Puerto Rico [Territory]

States - Big Screen

"Rich Port": Where the richness of having a competitive job at a living wage is possible for all people with disabilities.

2018 State Population.
-4.44%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,195,153
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.71%
Change from
2017 to 2018
328,525
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.36%
Change from
2017 to 2018
76,210
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-3.49%
Change from
2017 to 2018
23.20%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
4.54%
Change from
2017 to 2018
55.48%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 3,411,307 3,337,177 3,195,153
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 354,695 340,717 328,525
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 78,826 81,820 76,210
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 929,500 879,100 885,794
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 22.22% 24.01% 23.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 54.86% 52.96% 55.48%
State/National unemployment rate. 12.00% 10.80% 8.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 47.80% 48.20% 46.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 42.30% 43.40% 42.20%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 334,810 332,908 310,024
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 386,625 380,567 365,294
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 493,901 484,751 441,128
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 78,542 78,302 76,704
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 714,713 708,258 667,268
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 1,932 2,194 1,208
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,246 N/A 1,059
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 34,831 46,802 45,669
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 110,983 100,765 109,485

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 156,044 151,590

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 188 216
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 634 592
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 1,694 1,411
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 11.10% 15.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 7.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 0.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 6.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 32.50% 14.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A 77
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A 9
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A 71
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 589 145

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
5,009
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 201 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 204 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,143 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,098 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,082 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 281 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,825 1,873 1,998
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 181,771 169,691 165,205
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 76.27% 72.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.64% 9.22%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.30% 2.23%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.37% 99.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 57.46% 51.10%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 69.83% 65.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 84.58% 87.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 12.37% 14.36%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~In terms of service to individuals facing barriers to employment, counseling remains a key strategic activity across all core programs. Counselors has a specialized education coupled with years of experience and knowledge, and can provide information and guidance to clients on occupational requirements, employment opportunities, trends and other community resources that can benefit the job seekers.

As previously mentioned, seeking to activate the government entities' participation in key competitive programs aims to expand education, training and employment services to targeted populations. DEI, the qualification of local boards as Employment Networks under the Ticket to Work program, REO, Youthbuild, Job Plus, the expansion of activities for employment creation/retention under CDBG, are some of the targeted programs or activities.

Title II has a leading role in serving individuals with barriers to employment and ensuring their access to the labor force. To assist enhancing its service to these populations, the program will implement an Advisory Board to further fine-tuning and program improvements. (Page 93) Title I

i. Please, see information corresponding to 101(d)(2), above.
5. 101(d)(3)(B) the development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low—skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment:
i. Please, refer to section II(c)(1).

Goal 4 foresees to spur the development of sector strategies and career pathways by targeting opportunities in the public sector to resource the convening of partnerships. Strategy section aims to convene a working group to assist the State Board in developing support for sector strategies and career pathways. As mentioned above, Strategy section, addresses the utilization of proven methodologies provided by USDOL to aid in these efforts. PRDE’s programs (Title II and Carl D. Perkins supported CTE) will lead the way in pursuing the implementation of career pathways and providing the necessary insight to the State Board. The WDP and PRVRA will also support the effort by pursuing DEI funding. (Page 99) Title II

An enhanced coordination with the PREC will allow the harvesting of data being supplied by educational institutions under local and federal mandates to retrofit the educational and workforce systems. Additional opportunities could arise by devising ways in which the Council's State student financial assistance programs support the strategies of the system.

Local areas will be encouraged to leverage the resources of required partners to support the delivery of integrated services, through financial and non-financial agreements. Many of the arrangements for sharing other state resources must be worked out in detail at local level involving other agencies and the local One-Stop Centers’ partners, through MOUs.

A key strategy in leveraging other Federal investments that have enhanced access to workforce development programs at educational institutions is to equip the State Board to manage the function of identifying and seeking additional or dormant competitive funding opportunities that can benefit any component of the workforce development system. DEI and REO, among others, represent additional opportunities. To that end, the State is committed to advance the designation of the local boards as 501(c)(3) tax-exempted non-for profits to leverage non-traditional sources of grant funding. (Page 138) Title II
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Competitive graduates with knowledge and skills needed to adapt to changes in the economy, environment, and technology. Education is a cornerstone of Puerto Rico’s economy, society, and political systems. Its purpose is to build and sustain the knowledge and skills needed to ensure that individuals, communities and key institutions can adapt to changes in the world economy, the environment, and technology.

The Government of Puerto Rico now has the opportunity to fundamentally transform its education system in a way that improves student outcomes, supports the development of children, youth and adults, and supports its vision of economic and social development moving forward.

1. Upgrade school infrastructure to support resilience and sustainability

2. Increase K—12 access to vocational, technical, and career education and strengthen school-to-work transitions

3. Promote pre-school and out-of-school learning opportunities

4. Strengthen systems to support new education reform package. (Page 21) Title I

The Secretary for Special Education has:

1. With the approval of Law 263 of 2006 - Institution of vocational and career evaluation for all students in the special education program, all students with disabilities eligible for special education services, from the 12 years must be evaluated by certified vocational and career professionals with the purpose of delineating their transition plan from school to adult life.

2. To that, in collaboration with the PRDE's Counseling Program, in their public policies, we determinate the administration and interpretation of occupational interests and occupational counseling for training in decision-making for the selection of occupational careers for all student with disabilities.

3. DEPR and the School of Rehabilitation Counseling of the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, has a collaboration agreement to have Rehabilitation Counseling Practitioners in the Special Education Service Centers of all educational regions for collaborate with the School Counselor in the administration, interpretation, and counseling to the students with moderate and severe disabilities eligible for the special education program. This agreement comes into effect in September 2018.

4. PRDE has the Transition Manual from the School to the Work, approved in 1992. That manual is a teacher guides related to the process of transition from school to work for students with moderate disabilities.

5. All students who have an IEP, from the age of 16, or before being necessary, his plan establish some different coordinated activities whose purpose is the development of skills aimed at the world of employment and adult life.

6. Students with mild and moderate disabilities who are located in the regular classroom, participate in the same activities as regular students. Like a CEPA tests, College Board exam, 40 hours of occupational exploration, etc. with the reasonable accommodations established in your Individualized Educational Program (PEI) or your Service Plan (PS).

7. The Secretary for Special Education, for the 2018-2019 school year, hired transition coordinators whose goal was to coordinate all services related to the transition process.

8. DEPR has an inter-agency agreement with the Department of Labor - Vocational Rehabilitation Administration, which establishes the responsibilities of each agency to achieve a successful transition of students with disabilities from PRDE to DT / ARV.

9. Beginning at age 16, all students eligible for special education receive orientation and guidance to the services offered by the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), which is the leading agency in the process of transitioning for the school to the world of employment.

10. ARV, in coordination with the PRDE, offer different hours of training during the school year for students with disabilities.

11. ARV, in coordination with the PRDE, every summer, develops pre-employment experiences for students with disabilities who participate in the application and interview process for these programs. (Page 94) Title II

This State Board rules, policies and statutes, are designed to ensure:

a. An occupational and technical education is equally available to all students and is of consistent quality throughout Puerto Rico;

b. The time and content of career and technical education are properly and flexibly coordinated with academic instruction;

c. Career and technical education is available to all student populations, particularly in high unemployment areas or where occupational re-training needs are required;

d. Career and technical education programs, as well as curriculum courses, are useful for your graduates to obtain employment or improve the quality of their employment;

e. Career and technical education programs will be coordinated with state programs related to education and training. This includes ensuring that graduates in career and technical education receive appropriate credit for the requirements of apprenticeship and professional licensing programs in order for them to pass their revalidation exams;

f. Regional occupational and technical education services are provided efficiently. ; and

g. Alternative curriculums, curricula and/or standards are developed to allow inclusion of students with disabilities, and funds may be used for the provision of the services required in the Individualized Education Plan (IEP), as required by federal law. (Page 110) Title II

The designated State unit’s plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.

In Puerto Rico, Act 51-1996, as amended, provides for the coordination between the Assistant Secretariat of Comprehensive Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities of the PRDE, and the PRVRA, among other agencies. In terms of the public policy and practices for the development and implementation of the IPE, the PRVRA has established a protocol in accordance with federal regulations (34 CFR 361.22(a)(2)). Before the student with disabilities exits the school system, a Written Intervention Plan (WIP), or IPE, must be developed. Its purpose is to formalize the management of the VR services provision process in coordination with educational agencies. This plan includes:

• Application of guides and programmatic procedures for the provision of services
• Beginning and ending date of services
• Employment outcomes (regular employment, supported employment, self-employment or any other innovative option)
• Projected date for the achievement of the employment outcome (Page 272) Title IV

• Evidence in the IPE of the participation of the consumer (his own words) regarding the informed choice process, self-management, and others actions taken during his VR process

In addition, the IPE contains those transition services that could be provided to the disabled student, under the sponsorship of the PRVRA, while participating from the educational services of the PRDE, and after exhausting the available comparable services and benefits. The following is a description of such services:

• Career exploration
• Vocational counseling
• Orientation, postsecondary education (university level options and summer camp programs, among others)
• Assessment of vocational interests, capabilities and pre-employment skills
• Evaluation with an ecological approach
• Workshops and job readiness orientation (job skills, job interviews and drafting of a resume, among others)
• Vocational training/post-secondary education
• Supported employment services
• Transportation, including training on the use of public transportation
• Mentoring
• Self-management
• Use of auxiliary aids and services (assistive technology equipment/devices and services) (Page 273) Title IV

• The VR counselor informs to the transition analyst, in writing, the determination taken in regard to the referred student. Then, the transition analyst informs the outcome of said determination to the school official.
• The VR counselor evaluates the disabled youth’s capability towards the achievement of either an employment outcome or a more independent living.
• The VR counselor, with the participation of the disabled youth, his family or representative, develops the IPE; in accordance with the needs of the youth and taking into consideration the services included in the WIP or IPE prior to his exit of the school system.
• The transition analyst gathers statistical data showing the following: orientations provided to school staff, students and parents; meetings of the Programming and Placement Committee; students referred to the PRVRA by the PRDE; and eligible students.
• The transition analyst participates, if necessary, in the drafting of the IEP by recommending areas to be worked on during the transition stages. (Page 274) Title IV

• Offer and coordinate the provision of necessary services for the transition process to the post-school life.
• Coordinate so that officials of agencies included in this agreement are able to provide orientation on the services offered by those agencies to the parents, the students and the school staff.
• Provide academic and vocational services to the population with disabilities in accordance with federal and state laws and regulations.
• Collaborate with the other subscribing agencies in their objective of providing services related to job placement and follow up in employment to the students until they reach 21 years of age or graduate from high school.
• Provide, through schools, the human resource for the development of necessary basic academic and occupational skills, according to the needs identified in vocational evaluation results and in accordance with the provisions of the IPE. (Page 275) Title IV

1. Transition process for students with disabilities begins at schools through orientation provided by the Transition Counselor (TC) of the VRA, to teachers, students with disabilities and/or parents. As a result, meetings of the Placement and Programming Committee (PPC) take place, and decisions are made about IPE recommendations. A plan of action is developed and the TC may accept the referral of the student with disabilities. (Page 276) Title IV

In Puerto Rico, the Assistant Secretariat of Comprehensive Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities and the PRVRA are located in two different state departments (PRDE and PRDOLHR). The first one is responsible for the implementation of Public Law 108-446, as amended, known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA); the second one is responsible for the implementation of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and State Law 97-2000, as amended, known as the Vocational Rehabilitation Law of Puerto Rico. In addition to the aforementioned legislation, we have State Law 51-1996, as amended, known as the Integral Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities, which provides for the coordination to be achieved between various local agencies to ensure an effective transition of disabled youth coming from the Department of Education. Both agencies maintain cooperative ties related to the development of their respective human resources and as such, have been planning, developing, offering and/or participating in numerous in-service training activities since 1987. Some of the topics covered in such training include: transition from school to work; vocational evaluation; supported employment; IDEIA; Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Public Law No. 101-336, as amended; Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Public Law 105-220 of August 7 of 1998, as amended; among others. In addition, both agencies are members of an Advisory Committee, which meets periodically to plan and join efforts in the development and implementation of transition services from school to work. (Page 290) Title IV

• Continue with the monthly monitoring of eligibility determinations within 60 days, and planning and signature of IPE within 90 days, of the transition-age youth referred to the PRVRA.
• Maintain the participation of the VR counselor in the meetings of the Programming and Placement Committee (PPC) on transition-age youth.
• Offer Pre-Employment Transition services.
• Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the centers of assessment and adjustment (CAAs).
• Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the centers of support and employment modes (CSEMs) and the results of these youth in the different modes of employment.
• Strengthen relationships between the PRDE and the PRVRA to facilitate the identification of students who can benefit from the transition services.
• Continue providing orientation to the school staff on the services of the PRVRA. (Page 312) Title IV

The Assessment and Adjustment Office, the Support and Employment Modes Office and the VR Counseling Services Office of the PRVRA, planned and coordinated a variety of activities leading toward developing Work-based learning experiences for students in their transition process, as required by WIOA.

235. In July of 2016 a closure activity was coordinated for the 10 students from transition who participated in the Work-based learning experience held in June of 2016 at the Program-Industry for the Blind and those with other physical, mental and developmental disabilities.
236. In June of 2017, seven (7) employers loaned their facilities, and 56 transition students from the 6 regions of the VRS participated in a Work-based learning experience. Previously, 9 meetings had been held for a total of 78 participants at the regional level regarding the corresponding planning.  (Page 320) Title IV

The Administrator’s Office:
237. Developed the project’s protocol: Work-based Learning Experiences in State Government Agencies that started in the month of July, 2017.
238. Developed a protocol to carry out the project: Pre-Employment Transition Services Fair.
Strategy:
o Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the Centers of Assessment and Adjustment (CAAs). (Page 321) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~i5. 101(d)(3)(B) the development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low—skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment:
i. Please, refer to section II(c)(1).

Goal 4 foresees to spur the development of sector strategies and career pathways by targeting opportunities in the public sector to resource the convening of partnerships. Strategy section aims to convene a working group to assist the State Board in developing support for sector strategies and career pathways. As mentioned above, Strategy section, addresses the utilization of proven methodologies provided by USDOL to aid in these efforts. PRDE’s programs (Title II and Carl D. Perkins supported CTE) will lead the way in pursuing the implementation of career pathways and providing the necessary insight to the State Board. The WDP and PRVRA will also support the effort by pursuing DEI funding. (Page 99) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Registered Apprenticeship will also be delivered as a career pathway for job seekers and as a job—driven strategy for employers and industries. As required, procedures will be implemented by the PRDOLHR to add Registered Apprenticeship programs to the State list of eligible training providers and to verify their status, considering timely data collection requirements on new programs, including information on occupations included in the program; method and length of instruction; and, number of active apprentices. (Page 201) Title II

Upon request, sponsors or institutions that offer training programs registered under the National Apprenticeship Act, will be automatically included and maintained on the list for as long as the program remains registered under the National Apprenticeship Act. On-the-job training, customized training, incumbent worker training, and transitional employment providers are not subject to the requirements of the eligible training provider provisions. Also exempted are services for which the Local Board determines that any of the following conditions are met:

• There are insufficient providers.

• There is a training services program with demonstrated effectiveness offered in the local area by a community-based organization or other private organization to serve individuals with barriers to employment as defined under section 3(34) of WIOA. (Page 202) Tile II

  1. National Dislocated Worker Grants (DWGs) awarded and coordination with state rapid response activities and FEMA, for temporary jobs.
  2. Progress made in implementing sector strategies and career pathways. The discussion may include: business engagement strategies; work-based learning (including apprenticeship); work experiences for youth and adults; transitional jobs; and incumbent worker training strategies and policies.
  3. Promising practices, lessons learned, and success stories that focus on: serving employers; communities; individuals with barriers to employment; at-risk and priority populations served, including out-of-school youth, low-income adults, dislocated workers, individuals who are basic skills deficient, individuals with limited language proficiency, individuals with disabilities, veterans, the long-term unemployed, and any other individuals with barriers to employment,

The annual report will also include activities at the State level:

  1. Rapid Response Services;
  2. Performance measure narrative section;
  3. Allowable activities with Governor set aside funds;
  4. National Dislocated Worker Grants: ZIKA; Irma and Maria Grant; Disability Grant (Page 168) Title III

3. VRA, in its search to comply with WIOA, has purchased the PR SAM Sample (Puerto Rico Skills Assessment Module) and the CIRINO Gerena Electronic Vocational Interest tests that will allow VRA to offer career exploration services to transition students between 14 to 21 years of age, and who are receiving, or have received, special education or Section 504 services under the Rehabilitation Law of 1973, as amended. 4. A Work-based Learning Experience was offered to 58 students with disabilities under 6 private employers in June of 2017. 5. In August of 2017, a service fair was held for students with disabilities under the Career Exploration Counseling category. (Page 267) Title IV

During the summer of 2017, 56 students with disabilities participated of a Work-based Learning Experience through coordination between PRVRA and employers. PRVRA will continue carrying out this type of activities during the next years. To reach more employers, the Centers of Support and Employment Modes (CSEM) and the Office of Support and Employment Modes (OSEM) will continue to offer orientations by region to different sectors: businesses, industrial and government. We expect to obtain from those employers collaboration to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities. Evaluation and Adjustment Centers staff of the PRVRA also performs work based evaluation processes for applicants/consumers of the VRA, including youth with disabilities, and will continue to do so with employers’ collaboration. Transition Analysts will support CSEM/OSEM to identify more schools that offer services to students and youth with disabilities as possible candidates for Supported Employment and Pre-Employment Transition Services. (Page 279-280) Title IV

The Assessment and Adjustment Office, the Support and Employment Modes Office and the VR Counseling Services Office of the PRVRA, planned and coordinated a variety of activities leading toward developing Work-based learning experiences for students in their transition process, as required by WIOA. 235. In July of 2016 a closure activity was coordinated for the 10 students from transition who participated in the Work-based learning experience held in June of 2016 at the Program-Industry for the Blind and those with other physical, mental and developmental disabilities. 236. In June of 2017, seven (7) employers loaned their facilities, and 56 transition students from the 6 regions of the VRS participated in a Work-based learning experience. Previously, 9 meetings had been held for a total of 78 participants at the regional level regarding the corresponding planning. (Page 320) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~In terms of service to individuals facing barriers to employment, counseling remains a key strategic activity across all core programs. Counselors has a specialized education coupled with years of experience and knowledge, and can provide information and guidance to clients on occupational requirements, employment opportunities, trends and other community resources that can benefit the job seekers.

As previously mentioned, seeking to activate the government entities' participation in key competitive programs aims to expand education, training and employment services to targeted populations. DEI, the qualification of local boards as Employment Networks under the Ticket to Work program, REO, Youthbuild, Job Plus, the expansion of activities for employment creation/retention under CDBG, are some of the targeted programs or activities.

Title II has a leading role in serving individuals with barriers to employment and ensuring their access to the labor force. To assist enhancing its service to these populations, the program will implement an Advisory Board to further fine-tuning and program improvements. (Page 93) Title II

The Government requires recipients to engage in work without delay unless exempted. Congress never extended to the Government the option of including on case-by-case basis families in which a non-recipient parent receives SSI, when the Aid to the Aged, Blind and Disabled (AABD) Programs in the states were converted to SSI. Accordingly, the Government considers the SSI and AABD Programs as the same in the context of the TANF Program.

The participant is required to register and seek employment through the PRDOLHR's Employment Service. Also, it is referred to engage in work activities, as directed in the Puerto Rico’s Work Verification Plan. Most TANF recipients must comply with at least 30 hours a week of work participation. To verify countable hours, the participant must submit the time sheet to the case manager, which must be signed by his work activity supervisor. (Page 119) Title II

Employment and training programs administered by the Social Security Administration, including the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program established under section 1148 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1320b—19)

Through the issuance of local planning and certification guidance, the State Board will encourage local boards and operators to become engaged in the Ticket to Work program as qualified Employment Networks. Puerto Rico's serviced by 66 employment networks; nevertheless, just one (Caguas Guayama) out of the 15 local workforce areas is currently qualified as an Employment Network.

The PRVRA continues receiving referrals from the Ticket to Work Program for the purpose of providing vocational rehabilitation services. In addition, the PRVRA established an agreement with the Caribbean Center of Work Incentives Planning Assistance (CWIPA) to provide benefits planning service to the consumers of the PRVRA who are beneficiaries of the Social Security Disability Insurance. This service is expected to help these beneficiaries in decision-making regarding the benefits of reintegrating into the labor market. (Page 121) Title III

Strategies:
• Strengthen the coordination with the PRDOLHR to know employment trends and types of employers.
• Continue implementing employment projects through the development of self-employments.
• Continue with the programmatic monitoring interventions and technical assistance to the CRPs, to ensure quality and agility in the services to the consumers with the most significant disabilities.
• Continue the participation of the PRVRA consumers in employment-related activities available in the American Job Centers and other components of WIOA.
• Continue referring consumers, who are beneficiaries of the Social Security Disability Insurance, to the Caribbean Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (CWIPA) Program for the counseling service for benefits planning.
• Share with the PRSRC the Normative Communications governing the provision of services.
• Continue with the programmatic monitoring interventions of the services provision process to ensure compliance with the public policy.
• Continue offering technical assistance to the supervisory staff of counseling services to improve decision-making in case management.
• Refer the PRVRA consumers to the services of other components of WIOA (Title I, Title II Employment Service and other programs) to expand their job skills.

Goal 2
Ensure the provision of services to eligible youth with disabilities, and pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities coming from transition, so that they are able to achieve an employment outcome. (Page 311) Title IV

VRA gave: orientation to employers on salary incentives, affirmative actions and VRA services; technical assistance regarding the “Ticket-to-Work” Program. 4,417 employers were contacted, including small business so that they would come forward and recruit VRA consumers.

Strategy:
• Continue with the granting of salary incentives to employers in order to promote employment opportunities for VRA’s consumers.

Progress Report:
VRA formalized 10 wage-incentive contracts, where 18 consumers benefitted.

Strategy:
• Continue with the participation in the meetings of the State Board of WIOA (Page 322) Title IV

The Government requires recipients to engage in work without delay unless exempted. Congress never extended to the Government the option of including on case-by-case basis families in which a non-recipient parent receives SSI, when the Aid to the Aged, Blind and Disabled (AABD) Programs in the states were converted to SSI. Accordingly, the Government considers the SSI and AABD Programs as the same in the context of the TANF Program.

The participant is required to register and seek employment through the PRDOLHR's Employment Service. Also, it is referred to engage in work activities, as directed in the Puerto Rico’s Work Verification Plan. Most TANF recipients must comply with at least 30 hours a week of work participation. To verify countable hours, the participant must submit the time sheet to the case manager, which must be signed by his work activity supervisor. (Page 119) Title IV

QCPMO in collaboration with the State Rehabilitation Council carried out the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment.

VRCSO gave orientation about the Employment Networks for Social Security Disability Insurance Beneficiaries, at the ACAA facilities [Administración de Compensaciones por Accidentes de Automóviles]; and also, on VRA services given to the Department of Justice staff, as well as to the Department of Education.

So that new agencies could submit new proposals to the VRA to offer supported employment services to consumers with the most significant disabilities, OSEM gave orientation to the following enterprises: “Programa Florece la Montaña”; Pentaq Manufacturing Corporation; and the Moretta Díaz Corporation.

Assessment and Adjustment Office (OAA, Spanish acronym) provided information about interpreting services for the deaf to Interamerican University’s internship students. (Page 324) Title IV

 

Employer/ Business

~~The flexibility afforded by WIOA will be used to engage and expand the amount and type of training providers. For instance, the implementation of the Registered Apprenticeship program could allow the involvement of unions, trade associations as well as established providers like IHEs and community colleges as training providers.

As required under WIOA, the State maintains a publicly accessible list of eligible training providers and their eligible training programs, including relevant performance and cost information. The State Board adopted procedures for initial determination of eligibility and subsequent certification of training providers. (Page 137) Title II

As directed under WIOA, the initial eligibility of any provider will be valid for the period of one year.

Section C(II)(b) of the Governor’s procedures outlines the roles of the State and local areas in receiving and reviewing provider applications to decide if continued eligibility is granted. Newly eligible training providers that were determined to be eligible by transitioning into WIOA were subjected to the application procedure for continued eligibility before their initial year of eligibility expired. Applicants applying for continued eligibility are required to provide information to assess the following parameters:

• Performance accountability measures described in secs. 116(b)(2)(A)(i)(I) through (IV) of WIOA, including unsubsidized employment (Second Quarter after Exit), unsubsidized employment (Second Quarter after Exit), Median Earnings and Credential Attainment. If data is not yet available, compliance with the following alternate factors, as applicable: at least 75% of participants completing the program during the last two academic years; or, at least 70% of participants employed in the occupations related to the training program during the last two academic years, 60% if the occupation requires licensure. (Page 204) Title IV

The WDP will notify its determination to the Local Board. If the program is determined not to be eligible, the WDP will detail the reasons for its decision. The Local Board will notify the provider the determination of the WDP and, if it were adverse, the reasons for denial and information regarding the appeals process before the State Board, as provided under section E(II) of the State procedures.

As specified under E(I) of the State procedures, either the Local Board or the WDP might deny the provider its eligibility if the provider does not comply with the performance levels negotiated for the Local Area; or, if it fails to submit a complete proposal or is not authorized to operate, as might be required. For eligible programs, continued eligibility will be in effect for two (2) years. As required under WIOA and section D(II) of the State procedures, a training provider must deliver results and provide accurate information in order to retain its status as an eligible training provider. At least every two years, the WDP, in consultation with the Local Board might remove the provider from the list of approved providers for false reporting, for substantially violating a provision of title I of WIOA or its implementing regulations including non-discrimination provisions, failure to meet required performance outcomes, or debarment. The biennial review will also include verification of the registration status of registered apprenticeship programs. (Page 205) Title IV

Data Collection

• Integration of the local boards in the service—delivery model mandated by WIOA, including common intake, common outreach strategies and initiatives, universal service across the region, common performance measures (optional), identification of additional grants and fund opportunities, cost allocation plan, and MOU structure with required and optional partners, among other factors. (Page 183) Title II

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The effectiveness of the strategic framework will be assessed and tested according to procedures being mandated for each program and the system collectively. As prescribed under section 361.800 of the proposed rule One-Stop Centers and one-stop delivery systems will be certified for effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility, and continuous improvement, and as directed, these evaluations will take into account feedback from the One Stop network customers. (Page 84)

As required under section 677.160 of the proposed rule, the programs will be assessed on the basis of their negotiated levels of performance. Section 116(d)(2) of WIOA requires the State submit a performance report that will contain information on the actual performance levels achieved consistent with the proposed rule 677.175. The State will comply with these requirements and the implementing guidance to be jointly issued by the USDOL and the USDOE, which may include information on reportable individuals as determined by the Secretaries.

All programs must be evaluated in terms of their compliance with basic threshold requirements, including programmatic and physical accessibility. One-Stop certification guidance will be reviewed to include relevant measures for assessing partner performance. Additionally, as required under WIOA, guidance issued by USDOL, USDOE and other program grantors, and the goals and accountability measures included in regional and local plans. (Page 158) Title II

• Total number of participants who exited each of the core programs, including disaggregated counts of those who participated in and exited a core program by individuals with barriers to employment

• Demographics Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. (Page 171-172) Title I

The Commonwealth’s policies are consistent down to the level of Local Board governance structure. Circular Letter WIOA-2-2015 requires the appointment of a standing committee to provide information and assist the board with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities. Those might include issues relating to compliance with section 188 and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding the provision of programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the One-Stop Delivery System, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing support for or accommodation to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. The Commonwealth is one of 26 jurisdictions yet to benefit from the implementation of the DOL’s Disability Employment Initiative. As enunciated in the State Plan it will seek to join in the DOL’s initiative in order to expand the capacity of the workforce system to increase the number of individuals with disabilities participating in existing career pathways and programs. (Page 172) Title I

As established in the State Plan, Title I and the PRVRA will lead a comprehensive effort to adapt the recommendations of the USDOL’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) contained in its "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: a Section 188 Disability Reference Guide". All local areas will be required to implement the resulting guidance adopted by the State Board as part of the local area certification and the operator’s competitive selection processes. Also, ODEP’s recommendations in regards to expanding the participation of people with disabilities in the workforce by means of the Registered Apprenticeship program will be furthered through the SAA’s implementing regulations. Presently, the State Board’s monitoring guidance includes the following criteria for testing physical and programmatic accessibility of the One-Stop Centers:

• One-Stop Centers shall facilitate the availability and ease of access of both self-serviced and assisted methods, including computer for resume preparation, Internet to search for job opportunities, telephone to contact employers, fax for sending resumes to employers with job opportunities, printed and digital information on employment and career opportunities, and printed and digital information on financial assistance for studies. Compliance will be assessed through inspections of the self-service system, and the procedures adopted. (Page 173) Title II

The One-Stop Centers’ staff will be fully aware of non-discrimination and physical and programmatic accessibility mandates. The direct customer service staff will also be trained to follow intake procedures to ensure that adequate, voluntary and confidential information on a customer’s disability is collected and recorded and to manage the corresponding service protocol. Memorandums of Understanding will be advanced in order to delineate the roles of the operators, partner programs, and other programs that might be able to provide assistance, aids or services to persons with disabilities. Act 136 of 1996 requires that all government agencies provide an interpreter to assist persons with hearing impairments that prevent oral communication and limit their access to services, using the services of the Sign Language Communication training program offered by the Continued Education Program of Office of the Commonwealth’s Training and Labor Affairs Advisory and Human Resources Administration Office. At a basic level, cross-training on sign language will be readily facilitated by the PRVRA to One-Stop Centers’ staff in charge of customer service to aid in the referral to the PRVRA of hearing impaired customers that might appear to be eligible and in need of PRVRA services. (Page 174) Title II

Providing Rapid Response services under the Dislocated Workers program. • Providing assistance to State entities and agencies, local areas, and One—Stop Centers partners in carrying out the activities described in the State Unified Plan.

  • Providing technical assistance to local areas for carrying out the regional planning and service delivery efforts required under section 106(c).
  • Providing technical assistance to local areas that fail to meet local performance accountability measures described in section 116(c).
  • Providing assistance to local areas operating a fiscal and management accountability information system in accordance with section 116(i).
  • Monitoring and overseeing activities.
  • Disseminating the State list of eligible providers of training services.
  • Disseminating information identifying eligible providers for on—the—job training, customized training, incumbent worker training, internships, paid or unpaid work experience opportunities, or transitional jobs. • Disseminating information on effective service delivery strategies to serve workers and job seekers.
  • Disseminating performance information and information on the cost of attendance (including tuition and fees) for participants in applicable programs, as described in subsections (d) and (h) of section 122.
  • Disseminating information on physical and programmatic accessibility, in accordance with section188, if applicable, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), for individuals with disabilities.
  • Completing program and service delivery evaluations. (Page 195) Title II

It would be most appropriate to award a contract to an IHE or other eligible provider of training services in order to facilitate the training of multiple individuals in in-demand industry sectors or occupations, and such contract does not limit customer choice.

  • The Local Board provides training services through a pay-for-performance contract. Any educational provider seeking initial eligibility determination must complete the application and submit the required information electronically to the Local Board. Providers might submit an application at any time during the year. Applicants are required to provide the following information:
  • Specification of in-demand industry sectors and occupations aligned with their training services
  • Evidence of the financial stability of the provider or institution
  • If applicable, evidence of State license to operate issued by the PREC, for each location where the training program will be offered
  • Information addressing factors related to the indicators of performance, as described in secs. 116(b)(2)(A)(i)(I) through (IV) of WIOA, including unsubsidized employment (second quarter after exit), unsubsidized employment (fourth quarter after exit), median earnings, and credentials attainment.
  • Information concerning whether the provider is in a partnership with businesses providing employment, including information about the quality and quantity of employer partnerships • Information to demonstrate if program of training services leads to an industry recognized credential and/or recognized post-secondary credential
  • Evidence to demonstrate compliance with the legal and regulatory provisions on equal opportunity and non-discrimination, reasonable accommodation and physical and programmatic accessibility (Page 203) Title II
Vets

Gold Card Initiative

The Gold Card provides unemployed post-9/11 era veterans with the intensive and follow-up services they need to succeed in today's job market. The Gold Card initiative is a joint effort of the DOLETA and the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS). ETA and VETS have developed a series of enhanced intensive services, including follow-up services, to identify those barriers to employment faced by veterans of post 9/11 era. The services, when provided under the Priority of Services to Veterans, are designed to overcome those barriers and to reinsert our 9/11 era veterans the labor workforce.

Due to the high unemployment rate faced by our veteran population, “Gold Card” services are available to veterans to help them obtain the necessary help to reinsert them in the labor market as soon as possible. An eligible veteran can present the Gold Card at his/her local One-Stop Career Center to receive enhanced intensive services including up to six months of follow-up. Information about the “Gold Card” initiative might be found at http://www.dol.gov/vets/goldcard.html. On this web site veterans might have the opportunity to print their “Gold Card” certificate and obtain information about how to access the available services.

The enhanced in-person services available for Gold Card holders at local One-Stop Career Centers may include:

  • Job readiness assessment, including interviews and testing
  • Development of an Individual Development Plan (IDP)
  • Career guidance through group or individual counseling that helps veterans in making training and career decisions
  • Provision of labor market, occupational, and skills transferability information that inform educational, training, and occupational decisions • Referral to job banks, job portals, and job openings • Referral to employers and registered apprenticeship sponsors
  • Referral to training by WIA-funded or third party service providers
  • Monthly follow-up by an assigned case manager for up to six months Employment and training activities carried out under the Community Services Block Grant Act (42 U.S.C. 9901 et seq.) (Page 116) Title II
Mental Health

~~11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;
12. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participants outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance; and
13. Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs.  (Page I63) Title IV

32. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with Section 116) and to monitor program performance;
33. Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs (Integrated English Literacy and Civics Education) (Page 250) Title IV

This Advisory Council of Substance Abuse and Mental Health of Puerto Rico is composed of government agencies, mental health patients and family members. It is supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (ASSMCA, by its Spanish acronym). This is the organization selected by the Health Insurance Administration of Puerto Rico to carry out operational functions of the Health Plan and offer treatment for mental health conditions, alcohol and drug abuse in the San Juan and Western regions. The PRVRA is a mandatory member of this council and participates in the planning for the provision of these services.

PRVRA participates as a member of the Advisory Council of Substance Abuse and Mental Health of Puerto Rico. The Council’s mission is to promote compliance with federal public law and the public policy of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, in order to offer adequate mental health and substance abuse services and promote a better quality of life for people and their families. The Council’s objectives are to:

1. Participate in the writing and implementation of the Block Grant, in accordance with Section 1915 (a) of the federal law. 2. Participate in the development of the State Plan for the Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Administration. 3. Review and evaluate adequacy and distribution of mental health and substance abuse services in PR to identify service needs. 

Advocate for people with mental health and substance abuse disabilities in PR, in order to guarantee establishment of a high quality integrated service system. (Page 280-281) Title IV

Youth are enrolled in the Foster Care program at age 14. They must be attending school, must not bear dispositive measures pursuant to Act 88-1986 (Youth Offenders Act), should not have disabling mental health conditions and must be subject to the temporary or permanent custody of the PRDOF. An intermediate program stage comprises individuals age 16 to 18, followed by a completion or exit stage for 19 to 21 year old. Through the stages, training and workshop activities in the independent living program are geared towards preparing participants to face adulthood. Topics involve money management, sex education, violence, rights and responsibilities, as well as moral and spiritual values.

As part of its 2015-2019 Child and Family Service Plan, the PRDOF targeted the youth in transition as a population in greater risk of maltreatment, particularly youth who have been in foster care that face even greater challenges because they have grown up with hardships that constitute risk factors. The Foster Care Independent Living Program empowers the youths in making a satisfactory transition to self-sufficiency by providing a continuum of services which includes: educational and/or vocational training; career planning; job preparation, search and retention, skills development; health; housing; ability to work as a member of a team; prevention of substance use/abuse (drugs, alcohol & tobacco); activities to develop emotional maturity; counseling to promote management of unresolved emotional problems; violence prevention; skills in identifying and accessing services; parenting skills development; orientation on legal rights and responsibilities; cultural awareness activities; workshops and counseling to develop a sense of moral social responsibility; socialization skills development (conflict resolution, problem solving, anger management, communication skills); and mentoring. (Page 55) Title IV

The program also coordinates program or supportive services with other entities, including those offered by the Youth Development Program at PRDEDC; the provision of health care services, including mental health services with the Department of Health and prevention programs administered by the Government’s Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; PRDOH's help in finding subsidize housing; services to victims of or at-risk of domestic violence, such as counseling, referrals and hot-line services, and shelter alternatives to victims offered by the Women’s Advocate Office; childcare and developmental services for pre-school children of TANF participants engaged in activities approved by the program, offered through service providers; and referral of participants to enroll in the PRCEC's and the Economic Development Bank to benefit from programs targeting self-employment and entrepreneurship, among other. (Page 121) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Each outreach staff establishes a list of available resources and develops partnerships with local organizations serving MSFWs. Resources include, but are not limited to: Department of Health, Farmworker Health Program, State Workers Compensation, Migrant Legal Services, PathStone Corporation, Department of Education for Adult Literacy, ESL and GED services to MSFWs. Career centers will collaborate with LWDBs to ensure MSFWs have training opportunities for jobs in demand in the area. We believe there are enough resources for Outreach but will continue to seek for additional resources that meets MSFWs needs as they are identified. (Page 232) Title III

Verifying priority of service status through the required paperwork is not mandatory unless the covered persons undergo eligibility determination or if the applicable federal program rules require the verification on site. Once priority of service is determined, covered persons move ahead of the line to receive the appropriate employment, training and placement services over the non—covered persons as required by law and as stated by VPL 07—09. Some Unemployment Insurance offices have adopted this priority of service model from the Employment Service although not mandated by law. Local areas will continue to encourage the provision of additional priority services and information to veterans, including priority access to job orders and individual training accounts (ITAs).

Other steps that will ensure priority of service to veterans include: training staff members; periodic reception and labor exchange staff reinforcement; DVOP/LVER preferential access to job opportunities; placement of signs in waiting areas stating veterans’ preference in all offices; a brief orientation (in the morning and afternoons) to clients waiting to be served at the reception area related to the priority to veterans offered; distribution of printed informative material; and data and report validation. (Page 171) Title II

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Vocational Rehabilitation invests in new technology to handle their cases (used Google translate for Spanish to English translation) - 11/04/2019

"In order to comply with the new federal regulations, the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), began [on November 11, 2019], its implementation plan for a new electronic system for handling cases of applicants and consumers potentially eligible for our services, as announced by administrator Madeline Hernández Dipiní. ” 

(Used Google translate for Spanish to English translation of quote. Citation link leads to a document in Spanish.)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transforming Lives through Supported Employment grants (Short Title: Supported Employment Program) - 03/18/2019

~~“The purpose of the program is to support state and community efforts to refine, implement, and sustain evidence-based supported employment programs and mutually compatible and supportive evidence-based practices (e.g., supported education) for transition-aged youth/young adults (ages 16-25) with serious emotional disturbance (SED), and adults with serious mental illness (SMI) or co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (COD). SAMHSA expects that this program will increase state and community capacity to implement and sustain Supported Employment Program (SEP) models and integrated supports to improve competitive employment outcomes for individuals with SED, SMI, or COD….

Eligible applicants are domestic public and private nonprofit entities. For example:State governments; the District of Columbia, Guam, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau are also eligible to apply.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Puerto Rico differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The Puerto Rico Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The Puerto Rico Department of Health is the single state agency, and they have a cooperative agreement with the Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration (PRHIA) also known as Administracion de Seguros Salud de Puerto Rico (ASES) which implements and administers island-wide health insurance system. Approximately half of Puerto Rico's 3.5 million residents have low incomes and depend upon the public health system for their medical care.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $5.4 billion in Medicaid funding to Puerto Rico.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Puerto Rico, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Puerto Rico’s FMAP to 57.2%.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Services Offered by the San Juan Regional Office - 01/01/2019

~~“VA’s San Juan Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. We offer the following additional services:

Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to applyInformation about VA health care and memorial benefitsOutreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women VeteransPublic affairs”

Systems
  • Other

The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“ARV provides services to people with eligible impairments, so that they can prepare, obtain, retain, or maintain a job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Puerto Rico for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“Persons with disabilities in Puerto Rico achieve greater independence, are empowered and take control of their lives in order to increase their integration, inclusion, equality and access to the services and resources in the community according to the following Goals.Goal 1Persons with disabilities have the necessary independent living services and other complementary services.Goal 2Persons with disabilities exercise control in decision-making and intercede for system changes.Goal 3The community at large knows about the independent living philosophy and services” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Services Offered by the San Juan Regional Office - 01/01/2019

~~“VA’s San Juan Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. We offer the following additional services:

Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to applyInformation about VA health care and memorial benefitsOutreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women VeteransPublic affairs”

Systems
  • Other

The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“ARV provides services to people with eligible impairments, so that they can prepare, obtain, retain, or maintain a job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Puerto Rico for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“Persons with disabilities in Puerto Rico achieve greater independence, are empowered and take control of their lives in order to increase their integration, inclusion, equality and access to the services and resources in the community according to the following Goals.Goal 1Persons with disabilities have the necessary independent living services and other complementary services.Goal 2Persons with disabilities exercise control in decision-making and intercede for system changes.Goal 3The community at large knows about the independent living philosophy and services” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Vocational Rehabilitation invests in new technology to handle their cases (used Google translate for Spanish to English translation) - 11/04/2019

"In order to comply with the new federal regulations, the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), began [on November 11, 2019], its implementation plan for a new electronic system for handling cases of applicants and consumers potentially eligible for our services, as announced by administrator Madeline Hernández Dipiní. ” 

(Used Google translate for Spanish to English translation of quote. Citation link leads to a document in Spanish.)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transforming Lives through Supported Employment grants (Short Title: Supported Employment Program) - 03/18/2019

~~“The purpose of the program is to support state and community efforts to refine, implement, and sustain evidence-based supported employment programs and mutually compatible and supportive evidence-based practices (e.g., supported education) for transition-aged youth/young adults (ages 16-25) with serious emotional disturbance (SED), and adults with serious mental illness (SMI) or co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (COD). SAMHSA expects that this program will increase state and community capacity to implement and sustain Supported Employment Program (SEP) models and integrated supports to improve competitive employment outcomes for individuals with SED, SMI, or COD….

Eligible applicants are domestic public and private nonprofit entities. For example:State governments; the District of Columbia, Guam, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau are also eligible to apply.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Puerto Rico differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The Puerto Rico Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The Puerto Rico Department of Health is the single state agency, and they have a cooperative agreement with the Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration (PRHIA) also known as Administracion de Seguros Salud de Puerto Rico (ASES) which implements and administers island-wide health insurance system. Approximately half of Puerto Rico's 3.5 million residents have low incomes and depend upon the public health system for their medical care.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $5.4 billion in Medicaid funding to Puerto Rico.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Puerto Rico, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Puerto Rico’s FMAP to 57.2%.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

"Rich Port": Where the richness of having a competitive job at a living wage is possible for all people with disabilities.

2018 State Population.
-4.44%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,195,153
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.71%
Change from
2017 to 2018
328,525
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.36%
Change from
2017 to 2018
76,210
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-3.49%
Change from
2017 to 2018
23.20%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
4.54%
Change from
2017 to 2018
55.48%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 3,411,307 3,337,177 3,195,153
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 354,695 340,717 328,525
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 78,826 81,820 76,210
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 929,500 879,100 885,794
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 22.22% 24.01% 23.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 54.86% 52.96% 55.48%
State/National unemployment rate. 12.00% 10.80% 8.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 47.80% 48.20% 46.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 42.30% 43.40% 42.20%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 334,810 332,908 310,024
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 386,625 380,567 365,294
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 493,901 484,751 441,128
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 78,542 78,302 76,704
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 714,713 708,258 667,268
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 1,932 2,194 1,208
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,246 N/A 1,059
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 34,831 46,802 45,669
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 110,983 100,765 109,485

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 156,044 151,590

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 188 216
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 634 592
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 1,694 1,411
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 11.10% 15.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 7.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 0.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 6.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 32.50% 14.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A 77
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A 9
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A 71
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 589 145

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
5,009
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 201 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 204 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,143 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,098 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,082 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 281 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,825 1,873 1,998
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 181,771 169,691 165,205
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 76.27% 72.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.64% 9.22%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.30% 2.23%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.37% 99.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 57.46% 51.10%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 69.83% 65.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 84.58% 87.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 12.37% 14.36%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~In terms of service to individuals facing barriers to employment, counseling remains a key strategic activity across all core programs. Counselors has a specialized education coupled with years of experience and knowledge, and can provide information and guidance to clients on occupational requirements, employment opportunities, trends and other community resources that can benefit the job seekers.

As previously mentioned, seeking to activate the government entities' participation in key competitive programs aims to expand education, training and employment services to targeted populations. DEI, the qualification of local boards as Employment Networks under the Ticket to Work program, REO, Youthbuild, Job Plus, the expansion of activities for employment creation/retention under CDBG, are some of the targeted programs or activities.

Title II has a leading role in serving individuals with barriers to employment and ensuring their access to the labor force. To assist enhancing its service to these populations, the program will implement an Advisory Board to further fine-tuning and program improvements. (Page 93) Title I

i. Please, see information corresponding to 101(d)(2), above.
5. 101(d)(3)(B) the development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low—skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment:
i. Please, refer to section II(c)(1).

Goal 4 foresees to spur the development of sector strategies and career pathways by targeting opportunities in the public sector to resource the convening of partnerships. Strategy section aims to convene a working group to assist the State Board in developing support for sector strategies and career pathways. As mentioned above, Strategy section, addresses the utilization of proven methodologies provided by USDOL to aid in these efforts. PRDE’s programs (Title II and Carl D. Perkins supported CTE) will lead the way in pursuing the implementation of career pathways and providing the necessary insight to the State Board. The WDP and PRVRA will also support the effort by pursuing DEI funding. (Page 99) Title II

An enhanced coordination with the PREC will allow the harvesting of data being supplied by educational institutions under local and federal mandates to retrofit the educational and workforce systems. Additional opportunities could arise by devising ways in which the Council's State student financial assistance programs support the strategies of the system.

Local areas will be encouraged to leverage the resources of required partners to support the delivery of integrated services, through financial and non-financial agreements. Many of the arrangements for sharing other state resources must be worked out in detail at local level involving other agencies and the local One-Stop Centers’ partners, through MOUs.

A key strategy in leveraging other Federal investments that have enhanced access to workforce development programs at educational institutions is to equip the State Board to manage the function of identifying and seeking additional or dormant competitive funding opportunities that can benefit any component of the workforce development system. DEI and REO, among others, represent additional opportunities. To that end, the State is committed to advance the designation of the local boards as 501(c)(3) tax-exempted non-for profits to leverage non-traditional sources of grant funding. (Page 138) Title II
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Competitive graduates with knowledge and skills needed to adapt to changes in the economy, environment, and technology. Education is a cornerstone of Puerto Rico’s economy, society, and political systems. Its purpose is to build and sustain the knowledge and skills needed to ensure that individuals, communities and key institutions can adapt to changes in the world economy, the environment, and technology.

The Government of Puerto Rico now has the opportunity to fundamentally transform its education system in a way that improves student outcomes, supports the development of children, youth and adults, and supports its vision of economic and social development moving forward.

1. Upgrade school infrastructure to support resilience and sustainability

2. Increase K—12 access to vocational, technical, and career education and strengthen school-to-work transitions

3. Promote pre-school and out-of-school learning opportunities

4. Strengthen systems to support new education reform package. (Page 21) Title I

The Secretary for Special Education has:

1. With the approval of Law 263 of 2006 - Institution of vocational and career evaluation for all students in the special education program, all students with disabilities eligible for special education services, from the 12 years must be evaluated by certified vocational and career professionals with the purpose of delineating their transition plan from school to adult life.

2. To that, in collaboration with the PRDE's Counseling Program, in their public policies, we determinate the administration and interpretation of occupational interests and occupational counseling for training in decision-making for the selection of occupational careers for all student with disabilities.

3. DEPR and the School of Rehabilitation Counseling of the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, has a collaboration agreement to have Rehabilitation Counseling Practitioners in the Special Education Service Centers of all educational regions for collaborate with the School Counselor in the administration, interpretation, and counseling to the students with moderate and severe disabilities eligible for the special education program. This agreement comes into effect in September 2018.

4. PRDE has the Transition Manual from the School to the Work, approved in 1992. That manual is a teacher guides related to the process of transition from school to work for students with moderate disabilities.

5. All students who have an IEP, from the age of 16, or before being necessary, his plan establish some different coordinated activities whose purpose is the development of skills aimed at the world of employment and adult life.

6. Students with mild and moderate disabilities who are located in the regular classroom, participate in the same activities as regular students. Like a CEPA tests, College Board exam, 40 hours of occupational exploration, etc. with the reasonable accommodations established in your Individualized Educational Program (PEI) or your Service Plan (PS).

7. The Secretary for Special Education, for the 2018-2019 school year, hired transition coordinators whose goal was to coordinate all services related to the transition process.

8. DEPR has an inter-agency agreement with the Department of Labor - Vocational Rehabilitation Administration, which establishes the responsibilities of each agency to achieve a successful transition of students with disabilities from PRDE to DT / ARV.

9. Beginning at age 16, all students eligible for special education receive orientation and guidance to the services offered by the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), which is the leading agency in the process of transitioning for the school to the world of employment.

10. ARV, in coordination with the PRDE, offer different hours of training during the school year for students with disabilities.

11. ARV, in coordination with the PRDE, every summer, develops pre-employment experiences for students with disabilities who participate in the application and interview process for these programs. (Page 94) Title II

This State Board rules, policies and statutes, are designed to ensure:

a. An occupational and technical education is equally available to all students and is of consistent quality throughout Puerto Rico;

b. The time and content of career and technical education are properly and flexibly coordinated with academic instruction;

c. Career and technical education is available to all student populations, particularly in high unemployment areas or where occupational re-training needs are required;

d. Career and technical education programs, as well as curriculum courses, are useful for your graduates to obtain employment or improve the quality of their employment;

e. Career and technical education programs will be coordinated with state programs related to education and training. This includes ensuring that graduates in career and technical education receive appropriate credit for the requirements of apprenticeship and professional licensing programs in order for them to pass their revalidation exams;

f. Regional occupational and technical education services are provided efficiently. ; and

g. Alternative curriculums, curricula and/or standards are developed to allow inclusion of students with disabilities, and funds may be used for the provision of the services required in the Individualized Education Plan (IEP), as required by federal law. (Page 110) Title II

The designated State unit’s plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.

In Puerto Rico, Act 51-1996, as amended, provides for the coordination between the Assistant Secretariat of Comprehensive Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities of the PRDE, and the PRVRA, among other agencies. In terms of the public policy and practices for the development and implementation of the IPE, the PRVRA has established a protocol in accordance with federal regulations (34 CFR 361.22(a)(2)). Before the student with disabilities exits the school system, a Written Intervention Plan (WIP), or IPE, must be developed. Its purpose is to formalize the management of the VR services provision process in coordination with educational agencies. This plan includes:

• Application of guides and programmatic procedures for the provision of services
• Beginning and ending date of services
• Employment outcomes (regular employment, supported employment, self-employment or any other innovative option)
• Projected date for the achievement of the employment outcome (Page 272) Title IV

• Evidence in the IPE of the participation of the consumer (his own words) regarding the informed choice process, self-management, and others actions taken during his VR process

In addition, the IPE contains those transition services that could be provided to the disabled student, under the sponsorship of the PRVRA, while participating from the educational services of the PRDE, and after exhausting the available comparable services and benefits. The following is a description of such services:

• Career exploration
• Vocational counseling
• Orientation, postsecondary education (university level options and summer camp programs, among others)
• Assessment of vocational interests, capabilities and pre-employment skills
• Evaluation with an ecological approach
• Workshops and job readiness orientation (job skills, job interviews and drafting of a resume, among others)
• Vocational training/post-secondary education
• Supported employment services
• Transportation, including training on the use of public transportation
• Mentoring
• Self-management
• Use of auxiliary aids and services (assistive technology equipment/devices and services) (Page 273) Title IV

• The VR counselor informs to the transition analyst, in writing, the determination taken in regard to the referred student. Then, the transition analyst informs the outcome of said determination to the school official.
• The VR counselor evaluates the disabled youth’s capability towards the achievement of either an employment outcome or a more independent living.
• The VR counselor, with the participation of the disabled youth, his family or representative, develops the IPE; in accordance with the needs of the youth and taking into consideration the services included in the WIP or IPE prior to his exit of the school system.
• The transition analyst gathers statistical data showing the following: orientations provided to school staff, students and parents; meetings of the Programming and Placement Committee; students referred to the PRVRA by the PRDE; and eligible students.
• The transition analyst participates, if necessary, in the drafting of the IEP by recommending areas to be worked on during the transition stages. (Page 274) Title IV

• Offer and coordinate the provision of necessary services for the transition process to the post-school life.
• Coordinate so that officials of agencies included in this agreement are able to provide orientation on the services offered by those agencies to the parents, the students and the school staff.
• Provide academic and vocational services to the population with disabilities in accordance with federal and state laws and regulations.
• Collaborate with the other subscribing agencies in their objective of providing services related to job placement and follow up in employment to the students until they reach 21 years of age or graduate from high school.
• Provide, through schools, the human resource for the development of necessary basic academic and occupational skills, according to the needs identified in vocational evaluation results and in accordance with the provisions of the IPE. (Page 275) Title IV

1. Transition process for students with disabilities begins at schools through orientation provided by the Transition Counselor (TC) of the VRA, to teachers, students with disabilities and/or parents. As a result, meetings of the Placement and Programming Committee (PPC) take place, and decisions are made about IPE recommendations. A plan of action is developed and the TC may accept the referral of the student with disabilities. (Page 276) Title IV

In Puerto Rico, the Assistant Secretariat of Comprehensive Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities and the PRVRA are located in two different state departments (PRDE and PRDOLHR). The first one is responsible for the implementation of Public Law 108-446, as amended, known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA); the second one is responsible for the implementation of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and State Law 97-2000, as amended, known as the Vocational Rehabilitation Law of Puerto Rico. In addition to the aforementioned legislation, we have State Law 51-1996, as amended, known as the Integral Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities, which provides for the coordination to be achieved between various local agencies to ensure an effective transition of disabled youth coming from the Department of Education. Both agencies maintain cooperative ties related to the development of their respective human resources and as such, have been planning, developing, offering and/or participating in numerous in-service training activities since 1987. Some of the topics covered in such training include: transition from school to work; vocational evaluation; supported employment; IDEIA; Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Public Law No. 101-336, as amended; Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Public Law 105-220 of August 7 of 1998, as amended; among others. In addition, both agencies are members of an Advisory Committee, which meets periodically to plan and join efforts in the development and implementation of transition services from school to work. (Page 290) Title IV

• Continue with the monthly monitoring of eligibility determinations within 60 days, and planning and signature of IPE within 90 days, of the transition-age youth referred to the PRVRA.
• Maintain the participation of the VR counselor in the meetings of the Programming and Placement Committee (PPC) on transition-age youth.
• Offer Pre-Employment Transition services.
• Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the centers of assessment and adjustment (CAAs).
• Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the centers of support and employment modes (CSEMs) and the results of these youth in the different modes of employment.
• Strengthen relationships between the PRDE and the PRVRA to facilitate the identification of students who can benefit from the transition services.
• Continue providing orientation to the school staff on the services of the PRVRA. (Page 312) Title IV

The Assessment and Adjustment Office, the Support and Employment Modes Office and the VR Counseling Services Office of the PRVRA, planned and coordinated a variety of activities leading toward developing Work-based learning experiences for students in their transition process, as required by WIOA.

235. In July of 2016 a closure activity was coordinated for the 10 students from transition who participated in the Work-based learning experience held in June of 2016 at the Program-Industry for the Blind and those with other physical, mental and developmental disabilities.
236. In June of 2017, seven (7) employers loaned their facilities, and 56 transition students from the 6 regions of the VRS participated in a Work-based learning experience. Previously, 9 meetings had been held for a total of 78 participants at the regional level regarding the corresponding planning.  (Page 320) Title IV

The Administrator’s Office:
237. Developed the project’s protocol: Work-based Learning Experiences in State Government Agencies that started in the month of July, 2017.
238. Developed a protocol to carry out the project: Pre-Employment Transition Services Fair.
Strategy:
o Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the Centers of Assessment and Adjustment (CAAs). (Page 321) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~i5. 101(d)(3)(B) the development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low—skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment:
i. Please, refer to section II(c)(1).

Goal 4 foresees to spur the development of sector strategies and career pathways by targeting opportunities in the public sector to resource the convening of partnerships. Strategy section aims to convene a working group to assist the State Board in developing support for sector strategies and career pathways. As mentioned above, Strategy section, addresses the utilization of proven methodologies provided by USDOL to aid in these efforts. PRDE’s programs (Title II and Carl D. Perkins supported CTE) will lead the way in pursuing the implementation of career pathways and providing the necessary insight to the State Board. The WDP and PRVRA will also support the effort by pursuing DEI funding. (Page 99) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Registered Apprenticeship will also be delivered as a career pathway for job seekers and as a job—driven strategy for employers and industries. As required, procedures will be implemented by the PRDOLHR to add Registered Apprenticeship programs to the State list of eligible training providers and to verify their status, considering timely data collection requirements on new programs, including information on occupations included in the program; method and length of instruction; and, number of active apprentices. (Page 201) Title II

Upon request, sponsors or institutions that offer training programs registered under the National Apprenticeship Act, will be automatically included and maintained on the list for as long as the program remains registered under the National Apprenticeship Act. On-the-job training, customized training, incumbent worker training, and transitional employment providers are not subject to the requirements of the eligible training provider provisions. Also exempted are services for which the Local Board determines that any of the following conditions are met:

• There are insufficient providers.

• There is a training services program with demonstrated effectiveness offered in the local area by a community-based organization or other private organization to serve individuals with barriers to employment as defined under section 3(34) of WIOA. (Page 202) Tile II

  1. National Dislocated Worker Grants (DWGs) awarded and coordination with state rapid response activities and FEMA, for temporary jobs.
  2. Progress made in implementing sector strategies and career pathways. The discussion may include: business engagement strategies; work-based learning (including apprenticeship); work experiences for youth and adults; transitional jobs; and incumbent worker training strategies and policies.
  3. Promising practices, lessons learned, and success stories that focus on: serving employers; communities; individuals with barriers to employment; at-risk and priority populations served, including out-of-school youth, low-income adults, dislocated workers, individuals who are basic skills deficient, individuals with limited language proficiency, individuals with disabilities, veterans, the long-term unemployed, and any other individuals with barriers to employment,

The annual report will also include activities at the State level:

  1. Rapid Response Services;
  2. Performance measure narrative section;
  3. Allowable activities with Governor set aside funds;
  4. National Dislocated Worker Grants: ZIKA; Irma and Maria Grant; Disability Grant (Page 168) Title III

3. VRA, in its search to comply with WIOA, has purchased the PR SAM Sample (Puerto Rico Skills Assessment Module) and the CIRINO Gerena Electronic Vocational Interest tests that will allow VRA to offer career exploration services to transition students between 14 to 21 years of age, and who are receiving, or have received, special education or Section 504 services under the Rehabilitation Law of 1973, as amended. 4. A Work-based Learning Experience was offered to 58 students with disabilities under 6 private employers in June of 2017. 5. In August of 2017, a service fair was held for students with disabilities under the Career Exploration Counseling category. (Page 267) Title IV

During the summer of 2017, 56 students with disabilities participated of a Work-based Learning Experience through coordination between PRVRA and employers. PRVRA will continue carrying out this type of activities during the next years. To reach more employers, the Centers of Support and Employment Modes (CSEM) and the Office of Support and Employment Modes (OSEM) will continue to offer orientations by region to different sectors: businesses, industrial and government. We expect to obtain from those employers collaboration to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities. Evaluation and Adjustment Centers staff of the PRVRA also performs work based evaluation processes for applicants/consumers of the VRA, including youth with disabilities, and will continue to do so with employers’ collaboration. Transition Analysts will support CSEM/OSEM to identify more schools that offer services to students and youth with disabilities as possible candidates for Supported Employment and Pre-Employment Transition Services. (Page 279-280) Title IV

The Assessment and Adjustment Office, the Support and Employment Modes Office and the VR Counseling Services Office of the PRVRA, planned and coordinated a variety of activities leading toward developing Work-based learning experiences for students in their transition process, as required by WIOA. 235. In July of 2016 a closure activity was coordinated for the 10 students from transition who participated in the Work-based learning experience held in June of 2016 at the Program-Industry for the Blind and those with other physical, mental and developmental disabilities. 236. In June of 2017, seven (7) employers loaned their facilities, and 56 transition students from the 6 regions of the VRS participated in a Work-based learning experience. Previously, 9 meetings had been held for a total of 78 participants at the regional level regarding the corresponding planning. (Page 320) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~In terms of service to individuals facing barriers to employment, counseling remains a key strategic activity across all core programs. Counselors has a specialized education coupled with years of experience and knowledge, and can provide information and guidance to clients on occupational requirements, employment opportunities, trends and other community resources that can benefit the job seekers.

As previously mentioned, seeking to activate the government entities' participation in key competitive programs aims to expand education, training and employment services to targeted populations. DEI, the qualification of local boards as Employment Networks under the Ticket to Work program, REO, Youthbuild, Job Plus, the expansion of activities for employment creation/retention under CDBG, are some of the targeted programs or activities.

Title II has a leading role in serving individuals with barriers to employment and ensuring their access to the labor force. To assist enhancing its service to these populations, the program will implement an Advisory Board to further fine-tuning and program improvements. (Page 93) Title II

The Government requires recipients to engage in work without delay unless exempted. Congress never extended to the Government the option of including on case-by-case basis families in which a non-recipient parent receives SSI, when the Aid to the Aged, Blind and Disabled (AABD) Programs in the states were converted to SSI. Accordingly, the Government considers the SSI and AABD Programs as the same in the context of the TANF Program.

The participant is required to register and seek employment through the PRDOLHR's Employment Service. Also, it is referred to engage in work activities, as directed in the Puerto Rico’s Work Verification Plan. Most TANF recipients must comply with at least 30 hours a week of work participation. To verify countable hours, the participant must submit the time sheet to the case manager, which must be signed by his work activity supervisor. (Page 119) Title II

Employment and training programs administered by the Social Security Administration, including the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program established under section 1148 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1320b—19)

Through the issuance of local planning and certification guidance, the State Board will encourage local boards and operators to become engaged in the Ticket to Work program as qualified Employment Networks. Puerto Rico's serviced by 66 employment networks; nevertheless, just one (Caguas Guayama) out of the 15 local workforce areas is currently qualified as an Employment Network.

The PRVRA continues receiving referrals from the Ticket to Work Program for the purpose of providing vocational rehabilitation services. In addition, the PRVRA established an agreement with the Caribbean Center of Work Incentives Planning Assistance (CWIPA) to provide benefits planning service to the consumers of the PRVRA who are beneficiaries of the Social Security Disability Insurance. This service is expected to help these beneficiaries in decision-making regarding the benefits of reintegrating into the labor market. (Page 121) Title III

Strategies:
• Strengthen the coordination with the PRDOLHR to know employment trends and types of employers.
• Continue implementing employment projects through the development of self-employments.
• Continue with the programmatic monitoring interventions and technical assistance to the CRPs, to ensure quality and agility in the services to the consumers with the most significant disabilities.
• Continue the participation of the PRVRA consumers in employment-related activities available in the American Job Centers and other components of WIOA.
• Continue referring consumers, who are beneficiaries of the Social Security Disability Insurance, to the Caribbean Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (CWIPA) Program for the counseling service for benefits planning.
• Share with the PRSRC the Normative Communications governing the provision of services.
• Continue with the programmatic monitoring interventions of the services provision process to ensure compliance with the public policy.
• Continue offering technical assistance to the supervisory staff of counseling services to improve decision-making in case management.
• Refer the PRVRA consumers to the services of other components of WIOA (Title I, Title II Employment Service and other programs) to expand their job skills.

Goal 2
Ensure the provision of services to eligible youth with disabilities, and pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities coming from transition, so that they are able to achieve an employment outcome. (Page 311) Title IV

VRA gave: orientation to employers on salary incentives, affirmative actions and VRA services; technical assistance regarding the “Ticket-to-Work” Program. 4,417 employers were contacted, including small business so that they would come forward and recruit VRA consumers.

Strategy:
• Continue with the granting of salary incentives to employers in order to promote employment opportunities for VRA’s consumers.

Progress Report:
VRA formalized 10 wage-incentive contracts, where 18 consumers benefitted.

Strategy:
• Continue with the participation in the meetings of the State Board of WIOA (Page 322) Title IV

The Government requires recipients to engage in work without delay unless exempted. Congress never extended to the Government the option of including on case-by-case basis families in which a non-recipient parent receives SSI, when the Aid to the Aged, Blind and Disabled (AABD) Programs in the states were converted to SSI. Accordingly, the Government considers the SSI and AABD Programs as the same in the context of the TANF Program.

The participant is required to register and seek employment through the PRDOLHR's Employment Service. Also, it is referred to engage in work activities, as directed in the Puerto Rico’s Work Verification Plan. Most TANF recipients must comply with at least 30 hours a week of work participation. To verify countable hours, the participant must submit the time sheet to the case manager, which must be signed by his work activity supervisor. (Page 119) Title IV

QCPMO in collaboration with the State Rehabilitation Council carried out the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment.

VRCSO gave orientation about the Employment Networks for Social Security Disability Insurance Beneficiaries, at the ACAA facilities [Administración de Compensaciones por Accidentes de Automóviles]; and also, on VRA services given to the Department of Justice staff, as well as to the Department of Education.

So that new agencies could submit new proposals to the VRA to offer supported employment services to consumers with the most significant disabilities, OSEM gave orientation to the following enterprises: “Programa Florece la Montaña”; Pentaq Manufacturing Corporation; and the Moretta Díaz Corporation.

Assessment and Adjustment Office (OAA, Spanish acronym) provided information about interpreting services for the deaf to Interamerican University’s internship students. (Page 324) Title IV

 

Employer/ Business

~~The flexibility afforded by WIOA will be used to engage and expand the amount and type of training providers. For instance, the implementation of the Registered Apprenticeship program could allow the involvement of unions, trade associations as well as established providers like IHEs and community colleges as training providers.

As required under WIOA, the State maintains a publicly accessible list of eligible training providers and their eligible training programs, including relevant performance and cost information. The State Board adopted procedures for initial determination of eligibility and subsequent certification of training providers. (Page 137) Title II

As directed under WIOA, the initial eligibility of any provider will be valid for the period of one year.

Section C(II)(b) of the Governor’s procedures outlines the roles of the State and local areas in receiving and reviewing provider applications to decide if continued eligibility is granted. Newly eligible training providers that were determined to be eligible by transitioning into WIOA were subjected to the application procedure for continued eligibility before their initial year of eligibility expired. Applicants applying for continued eligibility are required to provide information to assess the following parameters:

• Performance accountability measures described in secs. 116(b)(2)(A)(i)(I) through (IV) of WIOA, including unsubsidized employment (Second Quarter after Exit), unsubsidized employment (Second Quarter after Exit), Median Earnings and Credential Attainment. If data is not yet available, compliance with the following alternate factors, as applicable: at least 75% of participants completing the program during the last two academic years; or, at least 70% of participants employed in the occupations related to the training program during the last two academic years, 60% if the occupation requires licensure. (Page 204) Title IV

The WDP will notify its determination to the Local Board. If the program is determined not to be eligible, the WDP will detail the reasons for its decision. The Local Board will notify the provider the determination of the WDP and, if it were adverse, the reasons for denial and information regarding the appeals process before the State Board, as provided under section E(II) of the State procedures.

As specified under E(I) of the State procedures, either the Local Board or the WDP might deny the provider its eligibility if the provider does not comply with the performance levels negotiated for the Local Area; or, if it fails to submit a complete proposal or is not authorized to operate, as might be required. For eligible programs, continued eligibility will be in effect for two (2) years. As required under WIOA and section D(II) of the State procedures, a training provider must deliver results and provide accurate information in order to retain its status as an eligible training provider. At least every two years, the WDP, in consultation with the Local Board might remove the provider from the list of approved providers for false reporting, for substantially violating a provision of title I of WIOA or its implementing regulations including non-discrimination provisions, failure to meet required performance outcomes, or debarment. The biennial review will also include verification of the registration status of registered apprenticeship programs. (Page 205) Title IV

Data Collection

• Integration of the local boards in the service—delivery model mandated by WIOA, including common intake, common outreach strategies and initiatives, universal service across the region, common performance measures (optional), identification of additional grants and fund opportunities, cost allocation plan, and MOU structure with required and optional partners, among other factors. (Page 183) Title II

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The effectiveness of the strategic framework will be assessed and tested according to procedures being mandated for each program and the system collectively. As prescribed under section 361.800 of the proposed rule One-Stop Centers and one-stop delivery systems will be certified for effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility, and continuous improvement, and as directed, these evaluations will take into account feedback from the One Stop network customers. (Page 84)

As required under section 677.160 of the proposed rule, the programs will be assessed on the basis of their negotiated levels of performance. Section 116(d)(2) of WIOA requires the State submit a performance report that will contain information on the actual performance levels achieved consistent with the proposed rule 677.175. The State will comply with these requirements and the implementing guidance to be jointly issued by the USDOL and the USDOE, which may include information on reportable individuals as determined by the Secretaries.

All programs must be evaluated in terms of their compliance with basic threshold requirements, including programmatic and physical accessibility. One-Stop certification guidance will be reviewed to include relevant measures for assessing partner performance. Additionally, as required under WIOA, guidance issued by USDOL, USDOE and other program grantors, and the goals and accountability measures included in regional and local plans. (Page 158) Title II

• Total number of participants who exited each of the core programs, including disaggregated counts of those who participated in and exited a core program by individuals with barriers to employment

• Demographics Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. (Page 171-172) Title I

The Commonwealth’s policies are consistent down to the level of Local Board governance structure. Circular Letter WIOA-2-2015 requires the appointment of a standing committee to provide information and assist the board with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities. Those might include issues relating to compliance with section 188 and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding the provision of programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the One-Stop Delivery System, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing support for or accommodation to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. The Commonwealth is one of 26 jurisdictions yet to benefit from the implementation of the DOL’s Disability Employment Initiative. As enunciated in the State Plan it will seek to join in the DOL’s initiative in order to expand the capacity of the workforce system to increase the number of individuals with disabilities participating in existing career pathways and programs. (Page 172) Title I

As established in the State Plan, Title I and the PRVRA will lead a comprehensive effort to adapt the recommendations of the USDOL’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) contained in its "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: a Section 188 Disability Reference Guide". All local areas will be required to implement the resulting guidance adopted by the State Board as part of the local area certification and the operator’s competitive selection processes. Also, ODEP’s recommendations in regards to expanding the participation of people with disabilities in the workforce by means of the Registered Apprenticeship program will be furthered through the SAA’s implementing regulations. Presently, the State Board’s monitoring guidance includes the following criteria for testing physical and programmatic accessibility of the One-Stop Centers:

• One-Stop Centers shall facilitate the availability and ease of access of both self-serviced and assisted methods, including computer for resume preparation, Internet to search for job opportunities, telephone to contact employers, fax for sending resumes to employers with job opportunities, printed and digital information on employment and career opportunities, and printed and digital information on financial assistance for studies. Compliance will be assessed through inspections of the self-service system, and the procedures adopted. (Page 173) Title II

The One-Stop Centers’ staff will be fully aware of non-discrimination and physical and programmatic accessibility mandates. The direct customer service staff will also be trained to follow intake procedures to ensure that adequate, voluntary and confidential information on a customer’s disability is collected and recorded and to manage the corresponding service protocol. Memorandums of Understanding will be advanced in order to delineate the roles of the operators, partner programs, and other programs that might be able to provide assistance, aids or services to persons with disabilities. Act 136 of 1996 requires that all government agencies provide an interpreter to assist persons with hearing impairments that prevent oral communication and limit their access to services, using the services of the Sign Language Communication training program offered by the Continued Education Program of Office of the Commonwealth’s Training and Labor Affairs Advisory and Human Resources Administration Office. At a basic level, cross-training on sign language will be readily facilitated by the PRVRA to One-Stop Centers’ staff in charge of customer service to aid in the referral to the PRVRA of hearing impaired customers that might appear to be eligible and in need of PRVRA services. (Page 174) Title II

Providing Rapid Response services under the Dislocated Workers program. • Providing assistance to State entities and agencies, local areas, and One—Stop Centers partners in carrying out the activities described in the State Unified Plan.

  • Providing technical assistance to local areas for carrying out the regional planning and service delivery efforts required under section 106(c).
  • Providing technical assistance to local areas that fail to meet local performance accountability measures described in section 116(c).
  • Providing assistance to local areas operating a fiscal and management accountability information system in accordance with section 116(i).
  • Monitoring and overseeing activities.
  • Disseminating the State list of eligible providers of training services.
  • Disseminating information identifying eligible providers for on—the—job training, customized training, incumbent worker training, internships, paid or unpaid work experience opportunities, or transitional jobs. • Disseminating information on effective service delivery strategies to serve workers and job seekers.
  • Disseminating performance information and information on the cost of attendance (including tuition and fees) for participants in applicable programs, as described in subsections (d) and (h) of section 122.
  • Disseminating information on physical and programmatic accessibility, in accordance with section188, if applicable, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), for individuals with disabilities.
  • Completing program and service delivery evaluations. (Page 195) Title II

It would be most appropriate to award a contract to an IHE or other eligible provider of training services in order to facilitate the training of multiple individuals in in-demand industry sectors or occupations, and such contract does not limit customer choice.

  • The Local Board provides training services through a pay-for-performance contract. Any educational provider seeking initial eligibility determination must complete the application and submit the required information electronically to the Local Board. Providers might submit an application at any time during the year. Applicants are required to provide the following information:
  • Specification of in-demand industry sectors and occupations aligned with their training services
  • Evidence of the financial stability of the provider or institution
  • If applicable, evidence of State license to operate issued by the PREC, for each location where the training program will be offered
  • Information addressing factors related to the indicators of performance, as described in secs. 116(b)(2)(A)(i)(I) through (IV) of WIOA, including unsubsidized employment (second quarter after exit), unsubsidized employment (fourth quarter after exit), median earnings, and credentials attainment.
  • Information concerning whether the provider is in a partnership with businesses providing employment, including information about the quality and quantity of employer partnerships • Information to demonstrate if program of training services leads to an industry recognized credential and/or recognized post-secondary credential
  • Evidence to demonstrate compliance with the legal and regulatory provisions on equal opportunity and non-discrimination, reasonable accommodation and physical and programmatic accessibility (Page 203) Title II
Vets

Gold Card Initiative

The Gold Card provides unemployed post-9/11 era veterans with the intensive and follow-up services they need to succeed in today's job market. The Gold Card initiative is a joint effort of the DOLETA and the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS). ETA and VETS have developed a series of enhanced intensive services, including follow-up services, to identify those barriers to employment faced by veterans of post 9/11 era. The services, when provided under the Priority of Services to Veterans, are designed to overcome those barriers and to reinsert our 9/11 era veterans the labor workforce.

Due to the high unemployment rate faced by our veteran population, “Gold Card” services are available to veterans to help them obtain the necessary help to reinsert them in the labor market as soon as possible. An eligible veteran can present the Gold Card at his/her local One-Stop Career Center to receive enhanced intensive services including up to six months of follow-up. Information about the “Gold Card” initiative might be found at http://www.dol.gov/vets/goldcard.html. On this web site veterans might have the opportunity to print their “Gold Card” certificate and obtain information about how to access the available services.

The enhanced in-person services available for Gold Card holders at local One-Stop Career Centers may include:

  • Job readiness assessment, including interviews and testing
  • Development of an Individual Development Plan (IDP)
  • Career guidance through group or individual counseling that helps veterans in making training and career decisions
  • Provision of labor market, occupational, and skills transferability information that inform educational, training, and occupational decisions • Referral to job banks, job portals, and job openings • Referral to employers and registered apprenticeship sponsors
  • Referral to training by WIA-funded or third party service providers
  • Monthly follow-up by an assigned case manager for up to six months Employment and training activities carried out under the Community Services Block Grant Act (42 U.S.C. 9901 et seq.) (Page 116) Title II
Mental Health

~~11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;
12. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participants outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance; and
13. Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs.  (Page I63) Title IV

32. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with Section 116) and to monitor program performance;
33. Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs (Integrated English Literacy and Civics Education) (Page 250) Title IV

This Advisory Council of Substance Abuse and Mental Health of Puerto Rico is composed of government agencies, mental health patients and family members. It is supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (ASSMCA, by its Spanish acronym). This is the organization selected by the Health Insurance Administration of Puerto Rico to carry out operational functions of the Health Plan and offer treatment for mental health conditions, alcohol and drug abuse in the San Juan and Western regions. The PRVRA is a mandatory member of this council and participates in the planning for the provision of these services.

PRVRA participates as a member of the Advisory Council of Substance Abuse and Mental Health of Puerto Rico. The Council’s mission is to promote compliance with federal public law and the public policy of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, in order to offer adequate mental health and substance abuse services and promote a better quality of life for people and their families. The Council’s objectives are to:

1. Participate in the writing and implementation of the Block Grant, in accordance with Section 1915 (a) of the federal law. 2. Participate in the development of the State Plan for the Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Administration. 3. Review and evaluate adequacy and distribution of mental health and substance abuse services in PR to identify service needs. 

Advocate for people with mental health and substance abuse disabilities in PR, in order to guarantee establishment of a high quality integrated service system. (Page 280-281) Title IV

Youth are enrolled in the Foster Care program at age 14. They must be attending school, must not bear dispositive measures pursuant to Act 88-1986 (Youth Offenders Act), should not have disabling mental health conditions and must be subject to the temporary or permanent custody of the PRDOF. An intermediate program stage comprises individuals age 16 to 18, followed by a completion or exit stage for 19 to 21 year old. Through the stages, training and workshop activities in the independent living program are geared towards preparing participants to face adulthood. Topics involve money management, sex education, violence, rights and responsibilities, as well as moral and spiritual values.

As part of its 2015-2019 Child and Family Service Plan, the PRDOF targeted the youth in transition as a population in greater risk of maltreatment, particularly youth who have been in foster care that face even greater challenges because they have grown up with hardships that constitute risk factors. The Foster Care Independent Living Program empowers the youths in making a satisfactory transition to self-sufficiency by providing a continuum of services which includes: educational and/or vocational training; career planning; job preparation, search and retention, skills development; health; housing; ability to work as a member of a team; prevention of substance use/abuse (drugs, alcohol & tobacco); activities to develop emotional maturity; counseling to promote management of unresolved emotional problems; violence prevention; skills in identifying and accessing services; parenting skills development; orientation on legal rights and responsibilities; cultural awareness activities; workshops and counseling to develop a sense of moral social responsibility; socialization skills development (conflict resolution, problem solving, anger management, communication skills); and mentoring. (Page 55) Title IV

The program also coordinates program or supportive services with other entities, including those offered by the Youth Development Program at PRDEDC; the provision of health care services, including mental health services with the Department of Health and prevention programs administered by the Government’s Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; PRDOH's help in finding subsidize housing; services to victims of or at-risk of domestic violence, such as counseling, referrals and hot-line services, and shelter alternatives to victims offered by the Women’s Advocate Office; childcare and developmental services for pre-school children of TANF participants engaged in activities approved by the program, offered through service providers; and referral of participants to enroll in the PRCEC's and the Economic Development Bank to benefit from programs targeting self-employment and entrepreneurship, among other. (Page 121) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Each outreach staff establishes a list of available resources and develops partnerships with local organizations serving MSFWs. Resources include, but are not limited to: Department of Health, Farmworker Health Program, State Workers Compensation, Migrant Legal Services, PathStone Corporation, Department of Education for Adult Literacy, ESL and GED services to MSFWs. Career centers will collaborate with LWDBs to ensure MSFWs have training opportunities for jobs in demand in the area. We believe there are enough resources for Outreach but will continue to seek for additional resources that meets MSFWs needs as they are identified. (Page 232) Title III

Verifying priority of service status through the required paperwork is not mandatory unless the covered persons undergo eligibility determination or if the applicable federal program rules require the verification on site. Once priority of service is determined, covered persons move ahead of the line to receive the appropriate employment, training and placement services over the non—covered persons as required by law and as stated by VPL 07—09. Some Unemployment Insurance offices have adopted this priority of service model from the Employment Service although not mandated by law. Local areas will continue to encourage the provision of additional priority services and information to veterans, including priority access to job orders and individual training accounts (ITAs).

Other steps that will ensure priority of service to veterans include: training staff members; periodic reception and labor exchange staff reinforcement; DVOP/LVER preferential access to job opportunities; placement of signs in waiting areas stating veterans’ preference in all offices; a brief orientation (in the morning and afternoons) to clients waiting to be served at the reception area related to the priority to veterans offered; distribution of printed informative material; and data and report validation. (Page 171) Title II

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Vocational Rehabilitation invests in new technology to handle their cases (used Google translate for Spanish to English translation) - 11/04/2019

"In order to comply with the new federal regulations, the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), began [on November 11, 2019], its implementation plan for a new electronic system for handling cases of applicants and consumers potentially eligible for our services, as announced by administrator Madeline Hernández Dipiní. ” 

(Used Google translate for Spanish to English translation of quote. Citation link leads to a document in Spanish.)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transforming Lives through Supported Employment grants (Short Title: Supported Employment Program) - 03/18/2019

~~“The purpose of the program is to support state and community efforts to refine, implement, and sustain evidence-based supported employment programs and mutually compatible and supportive evidence-based practices (e.g., supported education) for transition-aged youth/young adults (ages 16-25) with serious emotional disturbance (SED), and adults with serious mental illness (SMI) or co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (COD). SAMHSA expects that this program will increase state and community capacity to implement and sustain Supported Employment Program (SEP) models and integrated supports to improve competitive employment outcomes for individuals with SED, SMI, or COD….

Eligible applicants are domestic public and private nonprofit entities. For example:State governments; the District of Columbia, Guam, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau are also eligible to apply.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Puerto Rico differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The Puerto Rico Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The Puerto Rico Department of Health is the single state agency, and they have a cooperative agreement with the Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration (PRHIA) also known as Administracion de Seguros Salud de Puerto Rico (ASES) which implements and administers island-wide health insurance system. Approximately half of Puerto Rico's 3.5 million residents have low incomes and depend upon the public health system for their medical care.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $5.4 billion in Medicaid funding to Puerto Rico.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Puerto Rico, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Puerto Rico’s FMAP to 57.2%.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Services Offered by the San Juan Regional Office - 01/01/2019

~~“VA’s San Juan Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. We offer the following additional services:

Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to applyInformation about VA health care and memorial benefitsOutreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women VeteransPublic affairs”

Systems
  • Other

The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“ARV provides services to people with eligible impairments, so that they can prepare, obtain, retain, or maintain a job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Puerto Rico for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“Persons with disabilities in Puerto Rico achieve greater independence, are empowered and take control of their lives in order to increase their integration, inclusion, equality and access to the services and resources in the community according to the following Goals.Goal 1Persons with disabilities have the necessary independent living services and other complementary services.Goal 2Persons with disabilities exercise control in decision-making and intercede for system changes.Goal 3The community at large knows about the independent living philosophy and services” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Services Offered by the San Juan Regional Office - 01/01/2019

~~“VA’s San Juan Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. We offer the following additional services:

Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to applyInformation about VA health care and memorial benefitsOutreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women VeteransPublic affairs”

Systems
  • Other

The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“ARV provides services to people with eligible impairments, so that they can prepare, obtain, retain, or maintain a job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Puerto Rico for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“Persons with disabilities in Puerto Rico achieve greater independence, are empowered and take control of their lives in order to increase their integration, inclusion, equality and access to the services and resources in the community according to the following Goals.Goal 1Persons with disabilities have the necessary independent living services and other complementary services.Goal 2Persons with disabilities exercise control in decision-making and intercede for system changes.Goal 3The community at large knows about the independent living philosophy and services” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Vocational Rehabilitation invests in new technology to handle their cases (used Google translate for Spanish to English translation) - 11/04/2019

"In order to comply with the new federal regulations, the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), began [on November 11, 2019], its implementation plan for a new electronic system for handling cases of applicants and consumers potentially eligible for our services, as announced by administrator Madeline Hernández Dipiní. ” 

(Used Google translate for Spanish to English translation of quote. Citation link leads to a document in Spanish.)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transforming Lives through Supported Employment grants (Short Title: Supported Employment Program) - 03/18/2019

~~“The purpose of the program is to support state and community efforts to refine, implement, and sustain evidence-based supported employment programs and mutually compatible and supportive evidence-based practices (e.g., supported education) for transition-aged youth/young adults (ages 16-25) with serious emotional disturbance (SED), and adults with serious mental illness (SMI) or co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (COD). SAMHSA expects that this program will increase state and community capacity to implement and sustain Supported Employment Program (SEP) models and integrated supports to improve competitive employment outcomes for individuals with SED, SMI, or COD….

Eligible applicants are domestic public and private nonprofit entities. For example:State governments; the District of Columbia, Guam, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau are also eligible to apply.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Puerto Rico differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The Puerto Rico Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The Puerto Rico Department of Health is the single state agency, and they have a cooperative agreement with the Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration (PRHIA) also known as Administracion de Seguros Salud de Puerto Rico (ASES) which implements and administers island-wide health insurance system. Approximately half of Puerto Rico's 3.5 million residents have low incomes and depend upon the public health system for their medical care.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $5.4 billion in Medicaid funding to Puerto Rico.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Puerto Rico, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Puerto Rico’s FMAP to 57.2%.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

"Rich Port": Where the richness of having a competitive job at a living wage is possible for all people with disabilities.

2018 State Population.
-4.44%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,195,153
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.71%
Change from
2017 to 2018
328,525
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.36%
Change from
2017 to 2018
76,210
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-3.49%
Change from
2017 to 2018
23.20%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
4.54%
Change from
2017 to 2018
55.48%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 3,411,307 3,337,177 3,195,153
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 354,695 340,717 328,525
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 78,826 81,820 76,210
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 929,500 879,100 885,794
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 22.22% 24.01% 23.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 54.86% 52.96% 55.48%
State/National unemployment rate. 12.00% 10.80% 8.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 47.80% 48.20% 46.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 42.30% 43.40% 42.20%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 334,810 332,908 310,024
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 386,625 380,567 365,294
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 493,901 484,751 441,128
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 78,542 78,302 76,704
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 714,713 708,258 667,268
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 1,932 2,194 1,208
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,246 N/A 1,059
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 34,831 46,802 45,669
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 110,983 100,765 109,485

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 156,044 151,590

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 188 216
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 634 592
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 1,694 1,411
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 11.10% 15.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 7.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 0.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 6.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 32.50% 14.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A 77
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A 9
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A 71
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 589 145

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
5,009
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 201 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 204 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,143 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,098 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 1,082 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 281 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,825 1,873 1,998
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 181,771 169,691 165,205
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 76.27% 72.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 8.64% 9.22%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.30% 2.23%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 96.37% 99.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 57.46% 51.10%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 69.83% 65.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 84.58% 87.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 12.37% 14.36%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~In terms of service to individuals facing barriers to employment, counseling remains a key strategic activity across all core programs. Counselors has a specialized education coupled with years of experience and knowledge, and can provide information and guidance to clients on occupational requirements, employment opportunities, trends and other community resources that can benefit the job seekers.

As previously mentioned, seeking to activate the government entities' participation in key competitive programs aims to expand education, training and employment services to targeted populations. DEI, the qualification of local boards as Employment Networks under the Ticket to Work program, REO, Youthbuild, Job Plus, the expansion of activities for employment creation/retention under CDBG, are some of the targeted programs or activities.

Title II has a leading role in serving individuals with barriers to employment and ensuring their access to the labor force. To assist enhancing its service to these populations, the program will implement an Advisory Board to further fine-tuning and program improvements. (Page 93) Title I

i. Please, see information corresponding to 101(d)(2), above.
5. 101(d)(3)(B) the development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low—skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment:
i. Please, refer to section II(c)(1).

Goal 4 foresees to spur the development of sector strategies and career pathways by targeting opportunities in the public sector to resource the convening of partnerships. Strategy section aims to convene a working group to assist the State Board in developing support for sector strategies and career pathways. As mentioned above, Strategy section, addresses the utilization of proven methodologies provided by USDOL to aid in these efforts. PRDE’s programs (Title II and Carl D. Perkins supported CTE) will lead the way in pursuing the implementation of career pathways and providing the necessary insight to the State Board. The WDP and PRVRA will also support the effort by pursuing DEI funding. (Page 99) Title II

An enhanced coordination with the PREC will allow the harvesting of data being supplied by educational institutions under local and federal mandates to retrofit the educational and workforce systems. Additional opportunities could arise by devising ways in which the Council's State student financial assistance programs support the strategies of the system.

Local areas will be encouraged to leverage the resources of required partners to support the delivery of integrated services, through financial and non-financial agreements. Many of the arrangements for sharing other state resources must be worked out in detail at local level involving other agencies and the local One-Stop Centers’ partners, through MOUs.

A key strategy in leveraging other Federal investments that have enhanced access to workforce development programs at educational institutions is to equip the State Board to manage the function of identifying and seeking additional or dormant competitive funding opportunities that can benefit any component of the workforce development system. DEI and REO, among others, represent additional opportunities. To that end, the State is committed to advance the designation of the local boards as 501(c)(3) tax-exempted non-for profits to leverage non-traditional sources of grant funding. (Page 138) Title II
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Competitive graduates with knowledge and skills needed to adapt to changes in the economy, environment, and technology. Education is a cornerstone of Puerto Rico’s economy, society, and political systems. Its purpose is to build and sustain the knowledge and skills needed to ensure that individuals, communities and key institutions can adapt to changes in the world economy, the environment, and technology.

The Government of Puerto Rico now has the opportunity to fundamentally transform its education system in a way that improves student outcomes, supports the development of children, youth and adults, and supports its vision of economic and social development moving forward.

1. Upgrade school infrastructure to support resilience and sustainability

2. Increase K—12 access to vocational, technical, and career education and strengthen school-to-work transitions

3. Promote pre-school and out-of-school learning opportunities

4. Strengthen systems to support new education reform package. (Page 21) Title I

The Secretary for Special Education has:

1. With the approval of Law 263 of 2006 - Institution of vocational and career evaluation for all students in the special education program, all students with disabilities eligible for special education services, from the 12 years must be evaluated by certified vocational and career professionals with the purpose of delineating their transition plan from school to adult life.

2. To that, in collaboration with the PRDE's Counseling Program, in their public policies, we determinate the administration and interpretation of occupational interests and occupational counseling for training in decision-making for the selection of occupational careers for all student with disabilities.

3. DEPR and the School of Rehabilitation Counseling of the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, has a collaboration agreement to have Rehabilitation Counseling Practitioners in the Special Education Service Centers of all educational regions for collaborate with the School Counselor in the administration, interpretation, and counseling to the students with moderate and severe disabilities eligible for the special education program. This agreement comes into effect in September 2018.

4. PRDE has the Transition Manual from the School to the Work, approved in 1992. That manual is a teacher guides related to the process of transition from school to work for students with moderate disabilities.

5. All students who have an IEP, from the age of 16, or before being necessary, his plan establish some different coordinated activities whose purpose is the development of skills aimed at the world of employment and adult life.

6. Students with mild and moderate disabilities who are located in the regular classroom, participate in the same activities as regular students. Like a CEPA tests, College Board exam, 40 hours of occupational exploration, etc. with the reasonable accommodations established in your Individualized Educational Program (PEI) or your Service Plan (PS).

7. The Secretary for Special Education, for the 2018-2019 school year, hired transition coordinators whose goal was to coordinate all services related to the transition process.

8. DEPR has an inter-agency agreement with the Department of Labor - Vocational Rehabilitation Administration, which establishes the responsibilities of each agency to achieve a successful transition of students with disabilities from PRDE to DT / ARV.

9. Beginning at age 16, all students eligible for special education receive orientation and guidance to the services offered by the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), which is the leading agency in the process of transitioning for the school to the world of employment.

10. ARV, in coordination with the PRDE, offer different hours of training during the school year for students with disabilities.

11. ARV, in coordination with the PRDE, every summer, develops pre-employment experiences for students with disabilities who participate in the application and interview process for these programs. (Page 94) Title II

This State Board rules, policies and statutes, are designed to ensure:

a. An occupational and technical education is equally available to all students and is of consistent quality throughout Puerto Rico;

b. The time and content of career and technical education are properly and flexibly coordinated with academic instruction;

c. Career and technical education is available to all student populations, particularly in high unemployment areas or where occupational re-training needs are required;

d. Career and technical education programs, as well as curriculum courses, are useful for your graduates to obtain employment or improve the quality of their employment;

e. Career and technical education programs will be coordinated with state programs related to education and training. This includes ensuring that graduates in career and technical education receive appropriate credit for the requirements of apprenticeship and professional licensing programs in order for them to pass their revalidation exams;

f. Regional occupational and technical education services are provided efficiently. ; and

g. Alternative curriculums, curricula and/or standards are developed to allow inclusion of students with disabilities, and funds may be used for the provision of the services required in the Individualized Education Plan (IEP), as required by federal law. (Page 110) Title II

The designated State unit’s plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.

In Puerto Rico, Act 51-1996, as amended, provides for the coordination between the Assistant Secretariat of Comprehensive Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities of the PRDE, and the PRVRA, among other agencies. In terms of the public policy and practices for the development and implementation of the IPE, the PRVRA has established a protocol in accordance with federal regulations (34 CFR 361.22(a)(2)). Before the student with disabilities exits the school system, a Written Intervention Plan (WIP), or IPE, must be developed. Its purpose is to formalize the management of the VR services provision process in coordination with educational agencies. This plan includes:

• Application of guides and programmatic procedures for the provision of services
• Beginning and ending date of services
• Employment outcomes (regular employment, supported employment, self-employment or any other innovative option)
• Projected date for the achievement of the employment outcome (Page 272) Title IV

• Evidence in the IPE of the participation of the consumer (his own words) regarding the informed choice process, self-management, and others actions taken during his VR process

In addition, the IPE contains those transition services that could be provided to the disabled student, under the sponsorship of the PRVRA, while participating from the educational services of the PRDE, and after exhausting the available comparable services and benefits. The following is a description of such services:

• Career exploration
• Vocational counseling
• Orientation, postsecondary education (university level options and summer camp programs, among others)
• Assessment of vocational interests, capabilities and pre-employment skills
• Evaluation with an ecological approach
• Workshops and job readiness orientation (job skills, job interviews and drafting of a resume, among others)
• Vocational training/post-secondary education
• Supported employment services
• Transportation, including training on the use of public transportation
• Mentoring
• Self-management
• Use of auxiliary aids and services (assistive technology equipment/devices and services) (Page 273) Title IV

• The VR counselor informs to the transition analyst, in writing, the determination taken in regard to the referred student. Then, the transition analyst informs the outcome of said determination to the school official.
• The VR counselor evaluates the disabled youth’s capability towards the achievement of either an employment outcome or a more independent living.
• The VR counselor, with the participation of the disabled youth, his family or representative, develops the IPE; in accordance with the needs of the youth and taking into consideration the services included in the WIP or IPE prior to his exit of the school system.
• The transition analyst gathers statistical data showing the following: orientations provided to school staff, students and parents; meetings of the Programming and Placement Committee; students referred to the PRVRA by the PRDE; and eligible students.
• The transition analyst participates, if necessary, in the drafting of the IEP by recommending areas to be worked on during the transition stages. (Page 274) Title IV

• Offer and coordinate the provision of necessary services for the transition process to the post-school life.
• Coordinate so that officials of agencies included in this agreement are able to provide orientation on the services offered by those agencies to the parents, the students and the school staff.
• Provide academic and vocational services to the population with disabilities in accordance with federal and state laws and regulations.
• Collaborate with the other subscribing agencies in their objective of providing services related to job placement and follow up in employment to the students until they reach 21 years of age or graduate from high school.
• Provide, through schools, the human resource for the development of necessary basic academic and occupational skills, according to the needs identified in vocational evaluation results and in accordance with the provisions of the IPE. (Page 275) Title IV

1. Transition process for students with disabilities begins at schools through orientation provided by the Transition Counselor (TC) of the VRA, to teachers, students with disabilities and/or parents. As a result, meetings of the Placement and Programming Committee (PPC) take place, and decisions are made about IPE recommendations. A plan of action is developed and the TC may accept the referral of the student with disabilities. (Page 276) Title IV

In Puerto Rico, the Assistant Secretariat of Comprehensive Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities and the PRVRA are located in two different state departments (PRDE and PRDOLHR). The first one is responsible for the implementation of Public Law 108-446, as amended, known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA); the second one is responsible for the implementation of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and State Law 97-2000, as amended, known as the Vocational Rehabilitation Law of Puerto Rico. In addition to the aforementioned legislation, we have State Law 51-1996, as amended, known as the Integral Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities, which provides for the coordination to be achieved between various local agencies to ensure an effective transition of disabled youth coming from the Department of Education. Both agencies maintain cooperative ties related to the development of their respective human resources and as such, have been planning, developing, offering and/or participating in numerous in-service training activities since 1987. Some of the topics covered in such training include: transition from school to work; vocational evaluation; supported employment; IDEIA; Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Public Law No. 101-336, as amended; Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Public Law 105-220 of August 7 of 1998, as amended; among others. In addition, both agencies are members of an Advisory Committee, which meets periodically to plan and join efforts in the development and implementation of transition services from school to work. (Page 290) Title IV

• Continue with the monthly monitoring of eligibility determinations within 60 days, and planning and signature of IPE within 90 days, of the transition-age youth referred to the PRVRA.
• Maintain the participation of the VR counselor in the meetings of the Programming and Placement Committee (PPC) on transition-age youth.
• Offer Pre-Employment Transition services.
• Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the centers of assessment and adjustment (CAAs).
• Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the centers of support and employment modes (CSEMs) and the results of these youth in the different modes of employment.
• Strengthen relationships between the PRDE and the PRVRA to facilitate the identification of students who can benefit from the transition services.
• Continue providing orientation to the school staff on the services of the PRVRA. (Page 312) Title IV

The Assessment and Adjustment Office, the Support and Employment Modes Office and the VR Counseling Services Office of the PRVRA, planned and coordinated a variety of activities leading toward developing Work-based learning experiences for students in their transition process, as required by WIOA.

235. In July of 2016 a closure activity was coordinated for the 10 students from transition who participated in the Work-based learning experience held in June of 2016 at the Program-Industry for the Blind and those with other physical, mental and developmental disabilities.
236. In June of 2017, seven (7) employers loaned their facilities, and 56 transition students from the 6 regions of the VRS participated in a Work-based learning experience. Previously, 9 meetings had been held for a total of 78 participants at the regional level regarding the corresponding planning.  (Page 320) Title IV

The Administrator’s Office:
237. Developed the project’s protocol: Work-based Learning Experiences in State Government Agencies that started in the month of July, 2017.
238. Developed a protocol to carry out the project: Pre-Employment Transition Services Fair.
Strategy:
o Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the Centers of Assessment and Adjustment (CAAs). (Page 321) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~i5. 101(d)(3)(B) the development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low—skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment:
i. Please, refer to section II(c)(1).

Goal 4 foresees to spur the development of sector strategies and career pathways by targeting opportunities in the public sector to resource the convening of partnerships. Strategy section aims to convene a working group to assist the State Board in developing support for sector strategies and career pathways. As mentioned above, Strategy section, addresses the utilization of proven methodologies provided by USDOL to aid in these efforts. PRDE’s programs (Title II and Carl D. Perkins supported CTE) will lead the way in pursuing the implementation of career pathways and providing the necessary insight to the State Board. The WDP and PRVRA will also support the effort by pursuing DEI funding. (Page 99) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Registered Apprenticeship will also be delivered as a career pathway for job seekers and as a job—driven strategy for employers and industries. As required, procedures will be implemented by the PRDOLHR to add Registered Apprenticeship programs to the State list of eligible training providers and to verify their status, considering timely data collection requirements on new programs, including information on occupations included in the program; method and length of instruction; and, number of active apprentices. (Page 201) Title II

Upon request, sponsors or institutions that offer training programs registered under the National Apprenticeship Act, will be automatically included and maintained on the list for as long as the program remains registered under the National Apprenticeship Act. On-the-job training, customized training, incumbent worker training, and transitional employment providers are not subject to the requirements of the eligible training provider provisions. Also exempted are services for which the Local Board determines that any of the following conditions are met:

• There are insufficient providers.

• There is a training services program with demonstrated effectiveness offered in the local area by a community-based organization or other private organization to serve individuals with barriers to employment as defined under section 3(34) of WIOA. (Page 202) Tile II

  1. National Dislocated Worker Grants (DWGs) awarded and coordination with state rapid response activities and FEMA, for temporary jobs.
  2. Progress made in implementing sector strategies and career pathways. The discussion may include: business engagement strategies; work-based learning (including apprenticeship); work experiences for youth and adults; transitional jobs; and incumbent worker training strategies and policies.
  3. Promising practices, lessons learned, and success stories that focus on: serving employers; communities; individuals with barriers to employment; at-risk and priority populations served, including out-of-school youth, low-income adults, dislocated workers, individuals who are basic skills deficient, individuals with limited language proficiency, individuals with disabilities, veterans, the long-term unemployed, and any other individuals with barriers to employment,

The annual report will also include activities at the State level:

  1. Rapid Response Services;
  2. Performance measure narrative section;
  3. Allowable activities with Governor set aside funds;
  4. National Dislocated Worker Grants: ZIKA; Irma and Maria Grant; Disability Grant (Page 168) Title III

3. VRA, in its search to comply with WIOA, has purchased the PR SAM Sample (Puerto Rico Skills Assessment Module) and the CIRINO Gerena Electronic Vocational Interest tests that will allow VRA to offer career exploration services to transition students between 14 to 21 years of age, and who are receiving, or have received, special education or Section 504 services under the Rehabilitation Law of 1973, as amended. 4. A Work-based Learning Experience was offered to 58 students with disabilities under 6 private employers in June of 2017. 5. In August of 2017, a service fair was held for students with disabilities under the Career Exploration Counseling category. (Page 267) Title IV

During the summer of 2017, 56 students with disabilities participated of a Work-based Learning Experience through coordination between PRVRA and employers. PRVRA will continue carrying out this type of activities during the next years. To reach more employers, the Centers of Support and Employment Modes (CSEM) and the Office of Support and Employment Modes (OSEM) will continue to offer orientations by region to different sectors: businesses, industrial and government. We expect to obtain from those employers collaboration to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities. Evaluation and Adjustment Centers staff of the PRVRA also performs work based evaluation processes for applicants/consumers of the VRA, including youth with disabilities, and will continue to do so with employers’ collaboration. Transition Analysts will support CSEM/OSEM to identify more schools that offer services to students and youth with disabilities as possible candidates for Supported Employment and Pre-Employment Transition Services. (Page 279-280) Title IV

The Assessment and Adjustment Office, the Support and Employment Modes Office and the VR Counseling Services Office of the PRVRA, planned and coordinated a variety of activities leading toward developing Work-based learning experiences for students in their transition process, as required by WIOA. 235. In July of 2016 a closure activity was coordinated for the 10 students from transition who participated in the Work-based learning experience held in June of 2016 at the Program-Industry for the Blind and those with other physical, mental and developmental disabilities. 236. In June of 2017, seven (7) employers loaned their facilities, and 56 transition students from the 6 regions of the VRS participated in a Work-based learning experience. Previously, 9 meetings had been held for a total of 78 participants at the regional level regarding the corresponding planning. (Page 320) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~In terms of service to individuals facing barriers to employment, counseling remains a key strategic activity across all core programs. Counselors has a specialized education coupled with years of experience and knowledge, and can provide information and guidance to clients on occupational requirements, employment opportunities, trends and other community resources that can benefit the job seekers.

As previously mentioned, seeking to activate the government entities' participation in key competitive programs aims to expand education, training and employment services to targeted populations. DEI, the qualification of local boards as Employment Networks under the Ticket to Work program, REO, Youthbuild, Job Plus, the expansion of activities for employment creation/retention under CDBG, are some of the targeted programs or activities.

Title II has a leading role in serving individuals with barriers to employment and ensuring their access to the labor force. To assist enhancing its service to these populations, the program will implement an Advisory Board to further fine-tuning and program improvements. (Page 93) Title II

The Government requires recipients to engage in work without delay unless exempted. Congress never extended to the Government the option of including on case-by-case basis families in which a non-recipient parent receives SSI, when the Aid to the Aged, Blind and Disabled (AABD) Programs in the states were converted to SSI. Accordingly, the Government considers the SSI and AABD Programs as the same in the context of the TANF Program.

The participant is required to register and seek employment through the PRDOLHR's Employment Service. Also, it is referred to engage in work activities, as directed in the Puerto Rico’s Work Verification Plan. Most TANF recipients must comply with at least 30 hours a week of work participation. To verify countable hours, the participant must submit the time sheet to the case manager, which must be signed by his work activity supervisor. (Page 119) Title II

Employment and training programs administered by the Social Security Administration, including the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program established under section 1148 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1320b—19)

Through the issuance of local planning and certification guidance, the State Board will encourage local boards and operators to become engaged in the Ticket to Work program as qualified Employment Networks. Puerto Rico's serviced by 66 employment networks; nevertheless, just one (Caguas Guayama) out of the 15 local workforce areas is currently qualified as an Employment Network.

The PRVRA continues receiving referrals from the Ticket to Work Program for the purpose of providing vocational rehabilitation services. In addition, the PRVRA established an agreement with the Caribbean Center of Work Incentives Planning Assistance (CWIPA) to provide benefits planning service to the consumers of the PRVRA who are beneficiaries of the Social Security Disability Insurance. This service is expected to help these beneficiaries in decision-making regarding the benefits of reintegrating into the labor market. (Page 121) Title III

Strategies:
• Strengthen the coordination with the PRDOLHR to know employment trends and types of employers.
• Continue implementing employment projects through the development of self-employments.
• Continue with the programmatic monitoring interventions and technical assistance to the CRPs, to ensure quality and agility in the services to the consumers with the most significant disabilities.
• Continue the participation of the PRVRA consumers in employment-related activities available in the American Job Centers and other components of WIOA.
• Continue referring consumers, who are beneficiaries of the Social Security Disability Insurance, to the Caribbean Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (CWIPA) Program for the counseling service for benefits planning.
• Share with the PRSRC the Normative Communications governing the provision of services.
• Continue with the programmatic monitoring interventions of the services provision process to ensure compliance with the public policy.
• Continue offering technical assistance to the supervisory staff of counseling services to improve decision-making in case management.
• Refer the PRVRA consumers to the services of other components of WIOA (Title I, Title II Employment Service and other programs) to expand their job skills.

Goal 2
Ensure the provision of services to eligible youth with disabilities, and pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities coming from transition, so that they are able to achieve an employment outcome. (Page 311) Title IV

VRA gave: orientation to employers on salary incentives, affirmative actions and VRA services; technical assistance regarding the “Ticket-to-Work” Program. 4,417 employers were contacted, including small business so that they would come forward and recruit VRA consumers.

Strategy:
• Continue with the granting of salary incentives to employers in order to promote employment opportunities for VRA’s consumers.

Progress Report:
VRA formalized 10 wage-incentive contracts, where 18 consumers benefitted.

Strategy:
• Continue with the participation in the meetings of the State Board of WIOA (Page 322) Title IV

The Government requires recipients to engage in work without delay unless exempted. Congress never extended to the Government the option of including on case-by-case basis families in which a non-recipient parent receives SSI, when the Aid to the Aged, Blind and Disabled (AABD) Programs in the states were converted to SSI. Accordingly, the Government considers the SSI and AABD Programs as the same in the context of the TANF Program.

The participant is required to register and seek employment through the PRDOLHR's Employment Service. Also, it is referred to engage in work activities, as directed in the Puerto Rico’s Work Verification Plan. Most TANF recipients must comply with at least 30 hours a week of work participation. To verify countable hours, the participant must submit the time sheet to the case manager, which must be signed by his work activity supervisor. (Page 119) Title IV

QCPMO in collaboration with the State Rehabilitation Council carried out the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment.

VRCSO gave orientation about the Employment Networks for Social Security Disability Insurance Beneficiaries, at the ACAA facilities [Administración de Compensaciones por Accidentes de Automóviles]; and also, on VRA services given to the Department of Justice staff, as well as to the Department of Education.

So that new agencies could submit new proposals to the VRA to offer supported employment services to consumers with the most significant disabilities, OSEM gave orientation to the following enterprises: “Programa Florece la Montaña”; Pentaq Manufacturing Corporation; and the Moretta Díaz Corporation.

Assessment and Adjustment Office (OAA, Spanish acronym) provided information about interpreting services for the deaf to Interamerican University’s internship students. (Page 324) Title IV

 

Employer/ Business

~~The flexibility afforded by WIOA will be used to engage and expand the amount and type of training providers. For instance, the implementation of the Registered Apprenticeship program could allow the involvement of unions, trade associations as well as established providers like IHEs and community colleges as training providers.

As required under WIOA, the State maintains a publicly accessible list of eligible training providers and their eligible training programs, including relevant performance and cost information. The State Board adopted procedures for initial determination of eligibility and subsequent certification of training providers. (Page 137) Title II

As directed under WIOA, the initial eligibility of any provider will be valid for the period of one year.

Section C(II)(b) of the Governor’s procedures outlines the roles of the State and local areas in receiving and reviewing provider applications to decide if continued eligibility is granted. Newly eligible training providers that were determined to be eligible by transitioning into WIOA were subjected to the application procedure for continued eligibility before their initial year of eligibility expired. Applicants applying for continued eligibility are required to provide information to assess the following parameters:

• Performance accountability measures described in secs. 116(b)(2)(A)(i)(I) through (IV) of WIOA, including unsubsidized employment (Second Quarter after Exit), unsubsidized employment (Second Quarter after Exit), Median Earnings and Credential Attainment. If data is not yet available, compliance with the following alternate factors, as applicable: at least 75% of participants completing the program during the last two academic years; or, at least 70% of participants employed in the occupations related to the training program during the last two academic years, 60% if the occupation requires licensure. (Page 204) Title IV

The WDP will notify its determination to the Local Board. If the program is determined not to be eligible, the WDP will detail the reasons for its decision. The Local Board will notify the provider the determination of the WDP and, if it were adverse, the reasons for denial and information regarding the appeals process before the State Board, as provided under section E(II) of the State procedures.

As specified under E(I) of the State procedures, either the Local Board or the WDP might deny the provider its eligibility if the provider does not comply with the performance levels negotiated for the Local Area; or, if it fails to submit a complete proposal or is not authorized to operate, as might be required. For eligible programs, continued eligibility will be in effect for two (2) years. As required under WIOA and section D(II) of the State procedures, a training provider must deliver results and provide accurate information in order to retain its status as an eligible training provider. At least every two years, the WDP, in consultation with the Local Board might remove the provider from the list of approved providers for false reporting, for substantially violating a provision of title I of WIOA or its implementing regulations including non-discrimination provisions, failure to meet required performance outcomes, or debarment. The biennial review will also include verification of the registration status of registered apprenticeship programs. (Page 205) Title IV

Data Collection

• Integration of the local boards in the service—delivery model mandated by WIOA, including common intake, common outreach strategies and initiatives, universal service across the region, common performance measures (optional), identification of additional grants and fund opportunities, cost allocation plan, and MOU structure with required and optional partners, among other factors. (Page 183) Title II

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The effectiveness of the strategic framework will be assessed and tested according to procedures being mandated for each program and the system collectively. As prescribed under section 361.800 of the proposed rule One-Stop Centers and one-stop delivery systems will be certified for effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility, and continuous improvement, and as directed, these evaluations will take into account feedback from the One Stop network customers. (Page 84)

As required under section 677.160 of the proposed rule, the programs will be assessed on the basis of their negotiated levels of performance. Section 116(d)(2) of WIOA requires the State submit a performance report that will contain information on the actual performance levels achieved consistent with the proposed rule 677.175. The State will comply with these requirements and the implementing guidance to be jointly issued by the USDOL and the USDOE, which may include information on reportable individuals as determined by the Secretaries.

All programs must be evaluated in terms of their compliance with basic threshold requirements, including programmatic and physical accessibility. One-Stop certification guidance will be reviewed to include relevant measures for assessing partner performance. Additionally, as required under WIOA, guidance issued by USDOL, USDOE and other program grantors, and the goals and accountability measures included in regional and local plans. (Page 158) Title II

• Total number of participants who exited each of the core programs, including disaggregated counts of those who participated in and exited a core program by individuals with barriers to employment

• Demographics Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. (Page 171-172) Title I

The Commonwealth’s policies are consistent down to the level of Local Board governance structure. Circular Letter WIOA-2-2015 requires the appointment of a standing committee to provide information and assist the board with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities. Those might include issues relating to compliance with section 188 and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding the provision of programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the One-Stop Delivery System, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing support for or accommodation to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. The Commonwealth is one of 26 jurisdictions yet to benefit from the implementation of the DOL’s Disability Employment Initiative. As enunciated in the State Plan it will seek to join in the DOL’s initiative in order to expand the capacity of the workforce system to increase the number of individuals with disabilities participating in existing career pathways and programs. (Page 172) Title I

As established in the State Plan, Title I and the PRVRA will lead a comprehensive effort to adapt the recommendations of the USDOL’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) contained in its "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: a Section 188 Disability Reference Guide". All local areas will be required to implement the resulting guidance adopted by the State Board as part of the local area certification and the operator’s competitive selection processes. Also, ODEP’s recommendations in regards to expanding the participation of people with disabilities in the workforce by means of the Registered Apprenticeship program will be furthered through the SAA’s implementing regulations. Presently, the State Board’s monitoring guidance includes the following criteria for testing physical and programmatic accessibility of the One-Stop Centers:

• One-Stop Centers shall facilitate the availability and ease of access of both self-serviced and assisted methods, including computer for resume preparation, Internet to search for job opportunities, telephone to contact employers, fax for sending resumes to employers with job opportunities, printed and digital information on employment and career opportunities, and printed and digital information on financial assistance for studies. Compliance will be assessed through inspections of the self-service system, and the procedures adopted. (Page 173) Title II

The One-Stop Centers’ staff will be fully aware of non-discrimination and physical and programmatic accessibility mandates. The direct customer service staff will also be trained to follow intake procedures to ensure that adequate, voluntary and confidential information on a customer’s disability is collected and recorded and to manage the corresponding service protocol. Memorandums of Understanding will be advanced in order to delineate the roles of the operators, partner programs, and other programs that might be able to provide assistance, aids or services to persons with disabilities. Act 136 of 1996 requires that all government agencies provide an interpreter to assist persons with hearing impairments that prevent oral communication and limit their access to services, using the services of the Sign Language Communication training program offered by the Continued Education Program of Office of the Commonwealth’s Training and Labor Affairs Advisory and Human Resources Administration Office. At a basic level, cross-training on sign language will be readily facilitated by the PRVRA to One-Stop Centers’ staff in charge of customer service to aid in the referral to the PRVRA of hearing impaired customers that might appear to be eligible and in need of PRVRA services. (Page 174) Title II

Providing Rapid Response services under the Dislocated Workers program. • Providing assistance to State entities and agencies, local areas, and One—Stop Centers partners in carrying out the activities described in the State Unified Plan.

  • Providing technical assistance to local areas for carrying out the regional planning and service delivery efforts required under section 106(c).
  • Providing technical assistance to local areas that fail to meet local performance accountability measures described in section 116(c).
  • Providing assistance to local areas operating a fiscal and management accountability information system in accordance with section 116(i).
  • Monitoring and overseeing activities.
  • Disseminating the State list of eligible providers of training services.
  • Disseminating information identifying eligible providers for on—the—job training, customized training, incumbent worker training, internships, paid or unpaid work experience opportunities, or transitional jobs. • Disseminating information on effective service delivery strategies to serve workers and job seekers.
  • Disseminating performance information and information on the cost of attendance (including tuition and fees) for participants in applicable programs, as described in subsections (d) and (h) of section 122.
  • Disseminating information on physical and programmatic accessibility, in accordance with section188, if applicable, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), for individuals with disabilities.
  • Completing program and service delivery evaluations. (Page 195) Title II

It would be most appropriate to award a contract to an IHE or other eligible provider of training services in order to facilitate the training of multiple individuals in in-demand industry sectors or occupations, and such contract does not limit customer choice.

  • The Local Board provides training services through a pay-for-performance contract. Any educational provider seeking initial eligibility determination must complete the application and submit the required information electronically to the Local Board. Providers might submit an application at any time during the year. Applicants are required to provide the following information:
  • Specification of in-demand industry sectors and occupations aligned with their training services
  • Evidence of the financial stability of the provider or institution
  • If applicable, evidence of State license to operate issued by the PREC, for each location where the training program will be offered
  • Information addressing factors related to the indicators of performance, as described in secs. 116(b)(2)(A)(i)(I) through (IV) of WIOA, including unsubsidized employment (second quarter after exit), unsubsidized employment (fourth quarter after exit), median earnings, and credentials attainment.
  • Information concerning whether the provider is in a partnership with businesses providing employment, including information about the quality and quantity of employer partnerships • Information to demonstrate if program of training services leads to an industry recognized credential and/or recognized post-secondary credential
  • Evidence to demonstrate compliance with the legal and regulatory provisions on equal opportunity and non-discrimination, reasonable accommodation and physical and programmatic accessibility (Page 203) Title II
Vets

Gold Card Initiative

The Gold Card provides unemployed post-9/11 era veterans with the intensive and follow-up services they need to succeed in today's job market. The Gold Card initiative is a joint effort of the DOLETA and the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS). ETA and VETS have developed a series of enhanced intensive services, including follow-up services, to identify those barriers to employment faced by veterans of post 9/11 era. The services, when provided under the Priority of Services to Veterans, are designed to overcome those barriers and to reinsert our 9/11 era veterans the labor workforce.

Due to the high unemployment rate faced by our veteran population, “Gold Card” services are available to veterans to help them obtain the necessary help to reinsert them in the labor market as soon as possible. An eligible veteran can present the Gold Card at his/her local One-Stop Career Center to receive enhanced intensive services including up to six months of follow-up. Information about the “Gold Card” initiative might be found at http://www.dol.gov/vets/goldcard.html. On this web site veterans might have the opportunity to print their “Gold Card” certificate and obtain information about how to access the available services.

The enhanced in-person services available for Gold Card holders at local One-Stop Career Centers may include:

  • Job readiness assessment, including interviews and testing
  • Development of an Individual Development Plan (IDP)
  • Career guidance through group or individual counseling that helps veterans in making training and career decisions
  • Provision of labor market, occupational, and skills transferability information that inform educational, training, and occupational decisions • Referral to job banks, job portals, and job openings • Referral to employers and registered apprenticeship sponsors
  • Referral to training by WIA-funded or third party service providers
  • Monthly follow-up by an assigned case manager for up to six months Employment and training activities carried out under the Community Services Block Grant Act (42 U.S.C. 9901 et seq.) (Page 116) Title II
Mental Health

~~11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;
12. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participants outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance; and
13. Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs.  (Page I63) Title IV

32. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with Section 116) and to monitor program performance;
33. Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs (Integrated English Literacy and Civics Education) (Page 250) Title IV

This Advisory Council of Substance Abuse and Mental Health of Puerto Rico is composed of government agencies, mental health patients and family members. It is supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (ASSMCA, by its Spanish acronym). This is the organization selected by the Health Insurance Administration of Puerto Rico to carry out operational functions of the Health Plan and offer treatment for mental health conditions, alcohol and drug abuse in the San Juan and Western regions. The PRVRA is a mandatory member of this council and participates in the planning for the provision of these services.

PRVRA participates as a member of the Advisory Council of Substance Abuse and Mental Health of Puerto Rico. The Council’s mission is to promote compliance with federal public law and the public policy of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, in order to offer adequate mental health and substance abuse services and promote a better quality of life for people and their families. The Council’s objectives are to:

1. Participate in the writing and implementation of the Block Grant, in accordance with Section 1915 (a) of the federal law. 2. Participate in the development of the State Plan for the Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Administration. 3. Review and evaluate adequacy and distribution of mental health and substance abuse services in PR to identify service needs. 

Advocate for people with mental health and substance abuse disabilities in PR, in order to guarantee establishment of a high quality integrated service system. (Page 280-281) Title IV

Youth are enrolled in the Foster Care program at age 14. They must be attending school, must not bear dispositive measures pursuant to Act 88-1986 (Youth Offenders Act), should not have disabling mental health conditions and must be subject to the temporary or permanent custody of the PRDOF. An intermediate program stage comprises individuals age 16 to 18, followed by a completion or exit stage for 19 to 21 year old. Through the stages, training and workshop activities in the independent living program are geared towards preparing participants to face adulthood. Topics involve money management, sex education, violence, rights and responsibilities, as well as moral and spiritual values.

As part of its 2015-2019 Child and Family Service Plan, the PRDOF targeted the youth in transition as a population in greater risk of maltreatment, particularly youth who have been in foster care that face even greater challenges because they have grown up with hardships that constitute risk factors. The Foster Care Independent Living Program empowers the youths in making a satisfactory transition to self-sufficiency by providing a continuum of services which includes: educational and/or vocational training; career planning; job preparation, search and retention, skills development; health; housing; ability to work as a member of a team; prevention of substance use/abuse (drugs, alcohol & tobacco); activities to develop emotional maturity; counseling to promote management of unresolved emotional problems; violence prevention; skills in identifying and accessing services; parenting skills development; orientation on legal rights and responsibilities; cultural awareness activities; workshops and counseling to develop a sense of moral social responsibility; socialization skills development (conflict resolution, problem solving, anger management, communication skills); and mentoring. (Page 55) Title IV

The program also coordinates program or supportive services with other entities, including those offered by the Youth Development Program at PRDEDC; the provision of health care services, including mental health services with the Department of Health and prevention programs administered by the Government’s Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; PRDOH's help in finding subsidize housing; services to victims of or at-risk of domestic violence, such as counseling, referrals and hot-line services, and shelter alternatives to victims offered by the Women’s Advocate Office; childcare and developmental services for pre-school children of TANF participants engaged in activities approved by the program, offered through service providers; and referral of participants to enroll in the PRCEC's and the Economic Development Bank to benefit from programs targeting self-employment and entrepreneurship, among other. (Page 121) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Each outreach staff establishes a list of available resources and develops partnerships with local organizations serving MSFWs. Resources include, but are not limited to: Department of Health, Farmworker Health Program, State Workers Compensation, Migrant Legal Services, PathStone Corporation, Department of Education for Adult Literacy, ESL and GED services to MSFWs. Career centers will collaborate with LWDBs to ensure MSFWs have training opportunities for jobs in demand in the area. We believe there are enough resources for Outreach but will continue to seek for additional resources that meets MSFWs needs as they are identified. (Page 232) Title III

Verifying priority of service status through the required paperwork is not mandatory unless the covered persons undergo eligibility determination or if the applicable federal program rules require the verification on site. Once priority of service is determined, covered persons move ahead of the line to receive the appropriate employment, training and placement services over the non—covered persons as required by law and as stated by VPL 07—09. Some Unemployment Insurance offices have adopted this priority of service model from the Employment Service although not mandated by law. Local areas will continue to encourage the provision of additional priority services and information to veterans, including priority access to job orders and individual training accounts (ITAs).

Other steps that will ensure priority of service to veterans include: training staff members; periodic reception and labor exchange staff reinforcement; DVOP/LVER preferential access to job opportunities; placement of signs in waiting areas stating veterans’ preference in all offices; a brief orientation (in the morning and afternoons) to clients waiting to be served at the reception area related to the priority to veterans offered; distribution of printed informative material; and data and report validation. (Page 171) Title II

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Vocational Rehabilitation invests in new technology to handle their cases (used Google translate for Spanish to English translation) - 11/04/2019

"In order to comply with the new federal regulations, the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), began [on November 11, 2019], its implementation plan for a new electronic system for handling cases of applicants and consumers potentially eligible for our services, as announced by administrator Madeline Hernández Dipiní. ” 

(Used Google translate for Spanish to English translation of quote. Citation link leads to a document in Spanish.)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transforming Lives through Supported Employment grants (Short Title: Supported Employment Program) - 03/18/2019

~~“The purpose of the program is to support state and community efforts to refine, implement, and sustain evidence-based supported employment programs and mutually compatible and supportive evidence-based practices (e.g., supported education) for transition-aged youth/young adults (ages 16-25) with serious emotional disturbance (SED), and adults with serious mental illness (SMI) or co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (COD). SAMHSA expects that this program will increase state and community capacity to implement and sustain Supported Employment Program (SEP) models and integrated supports to improve competitive employment outcomes for individuals with SED, SMI, or COD….

Eligible applicants are domestic public and private nonprofit entities. For example:State governments; the District of Columbia, Guam, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau are also eligible to apply.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Puerto Rico differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The Puerto Rico Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The Puerto Rico Department of Health is the single state agency, and they have a cooperative agreement with the Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration (PRHIA) also known as Administracion de Seguros Salud de Puerto Rico (ASES) which implements and administers island-wide health insurance system. Approximately half of Puerto Rico's 3.5 million residents have low incomes and depend upon the public health system for their medical care.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $5.4 billion in Medicaid funding to Puerto Rico.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Puerto Rico, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Puerto Rico’s FMAP to 57.2%.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Services Offered by the San Juan Regional Office - 01/01/2019

~~“VA’s San Juan Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. We offer the following additional services:

Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to applyInformation about VA health care and memorial benefitsOutreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women VeteransPublic affairs”

Systems
  • Other

The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“ARV provides services to people with eligible impairments, so that they can prepare, obtain, retain, or maintain a job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Puerto Rico for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“Persons with disabilities in Puerto Rico achieve greater independence, are empowered and take control of their lives in order to increase their integration, inclusion, equality and access to the services and resources in the community according to the following Goals.Goal 1Persons with disabilities have the necessary independent living services and other complementary services.Goal 2Persons with disabilities exercise control in decision-making and intercede for system changes.Goal 3The community at large knows about the independent living philosophy and services” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Services Offered by the San Juan Regional Office - 01/01/2019

~~“VA’s San Juan Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. We offer the following additional services:

Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to applyInformation about VA health care and memorial benefitsOutreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women VeteransPublic affairs”

Systems
  • Other

The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“ARV provides services to people with eligible impairments, so that they can prepare, obtain, retain, or maintain a job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Puerto Rico for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“Persons with disabilities in Puerto Rico achieve greater independence, are empowered and take control of their lives in order to increase their integration, inclusion, equality and access to the services and resources in the community according to the following Goals.Goal 1Persons with disabilities have the necessary independent living services and other complementary services.Goal 2Persons with disabilities exercise control in decision-making and intercede for system changes.Goal 3The community at large knows about the independent living philosophy and services” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Vocational Rehabilitation invests in new technology to handle their cases (used Google translate for Spanish to English translation) - 11/04/2019

"In order to comply with the new federal regulations, the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), began [on November 11, 2019], its implementation plan for a new electronic system for handling cases of applicants and consumers potentially eligible for our services, as announced by administrator Madeline Hernández Dipiní. ” 

(Used Google translate for Spanish to English translation of quote. Citation link leads to a document in Spanish.)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transforming Lives through Supported Employment grants (Short Title: Supported Employment Program) - 03/18/2019

~~“The purpose of the program is to support state and community efforts to refine, implement, and sustain evidence-based supported employment programs and mutually compatible and supportive evidence-based practices (e.g., supported education) for transition-aged youth/young adults (ages 16-25) with serious emotional disturbance (SED), and adults with serious mental illness (SMI) or co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (COD). SAMHSA expects that this program will increase state and community capacity to implement and sustain Supported Employment Program (SEP) models and integrated supports to improve competitive employment outcomes for individuals with SED, SMI, or COD….

Eligible applicants are domestic public and private nonprofit entities. For example:State governments; the District of Columbia, Guam, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau are also eligible to apply.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Puerto Rico differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The Puerto Rico Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The Puerto Rico Department of Health is the single state agency, and they have a cooperative agreement with the Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration (PRHIA) also known as Administracion de Seguros Salud de Puerto Rico (ASES) which implements and administers island-wide health insurance system. Approximately half of Puerto Rico's 3.5 million residents have low incomes and depend upon the public health system for their medical care.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $5.4 billion in Medicaid funding to Puerto Rico.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Puerto Rico, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Puerto Rico’s FMAP to 57.2%.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phablet

Snapshot

"Rich Port": Where the richness of having a competitive job at a living wage is possible for all people with disabilities.

2018 State Population.
-4.44%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,195,153
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.71%
Change from
2017 to 2018
328,525
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.36%
Change from
2017 to 2018
76,210
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-3.49%
Change from
2017 to 2018
23.20%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
4.54%
Change from
2017 to 2018
55.48%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 3,195,153
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 328,525
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 76,210
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 885,794
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 23.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 55.48%
State/National unemployment rate. 8.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 46.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 42.20%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 310,024
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 365,294
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 441,128
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 76,704
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 667,268
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 1,208
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,059
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 45,669
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 109,485

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 151,590

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 216
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 592
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 1,411
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 14.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 77
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 9
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 71
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 145

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,998
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 165,205
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 72.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.22%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.23%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 51.10%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 65.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 87.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 14.36%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~In terms of service to individuals facing barriers to employment, counseling remains a key strategic activity across all core programs. Counselors has a specialized education coupled with years of experience and knowledge, and can provide information and guidance to clients on occupational requirements, employment opportunities, trends and other community resources that can benefit the job seekers.

As previously mentioned, seeking to activate the government entities' participation in key competitive programs aims to expand education, training and employment services to targeted populations. DEI, the qualification of local boards as Employment Networks under the Ticket to Work program, REO, Youthbuild, Job Plus, the expansion of activities for employment creation/retention under CDBG, are some of the targeted programs or activities.

Title II has a leading role in serving individuals with barriers to employment and ensuring their access to the labor force. To assist enhancing its service to these populations, the program will implement an Advisory Board to further fine-tuning and program improvements. (Page 93) Title I

i. Please, see information corresponding to 101(d)(2), above.
5. 101(d)(3)(B) the development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low—skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment:
i. Please, refer to section II(c)(1).

Goal 4 foresees to spur the development of sector strategies and career pathways by targeting opportunities in the public sector to resource the convening of partnerships. Strategy section aims to convene a working group to assist the State Board in developing support for sector strategies and career pathways. As mentioned above, Strategy section, addresses the utilization of proven methodologies provided by USDOL to aid in these efforts. PRDE’s programs (Title II and Carl D. Perkins supported CTE) will lead the way in pursuing the implementation of career pathways and providing the necessary insight to the State Board. The WDP and PRVRA will also support the effort by pursuing DEI funding. (Page 99) Title II

An enhanced coordination with the PREC will allow the harvesting of data being supplied by educational institutions under local and federal mandates to retrofit the educational and workforce systems. Additional opportunities could arise by devising ways in which the Council's State student financial assistance programs support the strategies of the system.

Local areas will be encouraged to leverage the resources of required partners to support the delivery of integrated services, through financial and non-financial agreements. Many of the arrangements for sharing other state resources must be worked out in detail at local level involving other agencies and the local One-Stop Centers’ partners, through MOUs.

A key strategy in leveraging other Federal investments that have enhanced access to workforce development programs at educational institutions is to equip the State Board to manage the function of identifying and seeking additional or dormant competitive funding opportunities that can benefit any component of the workforce development system. DEI and REO, among others, represent additional opportunities. To that end, the State is committed to advance the designation of the local boards as 501(c)(3) tax-exempted non-for profits to leverage non-traditional sources of grant funding. (Page 138) Title II
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Competitive graduates with knowledge and skills needed to adapt to changes in the economy, environment, and technology. Education is a cornerstone of Puerto Rico’s economy, society, and political systems. Its purpose is to build and sustain the knowledge and skills needed to ensure that individuals, communities and key institutions can adapt to changes in the world economy, the environment, and technology.

The Government of Puerto Rico now has the opportunity to fundamentally transform its education system in a way that improves student outcomes, supports the development of children, youth and adults, and supports its vision of economic and social development moving forward.

1. Upgrade school infrastructure to support resilience and sustainability

2. Increase K—12 access to vocational, technical, and career education and strengthen school-to-work transitions

3. Promote pre-school and out-of-school learning opportunities

4. Strengthen systems to support new education reform package. (Page 21) Title I

The Secretary for Special Education has:

1. With the approval of Law 263 of 2006 - Institution of vocational and career evaluation for all students in the special education program, all students with disabilities eligible for special education services, from the 12 years must be evaluated by certified vocational and career professionals with the purpose of delineating their transition plan from school to adult life.

2. To that, in collaboration with the PRDE's Counseling Program, in their public policies, we determinate the administration and interpretation of occupational interests and occupational counseling for training in decision-making for the selection of occupational careers for all student with disabilities.

3. DEPR and the School of Rehabilitation Counseling of the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, has a collaboration agreement to have Rehabilitation Counseling Practitioners in the Special Education Service Centers of all educational regions for collaborate with the School Counselor in the administration, interpretation, and counseling to the students with moderate and severe disabilities eligible for the special education program. This agreement comes into effect in September 2018.

4. PRDE has the Transition Manual from the School to the Work, approved in 1992. That manual is a teacher guides related to the process of transition from school to work for students with moderate disabilities.

5. All students who have an IEP, from the age of 16, or before being necessary, his plan establish some different coordinated activities whose purpose is the development of skills aimed at the world of employment and adult life.

6. Students with mild and moderate disabilities who are located in the regular classroom, participate in the same activities as regular students. Like a CEPA tests, College Board exam, 40 hours of occupational exploration, etc. with the reasonable accommodations established in your Individualized Educational Program (PEI) or your Service Plan (PS).

7. The Secretary for Special Education, for the 2018-2019 school year, hired transition coordinators whose goal was to coordinate all services related to the transition process.

8. DEPR has an inter-agency agreement with the Department of Labor - Vocational Rehabilitation Administration, which establishes the responsibilities of each agency to achieve a successful transition of students with disabilities from PRDE to DT / ARV.

9. Beginning at age 16, all students eligible for special education receive orientation and guidance to the services offered by the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), which is the leading agency in the process of transitioning for the school to the world of employment.

10. ARV, in coordination with the PRDE, offer different hours of training during the school year for students with disabilities.

11. ARV, in coordination with the PRDE, every summer, develops pre-employment experiences for students with disabilities who participate in the application and interview process for these programs. (Page 94) Title II

This State Board rules, policies and statutes, are designed to ensure:

a. An occupational and technical education is equally available to all students and is of consistent quality throughout Puerto Rico;

b. The time and content of career and technical education are properly and flexibly coordinated with academic instruction;

c. Career and technical education is available to all student populations, particularly in high unemployment areas or where occupational re-training needs are required;

d. Career and technical education programs, as well as curriculum courses, are useful for your graduates to obtain employment or improve the quality of their employment;

e. Career and technical education programs will be coordinated with state programs related to education and training. This includes ensuring that graduates in career and technical education receive appropriate credit for the requirements of apprenticeship and professional licensing programs in order for them to pass their revalidation exams;

f. Regional occupational and technical education services are provided efficiently. ; and

g. Alternative curriculums, curricula and/or standards are developed to allow inclusion of students with disabilities, and funds may be used for the provision of the services required in the Individualized Education Plan (IEP), as required by federal law. (Page 110) Title II

The designated State unit’s plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.

In Puerto Rico, Act 51-1996, as amended, provides for the coordination between the Assistant Secretariat of Comprehensive Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities of the PRDE, and the PRVRA, among other agencies. In terms of the public policy and practices for the development and implementation of the IPE, the PRVRA has established a protocol in accordance with federal regulations (34 CFR 361.22(a)(2)). Before the student with disabilities exits the school system, a Written Intervention Plan (WIP), or IPE, must be developed. Its purpose is to formalize the management of the VR services provision process in coordination with educational agencies. This plan includes:

• Application of guides and programmatic procedures for the provision of services
• Beginning and ending date of services
• Employment outcomes (regular employment, supported employment, self-employment or any other innovative option)
• Projected date for the achievement of the employment outcome (Page 272) Title IV

• Evidence in the IPE of the participation of the consumer (his own words) regarding the informed choice process, self-management, and others actions taken during his VR process

In addition, the IPE contains those transition services that could be provided to the disabled student, under the sponsorship of the PRVRA, while participating from the educational services of the PRDE, and after exhausting the available comparable services and benefits. The following is a description of such services:

• Career exploration
• Vocational counseling
• Orientation, postsecondary education (university level options and summer camp programs, among others)
• Assessment of vocational interests, capabilities and pre-employment skills
• Evaluation with an ecological approach
• Workshops and job readiness orientation (job skills, job interviews and drafting of a resume, among others)
• Vocational training/post-secondary education
• Supported employment services
• Transportation, including training on the use of public transportation
• Mentoring
• Self-management
• Use of auxiliary aids and services (assistive technology equipment/devices and services) (Page 273) Title IV

• The VR counselor informs to the transition analyst, in writing, the determination taken in regard to the referred student. Then, the transition analyst informs the outcome of said determination to the school official.
• The VR counselor evaluates the disabled youth’s capability towards the achievement of either an employment outcome or a more independent living.
• The VR counselor, with the participation of the disabled youth, his family or representative, develops the IPE; in accordance with the needs of the youth and taking into consideration the services included in the WIP or IPE prior to his exit of the school system.
• The transition analyst gathers statistical data showing the following: orientations provided to school staff, students and parents; meetings of the Programming and Placement Committee; students referred to the PRVRA by the PRDE; and eligible students.
• The transition analyst participates, if necessary, in the drafting of the IEP by recommending areas to be worked on during the transition stages. (Page 274) Title IV

• Offer and coordinate the provision of necessary services for the transition process to the post-school life.
• Coordinate so that officials of agencies included in this agreement are able to provide orientation on the services offered by those agencies to the parents, the students and the school staff.
• Provide academic and vocational services to the population with disabilities in accordance with federal and state laws and regulations.
• Collaborate with the other subscribing agencies in their objective of providing services related to job placement and follow up in employment to the students until they reach 21 years of age or graduate from high school.
• Provide, through schools, the human resource for the development of necessary basic academic and occupational skills, according to the needs identified in vocational evaluation results and in accordance with the provisions of the IPE. (Page 275) Title IV

1. Transition process for students with disabilities begins at schools through orientation provided by the Transition Counselor (TC) of the VRA, to teachers, students with disabilities and/or parents. As a result, meetings of the Placement and Programming Committee (PPC) take place, and decisions are made about IPE recommendations. A plan of action is developed and the TC may accept the referral of the student with disabilities. (Page 276) Title IV

In Puerto Rico, the Assistant Secretariat of Comprehensive Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities and the PRVRA are located in two different state departments (PRDE and PRDOLHR). The first one is responsible for the implementation of Public Law 108-446, as amended, known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA); the second one is responsible for the implementation of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and State Law 97-2000, as amended, known as the Vocational Rehabilitation Law of Puerto Rico. In addition to the aforementioned legislation, we have State Law 51-1996, as amended, known as the Integral Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities, which provides for the coordination to be achieved between various local agencies to ensure an effective transition of disabled youth coming from the Department of Education. Both agencies maintain cooperative ties related to the development of their respective human resources and as such, have been planning, developing, offering and/or participating in numerous in-service training activities since 1987. Some of the topics covered in such training include: transition from school to work; vocational evaluation; supported employment; IDEIA; Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Public Law No. 101-336, as amended; Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Public Law 105-220 of August 7 of 1998, as amended; among others. In addition, both agencies are members of an Advisory Committee, which meets periodically to plan and join efforts in the development and implementation of transition services from school to work. (Page 290) Title IV

• Continue with the monthly monitoring of eligibility determinations within 60 days, and planning and signature of IPE within 90 days, of the transition-age youth referred to the PRVRA.
• Maintain the participation of the VR counselor in the meetings of the Programming and Placement Committee (PPC) on transition-age youth.
• Offer Pre-Employment Transition services.
• Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the centers of assessment and adjustment (CAAs).
• Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the centers of support and employment modes (CSEMs) and the results of these youth in the different modes of employment.
• Strengthen relationships between the PRDE and the PRVRA to facilitate the identification of students who can benefit from the transition services.
• Continue providing orientation to the school staff on the services of the PRVRA. (Page 312) Title IV

The Assessment and Adjustment Office, the Support and Employment Modes Office and the VR Counseling Services Office of the PRVRA, planned and coordinated a variety of activities leading toward developing Work-based learning experiences for students in their transition process, as required by WIOA.

235. In July of 2016 a closure activity was coordinated for the 10 students from transition who participated in the Work-based learning experience held in June of 2016 at the Program-Industry for the Blind and those with other physical, mental and developmental disabilities.
236. In June of 2017, seven (7) employers loaned their facilities, and 56 transition students from the 6 regions of the VRS participated in a Work-based learning experience. Previously, 9 meetings had been held for a total of 78 participants at the regional level regarding the corresponding planning.  (Page 320) Title IV

The Administrator’s Office:
237. Developed the project’s protocol: Work-based Learning Experiences in State Government Agencies that started in the month of July, 2017.
238. Developed a protocol to carry out the project: Pre-Employment Transition Services Fair.
Strategy:
o Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the Centers of Assessment and Adjustment (CAAs). (Page 321) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~i5. 101(d)(3)(B) the development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low—skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment:
i. Please, refer to section II(c)(1).

Goal 4 foresees to spur the development of sector strategies and career pathways by targeting opportunities in the public sector to resource the convening of partnerships. Strategy section aims to convene a working group to assist the State Board in developing support for sector strategies and career pathways. As mentioned above, Strategy section, addresses the utilization of proven methodologies provided by USDOL to aid in these efforts. PRDE’s programs (Title II and Carl D. Perkins supported CTE) will lead the way in pursuing the implementation of career pathways and providing the necessary insight to the State Board. The WDP and PRVRA will also support the effort by pursuing DEI funding. (Page 99) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Registered Apprenticeship will also be delivered as a career pathway for job seekers and as a job—driven strategy for employers and industries. As required, procedures will be implemented by the PRDOLHR to add Registered Apprenticeship programs to the State list of eligible training providers and to verify their status, considering timely data collection requirements on new programs, including information on occupations included in the program; method and length of instruction; and, number of active apprentices. (Page 201) Title II

Upon request, sponsors or institutions that offer training programs registered under the National Apprenticeship Act, will be automatically included and maintained on the list for as long as the program remains registered under the National Apprenticeship Act. On-the-job training, customized training, incumbent worker training, and transitional employment providers are not subject to the requirements of the eligible training provider provisions. Also exempted are services for which the Local Board determines that any of the following conditions are met:

• There are insufficient providers.

• There is a training services program with demonstrated effectiveness offered in the local area by a community-based organization or other private organization to serve individuals with barriers to employment as defined under section 3(34) of WIOA. (Page 202) Tile II

  1. National Dislocated Worker Grants (DWGs) awarded and coordination with state rapid response activities and FEMA, for temporary jobs.
  2. Progress made in implementing sector strategies and career pathways. The discussion may include: business engagement strategies; work-based learning (including apprenticeship); work experiences for youth and adults; transitional jobs; and incumbent worker training strategies and policies.
  3. Promising practices, lessons learned, and success stories that focus on: serving employers; communities; individuals with barriers to employment; at-risk and priority populations served, including out-of-school youth, low-income adults, dislocated workers, individuals who are basic skills deficient, individuals with limited language proficiency, individuals with disabilities, veterans, the long-term unemployed, and any other individuals with barriers to employment,

The annual report will also include activities at the State level:

  1. Rapid Response Services;
  2. Performance measure narrative section;
  3. Allowable activities with Governor set aside funds;
  4. National Dislocated Worker Grants: ZIKA; Irma and Maria Grant; Disability Grant (Page 168) Title III

3. VRA, in its search to comply with WIOA, has purchased the PR SAM Sample (Puerto Rico Skills Assessment Module) and the CIRINO Gerena Electronic Vocational Interest tests that will allow VRA to offer career exploration services to transition students between 14 to 21 years of age, and who are receiving, or have received, special education or Section 504 services under the Rehabilitation Law of 1973, as amended. 4. A Work-based Learning Experience was offered to 58 students with disabilities under 6 private employers in June of 2017. 5. In August of 2017, a service fair was held for students with disabilities under the Career Exploration Counseling category. (Page 267) Title IV

During the summer of 2017, 56 students with disabilities participated of a Work-based Learning Experience through coordination between PRVRA and employers. PRVRA will continue carrying out this type of activities during the next years. To reach more employers, the Centers of Support and Employment Modes (CSEM) and the Office of Support and Employment Modes (OSEM) will continue to offer orientations by region to different sectors: businesses, industrial and government. We expect to obtain from those employers collaboration to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities. Evaluation and Adjustment Centers staff of the PRVRA also performs work based evaluation processes for applicants/consumers of the VRA, including youth with disabilities, and will continue to do so with employers’ collaboration. Transition Analysts will support CSEM/OSEM to identify more schools that offer services to students and youth with disabilities as possible candidates for Supported Employment and Pre-Employment Transition Services. (Page 279-280) Title IV

The Assessment and Adjustment Office, the Support and Employment Modes Office and the VR Counseling Services Office of the PRVRA, planned and coordinated a variety of activities leading toward developing Work-based learning experiences for students in their transition process, as required by WIOA. 235. In July of 2016 a closure activity was coordinated for the 10 students from transition who participated in the Work-based learning experience held in June of 2016 at the Program-Industry for the Blind and those with other physical, mental and developmental disabilities. 236. In June of 2017, seven (7) employers loaned their facilities, and 56 transition students from the 6 regions of the VRS participated in a Work-based learning experience. Previously, 9 meetings had been held for a total of 78 participants at the regional level regarding the corresponding planning. (Page 320) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~In terms of service to individuals facing barriers to employment, counseling remains a key strategic activity across all core programs. Counselors has a specialized education coupled with years of experience and knowledge, and can provide information and guidance to clients on occupational requirements, employment opportunities, trends and other community resources that can benefit the job seekers.

As previously mentioned, seeking to activate the government entities' participation in key competitive programs aims to expand education, training and employment services to targeted populations. DEI, the qualification of local boards as Employment Networks under the Ticket to Work program, REO, Youthbuild, Job Plus, the expansion of activities for employment creation/retention under CDBG, are some of the targeted programs or activities.

Title II has a leading role in serving individuals with barriers to employment and ensuring their access to the labor force. To assist enhancing its service to these populations, the program will implement an Advisory Board to further fine-tuning and program improvements. (Page 93) Title II

The Government requires recipients to engage in work without delay unless exempted. Congress never extended to the Government the option of including on case-by-case basis families in which a non-recipient parent receives SSI, when the Aid to the Aged, Blind and Disabled (AABD) Programs in the states were converted to SSI. Accordingly, the Government considers the SSI and AABD Programs as the same in the context of the TANF Program.

The participant is required to register and seek employment through the PRDOLHR's Employment Service. Also, it is referred to engage in work activities, as directed in the Puerto Rico’s Work Verification Plan. Most TANF recipients must comply with at least 30 hours a week of work participation. To verify countable hours, the participant must submit the time sheet to the case manager, which must be signed by his work activity supervisor. (Page 119) Title II

Employment and training programs administered by the Social Security Administration, including the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program established under section 1148 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1320b—19)

Through the issuance of local planning and certification guidance, the State Board will encourage local boards and operators to become engaged in the Ticket to Work program as qualified Employment Networks. Puerto Rico's serviced by 66 employment networks; nevertheless, just one (Caguas Guayama) out of the 15 local workforce areas is currently qualified as an Employment Network.

The PRVRA continues receiving referrals from the Ticket to Work Program for the purpose of providing vocational rehabilitation services. In addition, the PRVRA established an agreement with the Caribbean Center of Work Incentives Planning Assistance (CWIPA) to provide benefits planning service to the consumers of the PRVRA who are beneficiaries of the Social Security Disability Insurance. This service is expected to help these beneficiaries in decision-making regarding the benefits of reintegrating into the labor market. (Page 121) Title III

Strategies:
• Strengthen the coordination with the PRDOLHR to know employment trends and types of employers.
• Continue implementing employment projects through the development of self-employments.
• Continue with the programmatic monitoring interventions and technical assistance to the CRPs, to ensure quality and agility in the services to the consumers with the most significant disabilities.
• Continue the participation of the PRVRA consumers in employment-related activities available in the American Job Centers and other components of WIOA.
• Continue referring consumers, who are beneficiaries of the Social Security Disability Insurance, to the Caribbean Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (CWIPA) Program for the counseling service for benefits planning.
• Share with the PRSRC the Normative Communications governing the provision of services.
• Continue with the programmatic monitoring interventions of the services provision process to ensure compliance with the public policy.
• Continue offering technical assistance to the supervisory staff of counseling services to improve decision-making in case management.
• Refer the PRVRA consumers to the services of other components of WIOA (Title I, Title II Employment Service and other programs) to expand their job skills.

Goal 2
Ensure the provision of services to eligible youth with disabilities, and pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities coming from transition, so that they are able to achieve an employment outcome. (Page 311) Title IV

VRA gave: orientation to employers on salary incentives, affirmative actions and VRA services; technical assistance regarding the “Ticket-to-Work” Program. 4,417 employers were contacted, including small business so that they would come forward and recruit VRA consumers.

Strategy:
• Continue with the granting of salary incentives to employers in order to promote employment opportunities for VRA’s consumers.

Progress Report:
VRA formalized 10 wage-incentive contracts, where 18 consumers benefitted.

Strategy:
• Continue with the participation in the meetings of the State Board of WIOA (Page 322) Title IV

The Government requires recipients to engage in work without delay unless exempted. Congress never extended to the Government the option of including on case-by-case basis families in which a non-recipient parent receives SSI, when the Aid to the Aged, Blind and Disabled (AABD) Programs in the states were converted to SSI. Accordingly, the Government considers the SSI and AABD Programs as the same in the context of the TANF Program.

The participant is required to register and seek employment through the PRDOLHR's Employment Service. Also, it is referred to engage in work activities, as directed in the Puerto Rico’s Work Verification Plan. Most TANF recipients must comply with at least 30 hours a week of work participation. To verify countable hours, the participant must submit the time sheet to the case manager, which must be signed by his work activity supervisor. (Page 119) Title IV

QCPMO in collaboration with the State Rehabilitation Council carried out the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment.

VRCSO gave orientation about the Employment Networks for Social Security Disability Insurance Beneficiaries, at the ACAA facilities [Administración de Compensaciones por Accidentes de Automóviles]; and also, on VRA services given to the Department of Justice staff, as well as to the Department of Education.

So that new agencies could submit new proposals to the VRA to offer supported employment services to consumers with the most significant disabilities, OSEM gave orientation to the following enterprises: “Programa Florece la Montaña”; Pentaq Manufacturing Corporation; and the Moretta Díaz Corporation.

Assessment and Adjustment Office (OAA, Spanish acronym) provided information about interpreting services for the deaf to Interamerican University’s internship students. (Page 324) Title IV

 

Employer/ Business

~~The flexibility afforded by WIOA will be used to engage and expand the amount and type of training providers. For instance, the implementation of the Registered Apprenticeship program could allow the involvement of unions, trade associations as well as established providers like IHEs and community colleges as training providers.

As required under WIOA, the State maintains a publicly accessible list of eligible training providers and their eligible training programs, including relevant performance and cost information. The State Board adopted procedures for initial determination of eligibility and subsequent certification of training providers. (Page 137) Title II

As directed under WIOA, the initial eligibility of any provider will be valid for the period of one year.

Section C(II)(b) of the Governor’s procedures outlines the roles of the State and local areas in receiving and reviewing provider applications to decide if continued eligibility is granted. Newly eligible training providers that were determined to be eligible by transitioning into WIOA were subjected to the application procedure for continued eligibility before their initial year of eligibility expired. Applicants applying for continued eligibility are required to provide information to assess the following parameters:

• Performance accountability measures described in secs. 116(b)(2)(A)(i)(I) through (IV) of WIOA, including unsubsidized employment (Second Quarter after Exit), unsubsidized employment (Second Quarter after Exit), Median Earnings and Credential Attainment. If data is not yet available, compliance with the following alternate factors, as applicable: at least 75% of participants completing the program during the last two academic years; or, at least 70% of participants employed in the occupations related to the training program during the last two academic years, 60% if the occupation requires licensure. (Page 204) Title IV

The WDP will notify its determination to the Local Board. If the program is determined not to be eligible, the WDP will detail the reasons for its decision. The Local Board will notify the provider the determination of the WDP and, if it were adverse, the reasons for denial and information regarding the appeals process before the State Board, as provided under section E(II) of the State procedures.

As specified under E(I) of the State procedures, either the Local Board or the WDP might deny the provider its eligibility if the provider does not comply with the performance levels negotiated for the Local Area; or, if it fails to submit a complete proposal or is not authorized to operate, as might be required. For eligible programs, continued eligibility will be in effect for two (2) years. As required under WIOA and section D(II) of the State procedures, a training provider must deliver results and provide accurate information in order to retain its status as an eligible training provider. At least every two years, the WDP, in consultation with the Local Board might remove the provider from the list of approved providers for false reporting, for substantially violating a provision of title I of WIOA or its implementing regulations including non-discrimination provisions, failure to meet required performance outcomes, or debarment. The biennial review will also include verification of the registration status of registered apprenticeship programs. (Page 205) Title IV

Data Collection

• Integration of the local boards in the service—delivery model mandated by WIOA, including common intake, common outreach strategies and initiatives, universal service across the region, common performance measures (optional), identification of additional grants and fund opportunities, cost allocation plan, and MOU structure with required and optional partners, among other factors. (Page 183) Title II

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The effectiveness of the strategic framework will be assessed and tested according to procedures being mandated for each program and the system collectively. As prescribed under section 361.800 of the proposed rule One-Stop Centers and one-stop delivery systems will be certified for effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility, and continuous improvement, and as directed, these evaluations will take into account feedback from the One Stop network customers. (Page 84)

As required under section 677.160 of the proposed rule, the programs will be assessed on the basis of their negotiated levels of performance. Section 116(d)(2) of WIOA requires the State submit a performance report that will contain information on the actual performance levels achieved consistent with the proposed rule 677.175. The State will comply with these requirements and the implementing guidance to be jointly issued by the USDOL and the USDOE, which may include information on reportable individuals as determined by the Secretaries.

All programs must be evaluated in terms of their compliance with basic threshold requirements, including programmatic and physical accessibility. One-Stop certification guidance will be reviewed to include relevant measures for assessing partner performance. Additionally, as required under WIOA, guidance issued by USDOL, USDOE and other program grantors, and the goals and accountability measures included in regional and local plans. (Page 158) Title II

• Total number of participants who exited each of the core programs, including disaggregated counts of those who participated in and exited a core program by individuals with barriers to employment

• Demographics Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. (Page 171-172) Title I

The Commonwealth’s policies are consistent down to the level of Local Board governance structure. Circular Letter WIOA-2-2015 requires the appointment of a standing committee to provide information and assist the board with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities. Those might include issues relating to compliance with section 188 and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding the provision of programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the One-Stop Delivery System, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing support for or accommodation to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. The Commonwealth is one of 26 jurisdictions yet to benefit from the implementation of the DOL’s Disability Employment Initiative. As enunciated in the State Plan it will seek to join in the DOL’s initiative in order to expand the capacity of the workforce system to increase the number of individuals with disabilities participating in existing career pathways and programs. (Page 172) Title I

As established in the State Plan, Title I and the PRVRA will lead a comprehensive effort to adapt the recommendations of the USDOL’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) contained in its "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: a Section 188 Disability Reference Guide". All local areas will be required to implement the resulting guidance adopted by the State Board as part of the local area certification and the operator’s competitive selection processes. Also, ODEP’s recommendations in regards to expanding the participation of people with disabilities in the workforce by means of the Registered Apprenticeship program will be furthered through the SAA’s implementing regulations. Presently, the State Board’s monitoring guidance includes the following criteria for testing physical and programmatic accessibility of the One-Stop Centers:

• One-Stop Centers shall facilitate the availability and ease of access of both self-serviced and assisted methods, including computer for resume preparation, Internet to search for job opportunities, telephone to contact employers, fax for sending resumes to employers with job opportunities, printed and digital information on employment and career opportunities, and printed and digital information on financial assistance for studies. Compliance will be assessed through inspections of the self-service system, and the procedures adopted. (Page 173) Title II

The One-Stop Centers’ staff will be fully aware of non-discrimination and physical and programmatic accessibility mandates. The direct customer service staff will also be trained to follow intake procedures to ensure that adequate, voluntary and confidential information on a customer’s disability is collected and recorded and to manage the corresponding service protocol. Memorandums of Understanding will be advanced in order to delineate the roles of the operators, partner programs, and other programs that might be able to provide assistance, aids or services to persons with disabilities. Act 136 of 1996 requires that all government agencies provide an interpreter to assist persons with hearing impairments that prevent oral communication and limit their access to services, using the services of the Sign Language Communication training program offered by the Continued Education Program of Office of the Commonwealth’s Training and Labor Affairs Advisory and Human Resources Administration Office. At a basic level, cross-training on sign language will be readily facilitated by the PRVRA to One-Stop Centers’ staff in charge of customer service to aid in the referral to the PRVRA of hearing impaired customers that might appear to be eligible and in need of PRVRA services. (Page 174) Title II

Providing Rapid Response services under the Dislocated Workers program. • Providing assistance to State entities and agencies, local areas, and One—Stop Centers partners in carrying out the activities described in the State Unified Plan.

  • Providing technical assistance to local areas for carrying out the regional planning and service delivery efforts required under section 106(c).
  • Providing technical assistance to local areas that fail to meet local performance accountability measures described in section 116(c).
  • Providing assistance to local areas operating a fiscal and management accountability information system in accordance with section 116(i).
  • Monitoring and overseeing activities.
  • Disseminating the State list of eligible providers of training services.
  • Disseminating information identifying eligible providers for on—the—job training, customized training, incumbent worker training, internships, paid or unpaid work experience opportunities, or transitional jobs. • Disseminating information on effective service delivery strategies to serve workers and job seekers.
  • Disseminating performance information and information on the cost of attendance (including tuition and fees) for participants in applicable programs, as described in subsections (d) and (h) of section 122.
  • Disseminating information on physical and programmatic accessibility, in accordance with section188, if applicable, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), for individuals with disabilities.
  • Completing program and service delivery evaluations. (Page 195) Title II

It would be most appropriate to award a contract to an IHE or other eligible provider of training services in order to facilitate the training of multiple individuals in in-demand industry sectors or occupations, and such contract does not limit customer choice.

  • The Local Board provides training services through a pay-for-performance contract. Any educational provider seeking initial eligibility determination must complete the application and submit the required information electronically to the Local Board. Providers might submit an application at any time during the year. Applicants are required to provide the following information:
  • Specification of in-demand industry sectors and occupations aligned with their training services
  • Evidence of the financial stability of the provider or institution
  • If applicable, evidence of State license to operate issued by the PREC, for each location where the training program will be offered
  • Information addressing factors related to the indicators of performance, as described in secs. 116(b)(2)(A)(i)(I) through (IV) of WIOA, including unsubsidized employment (second quarter after exit), unsubsidized employment (fourth quarter after exit), median earnings, and credentials attainment.
  • Information concerning whether the provider is in a partnership with businesses providing employment, including information about the quality and quantity of employer partnerships • Information to demonstrate if program of training services leads to an industry recognized credential and/or recognized post-secondary credential
  • Evidence to demonstrate compliance with the legal and regulatory provisions on equal opportunity and non-discrimination, reasonable accommodation and physical and programmatic accessibility (Page 203) Title II
Vets

Gold Card Initiative

The Gold Card provides unemployed post-9/11 era veterans with the intensive and follow-up services they need to succeed in today's job market. The Gold Card initiative is a joint effort of the DOLETA and the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS). ETA and VETS have developed a series of enhanced intensive services, including follow-up services, to identify those barriers to employment faced by veterans of post 9/11 era. The services, when provided under the Priority of Services to Veterans, are designed to overcome those barriers and to reinsert our 9/11 era veterans the labor workforce.

Due to the high unemployment rate faced by our veteran population, “Gold Card” services are available to veterans to help them obtain the necessary help to reinsert them in the labor market as soon as possible. An eligible veteran can present the Gold Card at his/her local One-Stop Career Center to receive enhanced intensive services including up to six months of follow-up. Information about the “Gold Card” initiative might be found at http://www.dol.gov/vets/goldcard.html. On this web site veterans might have the opportunity to print their “Gold Card” certificate and obtain information about how to access the available services.

The enhanced in-person services available for Gold Card holders at local One-Stop Career Centers may include:

  • Job readiness assessment, including interviews and testing
  • Development of an Individual Development Plan (IDP)
  • Career guidance through group or individual counseling that helps veterans in making training and career decisions
  • Provision of labor market, occupational, and skills transferability information that inform educational, training, and occupational decisions • Referral to job banks, job portals, and job openings • Referral to employers and registered apprenticeship sponsors
  • Referral to training by WIA-funded or third party service providers
  • Monthly follow-up by an assigned case manager for up to six months Employment and training activities carried out under the Community Services Block Grant Act (42 U.S.C. 9901 et seq.) (Page 116) Title II
Mental Health

~~11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;
12. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participants outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance; and
13. Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs.  (Page I63) Title IV

32. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with Section 116) and to monitor program performance;
33. Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs (Integrated English Literacy and Civics Education) (Page 250) Title IV

This Advisory Council of Substance Abuse and Mental Health of Puerto Rico is composed of government agencies, mental health patients and family members. It is supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (ASSMCA, by its Spanish acronym). This is the organization selected by the Health Insurance Administration of Puerto Rico to carry out operational functions of the Health Plan and offer treatment for mental health conditions, alcohol and drug abuse in the San Juan and Western regions. The PRVRA is a mandatory member of this council and participates in the planning for the provision of these services.

PRVRA participates as a member of the Advisory Council of Substance Abuse and Mental Health of Puerto Rico. The Council’s mission is to promote compliance with federal public law and the public policy of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, in order to offer adequate mental health and substance abuse services and promote a better quality of life for people and their families. The Council’s objectives are to:

1. Participate in the writing and implementation of the Block Grant, in accordance with Section 1915 (a) of the federal law. 2. Participate in the development of the State Plan for the Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Administration. 3. Review and evaluate adequacy and distribution of mental health and substance abuse services in PR to identify service needs. 

Advocate for people with mental health and substance abuse disabilities in PR, in order to guarantee establishment of a high quality integrated service system. (Page 280-281) Title IV

Youth are enrolled in the Foster Care program at age 14. They must be attending school, must not bear dispositive measures pursuant to Act 88-1986 (Youth Offenders Act), should not have disabling mental health conditions and must be subject to the temporary or permanent custody of the PRDOF. An intermediate program stage comprises individuals age 16 to 18, followed by a completion or exit stage for 19 to 21 year old. Through the stages, training and workshop activities in the independent living program are geared towards preparing participants to face adulthood. Topics involve money management, sex education, violence, rights and responsibilities, as well as moral and spiritual values.

As part of its 2015-2019 Child and Family Service Plan, the PRDOF targeted the youth in transition as a population in greater risk of maltreatment, particularly youth who have been in foster care that face even greater challenges because they have grown up with hardships that constitute risk factors. The Foster Care Independent Living Program empowers the youths in making a satisfactory transition to self-sufficiency by providing a continuum of services which includes: educational and/or vocational training; career planning; job preparation, search and retention, skills development; health; housing; ability to work as a member of a team; prevention of substance use/abuse (drugs, alcohol & tobacco); activities to develop emotional maturity; counseling to promote management of unresolved emotional problems; violence prevention; skills in identifying and accessing services; parenting skills development; orientation on legal rights and responsibilities; cultural awareness activities; workshops and counseling to develop a sense of moral social responsibility; socialization skills development (conflict resolution, problem solving, anger management, communication skills); and mentoring. (Page 55) Title IV

The program also coordinates program or supportive services with other entities, including those offered by the Youth Development Program at PRDEDC; the provision of health care services, including mental health services with the Department of Health and prevention programs administered by the Government’s Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; PRDOH's help in finding subsidize housing; services to victims of or at-risk of domestic violence, such as counseling, referrals and hot-line services, and shelter alternatives to victims offered by the Women’s Advocate Office; childcare and developmental services for pre-school children of TANF participants engaged in activities approved by the program, offered through service providers; and referral of participants to enroll in the PRCEC's and the Economic Development Bank to benefit from programs targeting self-employment and entrepreneurship, among other. (Page 121) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Each outreach staff establishes a list of available resources and develops partnerships with local organizations serving MSFWs. Resources include, but are not limited to: Department of Health, Farmworker Health Program, State Workers Compensation, Migrant Legal Services, PathStone Corporation, Department of Education for Adult Literacy, ESL and GED services to MSFWs. Career centers will collaborate with LWDBs to ensure MSFWs have training opportunities for jobs in demand in the area. We believe there are enough resources for Outreach but will continue to seek for additional resources that meets MSFWs needs as they are identified. (Page 232) Title III

Verifying priority of service status through the required paperwork is not mandatory unless the covered persons undergo eligibility determination or if the applicable federal program rules require the verification on site. Once priority of service is determined, covered persons move ahead of the line to receive the appropriate employment, training and placement services over the non—covered persons as required by law and as stated by VPL 07—09. Some Unemployment Insurance offices have adopted this priority of service model from the Employment Service although not mandated by law. Local areas will continue to encourage the provision of additional priority services and information to veterans, including priority access to job orders and individual training accounts (ITAs).

Other steps that will ensure priority of service to veterans include: training staff members; periodic reception and labor exchange staff reinforcement; DVOP/LVER preferential access to job opportunities; placement of signs in waiting areas stating veterans’ preference in all offices; a brief orientation (in the morning and afternoons) to clients waiting to be served at the reception area related to the priority to veterans offered; distribution of printed informative material; and data and report validation. (Page 171) Title II

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Vocational Rehabilitation invests in new technology to handle their cases (used Google translate for Spanish to English translation) - 11/04/2019

"In order to comply with the new federal regulations, the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), began [on November 11, 2019], its implementation plan for a new electronic system for handling cases of applicants and consumers potentially eligible for our services, as announced by administrator Madeline Hernández Dipiní. ” 

(Used Google translate for Spanish to English translation of quote. Citation link leads to a document in Spanish.)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transforming Lives through Supported Employment grants (Short Title: Supported Employment Program) - 03/18/2019

~~“The purpose of the program is to support state and community efforts to refine, implement, and sustain evidence-based supported employment programs and mutually compatible and supportive evidence-based practices (e.g., supported education) for transition-aged youth/young adults (ages 16-25) with serious emotional disturbance (SED), and adults with serious mental illness (SMI) or co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (COD). SAMHSA expects that this program will increase state and community capacity to implement and sustain Supported Employment Program (SEP) models and integrated supports to improve competitive employment outcomes for individuals with SED, SMI, or COD….

Eligible applicants are domestic public and private nonprofit entities. For example:State governments; the District of Columbia, Guam, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau are also eligible to apply.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Puerto Rico differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The Puerto Rico Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The Puerto Rico Department of Health is the single state agency, and they have a cooperative agreement with the Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration (PRHIA) also known as Administracion de Seguros Salud de Puerto Rico (ASES) which implements and administers island-wide health insurance system. Approximately half of Puerto Rico's 3.5 million residents have low incomes and depend upon the public health system for their medical care.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $5.4 billion in Medicaid funding to Puerto Rico.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Puerto Rico, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Puerto Rico’s FMAP to 57.2%.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Services Offered by the San Juan Regional Office - 01/01/2019

~~“VA’s San Juan Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. We offer the following additional services:

Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to applyInformation about VA health care and memorial benefitsOutreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women VeteransPublic affairs”

Systems
  • Other

The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“ARV provides services to people with eligible impairments, so that they can prepare, obtain, retain, or maintain a job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Puerto Rico for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“Persons with disabilities in Puerto Rico achieve greater independence, are empowered and take control of their lives in order to increase their integration, inclusion, equality and access to the services and resources in the community according to the following Goals.Goal 1Persons with disabilities have the necessary independent living services and other complementary services.Goal 2Persons with disabilities exercise control in decision-making and intercede for system changes.Goal 3The community at large knows about the independent living philosophy and services” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Services Offered by the San Juan Regional Office - 01/01/2019

~~“VA’s San Juan Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. We offer the following additional services:

Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to applyInformation about VA health care and memorial benefitsOutreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women VeteransPublic affairs”

Systems
  • Other

The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“ARV provides services to people with eligible impairments, so that they can prepare, obtain, retain, or maintain a job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Puerto Rico for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“Persons with disabilities in Puerto Rico achieve greater independence, are empowered and take control of their lives in order to increase their integration, inclusion, equality and access to the services and resources in the community according to the following Goals.Goal 1Persons with disabilities have the necessary independent living services and other complementary services.Goal 2Persons with disabilities exercise control in decision-making and intercede for system changes.Goal 3The community at large knows about the independent living philosophy and services” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Vocational Rehabilitation invests in new technology to handle their cases (used Google translate for Spanish to English translation) - 11/04/2019

"In order to comply with the new federal regulations, the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), began [on November 11, 2019], its implementation plan for a new electronic system for handling cases of applicants and consumers potentially eligible for our services, as announced by administrator Madeline Hernández Dipiní. ” 

(Used Google translate for Spanish to English translation of quote. Citation link leads to a document in Spanish.)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transforming Lives through Supported Employment grants (Short Title: Supported Employment Program) - 03/18/2019

~~“The purpose of the program is to support state and community efforts to refine, implement, and sustain evidence-based supported employment programs and mutually compatible and supportive evidence-based practices (e.g., supported education) for transition-aged youth/young adults (ages 16-25) with serious emotional disturbance (SED), and adults with serious mental illness (SMI) or co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (COD). SAMHSA expects that this program will increase state and community capacity to implement and sustain Supported Employment Program (SEP) models and integrated supports to improve competitive employment outcomes for individuals with SED, SMI, or COD….

Eligible applicants are domestic public and private nonprofit entities. For example:State governments; the District of Columbia, Guam, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau are also eligible to apply.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Puerto Rico differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The Puerto Rico Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The Puerto Rico Department of Health is the single state agency, and they have a cooperative agreement with the Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration (PRHIA) also known as Administracion de Seguros Salud de Puerto Rico (ASES) which implements and administers island-wide health insurance system. Approximately half of Puerto Rico's 3.5 million residents have low incomes and depend upon the public health system for their medical care.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $5.4 billion in Medicaid funding to Puerto Rico.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Puerto Rico, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Puerto Rico’s FMAP to 57.2%.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

States - Phone

Snapshot

"Rich Port": Where the richness of having a competitive job at a living wage is possible for all people with disabilities.

2018 State Population.
-4.44%
Change from
2017 to 2018
3,195,153
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.71%
Change from
2017 to 2018
328,525
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-7.36%
Change from
2017 to 2018
76,210
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-3.49%
Change from
2017 to 2018
23.20%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
4.54%
Change from
2017 to 2018
55.48%

State Data

General

2018
Population. 3,195,153
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 328,525
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 76,210
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 885,794
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 23.20%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 55.48%
State/National unemployment rate. 8.50%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 46.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 42.20%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 310,024
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 365,294
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 441,128
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 76,704
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 667,268
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 1,208
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 1,059
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 45,669
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 109,485

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. N/A
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. N/A
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 151,590

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 216
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 592
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 1,411
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 15.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 7.40%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.90%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 6.90%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 14.00%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 77
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 9
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 71
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 145

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

VR OUTCOMES

2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 1,998
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 165,205
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 72.09%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 9.22%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.23%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 51.10%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 65.46%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 87.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 14.36%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

Data Not Available

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION OUTCOMES

Data Not Available

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~In terms of service to individuals facing barriers to employment, counseling remains a key strategic activity across all core programs. Counselors has a specialized education coupled with years of experience and knowledge, and can provide information and guidance to clients on occupational requirements, employment opportunities, trends and other community resources that can benefit the job seekers.

As previously mentioned, seeking to activate the government entities' participation in key competitive programs aims to expand education, training and employment services to targeted populations. DEI, the qualification of local boards as Employment Networks under the Ticket to Work program, REO, Youthbuild, Job Plus, the expansion of activities for employment creation/retention under CDBG, are some of the targeted programs or activities.

Title II has a leading role in serving individuals with barriers to employment and ensuring their access to the labor force. To assist enhancing its service to these populations, the program will implement an Advisory Board to further fine-tuning and program improvements. (Page 93) Title I

i. Please, see information corresponding to 101(d)(2), above.
5. 101(d)(3)(B) the development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low—skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment:
i. Please, refer to section II(c)(1).

Goal 4 foresees to spur the development of sector strategies and career pathways by targeting opportunities in the public sector to resource the convening of partnerships. Strategy section aims to convene a working group to assist the State Board in developing support for sector strategies and career pathways. As mentioned above, Strategy section, addresses the utilization of proven methodologies provided by USDOL to aid in these efforts. PRDE’s programs (Title II and Carl D. Perkins supported CTE) will lead the way in pursuing the implementation of career pathways and providing the necessary insight to the State Board. The WDP and PRVRA will also support the effort by pursuing DEI funding. (Page 99) Title II

An enhanced coordination with the PREC will allow the harvesting of data being supplied by educational institutions under local and federal mandates to retrofit the educational and workforce systems. Additional opportunities could arise by devising ways in which the Council's State student financial assistance programs support the strategies of the system.

Local areas will be encouraged to leverage the resources of required partners to support the delivery of integrated services, through financial and non-financial agreements. Many of the arrangements for sharing other state resources must be worked out in detail at local level involving other agencies and the local One-Stop Centers’ partners, through MOUs.

A key strategy in leveraging other Federal investments that have enhanced access to workforce development programs at educational institutions is to equip the State Board to manage the function of identifying and seeking additional or dormant competitive funding opportunities that can benefit any component of the workforce development system. DEI and REO, among others, represent additional opportunities. To that end, the State is committed to advance the designation of the local boards as 501(c)(3) tax-exempted non-for profits to leverage non-traditional sources of grant funding. (Page 138) Title II
 

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~Competitive graduates with knowledge and skills needed to adapt to changes in the economy, environment, and technology. Education is a cornerstone of Puerto Rico’s economy, society, and political systems. Its purpose is to build and sustain the knowledge and skills needed to ensure that individuals, communities and key institutions can adapt to changes in the world economy, the environment, and technology.

The Government of Puerto Rico now has the opportunity to fundamentally transform its education system in a way that improves student outcomes, supports the development of children, youth and adults, and supports its vision of economic and social development moving forward.

1. Upgrade school infrastructure to support resilience and sustainability

2. Increase K—12 access to vocational, technical, and career education and strengthen school-to-work transitions

3. Promote pre-school and out-of-school learning opportunities

4. Strengthen systems to support new education reform package. (Page 21) Title I

The Secretary for Special Education has:

1. With the approval of Law 263 of 2006 - Institution of vocational and career evaluation for all students in the special education program, all students with disabilities eligible for special education services, from the 12 years must be evaluated by certified vocational and career professionals with the purpose of delineating their transition plan from school to adult life.

2. To that, in collaboration with the PRDE's Counseling Program, in their public policies, we determinate the administration and interpretation of occupational interests and occupational counseling for training in decision-making for the selection of occupational careers for all student with disabilities.

3. DEPR and the School of Rehabilitation Counseling of the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus, has a collaboration agreement to have Rehabilitation Counseling Practitioners in the Special Education Service Centers of all educational regions for collaborate with the School Counselor in the administration, interpretation, and counseling to the students with moderate and severe disabilities eligible for the special education program. This agreement comes into effect in September 2018.

4. PRDE has the Transition Manual from the School to the Work, approved in 1992. That manual is a teacher guides related to the process of transition from school to work for students with moderate disabilities.

5. All students who have an IEP, from the age of 16, or before being necessary, his plan establish some different coordinated activities whose purpose is the development of skills aimed at the world of employment and adult life.

6. Students with mild and moderate disabilities who are located in the regular classroom, participate in the same activities as regular students. Like a CEPA tests, College Board exam, 40 hours of occupational exploration, etc. with the reasonable accommodations established in your Individualized Educational Program (PEI) or your Service Plan (PS).

7. The Secretary for Special Education, for the 2018-2019 school year, hired transition coordinators whose goal was to coordinate all services related to the transition process.

8. DEPR has an inter-agency agreement with the Department of Labor - Vocational Rehabilitation Administration, which establishes the responsibilities of each agency to achieve a successful transition of students with disabilities from PRDE to DT / ARV.

9. Beginning at age 16, all students eligible for special education receive orientation and guidance to the services offered by the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), which is the leading agency in the process of transitioning for the school to the world of employment.

10. ARV, in coordination with the PRDE, offer different hours of training during the school year for students with disabilities.

11. ARV, in coordination with the PRDE, every summer, develops pre-employment experiences for students with disabilities who participate in the application and interview process for these programs. (Page 94) Title II

This State Board rules, policies and statutes, are designed to ensure:

a. An occupational and technical education is equally available to all students and is of consistent quality throughout Puerto Rico;

b. The time and content of career and technical education are properly and flexibly coordinated with academic instruction;

c. Career and technical education is available to all student populations, particularly in high unemployment areas or where occupational re-training needs are required;

d. Career and technical education programs, as well as curriculum courses, are useful for your graduates to obtain employment or improve the quality of their employment;

e. Career and technical education programs will be coordinated with state programs related to education and training. This includes ensuring that graduates in career and technical education receive appropriate credit for the requirements of apprenticeship and professional licensing programs in order for them to pass their revalidation exams;

f. Regional occupational and technical education services are provided efficiently. ; and

g. Alternative curriculums, curricula and/or standards are developed to allow inclusion of students with disabilities, and funds may be used for the provision of the services required in the Individualized Education Plan (IEP), as required by federal law. (Page 110) Title II

The designated State unit’s plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of VR services, including pre-employment transition services, as well as procedures for the timely development and approval of individualized plans for employment for the students.

In Puerto Rico, Act 51-1996, as amended, provides for the coordination between the Assistant Secretariat of Comprehensive Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities of the PRDE, and the PRVRA, among other agencies. In terms of the public policy and practices for the development and implementation of the IPE, the PRVRA has established a protocol in accordance with federal regulations (34 CFR 361.22(a)(2)). Before the student with disabilities exits the school system, a Written Intervention Plan (WIP), or IPE, must be developed. Its purpose is to formalize the management of the VR services provision process in coordination with educational agencies. This plan includes:

• Application of guides and programmatic procedures for the provision of services
• Beginning and ending date of services
• Employment outcomes (regular employment, supported employment, self-employment or any other innovative option)
• Projected date for the achievement of the employment outcome (Page 272) Title IV

• Evidence in the IPE of the participation of the consumer (his own words) regarding the informed choice process, self-management, and others actions taken during his VR process

In addition, the IPE contains those transition services that could be provided to the disabled student, under the sponsorship of the PRVRA, while participating from the educational services of the PRDE, and after exhausting the available comparable services and benefits. The following is a description of such services:

• Career exploration
• Vocational counseling
• Orientation, postsecondary education (university level options and summer camp programs, among others)
• Assessment of vocational interests, capabilities and pre-employment skills
• Evaluation with an ecological approach
• Workshops and job readiness orientation (job skills, job interviews and drafting of a resume, among others)
• Vocational training/post-secondary education
• Supported employment services
• Transportation, including training on the use of public transportation
• Mentoring
• Self-management
• Use of auxiliary aids and services (assistive technology equipment/devices and services) (Page 273) Title IV

• The VR counselor informs to the transition analyst, in writing, the determination taken in regard to the referred student. Then, the transition analyst informs the outcome of said determination to the school official.
• The VR counselor evaluates the disabled youth’s capability towards the achievement of either an employment outcome or a more independent living.
• The VR counselor, with the participation of the disabled youth, his family or representative, develops the IPE; in accordance with the needs of the youth and taking into consideration the services included in the WIP or IPE prior to his exit of the school system.
• The transition analyst gathers statistical data showing the following: orientations provided to school staff, students and parents; meetings of the Programming and Placement Committee; students referred to the PRVRA by the PRDE; and eligible students.
• The transition analyst participates, if necessary, in the drafting of the IEP by recommending areas to be worked on during the transition stages. (Page 274) Title IV

• Offer and coordinate the provision of necessary services for the transition process to the post-school life.
• Coordinate so that officials of agencies included in this agreement are able to provide orientation on the services offered by those agencies to the parents, the students and the school staff.
• Provide academic and vocational services to the population with disabilities in accordance with federal and state laws and regulations.
• Collaborate with the other subscribing agencies in their objective of providing services related to job placement and follow up in employment to the students until they reach 21 years of age or graduate from high school.
• Provide, through schools, the human resource for the development of necessary basic academic and occupational skills, according to the needs identified in vocational evaluation results and in accordance with the provisions of the IPE. (Page 275) Title IV

1. Transition process for students with disabilities begins at schools through orientation provided by the Transition Counselor (TC) of the VRA, to teachers, students with disabilities and/or parents. As a result, meetings of the Placement and Programming Committee (PPC) take place, and decisions are made about IPE recommendations. A plan of action is developed and the TC may accept the referral of the student with disabilities. (Page 276) Title IV

In Puerto Rico, the Assistant Secretariat of Comprehensive Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities and the PRVRA are located in two different state departments (PRDE and PRDOLHR). The first one is responsible for the implementation of Public Law 108-446, as amended, known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA); the second one is responsible for the implementation of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and State Law 97-2000, as amended, known as the Vocational Rehabilitation Law of Puerto Rico. In addition to the aforementioned legislation, we have State Law 51-1996, as amended, known as the Integral Educational Services for Persons with Disabilities, which provides for the coordination to be achieved between various local agencies to ensure an effective transition of disabled youth coming from the Department of Education. Both agencies maintain cooperative ties related to the development of their respective human resources and as such, have been planning, developing, offering and/or participating in numerous in-service training activities since 1987. Some of the topics covered in such training include: transition from school to work; vocational evaluation; supported employment; IDEIA; Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Public Law No. 101-336, as amended; Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Public Law 105-220 of August 7 of 1998, as amended; among others. In addition, both agencies are members of an Advisory Committee, which meets periodically to plan and join efforts in the development and implementation of transition services from school to work. (Page 290) Title IV

• Continue with the monthly monitoring of eligibility determinations within 60 days, and planning and signature of IPE within 90 days, of the transition-age youth referred to the PRVRA.
• Maintain the participation of the VR counselor in the meetings of the Programming and Placement Committee (PPC) on transition-age youth.
• Offer Pre-Employment Transition services.
• Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the centers of assessment and adjustment (CAAs).
• Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the centers of support and employment modes (CSEMs) and the results of these youth in the different modes of employment.
• Strengthen relationships between the PRDE and the PRVRA to facilitate the identification of students who can benefit from the transition services.
• Continue providing orientation to the school staff on the services of the PRVRA. (Page 312) Title IV

The Assessment and Adjustment Office, the Support and Employment Modes Office and the VR Counseling Services Office of the PRVRA, planned and coordinated a variety of activities leading toward developing Work-based learning experiences for students in their transition process, as required by WIOA.

235. In July of 2016 a closure activity was coordinated for the 10 students from transition who participated in the Work-based learning experience held in June of 2016 at the Program-Industry for the Blind and those with other physical, mental and developmental disabilities.
236. In June of 2017, seven (7) employers loaned their facilities, and 56 transition students from the 6 regions of the VRS participated in a Work-based learning experience. Previously, 9 meetings had been held for a total of 78 participants at the regional level regarding the corresponding planning.  (Page 320) Title IV

The Administrator’s Office:
237. Developed the project’s protocol: Work-based Learning Experiences in State Government Agencies that started in the month of July, 2017.
238. Developed a protocol to carry out the project: Pre-Employment Transition Services Fair.
Strategy:
o Continue with the identification of transition-age consumers referred and served in the Centers of Assessment and Adjustment (CAAs). (Page 321) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~i5. 101(d)(3)(B) the development of strategies to support the use of career pathways for the purpose of providing individuals, including low—skilled adults, youth, and individuals with barriers to employment (including individuals with disabilities), with workforce investment activities, education, and supportive services to enter or retain employment:
i. Please, refer to section II(c)(1).

Goal 4 foresees to spur the development of sector strategies and career pathways by targeting opportunities in the public sector to resource the convening of partnerships. Strategy section aims to convene a working group to assist the State Board in developing support for sector strategies and career pathways. As mentioned above, Strategy section, addresses the utilization of proven methodologies provided by USDOL to aid in these efforts. PRDE’s programs (Title II and Carl D. Perkins supported CTE) will lead the way in pursuing the implementation of career pathways and providing the necessary insight to the State Board. The WDP and PRVRA will also support the effort by pursuing DEI funding. (Page 99) Title II
 

Apprenticeship

Registered Apprenticeship will also be delivered as a career pathway for job seekers and as a job—driven strategy for employers and industries. As required, procedures will be implemented by the PRDOLHR to add Registered Apprenticeship programs to the State list of eligible training providers and to verify their status, considering timely data collection requirements on new programs, including information on occupations included in the program; method and length of instruction; and, number of active apprentices. (Page 201) Title II

Upon request, sponsors or institutions that offer training programs registered under the National Apprenticeship Act, will be automatically included and maintained on the list for as long as the program remains registered under the National Apprenticeship Act. On-the-job training, customized training, incumbent worker training, and transitional employment providers are not subject to the requirements of the eligible training provider provisions. Also exempted are services for which the Local Board determines that any of the following conditions are met:

• There are insufficient providers.

• There is a training services program with demonstrated effectiveness offered in the local area by a community-based organization or other private organization to serve individuals with barriers to employment as defined under section 3(34) of WIOA. (Page 202) Tile II

  1. National Dislocated Worker Grants (DWGs) awarded and coordination with state rapid response activities and FEMA, for temporary jobs.
  2. Progress made in implementing sector strategies and career pathways. The discussion may include: business engagement strategies; work-based learning (including apprenticeship); work experiences for youth and adults; transitional jobs; and incumbent worker training strategies and policies.
  3. Promising practices, lessons learned, and success stories that focus on: serving employers; communities; individuals with barriers to employment; at-risk and priority populations served, including out-of-school youth, low-income adults, dislocated workers, individuals who are basic skills deficient, individuals with limited language proficiency, individuals with disabilities, veterans, the long-term unemployed, and any other individuals with barriers to employment,

The annual report will also include activities at the State level:

  1. Rapid Response Services;
  2. Performance measure narrative section;
  3. Allowable activities with Governor set aside funds;
  4. National Dislocated Worker Grants: ZIKA; Irma and Maria Grant; Disability Grant (Page 168) Title III

3. VRA, in its search to comply with WIOA, has purchased the PR SAM Sample (Puerto Rico Skills Assessment Module) and the CIRINO Gerena Electronic Vocational Interest tests that will allow VRA to offer career exploration services to transition students between 14 to 21 years of age, and who are receiving, or have received, special education or Section 504 services under the Rehabilitation Law of 1973, as amended. 4. A Work-based Learning Experience was offered to 58 students with disabilities under 6 private employers in June of 2017. 5. In August of 2017, a service fair was held for students with disabilities under the Career Exploration Counseling category. (Page 267) Title IV

During the summer of 2017, 56 students with disabilities participated of a Work-based Learning Experience through coordination between PRVRA and employers. PRVRA will continue carrying out this type of activities during the next years. To reach more employers, the Centers of Support and Employment Modes (CSEM) and the Office of Support and Employment Modes (OSEM) will continue to offer orientations by region to different sectors: businesses, industrial and government. We expect to obtain from those employers collaboration to identify competitive integrated employment and career exploration opportunities. Evaluation and Adjustment Centers staff of the PRVRA also performs work based evaluation processes for applicants/consumers of the VRA, including youth with disabilities, and will continue to do so with employers’ collaboration. Transition Analysts will support CSEM/OSEM to identify more schools that offer services to students and youth with disabilities as possible candidates for Supported Employment and Pre-Employment Transition Services. (Page 279-280) Title IV

The Assessment and Adjustment Office, the Support and Employment Modes Office and the VR Counseling Services Office of the PRVRA, planned and coordinated a variety of activities leading toward developing Work-based learning experiences for students in their transition process, as required by WIOA. 235. In July of 2016 a closure activity was coordinated for the 10 students from transition who participated in the Work-based learning experience held in June of 2016 at the Program-Industry for the Blind and those with other physical, mental and developmental disabilities. 236. In June of 2017, seven (7) employers loaned their facilities, and 56 transition students from the 6 regions of the VRS participated in a Work-based learning experience. Previously, 9 meetings had been held for a total of 78 participants at the regional level regarding the corresponding planning. (Page 320) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~In terms of service to individuals facing barriers to employment, counseling remains a key strategic activity across all core programs. Counselors has a specialized education coupled with years of experience and knowledge, and can provide information and guidance to clients on occupational requirements, employment opportunities, trends and other community resources that can benefit the job seekers.

As previously mentioned, seeking to activate the government entities' participation in key competitive programs aims to expand education, training and employment services to targeted populations. DEI, the qualification of local boards as Employment Networks under the Ticket to Work program, REO, Youthbuild, Job Plus, the expansion of activities for employment creation/retention under CDBG, are some of the targeted programs or activities.

Title II has a leading role in serving individuals with barriers to employment and ensuring their access to the labor force. To assist enhancing its service to these populations, the program will implement an Advisory Board to further fine-tuning and program improvements. (Page 93) Title II

The Government requires recipients to engage in work without delay unless exempted. Congress never extended to the Government the option of including on case-by-case basis families in which a non-recipient parent receives SSI, when the Aid to the Aged, Blind and Disabled (AABD) Programs in the states were converted to SSI. Accordingly, the Government considers the SSI and AABD Programs as the same in the context of the TANF Program.

The participant is required to register and seek employment through the PRDOLHR's Employment Service. Also, it is referred to engage in work activities, as directed in the Puerto Rico’s Work Verification Plan. Most TANF recipients must comply with at least 30 hours a week of work participation. To verify countable hours, the participant must submit the time sheet to the case manager, which must be signed by his work activity supervisor. (Page 119) Title II

Employment and training programs administered by the Social Security Administration, including the Ticket to Work and Self-Sufficiency Program established under section 1148 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1320b—19)

Through the issuance of local planning and certification guidance, the State Board will encourage local boards and operators to become engaged in the Ticket to Work program as qualified Employment Networks. Puerto Rico's serviced by 66 employment networks; nevertheless, just one (Caguas Guayama) out of the 15 local workforce areas is currently qualified as an Employment Network.

The PRVRA continues receiving referrals from the Ticket to Work Program for the purpose of providing vocational rehabilitation services. In addition, the PRVRA established an agreement with the Caribbean Center of Work Incentives Planning Assistance (CWIPA) to provide benefits planning service to the consumers of the PRVRA who are beneficiaries of the Social Security Disability Insurance. This service is expected to help these beneficiaries in decision-making regarding the benefits of reintegrating into the labor market. (Page 121) Title III

Strategies:
• Strengthen the coordination with the PRDOLHR to know employment trends and types of employers.
• Continue implementing employment projects through the development of self-employments.
• Continue with the programmatic monitoring interventions and technical assistance to the CRPs, to ensure quality and agility in the services to the consumers with the most significant disabilities.
• Continue the participation of the PRVRA consumers in employment-related activities available in the American Job Centers and other components of WIOA.
• Continue referring consumers, who are beneficiaries of the Social Security Disability Insurance, to the Caribbean Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (CWIPA) Program for the counseling service for benefits planning.
• Share with the PRSRC the Normative Communications governing the provision of services.
• Continue with the programmatic monitoring interventions of the services provision process to ensure compliance with the public policy.
• Continue offering technical assistance to the supervisory staff of counseling services to improve decision-making in case management.
• Refer the PRVRA consumers to the services of other components of WIOA (Title I, Title II Employment Service and other programs) to expand their job skills.

Goal 2
Ensure the provision of services to eligible youth with disabilities, and pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities coming from transition, so that they are able to achieve an employment outcome. (Page 311) Title IV

VRA gave: orientation to employers on salary incentives, affirmative actions and VRA services; technical assistance regarding the “Ticket-to-Work” Program. 4,417 employers were contacted, including small business so that they would come forward and recruit VRA consumers.

Strategy:
• Continue with the granting of salary incentives to employers in order to promote employment opportunities for VRA’s consumers.

Progress Report:
VRA formalized 10 wage-incentive contracts, where 18 consumers benefitted.

Strategy:
• Continue with the participation in the meetings of the State Board of WIOA (Page 322) Title IV

The Government requires recipients to engage in work without delay unless exempted. Congress never extended to the Government the option of including on case-by-case basis families in which a non-recipient parent receives SSI, when the Aid to the Aged, Blind and Disabled (AABD) Programs in the states were converted to SSI. Accordingly, the Government considers the SSI and AABD Programs as the same in the context of the TANF Program.

The participant is required to register and seek employment through the PRDOLHR's Employment Service. Also, it is referred to engage in work activities, as directed in the Puerto Rico’s Work Verification Plan. Most TANF recipients must comply with at least 30 hours a week of work participation. To verify countable hours, the participant must submit the time sheet to the case manager, which must be signed by his work activity supervisor. (Page 119) Title IV

QCPMO in collaboration with the State Rehabilitation Council carried out the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment.

VRCSO gave orientation about the Employment Networks for Social Security Disability Insurance Beneficiaries, at the ACAA facilities [Administración de Compensaciones por Accidentes de Automóviles]; and also, on VRA services given to the Department of Justice staff, as well as to the Department of Education.

So that new agencies could submit new proposals to the VRA to offer supported employment services to consumers with the most significant disabilities, OSEM gave orientation to the following enterprises: “Programa Florece la Montaña”; Pentaq Manufacturing Corporation; and the Moretta Díaz Corporation.

Assessment and Adjustment Office (OAA, Spanish acronym) provided information about interpreting services for the deaf to Interamerican University’s internship students. (Page 324) Title IV

 

Employer/ Business

~~The flexibility afforded by WIOA will be used to engage and expand the amount and type of training providers. For instance, the implementation of the Registered Apprenticeship program could allow the involvement of unions, trade associations as well as established providers like IHEs and community colleges as training providers.

As required under WIOA, the State maintains a publicly accessible list of eligible training providers and their eligible training programs, including relevant performance and cost information. The State Board adopted procedures for initial determination of eligibility and subsequent certification of training providers. (Page 137) Title II

As directed under WIOA, the initial eligibility of any provider will be valid for the period of one year.

Section C(II)(b) of the Governor’s procedures outlines the roles of the State and local areas in receiving and reviewing provider applications to decide if continued eligibility is granted. Newly eligible training providers that were determined to be eligible by transitioning into WIOA were subjected to the application procedure for continued eligibility before their initial year of eligibility expired. Applicants applying for continued eligibility are required to provide information to assess the following parameters:

• Performance accountability measures described in secs. 116(b)(2)(A)(i)(I) through (IV) of WIOA, including unsubsidized employment (Second Quarter after Exit), unsubsidized employment (Second Quarter after Exit), Median Earnings and Credential Attainment. If data is not yet available, compliance with the following alternate factors, as applicable: at least 75% of participants completing the program during the last two academic years; or, at least 70% of participants employed in the occupations related to the training program during the last two academic years, 60% if the occupation requires licensure. (Page 204) Title IV

The WDP will notify its determination to the Local Board. If the program is determined not to be eligible, the WDP will detail the reasons for its decision. The Local Board will notify the provider the determination of the WDP and, if it were adverse, the reasons for denial and information regarding the appeals process before the State Board, as provided under section E(II) of the State procedures.

As specified under E(I) of the State procedures, either the Local Board or the WDP might deny the provider its eligibility if the provider does not comply with the performance levels negotiated for the Local Area; or, if it fails to submit a complete proposal or is not authorized to operate, as might be required. For eligible programs, continued eligibility will be in effect for two (2) years. As required under WIOA and section D(II) of the State procedures, a training provider must deliver results and provide accurate information in order to retain its status as an eligible training provider. At least every two years, the WDP, in consultation with the Local Board might remove the provider from the list of approved providers for false reporting, for substantially violating a provision of title I of WIOA or its implementing regulations including non-discrimination provisions, failure to meet required performance outcomes, or debarment. The biennial review will also include verification of the registration status of registered apprenticeship programs. (Page 205) Title IV

Data Collection

• Integration of the local boards in the service—delivery model mandated by WIOA, including common intake, common outreach strategies and initiatives, universal service across the region, common performance measures (optional), identification of additional grants and fund opportunities, cost allocation plan, and MOU structure with required and optional partners, among other factors. (Page 183) Title II

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

The effectiveness of the strategic framework will be assessed and tested according to procedures being mandated for each program and the system collectively. As prescribed under section 361.800 of the proposed rule One-Stop Centers and one-stop delivery systems will be certified for effectiveness, physical and programmatic accessibility, and continuous improvement, and as directed, these evaluations will take into account feedback from the One Stop network customers. (Page 84)

As required under section 677.160 of the proposed rule, the programs will be assessed on the basis of their negotiated levels of performance. Section 116(d)(2) of WIOA requires the State submit a performance report that will contain information on the actual performance levels achieved consistent with the proposed rule 677.175. The State will comply with these requirements and the implementing guidance to be jointly issued by the USDOL and the USDOE, which may include information on reportable individuals as determined by the Secretaries.

All programs must be evaluated in terms of their compliance with basic threshold requirements, including programmatic and physical accessibility. One-Stop certification guidance will be reviewed to include relevant measures for assessing partner performance. Additionally, as required under WIOA, guidance issued by USDOL, USDOE and other program grantors, and the goals and accountability measures included in regional and local plans. (Page 158) Title II

• Total number of participants who exited each of the core programs, including disaggregated counts of those who participated in and exited a core program by individuals with barriers to employment

• Demographics Describe how the one-stop delivery system (including one-stop center operators and the one-stop delivery system partners), will comply with section 188 of WIOA (if applicable) and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.) with regard to the physical and programmatic accessibility of facilities, programs, services, technology, and materials for individuals with disabilities. This also must include a description of compliance through providing staff training and support for addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities. (Page 171-172) Title I

The Commonwealth’s policies are consistent down to the level of Local Board governance structure. Circular Letter WIOA-2-2015 requires the appointment of a standing committee to provide information and assist the board with operational and other issues relating to the provision of services to individuals with disabilities. Those might include issues relating to compliance with section 188 and applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, regarding the provision of programmatic and physical access to the services, programs, and activities of the One-Stop Delivery System, as well as appropriate training for staff on providing support for or accommodation to, and finding employment opportunities for, individuals with disabilities. The Commonwealth is one of 26 jurisdictions yet to benefit from the implementation of the DOL’s Disability Employment Initiative. As enunciated in the State Plan it will seek to join in the DOL’s initiative in order to expand the capacity of the workforce system to increase the number of individuals with disabilities participating in existing career pathways and programs. (Page 172) Title I

As established in the State Plan, Title I and the PRVRA will lead a comprehensive effort to adapt the recommendations of the USDOL’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) contained in its "Promising Practices in Achieving Universal Access and Equal Opportunity: a Section 188 Disability Reference Guide". All local areas will be required to implement the resulting guidance adopted by the State Board as part of the local area certification and the operator’s competitive selection processes. Also, ODEP’s recommendations in regards to expanding the participation of people with disabilities in the workforce by means of the Registered Apprenticeship program will be furthered through the SAA’s implementing regulations. Presently, the State Board’s monitoring guidance includes the following criteria for testing physical and programmatic accessibility of the One-Stop Centers:

• One-Stop Centers shall facilitate the availability and ease of access of both self-serviced and assisted methods, including computer for resume preparation, Internet to search for job opportunities, telephone to contact employers, fax for sending resumes to employers with job opportunities, printed and digital information on employment and career opportunities, and printed and digital information on financial assistance for studies. Compliance will be assessed through inspections of the self-service system, and the procedures adopted. (Page 173) Title II

The One-Stop Centers’ staff will be fully aware of non-discrimination and physical and programmatic accessibility mandates. The direct customer service staff will also be trained to follow intake procedures to ensure that adequate, voluntary and confidential information on a customer’s disability is collected and recorded and to manage the corresponding service protocol. Memorandums of Understanding will be advanced in order to delineate the roles of the operators, partner programs, and other programs that might be able to provide assistance, aids or services to persons with disabilities. Act 136 of 1996 requires that all government agencies provide an interpreter to assist persons with hearing impairments that prevent oral communication and limit their access to services, using the services of the Sign Language Communication training program offered by the Continued Education Program of Office of the Commonwealth’s Training and Labor Affairs Advisory and Human Resources Administration Office. At a basic level, cross-training on sign language will be readily facilitated by the PRVRA to One-Stop Centers’ staff in charge of customer service to aid in the referral to the PRVRA of hearing impaired customers that might appear to be eligible and in need of PRVRA services. (Page 174) Title II

Providing Rapid Response services under the Dislocated Workers program. • Providing assistance to State entities and agencies, local areas, and One—Stop Centers partners in carrying out the activities described in the State Unified Plan.

  • Providing technical assistance to local areas for carrying out the regional planning and service delivery efforts required under section 106(c).
  • Providing technical assistance to local areas that fail to meet local performance accountability measures described in section 116(c).
  • Providing assistance to local areas operating a fiscal and management accountability information system in accordance with section 116(i).
  • Monitoring and overseeing activities.
  • Disseminating the State list of eligible providers of training services.
  • Disseminating information identifying eligible providers for on—the—job training, customized training, incumbent worker training, internships, paid or unpaid work experience opportunities, or transitional jobs. • Disseminating information on effective service delivery strategies to serve workers and job seekers.
  • Disseminating performance information and information on the cost of attendance (including tuition and fees) for participants in applicable programs, as described in subsections (d) and (h) of section 122.
  • Disseminating information on physical and programmatic accessibility, in accordance with section188, if applicable, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.), for individuals with disabilities.
  • Completing program and service delivery evaluations. (Page 195) Title II

It would be most appropriate to award a contract to an IHE or other eligible provider of training services in order to facilitate the training of multiple individuals in in-demand industry sectors or occupations, and such contract does not limit customer choice.

  • The Local Board provides training services through a pay-for-performance contract. Any educational provider seeking initial eligibility determination must complete the application and submit the required information electronically to the Local Board. Providers might submit an application at any time during the year. Applicants are required to provide the following information:
  • Specification of in-demand industry sectors and occupations aligned with their training services
  • Evidence of the financial stability of the provider or institution
  • If applicable, evidence of State license to operate issued by the PREC, for each location where the training program will be offered
  • Information addressing factors related to the indicators of performance, as described in secs. 116(b)(2)(A)(i)(I) through (IV) of WIOA, including unsubsidized employment (second quarter after exit), unsubsidized employment (fourth quarter after exit), median earnings, and credentials attainment.
  • Information concerning whether the provider is in a partnership with businesses providing employment, including information about the quality and quantity of employer partnerships • Information to demonstrate if program of training services leads to an industry recognized credential and/or recognized post-secondary credential
  • Evidence to demonstrate compliance with the legal and regulatory provisions on equal opportunity and non-discrimination, reasonable accommodation and physical and programmatic accessibility (Page 203) Title II
Vets

Gold Card Initiative

The Gold Card provides unemployed post-9/11 era veterans with the intensive and follow-up services they need to succeed in today's job market. The Gold Card initiative is a joint effort of the DOLETA and the Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS). ETA and VETS have developed a series of enhanced intensive services, including follow-up services, to identify those barriers to employment faced by veterans of post 9/11 era. The services, when provided under the Priority of Services to Veterans, are designed to overcome those barriers and to reinsert our 9/11 era veterans the labor workforce.

Due to the high unemployment rate faced by our veteran population, “Gold Card” services are available to veterans to help them obtain the necessary help to reinsert them in the labor market as soon as possible. An eligible veteran can present the Gold Card at his/her local One-Stop Career Center to receive enhanced intensive services including up to six months of follow-up. Information about the “Gold Card” initiative might be found at http://www.dol.gov/vets/goldcard.html. On this web site veterans might have the opportunity to print their “Gold Card” certificate and obtain information about how to access the available services.

The enhanced in-person services available for Gold Card holders at local One-Stop Career Centers may include:

  • Job readiness assessment, including interviews and testing
  • Development of an Individual Development Plan (IDP)
  • Career guidance through group or individual counseling that helps veterans in making training and career decisions
  • Provision of labor market, occupational, and skills transferability information that inform educational, training, and occupational decisions • Referral to job banks, job portals, and job openings • Referral to employers and registered apprenticeship sponsors
  • Referral to training by WIA-funded or third party service providers
  • Monthly follow-up by an assigned case manager for up to six months Employment and training activities carried out under the Community Services Block Grant Act (42 U.S.C. 9901 et seq.) (Page 116) Title II
Mental Health

~~11. Whether the eligible provider’s activities offer flexible schedules and coordination with Federal, State, and local support services (such as child care, transportation, mental health services, and career planning) that are necessary to enable individuals including individuals with disabilities or other special needs, to attend and complete programs;
12. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participants outcomes (consistent with section 116) and to monitor program performance; and
13. Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs.  (Page I63) Title IV

32. Whether the eligible provider maintains a high-quality information management system that has the capacity to report measurable participant outcomes (consistent with Section 116) and to monitor program performance;
33. Whether the local areas in which the eligible provider is located have a demonstrated need for additional English language acquisition programs and civics education programs (Integrated English Literacy and Civics Education) (Page 250) Title IV

This Advisory Council of Substance Abuse and Mental Health of Puerto Rico is composed of government agencies, mental health patients and family members. It is supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (ASSMCA, by its Spanish acronym). This is the organization selected by the Health Insurance Administration of Puerto Rico to carry out operational functions of the Health Plan and offer treatment for mental health conditions, alcohol and drug abuse in the San Juan and Western regions. The PRVRA is a mandatory member of this council and participates in the planning for the provision of these services.

PRVRA participates as a member of the Advisory Council of Substance Abuse and Mental Health of Puerto Rico. The Council’s mission is to promote compliance with federal public law and the public policy of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, in order to offer adequate mental health and substance abuse services and promote a better quality of life for people and their families. The Council’s objectives are to:

1. Participate in the writing and implementation of the Block Grant, in accordance with Section 1915 (a) of the federal law. 2. Participate in the development of the State Plan for the Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services Administration. 3. Review and evaluate adequacy and distribution of mental health and substance abuse services in PR to identify service needs. 

Advocate for people with mental health and substance abuse disabilities in PR, in order to guarantee establishment of a high quality integrated service system. (Page 280-281) Title IV

Youth are enrolled in the Foster Care program at age 14. They must be attending school, must not bear dispositive measures pursuant to Act 88-1986 (Youth Offenders Act), should not have disabling mental health conditions and must be subject to the temporary or permanent custody of the PRDOF. An intermediate program stage comprises individuals age 16 to 18, followed by a completion or exit stage for 19 to 21 year old. Through the stages, training and workshop activities in the independent living program are geared towards preparing participants to face adulthood. Topics involve money management, sex education, violence, rights and responsibilities, as well as moral and spiritual values.

As part of its 2015-2019 Child and Family Service Plan, the PRDOF targeted the youth in transition as a population in greater risk of maltreatment, particularly youth who have been in foster care that face even greater challenges because they have grown up with hardships that constitute risk factors. The Foster Care Independent Living Program empowers the youths in making a satisfactory transition to self-sufficiency by providing a continuum of services which includes: educational and/or vocational training; career planning; job preparation, search and retention, skills development; health; housing; ability to work as a member of a team; prevention of substance use/abuse (drugs, alcohol & tobacco); activities to develop emotional maturity; counseling to promote management of unresolved emotional problems; violence prevention; skills in identifying and accessing services; parenting skills development; orientation on legal rights and responsibilities; cultural awareness activities; workshops and counseling to develop a sense of moral social responsibility; socialization skills development (conflict resolution, problem solving, anger management, communication skills); and mentoring. (Page 55) Title IV

The program also coordinates program or supportive services with other entities, including those offered by the Youth Development Program at PRDEDC; the provision of health care services, including mental health services with the Department of Health and prevention programs administered by the Government’s Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; PRDOH's help in finding subsidize housing; services to victims of or at-risk of domestic violence, such as counseling, referrals and hot-line services, and shelter alternatives to victims offered by the Women’s Advocate Office; childcare and developmental services for pre-school children of TANF participants engaged in activities approved by the program, offered through service providers; and referral of participants to enroll in the PRCEC's and the Economic Development Bank to benefit from programs targeting self-employment and entrepreneurship, among other. (Page 121) Title II

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Each outreach staff establishes a list of available resources and develops partnerships with local organizations serving MSFWs. Resources include, but are not limited to: Department of Health, Farmworker Health Program, State Workers Compensation, Migrant Legal Services, PathStone Corporation, Department of Education for Adult Literacy, ESL and GED services to MSFWs. Career centers will collaborate with LWDBs to ensure MSFWs have training opportunities for jobs in demand in the area. We believe there are enough resources for Outreach but will continue to seek for additional resources that meets MSFWs needs as they are identified. (Page 232) Title III

Verifying priority of service status through the required paperwork is not mandatory unless the covered persons undergo eligibility determination or if the applicable federal program rules require the verification on site. Once priority of service is determined, covered persons move ahead of the line to receive the appropriate employment, training and placement services over the non—covered persons as required by law and as stated by VPL 07—09. Some Unemployment Insurance offices have adopted this priority of service model from the Employment Service although not mandated by law. Local areas will continue to encourage the provision of additional priority services and information to veterans, including priority access to job orders and individual training accounts (ITAs).

Other steps that will ensure priority of service to veterans include: training staff members; periodic reception and labor exchange staff reinforcement; DVOP/LVER preferential access to job opportunities; placement of signs in waiting areas stating veterans’ preference in all offices; a brief orientation (in the morning and afternoons) to clients waiting to be served at the reception area related to the priority to veterans offered; distribution of printed informative material; and data and report validation. (Page 171) Title II

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2020

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Vocational Rehabilitation invests in new technology to handle their cases (used Google translate for Spanish to English translation) - 11/04/2019

"In order to comply with the new federal regulations, the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), began [on November 11, 2019], its implementation plan for a new electronic system for handling cases of applicants and consumers potentially eligible for our services, as announced by administrator Madeline Hernández Dipiní. ” 

(Used Google translate for Spanish to English translation of quote. Citation link leads to a document in Spanish.)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transforming Lives through Supported Employment grants (Short Title: Supported Employment Program) - 03/18/2019

~~“The purpose of the program is to support state and community efforts to refine, implement, and sustain evidence-based supported employment programs and mutually compatible and supportive evidence-based practices (e.g., supported education) for transition-aged youth/young adults (ages 16-25) with serious emotional disturbance (SED), and adults with serious mental illness (SMI) or co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (COD). SAMHSA expects that this program will increase state and community capacity to implement and sustain Supported Employment Program (SEP) models and integrated supports to improve competitive employment outcomes for individuals with SED, SMI, or COD….

Eligible applicants are domestic public and private nonprofit entities. For example:State governments; the District of Columbia, Guam, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau are also eligible to apply.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Puerto Rico differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The Puerto Rico Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The Puerto Rico Department of Health is the single state agency, and they have a cooperative agreement with the Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration (PRHIA) also known as Administracion de Seguros Salud de Puerto Rico (ASES) which implements and administers island-wide health insurance system. Approximately half of Puerto Rico's 3.5 million residents have low incomes and depend upon the public health system for their medical care.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $5.4 billion in Medicaid funding to Puerto Rico.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Puerto Rico, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Puerto Rico’s FMAP to 57.2%.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Services Offered by the San Juan Regional Office - 01/01/2019

~~“VA’s San Juan Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. We offer the following additional services:

Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to applyInformation about VA health care and memorial benefitsOutreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women VeteransPublic affairs”

Systems
  • Other

The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“ARV provides services to people with eligible impairments, so that they can prepare, obtain, retain, or maintain a job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Puerto Rico for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“Persons with disabilities in Puerto Rico achieve greater independence, are empowered and take control of their lives in order to increase their integration, inclusion, equality and access to the services and resources in the community according to the following Goals.Goal 1Persons with disabilities have the necessary independent living services and other complementary services.Goal 2Persons with disabilities exercise control in decision-making and intercede for system changes.Goal 3The community at large knows about the independent living philosophy and services” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Legislation have been entered for this state.

No Executive Orders have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Services Offered by the San Juan Regional Office - 01/01/2019

~~“VA’s San Juan Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. We offer the following additional services:

Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to applyInformation about VA health care and memorial benefitsOutreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women VeteransPublic affairs”

Systems
  • Other

The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation - 01/01/2019

~~“ARV provides services to people with eligible impairments, so that they can prepare, obtain, retain, or maintain a job.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) for Puerto Rico for 2017-2019 - 10/01/2016

~~“Persons with disabilities in Puerto Rico achieve greater independence, are empowered and take control of their lives in order to increase their integration, inclusion, equality and access to the services and resources in the community according to the following Goals.Goal 1Persons with disabilities have the necessary independent living services and other complementary services.Goal 2Persons with disabilities exercise control in decision-making and intercede for system changes.Goal 3The community at large knows about the independent living philosophy and services” 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

No Partnerships have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Vocational Rehabilitation invests in new technology to handle their cases (used Google translate for Spanish to English translation) - 11/04/2019

"In order to comply with the new federal regulations, the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (ARV), began [on November 11, 2019], its implementation plan for a new electronic system for handling cases of applicants and consumers potentially eligible for our services, as announced by administrator Madeline Hernández Dipiní. ” 

(Used Google translate for Spanish to English translation of quote. Citation link leads to a document in Spanish.)

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) - 03/29/2019

~~“PATH grants are distributed annually to all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each state or territory solicits proposals and awards funds to local public or nonprofit organizations, known as PATH providers. Supported Activities for PATH….

Across the United States, approximately 500 local organizations offer an array of essential services and supports that may not be supported by mainstream mental health programs. In total, PATH staff outreached to 139,515 individuals in 2017 and enrolled 73,246 PATH-eligible clients with the following services:

    Outreach    Screening and diagnostic treatment    Habilitation and rehabilitation    Community mental health    Substance use disorders treatment    Referrals for primary health care, job training, educational services, and housing    Housing services as specified in Section 522(b)(10) of the Public Health Service Act”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 Transforming Lives through Supported Employment grants (Short Title: Supported Employment Program) - 03/18/2019

~~“The purpose of the program is to support state and community efforts to refine, implement, and sustain evidence-based supported employment programs and mutually compatible and supportive evidence-based practices (e.g., supported education) for transition-aged youth/young adults (ages 16-25) with serious emotional disturbance (SED), and adults with serious mental illness (SMI) or co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (COD). SAMHSA expects that this program will increase state and community capacity to implement and sustain Supported Employment Program (SEP) models and integrated supports to improve competitive employment outcomes for individuals with SED, SMI, or COD….

Eligible applicants are domestic public and private nonprofit entities. For example:State governments; the District of Columbia, Guam, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau are also eligible to apply.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health

No Training/Capacity Building have been entered for this state.

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 1 of 1

Medicaid Overview - 01/01/2019

~~“The Medicaid program in Puerto Rico differs from Medicaid programs operating in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three important ways.

    The Puerto Rico Medicaid delivery system is a subset of the larger public government healthcare delivery system for most of the island’s population. The Puerto Rico Department of Health is the single state agency, and they have a cooperative agreement with the Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration (PRHIA) also known as Administracion de Seguros Salud de Puerto Rico (ASES) which implements and administers island-wide health insurance system. Approximately half of Puerto Rico's 3.5 million residents have low incomes and depend upon the public health system for their medical care.    Through Section 1108 of the Social Security Act (SSA), each territory is provided base funding to serve their Medicaid populations. For the period of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Section 2005 of the Affordable Care Act provided an additional $5.4 billion in Medicaid funding to Puerto Rico.    Unlike the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where the federal government will match all Medicaid expenditures at the appropriate federal matching assistance percentage (FMAP) rate for that state, in Puerto Rico, the FMAP is applied until the Medicaid ceiling funds and the Affordable Care Act available funds are exhausted. The statutory FMAP local matching rate increased from 50%/ 50% to 55% federal /45% local, effective July 1, 2011. From January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2015 there is a temporary 2.2% FMAP increase for all Medicaid enrollees, bringing Puerto Rico’s FMAP to 57.2%.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies