated, Continuous Transition Services for Students with Developmental Disabilities: A Pathway to Employment.” The specific purpose is to outline mutual goals, strategies, actions and responsibilities that staff of-the parties will endorse and conduct to accomplish the desired objectives(s).”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Youth Transition Program

~~“Established in 1990, the Oregon Youth Transition Program (YTP) is a collaborative partnership between the office of Vocational Rehabilitation, Oregon Department of Education, and the University of Oregon. It is funded by Vocational Rehabilitation every two-years through competitive grants to local school districts. The purpose of the YTP is to prepare students with disabilities for employment or career related postsecondary education or training through the provision of a comprehensive array of pre-employment transition activities and supports. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First: Capacity Building and Training and Technical Assistance Strategic Plan 2014-2015

The mission of this strategic plan is to, “To improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving integrated employment for individuals experiencing IDD, consistent with their abilities and choices. To improve Oregon’s employment services through innovation, best practices, and increased capacity, with the outcome of achieving integrated employment services for all individuals experiencing intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Developmental Disabilities Worker’s Guide - 08/27/2018

~~“SPPC services are available to eligible individuals – up to 20 hours each month – as stand-alone attendant/personal care services and related supports, or in combination with the Community First Choice Option/K Plan services.  Ingeneral, when the individual has minimalsupport needs and most of those needs are being met with alternative resources, including natural support, and only need minimal hours of paid-support, SPPC services may be an appropriate option.  “ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Oregon Innovation Grant Awardees - 07/14/2017

“The Oregon Legislature awarded a Policy Option Package in the 2015-17 session for the Department of Human Services (DHS) to fund innovative Employment First projects to increase capacity throughout the state.

The purpose of these grants is to expand efforts to increase competitive integrated employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). We are pleased to award more than 20 organizations throughout Oregon with innovation grants. Congratulations to the providers, family organizations, and case management entities that were awarded grants for innovative projects starting June 2017.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Project ACCESS - 09/14/2015

“The purpose of Project Access is to establish, implement, and evaluate a multi-level interagency transition model in the state of Oregon. The overall goal of the project is to improve and extend transition services to a greater number of youth with disabilities through a model program that brings vocational rehabilitation counselors (VRC's) into high school settings.”

“The model is a collaborative effort between Oregon's Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), public high schools in three Oregon school districts, and researchers at the University of Oregon.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ticket to Work Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - Integrated Employment Plan (revised 7/2015) - 07/06/2015

“(2010-2011) During this time period VR used resources within its Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIG) Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and other available resources to support of a variety of Employment First related activities including: Co-funding for many of the stakeholder and partner gatherings (e.g. Employment First Summit, Meet at the Mountain, stakeholder work groups); Participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN); and Improving access to benefits counseling and planning services such as the Work Incentive Project (WIN); and  Supporting other training and technical assistance activities”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in - 01/01/2012

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Work Incentive Network (WIN!) (now part of the activities of the MIG)

Part of the activities of the MIG

“Benefits and Work Incentive Counseling services help people with disabilities make informed decisions about work, benefits and the use of work incentives to achieve their employment goals, as well as helping them navigate the benefits system when they begin working."

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Oregon Employment First Training Course Descriptions

Content of the document reflects information from multiple state and training agency organizations and is designed as a tool for organizations participating in the Transformation Project for selection of needed training and technical assistance.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) 2014-2015

~"The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) provides core supported employment professional training through a series of four, 2 day trainings. These trainings help employment professionals meet Oregon’s employment professional core competencies requirement through eight days of in person training. Each of the two-day seminars results in twelve hours of training.The OELN Training Series is now accredited by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE)".
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Lane v. Brown Settlement (12-29-2015) - 12/29/2015

~~“Under the Settlement Agreement, Oregon agreed to continue its policy of decreasing the State’s support of sheltered workshops for people with I/DD in Oregon, and expanding the availability of supported employment services that allow individuals with I/DD the opportunity to work in competitive integrated employment settings.  The Settlement Agreement provides relief to two target populations – (1) adults with I/DD who are 21 years old or older and worked in a sheltered workshop on or after January 25, 2012 (sheltered workshop target population), and (2) transition-age youth with I/DD between the ages of 14 and 24 who are found eligible for services from the State’s Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) (transition-age target population)”

 

Systems
  • Other

Lane v. Kitzhaber, 12-CV-00138, (D. OR 2012) - 05/22/2013

“On May 22, 2013, the Court granted the United States' March 27 Motion to Intervene in a pending class action lawsuit against the State of Oregon. The United States' accompanying Complaint in Intervention alleges violations of Title II of the ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act for unnecessarily segregating individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in sheltered workshops when they could be served in integrated employment settings.”

  “Prior to requesting intervention the United States filed on April 20, 2012, a Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs Regarding Defendants' Motion to Dismiss.  The United States argued that Title II and the integration regulation apply to all services, programs, and activities of a public entity, including segregated, non-residential employment settings such as sheltered workshops.”    “On June 18, 2012, the United States filed a second Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs' Motion for Class Certification. In its Statement of Interest, the United States urged the Court to uphold class certification for a plaintiff class of thousands of individuals in, or referred to, Oregon sheltered workshops.”   
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - From the Department of Justice Findings Letter (2012) - 06/29/2012

“We have concluded that the State is failing to provide employment and vocational services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the most  integrated setting appropriate to their needs, in violation of the ADA.  The State plans, structures, and administers its system of providing employment and vocational services in a manner that delivers such services primarily in segregated sheltered workshops, rather than in integrated community employment.  Sheltered workshops segregate individuals from the community and provide little or no opportunity to interact with persons without disabilities, other than paid staff…  most persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving employment and vocational services from the state remain unnecessarily – and often indefinitely – confined to segregated sheltered workshops..”    
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - Staley v. Kitzhaber 2000 - 01/14/2000

“The lawsuit was the result of years of frustration in waiting for appropriate, adequate services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities, and their families… The lawsuit alleges that the State of Oregon failed to provide services in the most integrated possible setting to adults with mental retardation and/or developmental disabilities eligible for placement in an ICF/MR (intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded) and that individuals with developmental disabilities are entitled to receive Medicaid-Funded services with reasonable promptness.”

“This agreement is intended to provide relief to not only the plaintiffs but also to all other similarly situated individuals with developmental disabilities eligible to receive services under the federal Medicaid program.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

Ticket to Work Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - Integrated Employment Plan (revised 7/2015)

“(2010-2011) During this time period VR used resources within its Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIG) Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and other available resources to support of a variety of Employment First related activities including: Co-funding for many of the stakeholder and partner gatherings (e.g. Employment First Summit, Meet at the Mountain, stakeholder work groups); Participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN); and Improving access to benefits counseling and planning services such as the Work Incentive Project (WIN); and  Supporting other training and technical assistance activities”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Support Services Waiver (Brokerage)

Provides “Respite; Homemaker; Supported Employment Services; Environmental Accessibility Adaptations; Non-Medical Transportation; Chore Service; Personal Emergency Response Systems; Family Training; PT/OT/Speech; Special Diets; Specialized Supports; Support Services Brokerages; Emergent Services; Community Inclusion; Community Living; Specialized Medical Equipment.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon ICF/IDD Support Services (0375.R03.00)

~~Provides employment path services, supported employment - individual employment support, waiver case management, direct nursing, discovery/career exploration services, environmental safety modifications, family training - conferences and workshops, financial management services, special diets, specialized medical supplies, supported employment - small group employment support, vehicle modifications for individuals w/ID/DD ages 18 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The Beaver State of Oregon believes that "Things Look Different Here" when it comes to creating innovative employment options for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oregon’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.19%
Change from
2016 to 2017
4,142,776
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
288,493
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-9.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
109,027
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
37.79%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.45%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.04%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 4,028,977 4,093,465 4,142,776
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 320,586 303,115 288,493
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 121,155 118,914 109,027
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,646,699 1,696,553 1,751,754
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 37.79% 39.23% 37.79%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 76.22% 76.91% 78.04%
State/National unemployment rate. 5.60% 4.90% 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.40% 19.80% 20.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.10% 12.20% 12.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 299,421 298,208 289,157
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 305,954 296,968 283,759
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 536,463 523,359 505,721
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 10,487 11,151 10,873
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 43,966 46,866 39,234
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,203 9,629 9,991
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 13,604 13,981 14,137
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,320 1,678 1,037
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 26,984 27,138 24,617
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 7,314 8,240 6,540

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,736 4,806 4,951
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.10% 6.10% 6.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 109,815 108,974 107,703

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 14,588 7,857 11,607
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 36,542 18,564 24,671
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 66,459 20,659 39,390
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 22.00% 38.00% 29.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.40% 3.10% 2.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.00% 1.40% 1.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 23.00% N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,563 1,982 2,261
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 676 875 1,206
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 14,806 N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 16,874 15,839 15,471
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.06 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 6,910 3,689 3,819
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 2,765 1,637 1,815
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 40.00% 44.00% 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 70.36 40.63 45.05

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
4,181
4,583
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 31 28 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 628 719 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,003 1,031 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 1,243 1,402 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 797 874 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 479 529 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 35.10% 37.90% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 2,404 3,378 4,072
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 166,352 167,800 168,828
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 265 351 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 305 424 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $11,015,000 $26,199,000 $32,691,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $24,453,000 $18,824,000 $15,891,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $26,347,000 $20,516,000 $20,322,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $31,979,000 $10,816,000 $11,632,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 32.00% 49.00% 56.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,499 3,617 3,831
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,671 3,210 2,572
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 2,690 3,466 3,411
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 89.40 59.40 107.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 72.92% 73.37% 73.49%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.57% 10.15% 9.90%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.42% 1.19% 1.20%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 76.24% 83.24% 79.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.37% 24.41% 24.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 56.40% 59.52% 60.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 71.34% 73.24% 74.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 34.03% 35.11% 35.90%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,723,537
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,680
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 8,299
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 289,705
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 298,004
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 308
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 327
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,095,598
AbilityOne wages (services). $97,396

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 27 15 9
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 29 16 10
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 2 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,339 1,211 657
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,341 1,212 657

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

VR works closely with other State agencies whose populations benefit from VR Supported Employment (SE) Services. VR, the Department of Education, and the Office of Developmental Disability Services work together with the State’s Employment First program to ensure that individuals who experience Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities receive coordinated and sequenced services that meet their employment needs. This multi–agency collaboration operates under the guidance of Executive Order 15–01 and actively works to ensure that policies and services are aligned in a way that makes sense for transition age students as well as adults seeking services (Page 187)

VR and Oregon Department of Developmental Disability Services have refocused their work together over the last couple of years to achieve the outcomes set forth in Executive order 13–04, which was updated in Executive Order 15–01. These Executive Orders emphasize with more clarity the State’s Employment First Policy. Additionally, the State of Oregon has recently settled a lawsuit that calls for increased integrated employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. VR, ODDS, and the I/DD service delivery system have a working relationship that shares information, leverages and braids funding, and encourages the joint case management of joint clients. Moving forward VR will continue to work with ODDS and I/DD service delivery system as well as the Department of Education to increase our collaboration to maximize funding, streamline processes, and meet the competitive and integrated employment goals of joint clients. (Page 190)

  • Hired staff specialists who serve individuals with I/DD. These three groups of regional staff meet regularly; co–train other agency staff; and, co–develop tools and strategies to provide services that are consistent and reflect best practices
  • Have established collaborative training regarding consistency and quality in curricula used for VR, ODDS and ODE staff throughout Oregon; accomplished through:
    • Agency conferences (VR In–Service, DD Case Management Conference, and ODE Regional Transition Conferences) used mixed groups of staff and cross training techniques to further collaborative training goals
    • VR, DD, and school transition (ODE) staff training on varied topics, presented regionally to groups consisting of staff from all three agencies
    • Staff are consistently co–trained by specialists from the three agencies
  • Ongoing and regularly scheduled meetings lead to collaborative actions by Office of Developmental Disabilities (ODDS), VR and Oregon Department of Education (ODE):
    • Employment First Steering Committee meetings direct the overall work of the following collaborative meetings. This committee is co–led by VR and ODDS Administrators
    • Policy and Innovation meetings are co–led by VR staff and DD Staff to facilitate these collaborative actions:
  • The three agencies review and discuss all new or newly revised policy to assure alignment across agencies
  • Each agency sends policy transmittals to their regional and community staff when another of them adopts new or newly revised policy
    • Education and Transition meetings discuss pertinent issues for students who have transition plans including those receiving Pre–Vocational Services; facilitating these collaborative actions:
  • A jointly held goal of seamless transition for: students with transition plans, students in transition programs. (Page 190)

The Oregon Legislature has the sole authority to establish the type and number of state government positions, including VR positions. Over the last two biennium the legislature approved 14 new VRC positions to help support statewide Employment First initiatives. (Page 192)

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

School to Work Transition

At application, the majority of VR program clients are already receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits as a result of legal blindness. During development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), the OCB explores the client’s vocational goals and income needs, and commensurate with their skills, strengths and previous work experience jointly sets employment goals. For client’s targeting employment with earnings above the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level, the OCB utilizes the Ticket to Work program for cost reimbursement upon 9 months of successful employment at or above SGA level earnings.  (Page 27)

Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities 

  1. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns
  2. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity
  3. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon  (Page 206)
  4. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work–based learning opportunities 
  • Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide
  • Implement a progressive employment model
  • Create and train local VR employer engagement teams
  • Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities
  • Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets
  • Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers 

       5. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities

  • Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns
  • Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity
  • Continue to partner with the Work Inc. (Page 219)

While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income–dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services. Commission Services for Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities The Commission is reaching those with the most significant disabilities through outreach and by providing individualized services. (Page 261)

Outcome % of participants who were receiving SSI/SSDI at application*

  • Exited VR before services began 55%
  • Exited VR without an employment outcome, after services 60%
  • Exited VR with a noncompetitive employment outcome 62%
  • Exited VR with a competitive employment outcome 46% 

*   Note: Commission data is cumulative 2009–2013. While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income–dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services. (Page 301)

Career Pathways

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) requests a continuation of its waiver of state–wideness for its Youth Transition Program (YTP). Through this program, transition age youth with disabilities are provided with enhanced activities and services that lead to employment or career–related postsecondary education or training. YTP has two distinct but interconnected goals. The first is to improve post–school transition outcomes for youth with disabilities by preparing them for employment, postsecondary education or training, and independent living. The second is to increase capacity and foster positive systems change in schools and other agencies in assisting youth with disabilities in moving from school to work. (Page 178)

Our goals for the program for FFY 16 include:

  1. Coordinate the Summer Work Experience Program for students who require ongoing supports in partnership with the Department of Education
  2. Partner with the education team that will support students who are leaving secondary school programs to develop a transition plan for school to work
  3. Continue to outreach to the deaf–blind community
  4. Coordinate with community resources to maximize comparable benefits and improve services for our clients
  5. Grow the number of individuals served in the program and focus on positive outcomes in integrated settings with supports 

In addition: OCB will provide SE extended services after placement for up to 4 years for individuals not covered by alternative programs or funding. (Page 281)

Progress: The agency attended individualized transition plan meetings for all Supported Employment students exiting the schools in order to provide seamless services to students exiting the school system. (Page 296)

Goal 2: Partner with the education team that will support Supported Employment students who are leaving secondary school programs to develop a transition plan for school to work Progress: The agency attended individualized transition plan meetings for all Supported Employment students exiting the schools in order to provide seamless services to students exiting the school system. (Page 298-299)

Work Incentives & Benefits

Overall, the development and expansion of credit–bearing Career Pathways certificates across the 17 community colleges has been a key strategy for enhancing the training and job skills of Oregon’s workforce. Currently, the community colleges offer more than 400 Career Pathway certificate programs. These certificates are defined in Oregon statute as being 15 – 44 credit certificates that are completely contained within an Associate of Applied Science degree or one–year certificate. This means a working learner can continue to make progress toward a higher level credential without losing time or money having to take classes that are required in the higher level credential but different from those in the Career Pathway certificate. (Page 32)

AEFLA-funded Adult-Basic-Skills Programs work with employers through connections with their colleges’ Career Pathways, Customized Training, Workforce Training, and Occupational Skills Training programs. Another critical partner is VR. The Vocational Rehabilitation program by design contacts the Business and employer community utilizing a client specific approach. VR’s approach of utilizing contracted vendors to job develop for individual clients indicates a different model regarding employer outreach. However, employers also approach the VR offices with Job Opportunities and VR will address a process where these contacts and opportunities can be blended into a Workforce combined business outreach method. (Page 69)

9. Whether the eligible provider’s activities are delivered by well-trained instructors, counselors and administrators who meet any minimum qualifications established by the State, where applicable, and who have access to high quality professional development, including through electronic means.

10. Whether the eligible provider coordinates with other available education, training and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce development boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries in the development of career pathways.

11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer the flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs. (Page 160)

Employer/ Business

Oregon VR initiated a Ticket to Work shared payment agreement pilot with ten community mental health programs that provide evidence–based mental health supported employment services. These mental health agencies are governed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) who contracts with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) to provide annual programs and technical assistance. These agreements allow Oregon VR to be the Employment Network of record with SSA, partner with the mental health agency to provide dual services to an individual. Once the VR case is closed, the mental health agency continues to support the individual until the support is no longer needed. If the individual works and reaches the SSA TTW wage thresholds, Oregon VR receives TTW payments which in turn are split with the mental health agencies. This pilot evolved into a project that has strengthened the relationship between VR and these participating agencies by providing additional TTW dollars for additional program funding. As of July 2015 we have sixteen agreements in place. (Page 186)

511

State Operating Systems 

State operating systems to support implementation of the state’s strategies are primarily divided into three categories: 

  • Labor Market Information
  • Data Collection and Reporting Systems
  • Operations and Management Systems 

Labor Market Information 

The Oregon Employment Department’s Workforce and Economic Research Division provides accurate, reliable, and timely information about Oregon’s state and local labor markets. The division’s goal is to provide quality information that helps our customers make informed choices. Workforce development policy makers are a key research customer group, particularly serving the labor market information needs of state and local workforce development boards.

The division’s efforts focus on direct employer surveys, information from tax records, analysis of the data, and dissemination through publications, presentations, and responses to customer requests. Most labor market information is available on–line allowing staff more time to focus on custom analysis and answering challenging questions about the labor market. (All of Page 79 )

OWIB has established a goal and five strategies around creating a customer–centric, easy to access workforce system, including developing accountability mechanisms focused on results. The state board will assist the Governor by continuing to focus on system results and the needs or impediments to both measuring and improving the results for individuals and employers. Alignment of technology and data systems across the partner programs and agencies are the key to creating such a system and accountability mechanisms. (Page 99)

  • Support for the development of instructional content and models for career pathways;
  • Potential revision of OPABS and expansion of I–BEST and VESL models that integrate education and training;
  • Technical assistance to eligible providers on strategies to achieve negotiated targets on the primary indicators of performance;
  • Exploration of a standardized adult education and literacy orientation process with identified learning outcomes; and
  • Support for changes required to meet WIOA data collection and reporting requirements. (Page 167)

In the coming year, Oregon Adult Learning Standards trainers will also be able to track how Institute participants are implementing the Learning Standards in their classrooms and at a programmatic level. The State will continue to review evidence of implementation, e.g., course outlines, lesson plans, and classroom observation, as other training opportunities in Learning Standards, data collection and use, English language acquisition, and other topics in order to ensure the quality of professional development. (Page 168)Through the data collection efforts, researchers solicited information from four primary stakeholder groups:

  • potential, actual, or former consumers of VR services located throughout the state;
  • representatives of organizations that provide services to individuals who are potential, actual, or former consumers of VR services;
  • VR staff; and
  • representatives of businesses

The approach was designed to capture input from a variety of perspectives in order to acquire a sense of the multi-faceted needs of persons with disabilities in the state. Responses to the individual survey reflect the opinions of current and former clients of VR including individuals who had not yet developed a rehabilitation plan, individuals with active rehabilitation plans, and individuals whose cases had been closed. Efforts were made to gather information pertinent to un-served and under-served populations through inquiries with individuals who serve a broad range of persons with disabilities in the state (whether they are affiliated with VR or not). Likewise, the VR staff members that participated in key informant interviews, focus groups and surveys serve individuals with disabilities representing a broad range of backgrounds and experiences. Efforts were made to solicit responses from businesses reflecting the opinions of employers representing a variety of industries. (Page 199)

Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process ii. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies iii. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process in order to get clients into plan more quickly iv. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication v. Work with Lean Coordinator to identify opportunities for greater efficiencies in service delivery and policy that can be addressed. (Page 204)

The methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities: 

  1. Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process
  2. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies
  3. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process in order to get clients into plan more quickly
  4. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication
  5. Work with LEAN Coordinator to identify opportunities for greater efficiencies in service delivery and policy that can be addressed. (Page 212)
Mental Health

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability or implementation. (Page 114)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 81 - 83 of 83

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Oregon Administrative Rules Chapter 411 Division 345 Employment Services for Individuals with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities - 07/02/2018

~~“The purposes of the rules in OAR chapter 411, division 345 are to:(1) Effectuate Oregon’s Employment First policy, as described in the State of Oregon Executive Order No. 15-01 and OAR chapter 407, division 025, under which:(a) The employment of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities in competitive integrated employment is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, or other non-work day activities.(b) For individuals who successfully achieve the goal of competitive integrated employment, future person-centered service planning focuses on maintaining employment, maximizing the number of hours an individual works, using the standard of obtaining at least 20 hours of week of work, consistent with the individual’s preferences and interests, and considering additional career or advancement opportunities” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon HB 3063: Relating to Housing for Individuals with Mental Illness - 08/08/2017

“The Housing and Community Services Department, in collaboration with the Oregon Health Authority, shall disburse moneys in the Housing for Mental Health Fund to provide funding for:

(a) The development of community-based housing, including licensed residential treatment facilities, for individuals with mental illness and individuals with substance use disorders;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon SB 777 (ABLE Act) - 08/12/2015

"The Oregon 529 Savings Board shall establish by rule and maintain a qualified ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] program in accordance with the requirements of the ABLE Act. (2) The rules must: (a) Allow a person to make contributions for a taxable year to an ABLE account established for the purpose of meeting the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account..."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Oregon Senate Bill 22 - Employment First - 04/08/2013

The bill details the rights of persons with developmental disabilities who are receiving developmental disability services.  It proclaims that “individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities and society as a whole benefit when the individuals exercise choice and self-determination, living and working in the most integrated community settings appropriate to their needs, with supportive services that are designed and implemented consistent with the choice of the individuals regarding services, providers, goals and activities.”  Moreover it proclaims that, “the employment of individuals with developmental disabilities in fully integrated work settings is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, facility-based employment or day habilitation.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

427.007 OR Policy; Department of Human Services to plan and facilitate community services.

Emphasizes the importance of home and community based services that help to facilitate community integration for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. “Therefore, the Department of Human Services is directed to facilitate the development of appropriate community-based services, including family support, residential facilities, day programs, home care and other necessary support, care and training programs, in an orderly and systematic manner. The role of state-operated hospitals and training centers in Oregon shall be as specialized back-up facilities to a primary system of community-based services for persons with intellectual disabilities or other developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oregon Executive Order 15-01 - Providing employment services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities - 02/02/2015

Supersedes Executive Order 13-04   “This Executive Order revises and supersedes Executive Order 13-04 in order to provide further policy guidance intended to continue the state’s progress in these areas [providing supported employment services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities], including through a substantial reduction in employment in sheltered workshops.  Continue to improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving competitive integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, consistent with their abilities and choices, will benefit individuals with disabilities, their families, our communities, the economy, and the state.”  

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 31 - 32 of 32

Planning My Way to Work: A Transition Guide for Student with Disabilities Leaving High School

“This manual is intended to: Help you make your way through the transition process; Understand your rights, services and resources that may help you and your family; Provide information to help you understand complex adult service systems; Highlight that you direct your own transition; Reinforce that you and your team design your transition just for you; and Identify your work and other adult life goals and a plan to achieve those goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Memorandum of Understanding Developmental Disabilities Services Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/30/2016

“,,,IDDS adoption of and VR endorsement of the “Employment First Policy” for working age adults with developmental disabilities”   “This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services.  This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of the MOUR is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and rthe Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 115-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society. “  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding: Developmental Disabilities Services and Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/28/2016

“This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services. This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of this MOU is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and the Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 15-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding on Transition of Students with Disabilities to the Workforce - 02/02/2015

“Together with Executive Order No.15-01, this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) recognizes that, while the State cannot guarantee jobs, Oregon starts with the presumption that everyone can be employed in an integrated setting in a community-based job…Oregon is not guaranteeing anyone a job, but with significant additional resources, Oregon s optimistic that all persons with IDD will have an opportunity to obtain integrated employment.”   “Vision: Through strong agency collaboration, youth with disabilities will transition into competitive integrated employment or post-secondary education/ training.”    MOU Partners Include: Office of Developmental Disabilities Services Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Services Oregon Department of Education Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Cooperative Agreement Between the Oregon Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education - 12/01/2014

“The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to set forth the commitments of the ODE and VR to cooperate in activities leading to a successful transition for students with disabilities from a free and appropriate public education to postsecondary career-related training and employment activities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding on Transition of Students with Disabilities to the Workforce (August 2011) - 08/01/2011

"The general purpose of this MOU is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education that creates the initiative entitled, "Integrated, Continuous Transition Services for Students with Developmental Disabilities: A Pathway to Employment.” The specific purpose is to outline mutual goals, strategies, actions and responsibilities that staff of-the parties will endorse and conduct to accomplish the desired objectives(s).”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Youth Transition Program

~~“Established in 1990, the Oregon Youth Transition Program (YTP) is a collaborative partnership between the office of Vocational Rehabilitation, Oregon Department of Education, and the University of Oregon. It is funded by Vocational Rehabilitation every two-years through competitive grants to local school districts. The purpose of the YTP is to prepare students with disabilities for employment or career related postsecondary education or training through the provision of a comprehensive array of pre-employment transition activities and supports. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First: Capacity Building and Training and Technical Assistance Strategic Plan 2014-2015

The mission of this strategic plan is to, “To improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving integrated employment for individuals experiencing IDD, consistent with their abilities and choices. To improve Oregon’s employment services through innovation, best practices, and increased capacity, with the outcome of achieving integrated employment services for all individuals experiencing intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Developmental Disabilities Worker’s Guide - 08/27/2018

~~“SPPC services are available to eligible individuals – up to 20 hours each month – as stand-alone attendant/personal care services and related supports, or in combination with the Community First Choice Option/K Plan services.  Ingeneral, when the individual has minimalsupport needs and most of those needs are being met with alternative resources, including natural support, and only need minimal hours of paid-support, SPPC services may be an appropriate option.  “ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Oregon Innovation Grant Awardees - 07/14/2017

“The Oregon Legislature awarded a Policy Option Package in the 2015-17 session for the Department of Human Services (DHS) to fund innovative Employment First projects to increase capacity throughout the state.

The purpose of these grants is to expand efforts to increase competitive integrated employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). We are pleased to award more than 20 organizations throughout Oregon with innovation grants. Congratulations to the providers, family organizations, and case management entities that were awarded grants for innovative projects starting June 2017.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Project ACCESS - 09/14/2015

“The purpose of Project Access is to establish, implement, and evaluate a multi-level interagency transition model in the state of Oregon. The overall goal of the project is to improve and extend transition services to a greater number of youth with disabilities through a model program that brings vocational rehabilitation counselors (VRC's) into high school settings.”

“The model is a collaborative effort between Oregon's Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), public high schools in three Oregon school districts, and researchers at the University of Oregon.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ticket to Work Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - Integrated Employment Plan (revised 7/2015) - 07/06/2015

“(2010-2011) During this time period VR used resources within its Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIG) Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and other available resources to support of a variety of Employment First related activities including: Co-funding for many of the stakeholder and partner gatherings (e.g. Employment First Summit, Meet at the Mountain, stakeholder work groups); Participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN); and Improving access to benefits counseling and planning services such as the Work Incentive Project (WIN); and  Supporting other training and technical assistance activities”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in - 01/01/2012

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Work Incentive Network (WIN!) (now part of the activities of the MIG)

Part of the activities of the MIG

“Benefits and Work Incentive Counseling services help people with disabilities make informed decisions about work, benefits and the use of work incentives to achieve their employment goals, as well as helping them navigate the benefits system when they begin working."

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Oregon Employment First Training Course Descriptions

Content of the document reflects information from multiple state and training agency organizations and is designed as a tool for organizations participating in the Transformation Project for selection of needed training and technical assistance.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) 2014-2015

~"The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) provides core supported employment professional training through a series of four, 2 day trainings. These trainings help employment professionals meet Oregon’s employment professional core competencies requirement through eight days of in person training. Each of the two-day seminars results in twelve hours of training.The OELN Training Series is now accredited by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE)".
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Lane v. Brown Settlement (12-29-2015) - 12/29/2015

~~“Under the Settlement Agreement, Oregon agreed to continue its policy of decreasing the State’s support of sheltered workshops for people with I/DD in Oregon, and expanding the availability of supported employment services that allow individuals with I/DD the opportunity to work in competitive integrated employment settings.  The Settlement Agreement provides relief to two target populations – (1) adults with I/DD who are 21 years old or older and worked in a sheltered workshop on or after January 25, 2012 (sheltered workshop target population), and (2) transition-age youth with I/DD between the ages of 14 and 24 who are found eligible for services from the State’s Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) (transition-age target population)”

 

Systems
  • Other

Lane v. Kitzhaber, 12-CV-00138, (D. OR 2012) - 05/22/2013

“On May 22, 2013, the Court granted the United States' March 27 Motion to Intervene in a pending class action lawsuit against the State of Oregon. The United States' accompanying Complaint in Intervention alleges violations of Title II of the ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act for unnecessarily segregating individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in sheltered workshops when they could be served in integrated employment settings.”

  “Prior to requesting intervention the United States filed on April 20, 2012, a Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs Regarding Defendants' Motion to Dismiss.  The United States argued that Title II and the integration regulation apply to all services, programs, and activities of a public entity, including segregated, non-residential employment settings such as sheltered workshops.”    “On June 18, 2012, the United States filed a second Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs' Motion for Class Certification. In its Statement of Interest, the United States urged the Court to uphold class certification for a plaintiff class of thousands of individuals in, or referred to, Oregon sheltered workshops.”   
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - From the Department of Justice Findings Letter (2012) - 06/29/2012

“We have concluded that the State is failing to provide employment and vocational services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the most  integrated setting appropriate to their needs, in violation of the ADA.  The State plans, structures, and administers its system of providing employment and vocational services in a manner that delivers such services primarily in segregated sheltered workshops, rather than in integrated community employment.  Sheltered workshops segregate individuals from the community and provide little or no opportunity to interact with persons without disabilities, other than paid staff…  most persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving employment and vocational services from the state remain unnecessarily – and often indefinitely – confined to segregated sheltered workshops..”    
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - Staley v. Kitzhaber 2000 - 01/14/2000

“The lawsuit was the result of years of frustration in waiting for appropriate, adequate services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities, and their families… The lawsuit alleges that the State of Oregon failed to provide services in the most integrated possible setting to adults with mental retardation and/or developmental disabilities eligible for placement in an ICF/MR (intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded) and that individuals with developmental disabilities are entitled to receive Medicaid-Funded services with reasonable promptness.”

“This agreement is intended to provide relief to not only the plaintiffs but also to all other similarly situated individuals with developmental disabilities eligible to receive services under the federal Medicaid program.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

Ticket to Work Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - Integrated Employment Plan (revised 7/2015)

“(2010-2011) During this time period VR used resources within its Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIG) Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and other available resources to support of a variety of Employment First related activities including: Co-funding for many of the stakeholder and partner gatherings (e.g. Employment First Summit, Meet at the Mountain, stakeholder work groups); Participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN); and Improving access to benefits counseling and planning services such as the Work Incentive Project (WIN); and  Supporting other training and technical assistance activities”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Support Services Waiver (Brokerage)

Provides “Respite; Homemaker; Supported Employment Services; Environmental Accessibility Adaptations; Non-Medical Transportation; Chore Service; Personal Emergency Response Systems; Family Training; PT/OT/Speech; Special Diets; Specialized Supports; Support Services Brokerages; Emergent Services; Community Inclusion; Community Living; Specialized Medical Equipment.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon ICF/IDD Support Services (0375.R03.00)

~~Provides employment path services, supported employment - individual employment support, waiver case management, direct nursing, discovery/career exploration services, environmental safety modifications, family training - conferences and workshops, financial management services, special diets, specialized medical supplies, supported employment - small group employment support, vehicle modifications for individuals w/ID/DD ages 18 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The Beaver State of Oregon believes that "Things Look Different Here" when it comes to creating innovative employment options for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oregon’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.19%
Change from
2016 to 2017
4,142,776
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
288,493
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-9.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
109,027
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
37.79%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.45%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.04%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 4,142,776
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 288,493
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 109,027
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,751,754
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 37.79%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.04%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 289,157
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 283,759
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 505,721
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 10,873
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 39,234
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,991
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 14,137
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,037
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 24,617
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 6,540

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,951
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 107,703

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 11,607
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 24,671
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 39,390
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 29.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,261
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,206
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 15,471
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 3,819
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,815
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 45.05

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,072
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 168,828
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $32,691,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $15,891,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $20,322,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $11,632,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 56.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,831
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,572
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,411
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 107.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.49%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.90%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.20%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 79.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 60.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 74.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.90%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,723,537
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,680
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 8,299
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 289,705
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 298,004
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 308
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 327
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,095,598
AbilityOne wages (services). $97,396

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 9
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 10
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 657
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 657

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

VR works closely with other State agencies whose populations benefit from VR Supported Employment (SE) Services. VR, the Department of Education, and the Office of Developmental Disability Services work together with the State’s Employment First program to ensure that individuals who experience Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities receive coordinated and sequenced services that meet their employment needs. This multi–agency collaboration operates under the guidance of Executive Order 15–01 and actively works to ensure that policies and services are aligned in a way that makes sense for transition age students as well as adults seeking services (Page 187)

VR and Oregon Department of Developmental Disability Services have refocused their work together over the last couple of years to achieve the outcomes set forth in Executive order 13–04, which was updated in Executive Order 15–01. These Executive Orders emphasize with more clarity the State’s Employment First Policy. Additionally, the State of Oregon has recently settled a lawsuit that calls for increased integrated employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. VR, ODDS, and the I/DD service delivery system have a working relationship that shares information, leverages and braids funding, and encourages the joint case management of joint clients. Moving forward VR will continue to work with ODDS and I/DD service delivery system as well as the Department of Education to increase our collaboration to maximize funding, streamline processes, and meet the competitive and integrated employment goals of joint clients. (Page 190)

  • Hired staff specialists who serve individuals with I/DD. These three groups of regional staff meet regularly; co–train other agency staff; and, co–develop tools and strategies to provide services that are consistent and reflect best practices
  • Have established collaborative training regarding consistency and quality in curricula used for VR, ODDS and ODE staff throughout Oregon; accomplished through:
    • Agency conferences (VR In–Service, DD Case Management Conference, and ODE Regional Transition Conferences) used mixed groups of staff and cross training techniques to further collaborative training goals
    • VR, DD, and school transition (ODE) staff training on varied topics, presented regionally to groups consisting of staff from all three agencies
    • Staff are consistently co–trained by specialists from the three agencies
  • Ongoing and regularly scheduled meetings lead to collaborative actions by Office of Developmental Disabilities (ODDS), VR and Oregon Department of Education (ODE):
    • Employment First Steering Committee meetings direct the overall work of the following collaborative meetings. This committee is co–led by VR and ODDS Administrators
    • Policy and Innovation meetings are co–led by VR staff and DD Staff to facilitate these collaborative actions:
  • The three agencies review and discuss all new or newly revised policy to assure alignment across agencies
  • Each agency sends policy transmittals to their regional and community staff when another of them adopts new or newly revised policy
    • Education and Transition meetings discuss pertinent issues for students who have transition plans including those receiving Pre–Vocational Services; facilitating these collaborative actions:
  • A jointly held goal of seamless transition for: students with transition plans, students in transition programs. (Page 190)

The Oregon Legislature has the sole authority to establish the type and number of state government positions, including VR positions. Over the last two biennium the legislature approved 14 new VRC positions to help support statewide Employment First initiatives. (Page 192)

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

School to Work Transition

At application, the majority of VR program clients are already receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits as a result of legal blindness. During development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), the OCB explores the client’s vocational goals and income needs, and commensurate with their skills, strengths and previous work experience jointly sets employment goals. For client’s targeting employment with earnings above the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level, the OCB utilizes the Ticket to Work program for cost reimbursement upon 9 months of successful employment at or above SGA level earnings.  (Page 27)

Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities 

  1. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns
  2. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity
  3. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon  (Page 206)
  4. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work–based learning opportunities 
  • Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide
  • Implement a progressive employment model
  • Create and train local VR employer engagement teams
  • Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities
  • Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets
  • Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers 

       5. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities

  • Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns
  • Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity
  • Continue to partner with the Work Inc. (Page 219)

While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income–dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services. Commission Services for Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities The Commission is reaching those with the most significant disabilities through outreach and by providing individualized services. (Page 261)

Outcome % of participants who were receiving SSI/SSDI at application*

  • Exited VR before services began 55%
  • Exited VR without an employment outcome, after services 60%
  • Exited VR with a noncompetitive employment outcome 62%
  • Exited VR with a competitive employment outcome 46% 

*   Note: Commission data is cumulative 2009–2013. While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income–dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services. (Page 301)

Career Pathways

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) requests a continuation of its waiver of state–wideness for its Youth Transition Program (YTP). Through this program, transition age youth with disabilities are provided with enhanced activities and services that lead to employment or career–related postsecondary education or training. YTP has two distinct but interconnected goals. The first is to improve post–school transition outcomes for youth with disabilities by preparing them for employment, postsecondary education or training, and independent living. The second is to increase capacity and foster positive systems change in schools and other agencies in assisting youth with disabilities in moving from school to work. (Page 178)

Our goals for the program for FFY 16 include:

  1. Coordinate the Summer Work Experience Program for students who require ongoing supports in partnership with the Department of Education
  2. Partner with the education team that will support students who are leaving secondary school programs to develop a transition plan for school to work
  3. Continue to outreach to the deaf–blind community
  4. Coordinate with community resources to maximize comparable benefits and improve services for our clients
  5. Grow the number of individuals served in the program and focus on positive outcomes in integrated settings with supports 

In addition: OCB will provide SE extended services after placement for up to 4 years for individuals not covered by alternative programs or funding. (Page 281)

Progress: The agency attended individualized transition plan meetings for all Supported Employment students exiting the schools in order to provide seamless services to students exiting the school system. (Page 296)

Goal 2: Partner with the education team that will support Supported Employment students who are leaving secondary school programs to develop a transition plan for school to work Progress: The agency attended individualized transition plan meetings for all Supported Employment students exiting the schools in order to provide seamless services to students exiting the school system. (Page 298-299)

Work Incentives & Benefits

Overall, the development and expansion of credit–bearing Career Pathways certificates across the 17 community colleges has been a key strategy for enhancing the training and job skills of Oregon’s workforce. Currently, the community colleges offer more than 400 Career Pathway certificate programs. These certificates are defined in Oregon statute as being 15 – 44 credit certificates that are completely contained within an Associate of Applied Science degree or one–year certificate. This means a working learner can continue to make progress toward a higher level credential without losing time or money having to take classes that are required in the higher level credential but different from those in the Career Pathway certificate. (Page 32)

AEFLA-funded Adult-Basic-Skills Programs work with employers through connections with their colleges’ Career Pathways, Customized Training, Workforce Training, and Occupational Skills Training programs. Another critical partner is VR. The Vocational Rehabilitation program by design contacts the Business and employer community utilizing a client specific approach. VR’s approach of utilizing contracted vendors to job develop for individual clients indicates a different model regarding employer outreach. However, employers also approach the VR offices with Job Opportunities and VR will address a process where these contacts and opportunities can be blended into a Workforce combined business outreach method. (Page 69)

9. Whether the eligible provider’s activities are delivered by well-trained instructors, counselors and administrators who meet any minimum qualifications established by the State, where applicable, and who have access to high quality professional development, including through electronic means.

10. Whether the eligible provider coordinates with other available education, training and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce development boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries in the development of career pathways.

11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer the flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs. (Page 160)

Employer/ Business

Oregon VR initiated a Ticket to Work shared payment agreement pilot with ten community mental health programs that provide evidence–based mental health supported employment services. These mental health agencies are governed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) who contracts with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) to provide annual programs and technical assistance. These agreements allow Oregon VR to be the Employment Network of record with SSA, partner with the mental health agency to provide dual services to an individual. Once the VR case is closed, the mental health agency continues to support the individual until the support is no longer needed. If the individual works and reaches the SSA TTW wage thresholds, Oregon VR receives TTW payments which in turn are split with the mental health agencies. This pilot evolved into a project that has strengthened the relationship between VR and these participating agencies by providing additional TTW dollars for additional program funding. As of July 2015 we have sixteen agreements in place. (Page 186)

511

State Operating Systems 

State operating systems to support implementation of the state’s strategies are primarily divided into three categories: 

  • Labor Market Information
  • Data Collection and Reporting Systems
  • Operations and Management Systems 

Labor Market Information 

The Oregon Employment Department’s Workforce and Economic Research Division provides accurate, reliable, and timely information about Oregon’s state and local labor markets. The division’s goal is to provide quality information that helps our customers make informed choices. Workforce development policy makers are a key research customer group, particularly serving the labor market information needs of state and local workforce development boards.

The division’s efforts focus on direct employer surveys, information from tax records, analysis of the data, and dissemination through publications, presentations, and responses to customer requests. Most labor market information is available on–line allowing staff more time to focus on custom analysis and answering challenging questions about the labor market. (All of Page 79 )

OWIB has established a goal and five strategies around creating a customer–centric, easy to access workforce system, including developing accountability mechanisms focused on results. The state board will assist the Governor by continuing to focus on system results and the needs or impediments to both measuring and improving the results for individuals and employers. Alignment of technology and data systems across the partner programs and agencies are the key to creating such a system and accountability mechanisms. (Page 99)

  • Support for the development of instructional content and models for career pathways;
  • Potential revision of OPABS and expansion of I–BEST and VESL models that integrate education and training;
  • Technical assistance to eligible providers on strategies to achieve negotiated targets on the primary indicators of performance;
  • Exploration of a standardized adult education and literacy orientation process with identified learning outcomes; and
  • Support for changes required to meet WIOA data collection and reporting requirements. (Page 167)

In the coming year, Oregon Adult Learning Standards trainers will also be able to track how Institute participants are implementing the Learning Standards in their classrooms and at a programmatic level. The State will continue to review evidence of implementation, e.g., course outlines, lesson plans, and classroom observation, as other training opportunities in Learning Standards, data collection and use, English language acquisition, and other topics in order to ensure the quality of professional development. (Page 168)Through the data collection efforts, researchers solicited information from four primary stakeholder groups:

  • potential, actual, or former consumers of VR services located throughout the state;
  • representatives of organizations that provide services to individuals who are potential, actual, or former consumers of VR services;
  • VR staff; and
  • representatives of businesses

The approach was designed to capture input from a variety of perspectives in order to acquire a sense of the multi-faceted needs of persons with disabilities in the state. Responses to the individual survey reflect the opinions of current and former clients of VR including individuals who had not yet developed a rehabilitation plan, individuals with active rehabilitation plans, and individuals whose cases had been closed. Efforts were made to gather information pertinent to un-served and under-served populations through inquiries with individuals who serve a broad range of persons with disabilities in the state (whether they are affiliated with VR or not). Likewise, the VR staff members that participated in key informant interviews, focus groups and surveys serve individuals with disabilities representing a broad range of backgrounds and experiences. Efforts were made to solicit responses from businesses reflecting the opinions of employers representing a variety of industries. (Page 199)

Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process ii. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies iii. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process in order to get clients into plan more quickly iv. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication v. Work with Lean Coordinator to identify opportunities for greater efficiencies in service delivery and policy that can be addressed. (Page 204)

The methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities: 

  1. Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process
  2. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies
  3. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process in order to get clients into plan more quickly
  4. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication
  5. Work with LEAN Coordinator to identify opportunities for greater efficiencies in service delivery and policy that can be addressed. (Page 212)
Mental Health

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability or implementation. (Page 114)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 81 - 83 of 83

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Oregon Administrative Rules Chapter 411 Division 345 Employment Services for Individuals with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities - 07/02/2018

~~“The purposes of the rules in OAR chapter 411, division 345 are to:(1) Effectuate Oregon’s Employment First policy, as described in the State of Oregon Executive Order No. 15-01 and OAR chapter 407, division 025, under which:(a) The employment of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities in competitive integrated employment is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, or other non-work day activities.(b) For individuals who successfully achieve the goal of competitive integrated employment, future person-centered service planning focuses on maintaining employment, maximizing the number of hours an individual works, using the standard of obtaining at least 20 hours of week of work, consistent with the individual’s preferences and interests, and considering additional career or advancement opportunities” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon HB 3063: Relating to Housing for Individuals with Mental Illness - 08/08/2017

“The Housing and Community Services Department, in collaboration with the Oregon Health Authority, shall disburse moneys in the Housing for Mental Health Fund to provide funding for:

(a) The development of community-based housing, including licensed residential treatment facilities, for individuals with mental illness and individuals with substance use disorders;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon SB 777 (ABLE Act) - 08/12/2015

"The Oregon 529 Savings Board shall establish by rule and maintain a qualified ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] program in accordance with the requirements of the ABLE Act. (2) The rules must: (a) Allow a person to make contributions for a taxable year to an ABLE account established for the purpose of meeting the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account..."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Oregon Senate Bill 22 - Employment First - 04/08/2013

The bill details the rights of persons with developmental disabilities who are receiving developmental disability services.  It proclaims that “individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities and society as a whole benefit when the individuals exercise choice and self-determination, living and working in the most integrated community settings appropriate to their needs, with supportive services that are designed and implemented consistent with the choice of the individuals regarding services, providers, goals and activities.”  Moreover it proclaims that, “the employment of individuals with developmental disabilities in fully integrated work settings is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, facility-based employment or day habilitation.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

427.007 OR Policy; Department of Human Services to plan and facilitate community services.

Emphasizes the importance of home and community based services that help to facilitate community integration for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. “Therefore, the Department of Human Services is directed to facilitate the development of appropriate community-based services, including family support, residential facilities, day programs, home care and other necessary support, care and training programs, in an orderly and systematic manner. The role of state-operated hospitals and training centers in Oregon shall be as specialized back-up facilities to a primary system of community-based services for persons with intellectual disabilities or other developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oregon Executive Order 15-01 - Providing employment services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities - 02/02/2015

Supersedes Executive Order 13-04   “This Executive Order revises and supersedes Executive Order 13-04 in order to provide further policy guidance intended to continue the state’s progress in these areas [providing supported employment services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities], including through a substantial reduction in employment in sheltered workshops.  Continue to improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving competitive integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, consistent with their abilities and choices, will benefit individuals with disabilities, their families, our communities, the economy, and the state.”  

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 31 - 32 of 32

Planning My Way to Work: A Transition Guide for Student with Disabilities Leaving High School

“This manual is intended to: Help you make your way through the transition process; Understand your rights, services and resources that may help you and your family; Provide information to help you understand complex adult service systems; Highlight that you direct your own transition; Reinforce that you and your team design your transition just for you; and Identify your work and other adult life goals and a plan to achieve those goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Memorandum of Understanding Developmental Disabilities Services Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/30/2016

“,,,IDDS adoption of and VR endorsement of the “Employment First Policy” for working age adults with developmental disabilities”   “This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services.  This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of the MOUR is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and rthe Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 115-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society. “  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding: Developmental Disabilities Services and Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/28/2016

“This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services. This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of this MOU is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and the Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 15-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding on Transition of Students with Disabilities to the Workforce - 02/02/2015

“Together with Executive Order No.15-01, this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) recognizes that, while the State cannot guarantee jobs, Oregon starts with the presumption that everyone can be employed in an integrated setting in a community-based job…Oregon is not guaranteeing anyone a job, but with significant additional resources, Oregon s optimistic that all persons with IDD will have an opportunity to obtain integrated employment.”   “Vision: Through strong agency collaboration, youth with disabilities will transition into competitive integrated employment or post-secondary education/ training.”    MOU Partners Include: Office of Developmental Disabilities Services Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Services Oregon Department of Education Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Cooperative Agreement Between the Oregon Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education - 12/01/2014

“The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to set forth the commitments of the ODE and VR to cooperate in activities leading to a successful transition for students with disabilities from a free and appropriate public education to postsecondary career-related training and employment activities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding on Transition of Students with Disabilities to the Workforce (August 2011) - 08/01/2011

"The general purpose of this MOU is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education that creates the initiative entitled, "Integrated, Continuous Transition Services for Students with Developmental Disabilities: A Pathway to Employment.” The specific purpose is to outline mutual goals, strategies, actions and responsibilities that staff of-the parties will endorse and conduct to accomplish the desired objectives(s).”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Youth Transition Program

~~“Established in 1990, the Oregon Youth Transition Program (YTP) is a collaborative partnership between the office of Vocational Rehabilitation, Oregon Department of Education, and the University of Oregon. It is funded by Vocational Rehabilitation every two-years through competitive grants to local school districts. The purpose of the YTP is to prepare students with disabilities for employment or career related postsecondary education or training through the provision of a comprehensive array of pre-employment transition activities and supports. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First: Capacity Building and Training and Technical Assistance Strategic Plan 2014-2015

The mission of this strategic plan is to, “To improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving integrated employment for individuals experiencing IDD, consistent with their abilities and choices. To improve Oregon’s employment services through innovation, best practices, and increased capacity, with the outcome of achieving integrated employment services for all individuals experiencing intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Developmental Disabilities Worker’s Guide - 08/27/2018

~~“SPPC services are available to eligible individuals – up to 20 hours each month – as stand-alone attendant/personal care services and related supports, or in combination with the Community First Choice Option/K Plan services.  Ingeneral, when the individual has minimalsupport needs and most of those needs are being met with alternative resources, including natural support, and only need minimal hours of paid-support, SPPC services may be an appropriate option.  “ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Oregon Innovation Grant Awardees - 07/14/2017

“The Oregon Legislature awarded a Policy Option Package in the 2015-17 session for the Department of Human Services (DHS) to fund innovative Employment First projects to increase capacity throughout the state.

The purpose of these grants is to expand efforts to increase competitive integrated employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). We are pleased to award more than 20 organizations throughout Oregon with innovation grants. Congratulations to the providers, family organizations, and case management entities that were awarded grants for innovative projects starting June 2017.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Project ACCESS - 09/14/2015

“The purpose of Project Access is to establish, implement, and evaluate a multi-level interagency transition model in the state of Oregon. The overall goal of the project is to improve and extend transition services to a greater number of youth with disabilities through a model program that brings vocational rehabilitation counselors (VRC's) into high school settings.”

“The model is a collaborative effort between Oregon's Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), public high schools in three Oregon school districts, and researchers at the University of Oregon.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ticket to Work Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - Integrated Employment Plan (revised 7/2015) - 07/06/2015

“(2010-2011) During this time period VR used resources within its Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIG) Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and other available resources to support of a variety of Employment First related activities including: Co-funding for many of the stakeholder and partner gatherings (e.g. Employment First Summit, Meet at the Mountain, stakeholder work groups); Participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN); and Improving access to benefits counseling and planning services such as the Work Incentive Project (WIN); and  Supporting other training and technical assistance activities”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in - 01/01/2012

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Work Incentive Network (WIN!) (now part of the activities of the MIG)

Part of the activities of the MIG

“Benefits and Work Incentive Counseling services help people with disabilities make informed decisions about work, benefits and the use of work incentives to achieve their employment goals, as well as helping them navigate the benefits system when they begin working."

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Oregon Employment First Training Course Descriptions

Content of the document reflects information from multiple state and training agency organizations and is designed as a tool for organizations participating in the Transformation Project for selection of needed training and technical assistance.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) 2014-2015

~"The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) provides core supported employment professional training through a series of four, 2 day trainings. These trainings help employment professionals meet Oregon’s employment professional core competencies requirement through eight days of in person training. Each of the two-day seminars results in twelve hours of training.The OELN Training Series is now accredited by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE)".
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Lane v. Brown Settlement (12-29-2015) - 12/29/2015

~~“Under the Settlement Agreement, Oregon agreed to continue its policy of decreasing the State’s support of sheltered workshops for people with I/DD in Oregon, and expanding the availability of supported employment services that allow individuals with I/DD the opportunity to work in competitive integrated employment settings.  The Settlement Agreement provides relief to two target populations – (1) adults with I/DD who are 21 years old or older and worked in a sheltered workshop on or after January 25, 2012 (sheltered workshop target population), and (2) transition-age youth with I/DD between the ages of 14 and 24 who are found eligible for services from the State’s Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) (transition-age target population)”

 

Systems
  • Other

Lane v. Kitzhaber, 12-CV-00138, (D. OR 2012) - 05/22/2013

“On May 22, 2013, the Court granted the United States' March 27 Motion to Intervene in a pending class action lawsuit against the State of Oregon. The United States' accompanying Complaint in Intervention alleges violations of Title II of the ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act for unnecessarily segregating individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in sheltered workshops when they could be served in integrated employment settings.”

  “Prior to requesting intervention the United States filed on April 20, 2012, a Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs Regarding Defendants' Motion to Dismiss.  The United States argued that Title II and the integration regulation apply to all services, programs, and activities of a public entity, including segregated, non-residential employment settings such as sheltered workshops.”    “On June 18, 2012, the United States filed a second Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs' Motion for Class Certification. In its Statement of Interest, the United States urged the Court to uphold class certification for a plaintiff class of thousands of individuals in, or referred to, Oregon sheltered workshops.”   
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - From the Department of Justice Findings Letter (2012) - 06/29/2012

“We have concluded that the State is failing to provide employment and vocational services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the most  integrated setting appropriate to their needs, in violation of the ADA.  The State plans, structures, and administers its system of providing employment and vocational services in a manner that delivers such services primarily in segregated sheltered workshops, rather than in integrated community employment.  Sheltered workshops segregate individuals from the community and provide little or no opportunity to interact with persons without disabilities, other than paid staff…  most persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving employment and vocational services from the state remain unnecessarily – and often indefinitely – confined to segregated sheltered workshops..”    
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - Staley v. Kitzhaber 2000 - 01/14/2000

“The lawsuit was the result of years of frustration in waiting for appropriate, adequate services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities, and their families… The lawsuit alleges that the State of Oregon failed to provide services in the most integrated possible setting to adults with mental retardation and/or developmental disabilities eligible for placement in an ICF/MR (intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded) and that individuals with developmental disabilities are entitled to receive Medicaid-Funded services with reasonable promptness.”

“This agreement is intended to provide relief to not only the plaintiffs but also to all other similarly situated individuals with developmental disabilities eligible to receive services under the federal Medicaid program.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

Ticket to Work Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - Integrated Employment Plan (revised 7/2015)

“(2010-2011) During this time period VR used resources within its Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIG) Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and other available resources to support of a variety of Employment First related activities including: Co-funding for many of the stakeholder and partner gatherings (e.g. Employment First Summit, Meet at the Mountain, stakeholder work groups); Participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN); and Improving access to benefits counseling and planning services such as the Work Incentive Project (WIN); and  Supporting other training and technical assistance activities”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Support Services Waiver (Brokerage)

Provides “Respite; Homemaker; Supported Employment Services; Environmental Accessibility Adaptations; Non-Medical Transportation; Chore Service; Personal Emergency Response Systems; Family Training; PT/OT/Speech; Special Diets; Specialized Supports; Support Services Brokerages; Emergent Services; Community Inclusion; Community Living; Specialized Medical Equipment.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon ICF/IDD Support Services (0375.R03.00)

~~Provides employment path services, supported employment - individual employment support, waiver case management, direct nursing, discovery/career exploration services, environmental safety modifications, family training - conferences and workshops, financial management services, special diets, specialized medical supplies, supported employment - small group employment support, vehicle modifications for individuals w/ID/DD ages 18 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

The Beaver State of Oregon believes that "Things Look Different Here" when it comes to creating innovative employment options for workers with disabilities.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Oregon’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
1.19%
Change from
2016 to 2017
4,142,776
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-5.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
288,493
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-9.07%
Change from
2016 to 2017
109,027
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-3.81%
Change from
2016 to 2017
37.79%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.45%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.04%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 4,142,776
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 288,493
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 109,027
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,751,754
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 37.79%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.04%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.10%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.70%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.00%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 289,157
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 283,759
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 505,721
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 10,873
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 39,234
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 9,991
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 14,137
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 1,037
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 24,617
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 6,540

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,951
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 6.20%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 107,703

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 11,607
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 24,671
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 39,390
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 29.50%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.30%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 2,261
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,206
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 15,471
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.07

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 3,819
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 1,815
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 48.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 45.05

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 4,072
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 168,828
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $32,691,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $15,891,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $20,322,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $11,632,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 56.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 3,831
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,572
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,411
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 107.40

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 73.49%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.90%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.20%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 79.73%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 24.56%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 60.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 74.59%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 35.90%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,723,537
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 1,680
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 8,299
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 289,705
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 298,004
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 19
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 308
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 327
AbilityOne wages (products). $5,095,598
AbilityOne wages (services). $97,396

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 9
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 10
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 657
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 657

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

VR works closely with other State agencies whose populations benefit from VR Supported Employment (SE) Services. VR, the Department of Education, and the Office of Developmental Disability Services work together with the State’s Employment First program to ensure that individuals who experience Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities receive coordinated and sequenced services that meet their employment needs. This multi–agency collaboration operates under the guidance of Executive Order 15–01 and actively works to ensure that policies and services are aligned in a way that makes sense for transition age students as well as adults seeking services (Page 187)

VR and Oregon Department of Developmental Disability Services have refocused their work together over the last couple of years to achieve the outcomes set forth in Executive order 13–04, which was updated in Executive Order 15–01. These Executive Orders emphasize with more clarity the State’s Employment First Policy. Additionally, the State of Oregon has recently settled a lawsuit that calls for increased integrated employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. VR, ODDS, and the I/DD service delivery system have a working relationship that shares information, leverages and braids funding, and encourages the joint case management of joint clients. Moving forward VR will continue to work with ODDS and I/DD service delivery system as well as the Department of Education to increase our collaboration to maximize funding, streamline processes, and meet the competitive and integrated employment goals of joint clients. (Page 190)

  • Hired staff specialists who serve individuals with I/DD. These three groups of regional staff meet regularly; co–train other agency staff; and, co–develop tools and strategies to provide services that are consistent and reflect best practices
  • Have established collaborative training regarding consistency and quality in curricula used for VR, ODDS and ODE staff throughout Oregon; accomplished through:
    • Agency conferences (VR In–Service, DD Case Management Conference, and ODE Regional Transition Conferences) used mixed groups of staff and cross training techniques to further collaborative training goals
    • VR, DD, and school transition (ODE) staff training on varied topics, presented regionally to groups consisting of staff from all three agencies
    • Staff are consistently co–trained by specialists from the three agencies
  • Ongoing and regularly scheduled meetings lead to collaborative actions by Office of Developmental Disabilities (ODDS), VR and Oregon Department of Education (ODE):
    • Employment First Steering Committee meetings direct the overall work of the following collaborative meetings. This committee is co–led by VR and ODDS Administrators
    • Policy and Innovation meetings are co–led by VR staff and DD Staff to facilitate these collaborative actions:
  • The three agencies review and discuss all new or newly revised policy to assure alignment across agencies
  • Each agency sends policy transmittals to their regional and community staff when another of them adopts new or newly revised policy
    • Education and Transition meetings discuss pertinent issues for students who have transition plans including those receiving Pre–Vocational Services; facilitating these collaborative actions:
  • A jointly held goal of seamless transition for: students with transition plans, students in transition programs. (Page 190)

The Oregon Legislature has the sole authority to establish the type and number of state government positions, including VR positions. Over the last two biennium the legislature approved 14 new VRC positions to help support statewide Employment First initiatives. (Page 192)

Customized Employment

No specific disability related information found.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

No specific disability related information found.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

No specific disability related information found.

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

No specific disability related information found.

School to Work Transition

At application, the majority of VR program clients are already receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits as a result of legal blindness. During development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), the OCB explores the client’s vocational goals and income needs, and commensurate with their skills, strengths and previous work experience jointly sets employment goals. For client’s targeting employment with earnings above the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level, the OCB utilizes the Ticket to Work program for cost reimbursement upon 9 months of successful employment at or above SGA level earnings.  (Page 27)

Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities 

  1. Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns
  2. Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity
  3. Continue to partner with the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program operated by Disability Rights Oregon  (Page 206)
  4. Create an expansive employer engagement model that creates opportunities for work–based learning opportunities 
  • Develop a common employer engagement plan, language, and focus that can be used statewide
  • Implement a progressive employment model
  • Create and train local VR employer engagement teams
  • Work with partners on joint engagement opportunities
  • Engage with employers the need to meet the 503 federal hiring targets
  • Utilize the SRC Business Committee to enhance engagement with employers 

       5. Expand the use of Benefits Planning to assist Oregonians with Disabilities

  • Create online benefits training and information to address basic benefit concerns
  • Work with partner agencies to create additional funding opportunities for expanding capacity
  • Continue to partner with the Work Inc. (Page 219)

While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income–dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services. Commission Services for Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities The Commission is reaching those with the most significant disabilities through outreach and by providing individualized services. (Page 261)

Outcome % of participants who were receiving SSI/SSDI at application*

  • Exited VR before services began 55%
  • Exited VR without an employment outcome, after services 60%
  • Exited VR with a noncompetitive employment outcome 62%
  • Exited VR with a competitive employment outcome 46% 

*   Note: Commission data is cumulative 2009–2013. While receipt of SSI/SSDI indicates significance of disability, it can also impact employment for an individual, based on the need to maintain benefits and especially health insurance benefits that are income–dependent. The Commission addresses this consumer need through providing benefits planning services. (Page 301)

Career Pathways

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) requests a continuation of its waiver of state–wideness for its Youth Transition Program (YTP). Through this program, transition age youth with disabilities are provided with enhanced activities and services that lead to employment or career–related postsecondary education or training. YTP has two distinct but interconnected goals. The first is to improve post–school transition outcomes for youth with disabilities by preparing them for employment, postsecondary education or training, and independent living. The second is to increase capacity and foster positive systems change in schools and other agencies in assisting youth with disabilities in moving from school to work. (Page 178)

Our goals for the program for FFY 16 include:

  1. Coordinate the Summer Work Experience Program for students who require ongoing supports in partnership with the Department of Education
  2. Partner with the education team that will support students who are leaving secondary school programs to develop a transition plan for school to work
  3. Continue to outreach to the deaf–blind community
  4. Coordinate with community resources to maximize comparable benefits and improve services for our clients
  5. Grow the number of individuals served in the program and focus on positive outcomes in integrated settings with supports 

In addition: OCB will provide SE extended services after placement for up to 4 years for individuals not covered by alternative programs or funding. (Page 281)

Progress: The agency attended individualized transition plan meetings for all Supported Employment students exiting the schools in order to provide seamless services to students exiting the school system. (Page 296)

Goal 2: Partner with the education team that will support Supported Employment students who are leaving secondary school programs to develop a transition plan for school to work Progress: The agency attended individualized transition plan meetings for all Supported Employment students exiting the schools in order to provide seamless services to students exiting the school system. (Page 298-299)

Work Incentives & Benefits

Overall, the development and expansion of credit–bearing Career Pathways certificates across the 17 community colleges has been a key strategy for enhancing the training and job skills of Oregon’s workforce. Currently, the community colleges offer more than 400 Career Pathway certificate programs. These certificates are defined in Oregon statute as being 15 – 44 credit certificates that are completely contained within an Associate of Applied Science degree or one–year certificate. This means a working learner can continue to make progress toward a higher level credential without losing time or money having to take classes that are required in the higher level credential but different from those in the Career Pathway certificate. (Page 32)

AEFLA-funded Adult-Basic-Skills Programs work with employers through connections with their colleges’ Career Pathways, Customized Training, Workforce Training, and Occupational Skills Training programs. Another critical partner is VR. The Vocational Rehabilitation program by design contacts the Business and employer community utilizing a client specific approach. VR’s approach of utilizing contracted vendors to job develop for individual clients indicates a different model regarding employer outreach. However, employers also approach the VR offices with Job Opportunities and VR will address a process where these contacts and opportunities can be blended into a Workforce combined business outreach method. (Page 69)

9. Whether the eligible provider’s activities are delivered by well-trained instructors, counselors and administrators who meet any minimum qualifications established by the State, where applicable, and who have access to high quality professional development, including through electronic means.

10. Whether the eligible provider coordinates with other available education, training and social service resources in the community, such as by establishing strong links with elementary schools and secondary schools, postsecondary educational institutions, institutions of higher education, local workforce development boards, one-stop centers, job training programs, and social service agencies, business, industry, labor organizations, community-based organizations, nonprofit organizations, and intermediaries in the development of career pathways.

11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer the flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals, including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs. (Page 160)

Employer/ Business

Oregon VR initiated a Ticket to Work shared payment agreement pilot with ten community mental health programs that provide evidence–based mental health supported employment services. These mental health agencies are governed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) who contracts with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) to provide annual programs and technical assistance. These agreements allow Oregon VR to be the Employment Network of record with SSA, partner with the mental health agency to provide dual services to an individual. Once the VR case is closed, the mental health agency continues to support the individual until the support is no longer needed. If the individual works and reaches the SSA TTW wage thresholds, Oregon VR receives TTW payments which in turn are split with the mental health agencies. This pilot evolved into a project that has strengthened the relationship between VR and these participating agencies by providing additional TTW dollars for additional program funding. As of July 2015 we have sixteen agreements in place. (Page 186)

511

State Operating Systems 

State operating systems to support implementation of the state’s strategies are primarily divided into three categories: 

  • Labor Market Information
  • Data Collection and Reporting Systems
  • Operations and Management Systems 

Labor Market Information 

The Oregon Employment Department’s Workforce and Economic Research Division provides accurate, reliable, and timely information about Oregon’s state and local labor markets. The division’s goal is to provide quality information that helps our customers make informed choices. Workforce development policy makers are a key research customer group, particularly serving the labor market information needs of state and local workforce development boards.

The division’s efforts focus on direct employer surveys, information from tax records, analysis of the data, and dissemination through publications, presentations, and responses to customer requests. Most labor market information is available on–line allowing staff more time to focus on custom analysis and answering challenging questions about the labor market. (All of Page 79 )

OWIB has established a goal and five strategies around creating a customer–centric, easy to access workforce system, including developing accountability mechanisms focused on results. The state board will assist the Governor by continuing to focus on system results and the needs or impediments to both measuring and improving the results for individuals and employers. Alignment of technology and data systems across the partner programs and agencies are the key to creating such a system and accountability mechanisms. (Page 99)

  • Support for the development of instructional content and models for career pathways;
  • Potential revision of OPABS and expansion of I–BEST and VESL models that integrate education and training;
  • Technical assistance to eligible providers on strategies to achieve negotiated targets on the primary indicators of performance;
  • Exploration of a standardized adult education and literacy orientation process with identified learning outcomes; and
  • Support for changes required to meet WIOA data collection and reporting requirements. (Page 167)

In the coming year, Oregon Adult Learning Standards trainers will also be able to track how Institute participants are implementing the Learning Standards in their classrooms and at a programmatic level. The State will continue to review evidence of implementation, e.g., course outlines, lesson plans, and classroom observation, as other training opportunities in Learning Standards, data collection and use, English language acquisition, and other topics in order to ensure the quality of professional development. (Page 168)Through the data collection efforts, researchers solicited information from four primary stakeholder groups:

  • potential, actual, or former consumers of VR services located throughout the state;
  • representatives of organizations that provide services to individuals who are potential, actual, or former consumers of VR services;
  • VR staff; and
  • representatives of businesses

The approach was designed to capture input from a variety of perspectives in order to acquire a sense of the multi-faceted needs of persons with disabilities in the state. Responses to the individual survey reflect the opinions of current and former clients of VR including individuals who had not yet developed a rehabilitation plan, individuals with active rehabilitation plans, and individuals whose cases had been closed. Efforts were made to gather information pertinent to un-served and under-served populations through inquiries with individuals who serve a broad range of persons with disabilities in the state (whether they are affiliated with VR or not). Likewise, the VR staff members that participated in key informant interviews, focus groups and surveys serve individuals with disabilities representing a broad range of backgrounds and experiences. Efforts were made to solicit responses from businesses reflecting the opinions of employers representing a variety of industries. (Page 199)

Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process ii. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies iii. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process in order to get clients into plan more quickly iv. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication v. Work with Lean Coordinator to identify opportunities for greater efficiencies in service delivery and policy that can be addressed. (Page 204)

The methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities: 

  1. Promote earlier engagement with Workforce partners for VR clients in the application process
  2. Streamline referral and data collection from common referral agencies
  3. Work with VR staff to streamline the Individual Plan for Employment process in order to get clients into plan more quickly
  4. Use data to determine success rate of specific services and focus on their duplication
  5. Work with LEAN Coordinator to identify opportunities for greater efficiencies in service delivery and policy that can be addressed. (Page 212)
Mental Health

Section identified but no detailed information specifically addressing disability or implementation. (Page 114)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 81 - 83 of 83

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Oregon Administrative Rules Chapter 411 Division 345 Employment Services for Individuals with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities - 07/02/2018

~~“The purposes of the rules in OAR chapter 411, division 345 are to:(1) Effectuate Oregon’s Employment First policy, as described in the State of Oregon Executive Order No. 15-01 and OAR chapter 407, division 025, under which:(a) The employment of individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities in competitive integrated employment is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, or other non-work day activities.(b) For individuals who successfully achieve the goal of competitive integrated employment, future person-centered service planning focuses on maintaining employment, maximizing the number of hours an individual works, using the standard of obtaining at least 20 hours of week of work, consistent with the individual’s preferences and interests, and considering additional career or advancement opportunities” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon HB 3063: Relating to Housing for Individuals with Mental Illness - 08/08/2017

“The Housing and Community Services Department, in collaboration with the Oregon Health Authority, shall disburse moneys in the Housing for Mental Health Fund to provide funding for:

(a) The development of community-based housing, including licensed residential treatment facilities, for individuals with mental illness and individuals with substance use disorders;”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon SB 777 (ABLE Act) - 08/12/2015

"The Oregon 529 Savings Board shall establish by rule and maintain a qualified ABLE [Achieving a Better Life Experience] program in accordance with the requirements of the ABLE Act. (2) The rules must: (a) Allow a person to make contributions for a taxable year to an ABLE account established for the purpose of meeting the qualified disability expenses of the designated beneficiary of the account..."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
Citations

Oregon Senate Bill 22 - Employment First - 04/08/2013

The bill details the rights of persons with developmental disabilities who are receiving developmental disability services.  It proclaims that “individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities and society as a whole benefit when the individuals exercise choice and self-determination, living and working in the most integrated community settings appropriate to their needs, with supportive services that are designed and implemented consistent with the choice of the individuals regarding services, providers, goals and activities.”  Moreover it proclaims that, “the employment of individuals with developmental disabilities in fully integrated work settings is the highest priority over unemployment, segregated employment, facility-based employment or day habilitation.” 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

427.007 OR Policy; Department of Human Services to plan and facilitate community services.

Emphasizes the importance of home and community based services that help to facilitate community integration for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. “Therefore, the Department of Human Services is directed to facilitate the development of appropriate community-based services, including family support, residential facilities, day programs, home care and other necessary support, care and training programs, in an orderly and systematic manner. The role of state-operated hospitals and training centers in Oregon shall be as specialized back-up facilities to a primary system of community-based services for persons with intellectual disabilities or other developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Oregon Executive Order 15-01 - Providing employment services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities - 02/02/2015

Supersedes Executive Order 13-04   “This Executive Order revises and supersedes Executive Order 13-04 in order to provide further policy guidance intended to continue the state’s progress in these areas [providing supported employment services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities], including through a substantial reduction in employment in sheltered workshops.  Continue to improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving competitive integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, consistent with their abilities and choices, will benefit individuals with disabilities, their families, our communities, the economy, and the state.”  

 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Integrated Employment Services to Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

“Executive Order 15-01 which supersedes Executive Order 13-04 and outlines detailed strategies and requires the Oregon Department of Human Services (Department) to work with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to further improve Oregon’s systems of designing and delivering employment systems to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First Policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and an increased investment in employment services.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 31 - 32 of 32

Planning My Way to Work: A Transition Guide for Student with Disabilities Leaving High School

“This manual is intended to: Help you make your way through the transition process; Understand your rights, services and resources that may help you and your family; Provide information to help you understand complex adult service systems; Highlight that you direct your own transition; Reinforce that you and your team design your transition just for you; and Identify your work and other adult life goals and a plan to achieve those goals.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employment First – Comprehensive Services Developmental Disabilities Program

“Oregon has been successful in developing community-based care and discouraging institutionalization of seniors and the disabled because of their exceptional case management system. Through the case management program, consumers get information and assistance, assessment and planning. When an individual is found to need LTC services, a screener is called for the initial intake of information. As appropriate, the screener schedules an in-home visit by a case manager. During the visit, the case manager assesses the extent of functional disability and works with the client to ensure that a care plan mat matches his or her needs, values, and preferences. A comprehensive assessment allows for a care plan to be built on the client’s existing social network as well as on the resources available in the community”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Memorandum of Understanding Developmental Disabilities Services Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/30/2016

“,,,IDDS adoption of and VR endorsement of the “Employment First Policy” for working age adults with developmental disabilities”   “This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services.  This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of the MOUR is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and rthe Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 115-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society. “  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding: Developmental Disabilities Services and Vocational Rehabilitation - 03/28/2016

“This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is to impact and be implemented statewide, with a target population of all working age individuals with Developmental Disabilities eligible for both VR and ODDS services. This will include school age individuals engaged in employment related transition services. The general purpose of this MOU is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare, Self Sufficiency Program and the Aging and People with Disabilities that creates the initiative entitled Improved Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities; to fully implementation Executive Order 15-01; and, to fulfill mandates from the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) to empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment, economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and integration into society.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding on Transition of Students with Disabilities to the Workforce - 02/02/2015

“Together with Executive Order No.15-01, this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) recognizes that, while the State cannot guarantee jobs, Oregon starts with the presumption that everyone can be employed in an integrated setting in a community-based job…Oregon is not guaranteeing anyone a job, but with significant additional resources, Oregon s optimistic that all persons with IDD will have an opportunity to obtain integrated employment.”   “Vision: Through strong agency collaboration, youth with disabilities will transition into competitive integrated employment or post-secondary education/ training.”    MOU Partners Include: Office of Developmental Disabilities Services Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation Services Oregon Department of Education Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Cooperative Agreement Between the Oregon Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education - 12/01/2014

“The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to set forth the commitments of the ODE and VR to cooperate in activities leading to a successful transition for students with disabilities from a free and appropriate public education to postsecondary career-related training and employment activities.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Memorandum of Understanding on Transition of Students with Disabilities to the Workforce (August 2011) - 08/01/2011

"The general purpose of this MOU is to support the Charter between the Department of Human Services and the Oregon Department of Education that creates the initiative entitled, "Integrated, Continuous Transition Services for Students with Developmental Disabilities: A Pathway to Employment.” The specific purpose is to outline mutual goals, strategies, actions and responsibilities that staff of-the parties will endorse and conduct to accomplish the desired objectives(s).”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Youth Transition Program

~~“Established in 1990, the Oregon Youth Transition Program (YTP) is a collaborative partnership between the office of Vocational Rehabilitation, Oregon Department of Education, and the University of Oregon. It is funded by Vocational Rehabilitation every two-years through competitive grants to local school districts. The purpose of the YTP is to prepare students with disabilities for employment or career related postsecondary education or training through the provision of a comprehensive array of pre-employment transition activities and supports. “

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment First: Capacity Building and Training and Technical Assistance Strategic Plan 2014-2015

The mission of this strategic plan is to, “To improve Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving integrated employment for individuals experiencing IDD, consistent with their abilities and choices. To improve Oregon’s employment services through innovation, best practices, and increased capacity, with the outcome of achieving integrated employment services for all individuals experiencing intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD).”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Developmental Disabilities Worker’s Guide - 08/27/2018

~~“SPPC services are available to eligible individuals – up to 20 hours each month – as stand-alone attendant/personal care services and related supports, or in combination with the Community First Choice Option/K Plan services.  Ingeneral, when the individual has minimalsupport needs and most of those needs are being met with alternative resources, including natural support, and only need minimal hours of paid-support, SPPC services may be an appropriate option.  “ 

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Oregon Innovation Grant Awardees - 07/14/2017

“The Oregon Legislature awarded a Policy Option Package in the 2015-17 session for the Department of Human Services (DHS) to fund innovative Employment First projects to increase capacity throughout the state.

The purpose of these grants is to expand efforts to increase competitive integrated employment opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). We are pleased to award more than 20 organizations throughout Oregon with innovation grants. Congratulations to the providers, family organizations, and case management entities that were awarded grants for innovative projects starting June 2017.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Oregon Project ACCESS - 09/14/2015

“The purpose of Project Access is to establish, implement, and evaluate a multi-level interagency transition model in the state of Oregon. The overall goal of the project is to improve and extend transition services to a greater number of youth with disabilities through a model program that brings vocational rehabilitation counselors (VRC's) into high school settings.”

“The model is a collaborative effort between Oregon's Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), public high schools in three Oregon school districts, and researchers at the University of Oregon.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Ticket to Work Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - Integrated Employment Plan (revised 7/2015) - 07/06/2015

“(2010-2011) During this time period VR used resources within its Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIG) Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and other available resources to support of a variety of Employment First related activities including: Co-funding for many of the stakeholder and partner gatherings (e.g. Employment First Summit, Meet at the Mountain, stakeholder work groups); Participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN); and Improving access to benefits counseling and planning services such as the Work Incentive Project (WIN); and  Supporting other training and technical assistance activities”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Oregon Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in - 01/01/2012

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

The Work Incentive Network (WIN!) (now part of the activities of the MIG)

Part of the activities of the MIG

“Benefits and Work Incentive Counseling services help people with disabilities make informed decisions about work, benefits and the use of work incentives to achieve their employment goals, as well as helping them navigate the benefits system when they begin working."

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person (MFP) “On the Move”

Oregon’s Money Follows the Person project “On the Move in Oregon” aimed to reverse the increase in nursing facility utilization… and continue this state’s   historic rebalancing efforts using Home and Community-Based services.   From May 2007 through September 2011, the State agency transitioned 305 clients from institutions to home and community-based settings.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 12 of 12

Oregon Employment First Training Course Descriptions

Content of the document reflects information from multiple state and training agency organizations and is designed as a tool for organizations participating in the Transformation Project for selection of needed training and technical assistance.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation

The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) 2014-2015

~"The Oregon Employment Learning Network (OELN) provides core supported employment professional training through a series of four, 2 day trainings. These trainings help employment professionals meet Oregon’s employment professional core competencies requirement through eight days of in person training. Each of the two-day seminars results in twelve hours of training.The OELN Training Series is now accredited by the Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE)".
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Lane v. Brown Settlement (12-29-2015) - 12/29/2015

~~“Under the Settlement Agreement, Oregon agreed to continue its policy of decreasing the State’s support of sheltered workshops for people with I/DD in Oregon, and expanding the availability of supported employment services that allow individuals with I/DD the opportunity to work in competitive integrated employment settings.  The Settlement Agreement provides relief to two target populations – (1) adults with I/DD who are 21 years old or older and worked in a sheltered workshop on or after January 25, 2012 (sheltered workshop target population), and (2) transition-age youth with I/DD between the ages of 14 and 24 who are found eligible for services from the State’s Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) (transition-age target population)”

 

Systems
  • Other

Lane v. Kitzhaber, 12-CV-00138, (D. OR 2012) - 05/22/2013

“On May 22, 2013, the Court granted the United States' March 27 Motion to Intervene in a pending class action lawsuit against the State of Oregon. The United States' accompanying Complaint in Intervention alleges violations of Title II of the ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act for unnecessarily segregating individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in sheltered workshops when they could be served in integrated employment settings.”

  “Prior to requesting intervention the United States filed on April 20, 2012, a Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs Regarding Defendants' Motion to Dismiss.  The United States argued that Title II and the integration regulation apply to all services, programs, and activities of a public entity, including segregated, non-residential employment settings such as sheltered workshops.”    “On June 18, 2012, the United States filed a second Statement of Interest in Support of Plaintiffs' Motion for Class Certification. In its Statement of Interest, the United States urged the Court to uphold class certification for a plaintiff class of thousands of individuals in, or referred to, Oregon sheltered workshops.”   
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - From the Department of Justice Findings Letter (2012) - 06/29/2012

“We have concluded that the State is failing to provide employment and vocational services to persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the most  integrated setting appropriate to their needs, in violation of the ADA.  The State plans, structures, and administers its system of providing employment and vocational services in a manner that delivers such services primarily in segregated sheltered workshops, rather than in integrated community employment.  Sheltered workshops segregate individuals from the community and provide little or no opportunity to interact with persons without disabilities, other than paid staff…  most persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving employment and vocational services from the state remain unnecessarily – and often indefinitely – confined to segregated sheltered workshops..”    
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Oregon - Staley v. Kitzhaber 2000 - 01/14/2000

“The lawsuit was the result of years of frustration in waiting for appropriate, adequate services and supports to individuals with developmental disabilities, and their families… The lawsuit alleges that the State of Oregon failed to provide services in the most integrated possible setting to adults with mental retardation and/or developmental disabilities eligible for placement in an ICF/MR (intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded) and that individuals with developmental disabilities are entitled to receive Medicaid-Funded services with reasonable promptness.”

“This agreement is intended to provide relief to not only the plaintiffs but also to all other similarly situated individuals with developmental disabilities eligible to receive services under the federal Medicaid program.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
Displaying 11 - 14 of 14

Ticket to Work Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - Integrated Employment Plan (revised 7/2015)

“(2010-2011) During this time period VR used resources within its Medicaid Infrastructure Grants (MIG) Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and other available resources to support of a variety of Employment First related activities including: Co-funding for many of the stakeholder and partner gatherings (e.g. Employment First Summit, Meet at the Mountain, stakeholder work groups); Participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN); and Improving access to benefits counseling and planning services such as the Work Incentive Project (WIN); and  Supporting other training and technical assistance activities”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employed Persons with Disabilities (EPD) – Medicaid Buy-in

“EPD is a Medicaid program administered by the Oregon Department of Human services. EPD provides medical coverage and long-term services to people with disabilities who are employed. If you are eligible to participate, you will be charged a nominal fee based on your income.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon Support Services Waiver (Brokerage)

Provides “Respite; Homemaker; Supported Employment Services; Environmental Accessibility Adaptations; Non-Medical Transportation; Chore Service; Personal Emergency Response Systems; Family Training; PT/OT/Speech; Special Diets; Specialized Supports; Support Services Brokerages; Emergent Services; Community Inclusion; Community Living; Specialized Medical Equipment.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Oregon ICF/IDD Support Services (0375.R03.00)

~~Provides employment path services, supported employment - individual employment support, waiver case management, direct nursing, discovery/career exploration services, environmental safety modifications, family training - conferences and workshops, financial management services, special diets, specialized medical supplies, supported employment - small group employment support, vehicle modifications for individuals w/ID/DD ages 18 - no max age

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)