South Carolina

States - Big Screen

The Palmetto State is "Prepared in Mind and Resources" when it comes to improving supports for individuals with disabilities to increase access to competitive, integrated employment and socioeconomic advancement in South Carolina.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon South Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.25%
Change from
2018 to 2019
5,148,714
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.43%
Change from
2018 to 2019
357,695
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.74%
Change from
2018 to 2019
123,245
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.11%
Change from
2018 to 2019
34.46%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.62%
Change from
2018 to 2019
77.01%

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 5,024,369 5,084,127 5,148,714
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 376,889 366,373 357,695
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 122,789 122,332 123,245
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,985,199 2,020,381 2,052,071
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 32.58% 33.39% 34.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.37% 76.53% 77.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.30% 3.40% 2.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.40% 20.70% 20.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.60% 14.40% 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 359,484 344,760 342,542
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 368,217 372,344 374,268
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 492,410 487,136 482,563
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 207,435 197,298 201,996
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 20,192 26,650 20,052
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,309 4,231 4,114
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,505 4,890 6,587
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 364 N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 14,061 13,598 13,034
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 5,617 9,603 8,004

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,807 4,946 4,960
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.40% 4.60% 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 174,597 172,718 171,174

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,106 7,444 9,138
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 4,893 17,103 17,893
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 8,929 42,664 45,069
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 12.40% 17.40% 20.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.00% N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 520 N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 102,867 10,232 9,724
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.30 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 113 88 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 64 53 48
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 57.00% 60.00% 65.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.34 1.08 0.98

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 40.00% 42.00% 34.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,926 6,720 8,033
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 253,541 252,608 251,995
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 190 259 240
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 196 245 207

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $16,552,000 $13,698,891 $20,606,245
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $24,955,000 $25,631,619 $26,635,888
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $24,846,000 $25,458,826 $27,365,194
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $4,764,000 $4,926,715 $5,231,711
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 26.00% 23.00% 28.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 974 946 996
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,086 2,819 2,886
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,188 2,484 3,186
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 51.40 37.40 54.96

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.71% 61.61% 62.17%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 16.31% 15.84% 15.39%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.71% 1.56% 1.46%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.82% 91.90% 90.48%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.92% 26.21% 30.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 56.85% 57.36% 61.04%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 69.54% 84.39% 76.44%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 33.93% 31.15% 30.17%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,561,788
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 3,877
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 14,767
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 510,687
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 525,454
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 143
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 743
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 886
AbilityOne wages (products). $80,150
AbilityOne wages (services). $5,233,265

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 24 32 9
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 2 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 25 34 9
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,526 2,764 1,144
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 81 170 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,607 2,934 1,144

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Able SC is approved by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) to serve ticket beneficiaries as an Employment Network (EN) under SSA’s Ticket to Work program (discussed in more detail below), and also serves as the host and facilitator for the SC Disability Employment Coalition and the SC Employment First Initiative, two collaborative efforts that addresses employment barriers for individuals with disabilities. (Pages 40-41) Title I

In 2016, a consortium of partners working through the SC Disability Employment Coalition received a Partnership in Employment Systems Change grant known as the SC Employment First Initiative. The purpose of the grant is to increase competitive integrated employment outcomes for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

The initiative had three broad goals:

1.) Equip high school students and recent graduated with intellectual and development disabilities with the skills, awareness, and confidence needed to enter competitive employment.

2.) Unify and empower South Carolina education professionals, employment service providers, families, and the community at large towards support of Employment First principles.

3.) Develop and expand supports for South Carolina-based employers who hire persons with disabilities in competitive, community-based positions.

A major focus of the SC Employment First Initiative is to implement policy that competitive and integrated employment shall be considered the first option for any individual with disabilities applying for or receiving services from the state or any of its political subdivisions. In fact, Employment First legislation is pending in the South Carolina legislature which would have a positive effect on employment for people with disabilities. (Page 42) Title I

SCCB is an active member of the Employment First Initiative steering committee, an interagency partnership focused on ensuring that competitive integrated employment is the first priority for transition aged students with disabilities. SCCB is also an active member of the Advisory Council for Educating Students with Disabilities an advisory council for the Office of Special Education at the South Carolina Department of Education. All of these committees and councils create avenues for coordination and collaboration with state and local education officials. (Page 274) Title IV

SCCB is developing an updated Cooperative Agreement with the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (DDSN) to avoid duplication of services, increase coordination of employment services provided to the shared consumer populations, and to enhance Supported Employment programs. SCCB is an active partner with DDSN and both agencies are represented on the Employment First Initiative Steering Committee and the South Carolina Disability Employment Coalition. (Page 278) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~SCCB has established an internal Supported Employment program that includes Customized Employment provided by three (3) regionally assigned JOBS Specialists. During program year 2018 SCCB partnered with the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Technical Assistance Center and the Youth Technical Assistance Center to provide intensive Customized Employment training to the JOBS Specialists. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement with ABLE SC under provisions in the Ticket-to-Work program to provide ongoing supports for ticket holders. SCCB is working to establish other Cooperative Agreements with entities providing ongoing supports to consumers in Supported Employment. (Page 276) Title IV

98.SCCB did not offer supported employment or customized employment services to its consumers with most significant disabilities. This is reflected in the low numbers of employment outcomes for these individuals. (Page 286) Title IV

The South Carolina Commission for the Blind has established the capacities to provide Supported Employment to youth and adults with Most Significant Disabilities in response to the findings of the FFY 2016 CSNA. Funds received under section 603 of the Rehabilitation Act for Supported Employment are utilized to fund the costs of individualized discovery assessment, job development, job placement, and on-the-job supports for Supported Employment and Customized Employment delivered internally by JOBS Specialists. SCCB provides extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement under the Ticket to Work program to provide long term on going supports through an Employment Network (Able SC). SCCB utilizes 50% of Supported Employment funds to provide Supported Employment and Customized Employment for eligible youth. SCCB has established goals to provide Supported Employment services to 6eligible individuals during FFY 2018, 8 individuals during FFY 2019, 10individuals during FFY 2020, and 10 individuals during FFY 2021. (Page 313) Title IV

Strategy 2.2.3: Provide Customized Employment that includes intensive discovery of individualized skills, abilities, potential; and intensive customization of an existing job opening, creation of a job that fills an unmet need, and other customized options. SCCB provides Customized Employment through a qualified and trained JOBS Specialist (Job Oriented Blind Service). (Page 316) Title IV

SCCB will continue to seek opportunities and partnerships to aid in the development and establishment of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to provide community based adjustment to blindness services, supported employment (SE) services, customized employment (CE) services and life skills training. (Page 320) Title IV

CRP Establishment & Development: SCCB will continue to seek opportunities and partnerships to aid in the development and establishment of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to provide community based adjustment to blindness services, supported employment (SE) services, customized employment (CE) services, Braille training, vocational evaluation, and life skills training. (Page 321) Title IV

SCCB is committed to ensuring that services are provided in an equitable manner and are fully accessible. SCCB reviews, assesses and monitors agency programs to conduct continuous improvement activities. The greatest gap identified in the 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment pertained to the lack of a Supported Employment program at SCCB. In response SCCB established the JOBS Specialists (Job Oriented Blind Services) positons trained to provide Supported Employment (SE), Customized Employment (CE), and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) models to consumers who have Most Significant Disabilities. These positions function in a one-on-one consumer centered approach as Job Placement Specialists, On-The-Job Coaches, and in other employment related supportive roles allowed under Title VI. (Pages 321-322) Title IV

SCCB has established program capacity and resources to better serve individuals who have Most Significant Disabilities. SCCB has established JOBS Specialists who are providing Supported Employment and Customized Employment, evidence based practices that have not been offered by SCCB in the past. In addition, SCCB has hired and trained a Certified Work Incentive Counselor to help beneficiaries understand the implications of gainful employment on their Social Security benefits. (Page 323) Title IV

SCCB expended Supported Employment revenue during FFY 2017 for the first time as JOBS Specialists were on boarded and began providing Supported Employment services. Consumers being served by SE funds are currently in the placement and support phase, therefore no consumers served by Supported Employment funds have been transitioned to extended services at this time. SCCB signed a Partnership Plus Agreement with Able SC to provide on-going supports at the time when a consumer transitions from VR support. Building a quality Supported Employment program is a continued goal of SCCB for FFY 2018. Currently SCCB is undergoing extensive Customized Employment training and technical assistance to build capacity and program effectiveness. SCCB also added the capacity to provide benefit and work incentive counseling. (Page 325) Title IV

SCCB made substantial progress on creating a Supported Employment program through the establishment of the JOBS Specialists, providing both Supported Employment and Customized Employment training to these staff, and building the capacity to provide benefits and work incentive counseling services. The greatest impediment was that these resources had to be created where they did not exist prior. (Page 325) Title IV

SCCB expended Supported Employment revenue during FFY 2017 for the first time as JOBS Specialists were on boarded and began providing Supported Employment services. Consumers being served by SE funds are currently in the placement and support phase, therefore no consumers served by Supported Employment funds have been transitioned to extended services at this time. SCCB signed a Partnership Plus Agreement with Able SC to provide on-going supports at the time when a consumer transitions from VR support. Building a quality Supported Employment program is a continued goal of SCCB for FFY 2018. Currently SCCB is undergoing extensive Customized Employment training and technical assistance to build capacity and program effectiveness. (Page 326-327) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~CCB has developed a Self-Employment Toolkit intended to walk eligible consumers through the microenterprise development process. SCCB has partnered with the University of Wisconsin-Madison to provide Self-Employment and Social Security Work Incentive training to SCCB’s VR Counselors on May 17, 2018 and August 8, 2018. SCCB is working to build community partnerships to leverage resources from entities engaged in business development such as Small Business Development Centers, Business Incubator Programs, and South Carolina’s Technical College System. SCCB is also working to incorporate our Career Exploration Lab (3D Printer Lab) as a tool to assist in product development and prototyping. (Page 66) Title I

•SCVRD leverages other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services. Extended services providers are identified in each area to provide follow along and extended services following successful exit from the VR program. Partnerships at the state and local level with DDSN and the local DSN boards continue to grow and provide key linkages to extended services providers. (Page 182) Title I

SCVRD’s ongoing support services are limited to 24 months unless extended by an amendment to the IPE. Transition to extended services starts after an individual is stabilized in his/her job setting and has met the individualized work goal. The client’s employment stability is determined by the achievement of adequate job performance without a need for ongoing, intensive shadowing/mentoring from the job coach. The client, employer, job coach, and SCVRD counselor agree that this has occurred before transition to the extended service provider takes place. SCVRD continues to leverage resources for identifying extended service providers to meet long-term support needs. (Page 260) Title IV

Goal 1: Increase Program Capacity Leveraging Partnerships & Community Engagement
Priority 1.1: Improve WIOA Partnerships & One-Stop System Engagement
Priority 1.2: Improve Partnerships & Strategic Alliances to Increase Program Capacity
Priority 1.3: Increase Public Awareness & Community Engagement
Priority 1.4: Align Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center (EBMRC) Programing

Report of Progress Goal 1: SCCB achieved substantial progress on goal 1. SCCB improved WIOA partnerships and One-Stop System Engagement through the strategies of formalizing American Job Center partnerships with Memorandum’s of Understanding which include infrastructure cost agreements, specified co-located staff office times and space, center accessibility assessment and technical assistance, and staff cross training. SCCB has active MOU’s with all SC Works Centers. SCCB worked with core WIOA partner programs to create agency cross training modules for partnership workforce staff, and explored data sharing and common intake opportunities. SCCB finalized a Cooperative Agreement with SC Department of Education and is currently negotiating an update to the SC Vocational Rehabilitation Department Cooperative Agreement. SCCB negotiated and entered into a number of Cooperative Agreements with community based qualified fee-for-service vendors and other partners to expand capacity and available resources statewide. This has expanded program capacity to provide independent travel training (8 new vendors), home management training (2 new vendors), and Braille Literacy (2 new vendors) in community settings. SCCB also provides ZoomText, Jaws, and other assistive technology training through a fee-for-service contract with the National Federation of the Blind of South Carolina. (Page 322) Title IV

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.  

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Goal 1.2: Provide comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services to adult job seekers who are blind or visually impaired resulting in the attainment of industry recognized in-demand credentials required for competitive integrated employment.
Strategy 1.2.1: Provide quality Adjustment to Blindness and Pre-Vocational Training at the Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center for Employment & Independence. Adjustment to Blindness Training includes: Orientation & Mobility (Independent Travel), Independent Living Skills, Braille Literacy, Employability Soft Skills, Basic Financial Literacy, and Psychosocial Adjustment to Blindness Counseling. Pre-Vocational Training includes: Basic Keyboarding, Basic Microsoft Office Suite Training, and Assistive Technology Training such as Computer Screen Readers, Text Magnifiers, Low Vision Aids, Etc. (Page 315) Title IV

In 2017 SCCB rewrote the curriculum and courses offered at the Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center for Employment and Independence. This new curriculum includes pre-test and post-test assessments to measure skill gains and provide for continuous improvement. Several new center programs have been implemented including a partnership with Adult Education that brings GED preparation instruction and testing to the center. SCCB added a Basic Financial Literacy course using curriculum designed by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. SCCB has also added Soft-Skills training based on the “Skills to Pay the Bills” curriculum. (Page 323) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~The Transition Alliance of South Carolina is a broad systems improvement and technical assistance resource for professionals working with students with disabilities. Their primary outcome is to empower students to transition into community-based employment. Local transition programs choose to enhance their curriculum through a variety of evidence-based transition practices, including student-led IEP meetings, goal setting and attainment, socializing in the workplace, job accommodations, and other activities meant to empower students with disabilities to control their career strategy. TASC consists of a state-level interagency steering committee that supports local interagency transition teams across the state. (Page 42) Title I

SC Department of Education Office of Adult Education has a special education task force that creates and delivers training for adult education practitioners serving students with special needs. The OAE meets regularly with SCDE Office of Special Education Services to ensure compliance with all special education regulations. Additionally, OAE requires that all funded local providers have a written plan with local Special Education Departments to transition IEP (Individualized Education Plan) students, and that local providers comply with the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA) which requires each provider to describe the steps they propose to take to ensure equitable access to, and participation in, its federally assisted programs. OAE monitors for compliance with the written transition IEP as part of its annual compliance process, and collaborates with the Office of Special Education to monitor all other GEPA requirements. (Page 109) Title I

GEPA (General Education Provisions Act) 427 requirements are overseen by the SCDE-OAE in the following ways:
•In cooperation with SCDE - Office of General Counsel and the SCDE - Office of Special Education Services, OAE delivers training for adult education practitioners serving students with special needs.
•OAE meets regularly with the SCDE - Office of Special Education Services to ensure compliance with all special education regulations.
•OAE requires that all funded local providers have a written plan with local Special Education Departments to transition IEP (Individualized Education Plan) students, and that local providers comply with GEPA which requires each provider to describe the steps they propose to take to ensure equitable access to, and participation in, its federally assisted programs.

OAE monitors for compliance the written transition IEP as a part of its annual compliance process, and collaborates with the SCDE - Office of Special Education to monitor all other GEPA requirements. (Pages 170-171) Title I

SCVRD utilizes the “Guideposts for Success” (based on the work of the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth — NCWD/Y) as a framework for school-to-work transition services. This includes regular activities that focus on each of the required pre-employment transition service activities: job exploration counseling, work-based learning, counseling on opportunities for comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living skills, and instruction in self-advocacy. Group activities provide opportunities to not only facilitate peer mentoring, but also allow transition staff to observe and cultivate students’ leadership skills, as well as communication and social skills. Mentoring is a key component of the High School High Tech (HS/HT) program, and SCVRD collaborates with organizations that have youth-led mentoring programs in place. Through the agency’s VR Ambassadors program, former clients that have successfully transitioned into employment or postsecondary activities are available to assist with mentoring and participation in transition activities such as Disability Mentoring Day, and summer transition institutes. (Pages 174-175) Title I

In collaboration with the SC Department of Employment and Workforce (SCDEW) and the SCDE, SCVRD’s school-based transition counselors work together with local education agencies, community partners, workforce development boards, SC Works Centers and business partners to advise students with disabilities, and their families, regarding available career pathways and educational/training opportunities. SCVRD maintains a Transition Services Coordinator position and additional regional Transition Specialist positions whose duties focus on the authorized activities required for effective provision of pre-employment transition services. These include:
• Coordinate all transition-related activities and projects including those that involve other agencies, community organizations and local SCVRD field offices;
• Develop, monitor and update all transition documents and cooperative agreements;
• Provide technical assistance, professional development and training on transition-related issues to field office staff, education personnel, community organizations, families, and students;
• Review and update client service policy to ensure policies and procedures are reflective of SCVRD mission and focus on quality in serving youth in transition;
• Serve on the planning committee for the interagency South Carolina Youth Leadership Forum, a summer youth development and leadership program; • Participate in TASC, an interagency initiative to create systems change and support development of local interagency transition teams. (Page 175) Title I

Strategy 1.2 Enhance school-to-work transition services.
• Objective 1.2.1 Maximize relationships with education officials in all South Carolina school districts to support development of education and career pathways. 
• Objective 1.2.2 Improve services to individuals with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual/developmental disabilities.
• Objective 1.2.3 Enhance services for at-risk youth with disabilities.
• Objective 1.2.4 Expose students with disabilities to careers in science, technology, engineering and math through High School/High Tech programs. (Page 247) Title IV

SCCB Career BOOST (Building Occupational Opportunities for Students in Transition): Is a contractual pilot program in partnership with South Carolina’s Independent Living Centers, the National Federation of the Blind of South Carolina, and LEA’s. Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided to eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities in the public schools and other settings. These services include Self-Advocacy Workshops, Work Readiness Soft Skills Workshops, Exploration of Higher Education through College Tours, and Work Based Learning Experiences. (Page 272) Title IV

SCCB Vocational Rehabilitation Comprehensive Transition Services Program: This program serves students from age 15 until exit from high school at which time they are served by the SCCB adult VR program. SCCB has four (4) dedicated Transition Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors statewide building program infrastructure and education relationships to improve services to Transition Students. The Transition Counselors primarily collaborate with education officials such as the South Carolina Department of Education (local school districts), the South Carolina School for the Deaf and Blind (SCSDB) and the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (SCDDSN). Transition Counselors develop the initial Individualized Plan of Employment (IPE) while the consumer is attending high school. The IPE includes services pertaining to the adjustment, prevention or stabilization of vision, and Pre-Employment Transition Services as defined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA). In an effort to avoid the duplication of services, low vision and assistive technology needs will be coordinated with local school districts in accordance with the student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and IPE. In such instances, the alternative service providers and funding sources will be identified on the IPE and coordinated accordingly. SCCB will conduct semiannual meetings with the statewide vision teachers in an effort to facilitate the coordination of services to the most significantly disabled students and their need for supported employment services. Discussions will include, but not be limited to, collaboration with SCDDSN, SCDOE and the SCSDB to coordinate transition services. (Page 273) Title IV

While these gaps are areas of continued focus for SCCB, much has been accomplished since the Statewide Needs Assessment. SCCB now provides Career BOOST services to students with disabilities who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services. Career BOOST provides students with instruction in self-advocacy skills, work readiness skills training, work based learning experiences, and exploration of opportunities for career training in post-secondary schools and institutions of higher education. SCCB designed and operates the Student Internship Jr. Program that provides high school transition students with a paid work experience. SCCB Transition VR Counselors have increased their involvement in IEP meetings, and SCCB has formalized memorandum of understandings with LEA's. (Page 288) Title IV

SCCB established contractual programs for Pre-Employment Transition Services with South Carolina’s Independent Living Centers and the National Federation of the Blind. Since inception Career BOOST has provided 761 students with Self-Advocacy Workshops, 494 Work Readiness Workshops, and 160 Work Based Learning Experience such as paid internships and work site tours and job shadowing. Under Career Boost 62 eligible and potentially eligible high school students have participated in college and university tours, exploration of post-secondary educational options, and counseling on financial aid opportunities. SCCB conducted public awareness outreach and implemented a social media presence to enhance agency visibility. In 2017 SCCB rewrote the curriculum and courses offered at the Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center for Employment and Independence. This new curriculum includes pre-test and post-test assessments to measure skill gains and provide for continuous improvement. Several new center programs have been implemented including a partnership with Adult Education that brings GED preparation instruction and testing to the center. SCCB added a Basic Financial Literacy course using curriculum designed by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. SCCB has also added Soft-Skills training based on the “Skills to Pay the Bills” curriculum. (Pages 322-323) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~South Carolina’s one-stop delivery system is designed to be fully accessible so that all job seekers and employers can participate in the services offered. The Methods of Administration (MOA) - a state document required by the Civil Rights Center - is a “living” document that ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level expeditiously, and details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be accomplished.

Monitoring performed at both the state and local level ensures that all SC Works Centers are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize South Carolina’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual (e.g. SC Works Online Services) to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. Complaints of discrimination are directed to the State Equal Opportunity Officer.

Per federal regulations, each LWDA must appoint a local Equal Opportunity Officer who is responsible for ensuring local WIOA Section 188 compliance. Local Equal Opportunity Officers are trained to use the “ADA Checklist for Readily Achievable Barrier Removal,” the “Checklist for Existing Facilities,” and a recommended assistive technology checklist. New local Equal Opportunity Officers are provided with detailed training on regulations, policies, and procedures following appointment. Ongoing training is provided through EO Roundtables and on-site training on such topics as, “Serving Customers with Disabilities,” “Current EO Trends,” as well as topics deemed relevant by LWDAs and designed in response to their training requests.  (Page 108) Title I

For the current Unified State Plan, SCCB identified gaps from two primary sources. The first being unmet gaps identified in the FFY 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. The second source is the South Carolina Workforce Development Board’s Economic Analysis and Strategic Plan in order to align SCCB initiatives with the goals of South Carolina's Workforce Development System. The following gaps have been identified:

Gap 1: South Carolina’s current labor force, including individuals who are blind or visually impaired, do not have industry recognized credentials, knowledge, skills, or abilities to meet current or emerging demands of the business community.

Gap 2: SCCB needs to improve alignment of policies, resources, and staff expertise to provide job driven, labor market informed, vocational counseling and guidance that aligns with South Carolina’s Talent Pipeline Project and Sector Strategies initiatives to assist eligible consumers in accessing career pathways that lead to high and middle skill/income jobs in growth sectors.

Gap 3: SCCB needs to improve partnerships with business in order to more accurately identify current and future workforce needs of business and industry to support career pathways in growth sectors and improve services to business. (Page 291) Title IV

Goal 2: Increase Quantity & Quality of Employment Outcomes

Priority 2.1: Align VR Counseling with South Carolina’s Talent Pipeline Project, Emphasizing Career Pathways, Attainment of Industry Recognized Credentials, Job Driven/Sector Strategies & Labor Market Information

Priority 2.2: Increase Employment for those with Most Significant Disabilities

Priority 2.3: Increase Vocational Exploration & Opportunities for Transition Students Priority 2.4: Increase Employment for all eligible consumers

Report of Progress Goal 2: Under the previous state plan, SCCB focused efforts on building program capacity, resources and expertise needed in order to meet goal 2. This required resource location, resource reallocation, and program building. As these programs have been built, SCCB has not experienced an increase in the number of successful employment outcomes. Under the provisions of the previous Unified State Plan, SCCB has aligned VR Counseling, career exploration, vocational goal selection, and Individualized Plan for Employment development with labor market information and sector strategies. SCCB has instituted the use of The Career Index Plus for analyzing labor market information and helping consumers make informed job driven decisions. SCCB implemented significant staff training in the area of using labor market information and understanding South Carolina’s regional economic conditions. SCCB leveraged partnerships with the Department of Employment and Workforce, and the Job Driven Technical Assistance Center to provide staff with training on sector strategies, the talent pipeline efforts, and the use of labor market information. SCCB has established program capacity and resources to better serve individuals who have Most Significant Disabilities. SCCB has established JOBS Specialists who are providing Supported Employment and Customized Employment, evidence based practices that have not been offered by SCCB in the past. In addition, SCCB has hired and trained a Certified Work Incentive Counselor to help beneficiaries understand the implications of gainful employment on their Social Security benefits. SCCB established Career BOOST, a contractual program in partnership, collaboration, and coordination with Independent Living Centers, the National Federation of the Blind, and South Carolina’s Local Education Authorities. This program provides the required Pre-Employment Transition Services to eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities. SCCB hosted the first Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Career (STEM) Exploration Week for transition students during the summer of 2017. During the STEM Career Exploration week, 9 high school students who are blind or visually impaired were provided instruction by a team of scientists from San Jose State University, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, the Space Telescope Science Institute, and the International Astronomical Union. The students explored STEM careers using 3D printed tactile models of galaxies, planets, and other astronomical phenomena. Additionally, students were exposed to “sonification” techniques used by blind and visually impaired Astronomers to study the universe. SCCB is repeating the program in the summer of 2018. (Pages 323-324) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD) offers a range of training services that include OJT, job try-out, and registered apprenticeships. For OJT, in partnership with SCVRD, a company hires and trains a client for a specific position. The training progresses according to training milestones in an established training outline. Job try-outs are a stipend-funded training service coordinated between SCVRD, the client, and a business partner. During a job try-out, a career ready client learns specific, basic skills for a job at a company’s worksite(s). (Page 29) Title I

SCVRD maintains a priority on providing work-based learning experiences for students. Following a 5-year transition demonstration grant from the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), and in keeping with evidence-based practices that support work experience to be one of the most influential factors in successful postsecondary employment outcomes, transition staff actively pursue job tryout, job shadowing, internship, and apprenticeship opportunities for students. This impacts not only the ultimate outcome of competitive, integrated employment but has been shown to be an integral support for school completion and drop-out prevention. (Page 175) Title IV

Innovation and expansion activities have been identified within these strategies and include:

  • Continued expansion of work-based learning activities for students
  • Expansion of Project SEARCH sites
  • Cooperative agreement with Project HOPE Foundation, a non-profit organization that provides a lifespan of services and activities for individuals with autism
  • Expansion of transition job coaches focused on providing supported employment services to students and youth with the most significant disabilities
  • Maintaining a full-time counselor to provide vocational rehabilitation services to incarcerated youth, which has expanded to include additional programs operated by DJJ (e.g., Camp Aspen)
  • Maintaining a staff interpreter for clients who are deaf to provide video remote interpreting, on- site services to mutual clients of SCVRD and DHHS, extend consistent access to interpreter services in rural areas, and enhance the accessibility of VR productions and client and staff training materials
  • Creation of apprenticeships tailored to increase the participation levels of clients who are deaf (Page 259) Title IV

Goal 3.1: Provide specialized training through a Pre-Apprenticeship Program to prepare adults not enrolled in college programs, as an alternative career pathway to current and future business and industry needs.

Strategy 3.1.1: Utilize the principles STEM education to develop a Pre-Apprenticeship training program for job seekers who are blind and visually impaired that will satisfy the entry level skills needed for acceptance into registered apprenticeship programs. Incorporate the use of the most current Assistive Technology that will make graduates competitive when applying to fill open apprenticeship positions. (Pages 316-317) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Able SC is a Center for Independent Living (CIL) that is designed and operated within a local community by individuals with disabilities and provides an array of independent living services, including one-on-one and group training on topics such as employment soft skills, transportation utilization, accommodation requests, and transition from high school to post-secondary life.
Through funding from the SC Department of Education, SC Commission for the Blind, and local United Ways, Able SC provides independent living skills and pre-employment transition services to current middle and high school students with disabilities in the classroom.

Able SC is approved by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) to serve ticket beneficiaries as an Employment Network (EN) under SSA’s Ticket to Work program (discussed in more detail below), and also serves as the host and facilitator for the SC Disability Employment Coalition and the SC Employment First Initiative, two collaborative efforts that addresses employment barriers for individuals with disabilities. (Pages 40-41) Title I

Ticket to Work is a voluntary program for people receiving disability benefits from Social Security and whose primary goal is to find good careers and have a better self-supporting future. Consumers may receive employment services through an employment network provider, including career counseling, socialization to the workplace, and job support advice, among others. (Page 44) Title I

SCVRD’s supported employment goals and plans regarding the Title VI program are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and the department’s performance on the common performance measures as well as agency key performance indicators. The priorities are as follows:•Strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s 110 traditional program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs;

•Providing services to people with the most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, in order to successfully achieve and maintain competitive employment in integrated work settings; and

•Providing supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities. (Pages 180-181) Title I

The provision of early intervention services is a major issue given the long application process associated with making eligibility determinations for both the SSI and SSDI programs. There will be a need for increased supported employment services to improve the employment outcomes of many SSI/SSDI recipients. As a total count, the number of SSI/SSDI recipients, who applied for services, increased to 2,256 by 2013. The trend reflects an increase of 7.3 percent from the previous three years. (Page 198) Title I

SCVRD’s supported employment goals and plans regarding the Title VI program are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and the department’s performance on the common performance measures as well as agency key performance indicators. The priorities are as follows:
•Strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s 110 traditional program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs;
•Providing services to people with the most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, in order to successfully achieve and maintain competitive employment in integrated work settings; and
•Providing supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 244) Title I

The individual placement model for competitive employment remains the primary supported employment model being used by SCVRD. Emphasis is placed upon providing services to people with most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, whose employment needs are so significant that traditional 110 program services would not be sufficient to meet them. SCVRD coordinator of supported employment services also assists area office staff to identify and serve all eligible clients with the most significant disabilities. (Page 261) Title I

During the period of the last Unified State Plan cycle, SCCB made significant progress in closing these gaps. SCCB hired, trained, and obtained certification for a Work Incentives Counselor, and established referral pathways to the WIPA grantee benefits counseling services. SCCB established JOBS Specialist positions trained to provide Supported Employment including Customized Employment. SCCB signed a Ticket to Work Partnership Plus agreement with an Employment Network to provide on-going supports for supported employment cases. And SCCB has signed a number of fee-for-service agreements throughout the state with qualified service providers in the areas of Orientation and Mobility, Braille Instruction, Independent Living Skills that Support Employment, and adjustment to blindness psychological counseling. SCCB continues to work to close these gaps, and this modified state plan reflects these goals and priorities. (Page 286) Title IV

The South Carolina Commission for the Blind has established the capacities to provide Supported Employment to youth and adults with Most Significant Disabilities in response to the findings of the FFY 2016 CSNA. Funds received under section 603 of the Rehabilitation Act for Supported Employment are utilized to fund the costs of individualized discovery assessment, job development, job placement, and on-the-job supports for Supported Employment and Customized Employment delivered internally by JOBS Specialists. SCCB provides extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement under the Ticket to Work program to provide long term on going supports through an Employment Network (Able SC). (Page 313) Title IV

As required by WIOA 50% of Supported Employment funds will be used to provide Supported Employment Services to youth with most significant disabilities. SCCB built in-house capacities and resources to meet this goal since FPY 2016. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement under the Ticket to Work program to provide long term on going supports through an Employment Network (Able SC). SCCB will look for opportunities to engage with private and public partners to fund extended and ongoing supported employment services for this population. (Page 313) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~SCVRD utilizes multiple methods of working with employers to identify competitive, integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate the provision of VR services for adults and transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities. On a statewide and local basis, the Business Partnership Network, or BPN, provides an opportunity for regular engagement with business partners to gain input on hiring needs, training curricula, and opportunities for outreach with business and industry. Business Advisory Councils (BACs) are established to provide input on specific programs, such as the IT Training Centers, in Columbia and at the Bryant Center in Lyman. Members of the BAC assist in evaluating courses of study and curricula to ensure SCVRD stays current with what is needed in the workplace for IT professionals. Also, SCVRD utilizes Business Development Specialists (BDSs) across the state whose role is to identify opportunities for training, work-based learning, job development and placement, and emerging career pathways. BDS staff participate on local business services teams, along with partners from SC Works and LWDBs, to provide a coordinated approach to business development activities. BDS staff also work with transition counselors and coaches to identify opportunities for work-based learning experiences, internships, apprenticeships, and OJT for students in conjunction with the pre-employment transition services that are provided in high school settings. (Page 182) Title I

SCCB actively engages with the South Carolina business community through services provided by the Training & Employment Division (T&E) Employment Consultants. SCCB T&E Employment Consultants build and maintain partnerships with businesses to:
o Assess and better understand the unique human resource needs of South Carolina businesses;
o To help align SCCB programs to better meet the unique and specific human resource needs of South Carolina businesses;
o To create, establish, and foster relationships with South Carolina businesses that help them meet their unique and specific human resource needs, including talent acquisition and talent retention;
o Develop opportunities for Work Based Experiences, Internships, Job Shadowing, and other work based learning experiences that provide South Carolina Businesses with opportunities to gain experience with a diverse and qualified workforce;
o Create mutually beneficial relationships and facilitate linkages of job openings to a highly skilled and diverse talent pool of candidates. Referrals of consumers who are seeking employment and who have been judged to be Job Ready are received from SCCB Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. The Employment Consultant’s role is job development and placement that meets the needs of the business and the consumer. The Consultant also provides businesses and consumers with access to services that can be provided by SCCB or other governmental agencies. Incentives that may be applicable are also presented. These include: 
o The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC). This program allows a maximum available credit of $2,400 per eligible worker. 
o Sensitivity and awareness training for employers and organizations. This training includes American Disability Act (ADA), sighted guide techniques and attitudes regarding blindness. The presentation is designed to remove myths and apprehensions about blindness.
o Technical assistance for the implementation and support of assistive technology. (Pages 276-277) Title I

Data Collection

South Carolina has a vast workforce development system consisting of multiple public and private partners, the goal of which is to facilitate financial stability and economic prosperity for employers, individuals, and communities. We will evaluate the overall effectiveness of our system using the following tools: (1) WIOA common performance measures that assess employment, earnings, credential attainment, skills gain, and employer engagement; (2) SC Works Certification Standards that assess system management, job seeker services, and employer services; and (3) SWDB Strategic Plan key performance indicators. (Page 54) Title I

Accordingly, continuous improvement initiatives to build on the agency’s long-term history of success have focused on quality. SCVRD has embarked on an initiative known as “Quality One” (or “Q1”), which has a theme of “Quality happens one person at a time.” This included the establishment of workgroups to address quality measures and provide recommendations for a cohesive system that supports the provision of quality client services and metrics to gauge success and to realize results in increased successful employment outcomes for clients. This initiative aligns with SCVRD’s longstanding commitment to its Program Integrity model, which seeks a balance among productivity, customer service, and compliance assurance. Each of those components has measurable results and can be used to evaluate the agency at levels ranging from specific caseload or work unit up to an agency-wide level. The agency is proactively integrating the new WIOA common performance measures into program evaluation, data collection, and management information reports. (Page 92) Title I

SCVRD’s supported employment goals and plans regarding the Title VI program are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and the department’s performance on the common performance measures as well as agency key performance indicators. The priorities are as follows: •Strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s 110 traditional program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs; •Providing services to people with the most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, in order to successfully achieve and maintain competitive employment in integrated work settings; and •Providing supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities. (Pages 180-181) Title I

Based on the past three years’ data on services for students and youth, SCVRD estimates it will provide services, including but not limited to pre-employment transition services, to approximately 8,480 individuals that are initially referred by the school system. Data collection for the new 911 Case Services Report will allow for better identification of students with disabilities and provision of pre-employment transition services. As the new data becomes available, projections and fiscal forecasting for the provision of pre-employment transition services will be updated. (Page 204) Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Able Access is a fee for service program offered by Able SC to promote accessible and inclusive environments within businesses and government agencies. Staff provide Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) trainings and consultations. These services include but are not limited to policy and procedure review, onsite accessibility survey, testing on online property for screen reader/magnifier accessibility, and tailored staff trainings in a wide variety of disability topics (Page 41) Title I

Most workforce, economic development, and education programs are managed locally, and the quality of service delivery may vary by area. A number of measures are underway to improve the consistency of service delivery, including: the implementation of SC Works Center Standards and WIOA Eligible Training Provider provisions. The SC Works Center Standards address service delivery to job seekers and employers and center management, and are used by LWDBs to evaluate effectiveness, programmatic and physical accessibility, and continuous improvement of the SC Works delivery system. Along the same lines, training providers are now required to submit program data and meet certain requirements to be eligible to receive WIOA training funds. This will help ensure that participants receive high-quality training in high-demand, high-wage occupations. (Page 49) Title I

Monitoring performed at both the state and local level ensures that all SC Works Centers are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize South Carolina’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual (e.g. SC Works Online Services) to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. Complaints of discrimination are directed to the State Equal Opportunity Officer. (Page 108) Title I

As part of the SC Works center certification process, LWDBs are required to evaluate accessibility of the SC Works delivery system. SC Works centers were evaluated in 2017 and will be re-evaluated every three (3) years thereafter as required by WIOA. In order to be certified according to the SC Works certification standards, each center must meet the following accessibility baseline measures:

150.The Center is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Every workforce area will work with Vocational Rehabilitation partners and SCDEW Office of Equal Opportunity, as needed, to ensure ADA compliance.

151.The Center provides assistive technology for customers to use when accessing computers and other services. This includes customers with visual impairments, physical disabilities, and hearing impairments.

152. Staff should be identified to assist people with disabilities at the first point of contact and in case of emergency.

153.There are linkages to services for people with special needs, including veterans and others, related to disability. (Page 109-110) Title I

158.SCCB is working with the SC Works system to ensure one-stop center accessibility to persons with visual impairments. SCCB Assistive Technology Staff are current evaluating centers in several areas of the state to propose and provide hardware and/or software that will enable persons who are blind or low vision to access one stop center programs. (Page 110) Title I

Innovation and expansion activities have been identified within these strategies and include: Maintaining a staff interpreter for clients who are deaf to provide video remote interpreting, on- site services to mutual clients of SCVRD and DHHS, extend consistent access to interpreter services in rural areas, and enhance the accessibility of VR productions and client and staff training materials (Page 259) Title IV

Gaps included:

• America’s Job Centers (AJCs) in South Carolina (SC Works) have not effectively served individuals with blindness and vision impairments. There have been no documented instances of SCCB cases that are jointly served by other workforce entities.

• Historically, the relationship between SCCB and the AJCs, although cordial, is primarily one of referral with no evidence of substantial services after referral;

• Although the AJCs are accessible, the technology is frequently out of date and the AJC staff lack the skills to effectively operate/demonstrate the technology; Under WIOA there are legal requirements around the development of partnerships between SCCB and entities in the greater workforce development system.

While these gaps are the focus on continuing efforts both by the AJC's (SC Works) and SCCB, much has been accomplished since the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. SCCB has improved co-location of SCCB staff in the AJC's for specific periods of time each month where space allows. SCCB has signed MOU's and Infrastructure Cost Sharing Agreements with all SC Works service areas, and has been providing technical assistance to the AJC's in regards to programmatic and physical accessibility. (Page 287) Title IV

SCCB has been an active partner in the WIOA Unified State Plan Implementation Team. South Carolina’s plans are to continue convening this group of core WIOA partners to continue to develop meaningful and effective partnerships, share expertise and knowledge, skills, and abilities, and to expand the ability of the system to serve all individuals including those with disabilities. In addition, SCCB is working to ensure that there is agency presence in the local one stop American Job Centers on a consistent basis to provide support and expertise to consumers who are blind or visually impaired. SCCB entered into MOU's and Infrastructure Cost Agreements with all SC Works service deliver areas. SCCB is currently working with SC Works to provide assessment and technical assistance to ensure programmatic and physical accessibility. (Page 320) Title IV

Veterans

SC Works representatives are available in centers throughout the state to help veterans transition into the workforce. Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVER) staff conduct employer outreach and job development in the local community to assist veterans in gaining employment, including conducting seminars for employers and, in conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups. Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists are trained to provide intensive case management services to veterans and eligible spouses with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE), and age priority veterans ages 18 to 24, including individual career coaching, job referral, resume preparation assistance, career fairs and job search workshops, jobs training programs, and referrals to supporting or training services.

SCVRD has an ongoing partnership with DEW’s LVERs and DVOPs to coordinate outreach efforts with federal contractors. Federal contractors are required to establish an annual hiring benchmark for protected veterans and individuals with disabilities, or adopt the national benchmark provided by the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP). Through this informal partnership, SCVRD and DEW LVERs and DVOPs identify work ready individuals and coordinate employment opportunities with federal contractors. (Page 39) Title I

In accordance with the Jobs for Veterans Act, veterans and eligible spouses are given priority of service in employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the USDOL. Priority of service means that veterans and eligible spouses are given priority over non-covered persons for the receipt of employment, training, and placement service and that a veteran or an eligible spouse either receives access to a service earlier in time than a non-covered person, or, if the resource is limited, the veteran or eligible spouse receives access to the services instead of the non-covered person. The state has provided guidance to local workforce boards on how to implement the priority of service provisions.

The state monitors priority of service for veterans and eligible spouses by ensuring that local workforce areas have implemented appropriate priority of service policies. Local policies are assessed to determine the following:

o whether the policy explains the differences between Veterans’ Services and priority of service for veterans and eligible spouses;

o whether the policy describes the roles and responsibilities of SC Works Center staff and management as they pertain to Veterans’ Priority of Service; and,

o whether the policy demonstrates appropriate actions for showing priority of service to veterans and eligible spouses for Department of Labor funded programs in SC Works Centers. (Page 107) Title I

The state has issued guidance regarding services under the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP). DVOP staff must limit their activities to providing services to eligible veterans and eligible spouses who:

o meet the definition of an individual with a significant barrier to employment (SBE), as defined and updated by DOL, or

o are members of a veteran population identified by the Secretary of Labor as eligible for DVOP services, currently defined as veterans aged 18 to 24.

Per state guidance, an eligible veteran or eligible spouse who is identified as having a SBE must be immediately referred to a DVOP specialist. Veterans ages 18 to 24 must also be referred to DVOP specialists. In instances where a DVOP specialist is not available, referrals to a SCDEW career development specialist will be made. DVOP specialists will conduct an initial assessment to determine if the veteran or eligible spouse will benefit from the provision of case management. In the event that case management is determined not suitable, the DVOP will refer the veteran or eligible spouse to the other program staff who would best be able to meet their needs. Veterans with a SBE and those aged 18 to 24 must have access to all appropriate SC Works services and are not limited to receiving services only from DVOP specialists. Additionally, veterans and eligible spouses who do not meet the SBE definition or are not within a specified category identified by the Secretary of Labor, are to be referred to appropriate non-JVSG SC Works staff member(s) to receive services, on a priority basis. (Pages 107-108) Title I

Another area of identified need is response to the increase of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) through outreach and a focus on serving more individuals with brain injuries. This includes the general population as well as veterans from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The number of TBIs in the general population has increased slowly over the last decade according to the CDC; however, deaths from TBI have decreased. This decrease means an increase in the number of persons who might be returning to work and requiring vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 198) Title I

SCVRD provides services to veterans with disabilities; and, efforts to increase outreach to this population are ongoing. SCVRD has established relationships with local employers in all areas of the state, and collaboration with the Veterans Administration is essential to providing the greatest outreach for veterans with disabilities. SCVRD has assigned counselors to the state’s seven VA specialty clinics and each area office has designated counselors to work with local VA offices for referrals. (Page 200) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~SCVRD works collaboratively with DMH and has an established MOA that outlines roles, responsibilities, and referral procedures. In addition, several cooperative agreements are in place across the state for IPS (Individualized Placement and Support) caseloads to provide rapid placement and job coaching for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. Transition counselors working within the schools to provide pre-employment transition services coordinate with school-based mental health counselors to identify students in need of services, whether that is VR or mental health services. Through this “no wrong door” approach, students in need of services are connected to the appropriate resources in a timely manner. (Page 184) Title I

SCCB is developing a new Cooperative Agreement with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health to collaborate, coordinate, avoid duplication of services, and enhance the employment outcomes of shared consumer populations. (Page 278) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
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Executive Order No. 2019-39 South Carolina State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force - 12/12/2019

“WHEREAS, numerous state and federal public assistance programs currently provide support to individuals seeking education and employment, including Unemployment Insurance (“UI”), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (“SNAP”), Vocational Rehabilitation, and Medicaid benefits for qualified working disabled individuals; and…

NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of South Carolina and pursuant to the Constitution and Laws of this State and the powers conferred upon me therein, I hereby create and establish the State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“DECO Recovery Management, LLC was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Underserved and vulnerable uninsured populations: Latino/Hispanic; African Americans; Rural communities; young and “invincibles”; small employers; and self-employed individuals.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with South Carolina Chamber of Commerce, South Carolina Hospital Association, South Carolina of the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) , Carolina Chapter of the American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM), Greenville Memorial Hospital, Greer Memorial Hospital, North Greenville Hospital, Hillcrest Memorial Hospital , Patewood Memorial Hospital, Laurens County Memorial Hospital, Aiken Regional Medical Center, Oconee Memorial Hospital, and Bon Secours St. Francis Health System.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Andrew Foland \Phone: (410) 763-7475Email: afoland@decorm.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Waiver Case Management Standards - 07/01/2019

~~This document has information on how staff and providers are to operate when working with the Community Supports Waiver,  Head and Spinal Cord Injury Waiver, and Intellectual Disability/Related Disabilities Waiver.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Rehabilitative Behavioral Health Services (RBHS) - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina (South Carolina or State) State Medicaid Plan allows an array of behavioral health services under the Rehabilitative Services Option, 42 CFR 440.130(d).Rehabilitative Services are medical or remedial services that have been recommended by a Physician or other Licensed Practitioner of the Healing Arts(LPHA) within the scope of their practice under South Carolina State Law and as further determined by the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS)for maximum reduction of physical or mental disability and restoration of a beneficiary to their best possible functional level. This section describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the Providers of services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Licensed Independent Practitioner’s (LIP) Rehabilitative Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Services in this manual are intended to be delivered in an outpatient and community setting only. In accordance with 42CFR 435.1009-1011, services are not available for beneficiaries residing in an Institution of Mental Disease. Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitals and Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities (PRTFs) receive an all-inclusive, per diem rate for services. Services provided to beneficiaries in these settings are not Medicaid reimbursable”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Long-Term Care Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The mission of Long-Term Living (LTL) is to provide a cost-effective alternative to institutional placement for eligible clients with long term care needs, if they choose, allowing them to remain in a community environment. The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) Division of Long-Term Living operates several waiver programs, as well as three Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (DDSN) waivers. LTL also administers the Palmetto Senior Care (PSC) program.  More information is available by accessing the web link. .”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Local Education Agencies (LEA) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link. ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Mental Health (CMH) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Community mental health (MH) service providers must provide clinic services as defined in federal regulation42 CFR 440.90. This manual describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the providers of services.“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 06/30/2019

~~“The Client Assistance Program is also available to applicants or consumers of SCVRD. CAP is a federally funded program administered by Protection and Advocacy for People with Disabilities Inc. (P&A), a statewide non-profit that advocates for the rights of people with disabilities.

You can reach CAP by email at info@pandasc.org  .

CAP can also be reached at:

866-275-7273 (Toll-free)803-782-0639 (Columbia Area)866-232-4525 (TTY)”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veteran Services - 06/15/2019

~~“SCServes offers service members, veterans and their families access to a class-leading continuum of providers that runs the gamut from superior legal, housing and emergency service providers to employment, recreation and fitness, financial capabilities and more – all designed to provide those who serve, have served, and their families, with the most comprehensive service delivery experience available anywhere in the nation.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

South Carolina House Bill 4093: Employment First Initiative Study Committee - 05/25/2018

“An act to establish the South Carolina Employment First Study Committee for the Purpose of studying and evaluating the need for an Employment First Initiative Act, to provide expectations policies to be established by an Employment First Initiative Act, to provide for the composition of the study committee, and to provide the committee shall report its findings to the governor, President Pro Tempore of the Senate, and the Speaker of  the House of Representatives on or before May 1, 2019, at which time the study committee is dissolved.”

Systems
  • Other

South Carolina Uniform High School Diplomas Bill - 05/09/2017

“An act to amend section 59-39-100, as amended, code of laws of South Carolina, 1976, relating to the uniform diploma for graduates of accredited high schools, so as to provide personalized pathways for students to earn the diploma and to provide related course of study-based endorsements students may earn, to revise the coursework students entering ninth grade during the 2018-2019 school year must earn for graduation, to provide this revised coursework requirement must support the profile of the graduate,  to provide for a uniform employability credential available for certain students with disabilities as an alternative to diploma pathways, and to provide the State Department of Education shall monitor numbers of diplomas and employability credentials earned by students and biannually report such numbers to the State Board of Education and the General Assembly.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

South Carolina HB 3768 (ABLE legislation) - 04/29/2015

“A BILL TO AMEND THE CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, BY ADDING ARTICLE 3 TO CHAPTER 5, TITLE 11 SO AS TO ESTABLISH THE "SOUTH CAROLINA ABLE SAVINGS PROGRAM", TO ALLOW INDIVIDUALS WITH A DISABILITY AND THEIR FAMILIES TO SAVE PRIVATE FUNDS TO SUPPORT THE INDIVIDUAL WITH A DISABILITY, TO PROVIDE GUIDELINES TO THE STATE TREASURER FOR THE MAINTENANCE OF THESE ACCOUNTS, AND TO ESTABLISH THE SAVINGS PROGRAM TRUST FUND AND SAVINGS EXPENSE TRUST FUND; AND TO DESIGNATE THE EXISTING SECTIONS OF CHAPTER 5, TITLE 11 AS ARTICLE 1 AND ENTITLE THEM "GENERAL PROVISIONS".”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

S 0704 General Bill (referred to the Committee on Medical Affairs 4/2015) - 04/22/2015

 “A BILL TO AMEND CHAPTER 28, TITLE 44 OF THE 1976 CODE, RELATING TO THE SELF-SUFFICIENCY TRUST FUND; DISABILITY TRUST FUND; AID FOR DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED, MENTALLY ILL, AND PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED PERSONS, BY ADDING ARTICLE 5 TO PROVIDE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE DISABLED SELF-EMPLOYMENT DEVELOPMENT TRUST FUND FOR THE CREATION OF A PROGRAM WHICH WILL ASSIST INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES TO PURSUE ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SELF-EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES, BY PROVIDING BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT GRANTS FOR THE STARTUP, EXPANSION OR ACQUISITION OF A BUSINESS OPERATED WITHIN THE STATE…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order No. 2019-39 South Carolina State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force - 12/12/2019

“WHEREAS, numerous state and federal public assistance programs currently provide support to individuals seeking education and employment, including Unemployment Insurance (“UI”), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (“SNAP”), Vocational Rehabilitation, and Medicaid benefits for qualified working disabled individuals; and…

NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of South Carolina and pursuant to the Constitution and Laws of this State and the powers conferred upon me therein, I hereby create and establish the State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order, 2015-16 - 07/01/2015

“Governor Nikki Haley reestablishes the South Carolina Developmental Disabilities Council, which is the State's forum for developmental disabilities matters and will advocate for persons with those disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

Rehabilitative Behavioral Health Services (RBHS) - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina (South Carolina or State) State Medicaid Plan allows an array of behavioral health services under the Rehabilitative Services Option, 42 CFR 440.130(d).Rehabilitative Services are medical or remedial services that have been recommended by a Physician or other Licensed Practitioner of the Healing Arts(LPHA) within the scope of their practice under South Carolina State Law and as further determined by the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS)for maximum reduction of physical or mental disability and restoration of a beneficiary to their best possible functional level. This section describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the Providers of services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Licensed Independent Practitioner’s (LIP) Rehabilitative Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Services in this manual are intended to be delivered in an outpatient and community setting only. In accordance with 42CFR 435.1009-1011, services are not available for beneficiaries residing in an Institution of Mental Disease. Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitals and Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities (PRTFs) receive an all-inclusive, per diem rate for services. Services provided to beneficiaries in these settings are not Medicaid reimbursable”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Long-Term Care Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The mission of Long-Term Living (LTL) is to provide a cost-effective alternative to institutional placement for eligible clients with long term care needs, if they choose, allowing them to remain in a community environment. The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) Division of Long-Term Living operates several waiver programs, as well as three Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (DDSN) waivers. LTL also administers the Palmetto Senior Care (PSC) program.  More information is available by accessing the web link. .”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Local Education Agencies (LEA) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link. ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Mental Health (CMH) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Community mental health (MH) service providers must provide clinic services as defined in federal regulation42 CFR 440.90. This manual describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the providers of services.“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 06/30/2019

~~“The Client Assistance Program is also available to applicants or consumers of SCVRD. CAP is a federally funded program administered by Protection and Advocacy for People with Disabilities Inc. (P&A), a statewide non-profit that advocates for the rights of people with disabilities.

You can reach CAP by email at info@pandasc.org  .

CAP can also be reached at:

866-275-7273 (Toll-free)803-782-0639 (Columbia Area)866-232-4525 (TTY)”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Data and Technology (D&T) - 04/27/2019

~~“Data and Technology (D&T) is responsible for collecting and managing all programmatic data required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) as well as other federal and state laws and regulations relating to the provision of special education and related services for students with disabilities in the State of South Carolina. More information is available by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Transition Planning - 04/05/2019

~~This page has a collection of material to help with Secondary Transition

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department - 01/17/2019

~~“…prepares and assists eligible South Carolinians with disabilities to achieve and maintain competitive .employment. More about VR services can be found by accessing the web-link”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Services Offered by the Columbia Regional Office - 11/14/2018

~~“VA’s Columbia Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of benefits and services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in South Carolina. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Veteran Services - 06/15/2019

~~“SCServes offers service members, veterans and their families access to a class-leading continuum of providers that runs the gamut from superior legal, housing and emergency service providers to employment, recreation and fitness, financial capabilities and more – all designed to provide those who serve, have served, and their families, with the most comprehensive service delivery experience available anywhere in the nation.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Project E3 - 01/30/2019

~~“Project E3 will provide South Carolina’s state Vocational Rehabilitation agencies and their partners with the skills and competencies needed to effectively and efficiently address barriers to competitive integrated employment and community integration encountered by persons with disabilities in these regions.We will leverage promising practices, knowledge, and experience gained from this project to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities from underserved and economically disadvantaged populations throughout South Carolina and across the United States.Our specific goals for this project are to:• By the end of the first year, 25 individuals from each region will apply or return to vocational rehabilitation services.• By the end of the second year, approximately 18 individuals from each region will be found eligible for services.• By the end of the second year, the number of people who complete an Individualized plan for employment will increase by 50%. Of those, there will be an increase in the cases closed in competitive, integrated employment by 25%.• The project will develop a community consortium to direct, develop, and sustain services during the project and into the coming years.” 

Systems
  • Other
Citations

SC Employment First Initiative - 07/01/2017

“South Carolina is one of six states selected by the Administration for Community Living to receive funding in order to increase employment outcomes for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities statewide. Employment First emphasizes competitive, integrated employment as the preferred option for individuals with disabilities.

The South Carolina Disability Employment Coalition, through collaboration with thirteen Project Partners, will implement The SC Employment First Initiative to address barriers to successful employment for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

South Carolina Supported Employment Programs - 05/30/2013

• “Individual Placement and Support (IPS) is an evidenced-based supported employment best practice model. IPS is collaboration between South Carolina Department of Mental Health (SCDMH) and South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD). Since 2005 these state agencies have combined resources and personnel to implement the IPS Supported Employment model. The goal of this partnership is to place people with serve mental illness in competitive employment. Through the collaboration of this Supported Employment model, SCVRD and SCDMH are able to provide an integrated and seamless employment service delivery that results in improved employment outcomes for people with severe mental illness.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Transition Alliance of South Carolina (TASC)

"The Transition Alliance of South Carolina (TASC) is spearheaded by the Center for Disability Resources (CDR) at the University of South Carolina’s School of Medicine.

Utilizing funding and support from the South Carolina Department of Education, Office of Special Education Services, TASC partners and project staff housed at the Center for Disability Resources developed an infrastructure to support local interagency transition teams.  Project activities are focused on providing interagency teams the resources to increase their capacity to collaboratively and effectively serve young adults with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to adult-life.

Together, we build capacity for transition programming at the state level, while also serving as a bridge to and between local communities in South Carolina."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

South Carolina Disability Employment Coalition

~~“The SC Disability Employment Coalition (SCDEC) formed in the fall of 2014, through funding from the SC Developmental Disabilities  Council, to address employment barriers for individuals with disabilities in South Carolina. SCDEC stakeholders represent South Carolina employers, state and private agencies, and individuals with disabilities.

SCDEC members meet quarterly.  The SCDEC has four committees that meet on a monthly basis and is comprised of over 40 stakeholder organizations and individuals.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)

“People with all types of disabilities are employed, pursuing careers and building assets just like people without disabilities…Through advocacy and education, APSE advances employment and self-sufficiency for all people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

South Carolina Partnerships in Employment - 11/28/2016

“ACL’s Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

 

Able South Carolina received a grant for the South Carolina Employment First Initiative.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

South Carolina Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2012

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project." South Carolina received an EDI award for its program Integration Peer Support into Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Sourh Carolina SAMHSA Grant - "Health Mind Body Alliance"

“The integration model brings primary care into state community mental health clinics. Clinics are located in the underserved rural counties of Marlboro, Dillon, and Chesterfield South Carolina and the initial strategy included an FQHC [Federal Qualified Health Center]. Year two enrollment target is to serve 150 unduplicated clients (During the first quarters of year two for the grant 194 clients unduplicated clients were enrolled). Services are accessible to all consenting adult clients of TCCMHC [Tri-County Community Mental Health Center] with serious mental illness (Excepting incarcerated clients).”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person/Home Again

“Home Again is a program assisting seniors, individuals with disabilities, and children with severe emotional disturbances who currently live in facilities to transition back into their communities and receive appropriate services and supports.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
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2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“DECO Recovery Management, LLC was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Underserved and vulnerable uninsured populations: Latino/Hispanic; African Americans; Rural communities; young and “invincibles”; small employers; and self-employed individuals.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with South Carolina Chamber of Commerce, South Carolina Hospital Association, South Carolina of the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) , Carolina Chapter of the American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM), Greenville Memorial Hospital, Greer Memorial Hospital, North Greenville Hospital, Hillcrest Memorial Hospital , Patewood Memorial Hospital, Laurens County Memorial Hospital, Aiken Regional Medical Center, Oconee Memorial Hospital, and Bon Secours St. Francis Health System.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Andrew Foland \Phone: (410) 763-7475Email: afoland@decorm.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

6th Annual South Carolina State Transition Conference - 11/19/2018

~~“Join us for South Carolina’s premier interagency transition conference. Local school districts, adult service agency representatives, families and other professionals will attend this 2 day event in beautiful downtown Greenville. Early Registration ends 10/18/2019

    Lunch on both Tuesday and Wednesday is included with all exhibitor and sponsor registrations.    This year’s conference will once again include vendor breaks, breakout sessions and facilitated team planning time.    Make plans to stay over Wednesday night and join your colleagues from across the state for an evening Networking Social.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Community Employment Program Development Work Group - 03/07/2018

“This Employment Community of Practice offers an exciting opportunity for direct service providers interested in implementing customized employment practices. The community of practice builds capacity to improve the methodology and skills of employment staff to assist seekers with more significant barriers to obtain employment.”

This page is continuously updated with webinars and related resources around topics relating to community employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Waiver Case Management Standards - 07/01/2019

~~This document has information on how staff and providers are to operate when working with the Community Supports Waiver,  Head and Spinal Cord Injury Waiver, and Intellectual Disability/Related Disabilities Waiver.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Service Rate Increases - 07/01/2018

~~PROVIDER ALERTEffective for services provided on or after July 1, 2018, the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) increased reimbursement for qualified Adult Day Health Care Services, Personal Care I, Personal Care II and Attendant Care providers by approximately 8.2 percent.

For Community Long Term Care waivers, the updated fee schedule can be found at scdhhs.gov/resource/fee-schedules. For waivers operated by the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (SCDDSN), providers with questions about this action are encouraged to contact SCDDSN at (803) 898-9626.

Future updates to reimbursement rates will be communicated via the standard fee schedule update process and posted at scdhhs.gov.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Statewide Transition Plan - 03/31/2016

The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule on Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) establishing certain requirements for services that are provided through Medicaid waivers. There are specific requirements for where home and community-based services are received which will be referred to as the “settings requirements.” CMS required that each state submit a “Statewide Transition Plan” by March 17, 2015. The Statewide Transition Plan outlines how the state will come into conformance and compliance with the HCBS Rule settings requirements. States must come into full compliance with the HCBS Rule requirements by March 17, 2019. The South Carolina Department of Health and Human services (SCDHHS) has branded this effort for HCBS with the tagline: Independent•Integrated•Individual. This tagline was developed because home and community-based services help our members be independent, be integrated in the community, and are based on what is best for the individual.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

SC Community Supports (0676.R02.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day health care, personal care, respite care, waiver case management, incontinence supplies, adult day health care-nursing, adult day health care-transportation, assistive technology and appliances, behavior support, career preparation, community services, day activity, employment services, environmental mods, in-home support, PERS, private vehicle mods, support center services for individuals w/IID ages 0 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

South Carolina ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/28/2012

“South Carolina’s college and career readiness aspirations extend to all students, including those who need additional support and consideration because English is not their first language or due to a disability. To help ensure that we effectively analyze the linguistic demands of the CCSS to inform development of corresponding standards specific to these students that enable their success.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

South Carolina Statewide Transition Plan – Revised (HCBS)

The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) gives notice that the revised draft Statewide Transition Plan, required per Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Rule (42 CFR 441.301(c)(6)),was submitted on March 31, 2016 to CMS for review. It will be effective upon CMS approval.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Long Term Care - South Carolina Medicaid Waivers

“Community Long Term Care (CLTC) offers programs to help individuals who want to live at home, need assistance with their care, and are financially eligible for Medicaid."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

South Carolina Medicaid Money Follows the Person/Home Again

“Home Again is a program assisting seniors, individuals with disabilities, and children with severe emotional disturbances who currently live in facilities to transition back into their communities and receive appropriate services and supports.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

The Palmetto State is "Prepared in Mind and Resources" when it comes to improving supports for individuals with disabilities to increase access to competitive, integrated employment and socioeconomic advancement in South Carolina.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon South Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.25%
Change from
2018 to 2019
5,148,714
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.43%
Change from
2018 to 2019
357,695
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.74%
Change from
2018 to 2019
123,245
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.11%
Change from
2018 to 2019
34.46%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.62%
Change from
2018 to 2019
77.01%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 5,024,369 5,084,127 5,148,714
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 376,889 366,373 357,695
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 122,789 122,332 123,245
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,985,199 2,020,381 2,052,071
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 32.58% 33.39% 34.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.37% 76.53% 77.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.30% 3.40% 2.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.40% 20.70% 20.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.60% 14.40% 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 359,484 344,760 342,542
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 368,217 372,344 374,268
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 492,410 487,136 482,563
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 207,435 197,298 201,996
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 20,192 26,650 20,052
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,309 4,231 4,114
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,505 4,890 6,587
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 364 N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 14,061 13,598 13,034
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 5,617 9,603 8,004

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,807 4,946 4,960
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.40% 4.60% 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 174,597 172,718 171,174

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,106 7,444 9,138
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 4,893 17,103 17,893
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 8,929 42,664 45,069
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 12.40% 17.40% 20.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.00% N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 520 N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 102,867 10,232 9,724
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.30 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 113 88 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 64 53 48
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 57.00% 60.00% 65.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.34 1.08 0.98

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 40.00% 42.00% 34.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,926 6,720 8,033
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 253,541 252,608 251,995
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 190 259 240
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 196 245 207

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $16,552,000 $13,698,891 $20,606,245
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $24,955,000 $25,631,619 $26,635,888
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $24,846,000 $25,458,826 $27,365,194
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $4,764,000 $4,926,715 $5,231,711
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 26.00% 23.00% 28.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 974 946 996
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,086 2,819 2,886
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,188 2,484 3,186
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 51.40 37.40 54.96

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.71% 61.61% 62.17%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 16.31% 15.84% 15.39%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.71% 1.56% 1.46%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.82% 91.90% 90.48%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.92% 26.21% 30.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 56.85% 57.36% 61.04%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 69.54% 84.39% 76.44%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 33.93% 31.15% 30.17%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,561,788
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 3,877
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 14,767
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 510,687
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 525,454
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 143
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 743
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 886
AbilityOne wages (products). $80,150
AbilityOne wages (services). $5,233,265

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 24 32 9
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 2 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 25 34 9
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,526 2,764 1,144
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 81 170 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,607 2,934 1,144

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Able SC is approved by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) to serve ticket beneficiaries as an Employment Network (EN) under SSA’s Ticket to Work program (discussed in more detail below), and also serves as the host and facilitator for the SC Disability Employment Coalition and the SC Employment First Initiative, two collaborative efforts that addresses employment barriers for individuals with disabilities. (Pages 40-41) Title I

In 2016, a consortium of partners working through the SC Disability Employment Coalition received a Partnership in Employment Systems Change grant known as the SC Employment First Initiative. The purpose of the grant is to increase competitive integrated employment outcomes for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

The initiative had three broad goals:

1.) Equip high school students and recent graduated with intellectual and development disabilities with the skills, awareness, and confidence needed to enter competitive employment.

2.) Unify and empower South Carolina education professionals, employment service providers, families, and the community at large towards support of Employment First principles.

3.) Develop and expand supports for South Carolina-based employers who hire persons with disabilities in competitive, community-based positions.

A major focus of the SC Employment First Initiative is to implement policy that competitive and integrated employment shall be considered the first option for any individual with disabilities applying for or receiving services from the state or any of its political subdivisions. In fact, Employment First legislation is pending in the South Carolina legislature which would have a positive effect on employment for people with disabilities. (Page 42) Title I

SCCB is an active member of the Employment First Initiative steering committee, an interagency partnership focused on ensuring that competitive integrated employment is the first priority for transition aged students with disabilities. SCCB is also an active member of the Advisory Council for Educating Students with Disabilities an advisory council for the Office of Special Education at the South Carolina Department of Education. All of these committees and councils create avenues for coordination and collaboration with state and local education officials. (Page 274) Title IV

SCCB is developing an updated Cooperative Agreement with the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (DDSN) to avoid duplication of services, increase coordination of employment services provided to the shared consumer populations, and to enhance Supported Employment programs. SCCB is an active partner with DDSN and both agencies are represented on the Employment First Initiative Steering Committee and the South Carolina Disability Employment Coalition. (Page 278) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~SCCB has established an internal Supported Employment program that includes Customized Employment provided by three (3) regionally assigned JOBS Specialists. During program year 2018 SCCB partnered with the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Technical Assistance Center and the Youth Technical Assistance Center to provide intensive Customized Employment training to the JOBS Specialists. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement with ABLE SC under provisions in the Ticket-to-Work program to provide ongoing supports for ticket holders. SCCB is working to establish other Cooperative Agreements with entities providing ongoing supports to consumers in Supported Employment. (Page 276) Title IV

98.SCCB did not offer supported employment or customized employment services to its consumers with most significant disabilities. This is reflected in the low numbers of employment outcomes for these individuals. (Page 286) Title IV

The South Carolina Commission for the Blind has established the capacities to provide Supported Employment to youth and adults with Most Significant Disabilities in response to the findings of the FFY 2016 CSNA. Funds received under section 603 of the Rehabilitation Act for Supported Employment are utilized to fund the costs of individualized discovery assessment, job development, job placement, and on-the-job supports for Supported Employment and Customized Employment delivered internally by JOBS Specialists. SCCB provides extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement under the Ticket to Work program to provide long term on going supports through an Employment Network (Able SC). SCCB utilizes 50% of Supported Employment funds to provide Supported Employment and Customized Employment for eligible youth. SCCB has established goals to provide Supported Employment services to 6eligible individuals during FFY 2018, 8 individuals during FFY 2019, 10individuals during FFY 2020, and 10 individuals during FFY 2021. (Page 313) Title IV

Strategy 2.2.3: Provide Customized Employment that includes intensive discovery of individualized skills, abilities, potential; and intensive customization of an existing job opening, creation of a job that fills an unmet need, and other customized options. SCCB provides Customized Employment through a qualified and trained JOBS Specialist (Job Oriented Blind Service). (Page 316) Title IV

SCCB will continue to seek opportunities and partnerships to aid in the development and establishment of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to provide community based adjustment to blindness services, supported employment (SE) services, customized employment (CE) services and life skills training. (Page 320) Title IV

CRP Establishment & Development: SCCB will continue to seek opportunities and partnerships to aid in the development and establishment of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to provide community based adjustment to blindness services, supported employment (SE) services, customized employment (CE) services, Braille training, vocational evaluation, and life skills training. (Page 321) Title IV

SCCB is committed to ensuring that services are provided in an equitable manner and are fully accessible. SCCB reviews, assesses and monitors agency programs to conduct continuous improvement activities. The greatest gap identified in the 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment pertained to the lack of a Supported Employment program at SCCB. In response SCCB established the JOBS Specialists (Job Oriented Blind Services) positons trained to provide Supported Employment (SE), Customized Employment (CE), and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) models to consumers who have Most Significant Disabilities. These positions function in a one-on-one consumer centered approach as Job Placement Specialists, On-The-Job Coaches, and in other employment related supportive roles allowed under Title VI. (Pages 321-322) Title IV

SCCB has established program capacity and resources to better serve individuals who have Most Significant Disabilities. SCCB has established JOBS Specialists who are providing Supported Employment and Customized Employment, evidence based practices that have not been offered by SCCB in the past. In addition, SCCB has hired and trained a Certified Work Incentive Counselor to help beneficiaries understand the implications of gainful employment on their Social Security benefits. (Page 323) Title IV

SCCB expended Supported Employment revenue during FFY 2017 for the first time as JOBS Specialists were on boarded and began providing Supported Employment services. Consumers being served by SE funds are currently in the placement and support phase, therefore no consumers served by Supported Employment funds have been transitioned to extended services at this time. SCCB signed a Partnership Plus Agreement with Able SC to provide on-going supports at the time when a consumer transitions from VR support. Building a quality Supported Employment program is a continued goal of SCCB for FFY 2018. Currently SCCB is undergoing extensive Customized Employment training and technical assistance to build capacity and program effectiveness. SCCB also added the capacity to provide benefit and work incentive counseling. (Page 325) Title IV

SCCB made substantial progress on creating a Supported Employment program through the establishment of the JOBS Specialists, providing both Supported Employment and Customized Employment training to these staff, and building the capacity to provide benefits and work incentive counseling services. The greatest impediment was that these resources had to be created where they did not exist prior. (Page 325) Title IV

SCCB expended Supported Employment revenue during FFY 2017 for the first time as JOBS Specialists were on boarded and began providing Supported Employment services. Consumers being served by SE funds are currently in the placement and support phase, therefore no consumers served by Supported Employment funds have been transitioned to extended services at this time. SCCB signed a Partnership Plus Agreement with Able SC to provide on-going supports at the time when a consumer transitions from VR support. Building a quality Supported Employment program is a continued goal of SCCB for FFY 2018. Currently SCCB is undergoing extensive Customized Employment training and technical assistance to build capacity and program effectiveness. (Page 326-327) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~CCB has developed a Self-Employment Toolkit intended to walk eligible consumers through the microenterprise development process. SCCB has partnered with the University of Wisconsin-Madison to provide Self-Employment and Social Security Work Incentive training to SCCB’s VR Counselors on May 17, 2018 and August 8, 2018. SCCB is working to build community partnerships to leverage resources from entities engaged in business development such as Small Business Development Centers, Business Incubator Programs, and South Carolina’s Technical College System. SCCB is also working to incorporate our Career Exploration Lab (3D Printer Lab) as a tool to assist in product development and prototyping. (Page 66) Title I

•SCVRD leverages other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services. Extended services providers are identified in each area to provide follow along and extended services following successful exit from the VR program. Partnerships at the state and local level with DDSN and the local DSN boards continue to grow and provide key linkages to extended services providers. (Page 182) Title I

SCVRD’s ongoing support services are limited to 24 months unless extended by an amendment to the IPE. Transition to extended services starts after an individual is stabilized in his/her job setting and has met the individualized work goal. The client’s employment stability is determined by the achievement of adequate job performance without a need for ongoing, intensive shadowing/mentoring from the job coach. The client, employer, job coach, and SCVRD counselor agree that this has occurred before transition to the extended service provider takes place. SCVRD continues to leverage resources for identifying extended service providers to meet long-term support needs. (Page 260) Title IV

Goal 1: Increase Program Capacity Leveraging Partnerships & Community Engagement
Priority 1.1: Improve WIOA Partnerships & One-Stop System Engagement
Priority 1.2: Improve Partnerships & Strategic Alliances to Increase Program Capacity
Priority 1.3: Increase Public Awareness & Community Engagement
Priority 1.4: Align Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center (EBMRC) Programing

Report of Progress Goal 1: SCCB achieved substantial progress on goal 1. SCCB improved WIOA partnerships and One-Stop System Engagement through the strategies of formalizing American Job Center partnerships with Memorandum’s of Understanding which include infrastructure cost agreements, specified co-located staff office times and space, center accessibility assessment and technical assistance, and staff cross training. SCCB has active MOU’s with all SC Works Centers. SCCB worked with core WIOA partner programs to create agency cross training modules for partnership workforce staff, and explored data sharing and common intake opportunities. SCCB finalized a Cooperative Agreement with SC Department of Education and is currently negotiating an update to the SC Vocational Rehabilitation Department Cooperative Agreement. SCCB negotiated and entered into a number of Cooperative Agreements with community based qualified fee-for-service vendors and other partners to expand capacity and available resources statewide. This has expanded program capacity to provide independent travel training (8 new vendors), home management training (2 new vendors), and Braille Literacy (2 new vendors) in community settings. SCCB also provides ZoomText, Jaws, and other assistive technology training through a fee-for-service contract with the National Federation of the Blind of South Carolina. (Page 322) Title IV

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.  

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Goal 1.2: Provide comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services to adult job seekers who are blind or visually impaired resulting in the attainment of industry recognized in-demand credentials required for competitive integrated employment.
Strategy 1.2.1: Provide quality Adjustment to Blindness and Pre-Vocational Training at the Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center for Employment & Independence. Adjustment to Blindness Training includes: Orientation & Mobility (Independent Travel), Independent Living Skills, Braille Literacy, Employability Soft Skills, Basic Financial Literacy, and Psychosocial Adjustment to Blindness Counseling. Pre-Vocational Training includes: Basic Keyboarding, Basic Microsoft Office Suite Training, and Assistive Technology Training such as Computer Screen Readers, Text Magnifiers, Low Vision Aids, Etc. (Page 315) Title IV

In 2017 SCCB rewrote the curriculum and courses offered at the Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center for Employment and Independence. This new curriculum includes pre-test and post-test assessments to measure skill gains and provide for continuous improvement. Several new center programs have been implemented including a partnership with Adult Education that brings GED preparation instruction and testing to the center. SCCB added a Basic Financial Literacy course using curriculum designed by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. SCCB has also added Soft-Skills training based on the “Skills to Pay the Bills” curriculum. (Page 323) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~The Transition Alliance of South Carolina is a broad systems improvement and technical assistance resource for professionals working with students with disabilities. Their primary outcome is to empower students to transition into community-based employment. Local transition programs choose to enhance their curriculum through a variety of evidence-based transition practices, including student-led IEP meetings, goal setting and attainment, socializing in the workplace, job accommodations, and other activities meant to empower students with disabilities to control their career strategy. TASC consists of a state-level interagency steering committee that supports local interagency transition teams across the state. (Page 42) Title I

SC Department of Education Office of Adult Education has a special education task force that creates and delivers training for adult education practitioners serving students with special needs. The OAE meets regularly with SCDE Office of Special Education Services to ensure compliance with all special education regulations. Additionally, OAE requires that all funded local providers have a written plan with local Special Education Departments to transition IEP (Individualized Education Plan) students, and that local providers comply with the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA) which requires each provider to describe the steps they propose to take to ensure equitable access to, and participation in, its federally assisted programs. OAE monitors for compliance with the written transition IEP as part of its annual compliance process, and collaborates with the Office of Special Education to monitor all other GEPA requirements. (Page 109) Title I

GEPA (General Education Provisions Act) 427 requirements are overseen by the SCDE-OAE in the following ways:
•In cooperation with SCDE - Office of General Counsel and the SCDE - Office of Special Education Services, OAE delivers training for adult education practitioners serving students with special needs.
•OAE meets regularly with the SCDE - Office of Special Education Services to ensure compliance with all special education regulations.
•OAE requires that all funded local providers have a written plan with local Special Education Departments to transition IEP (Individualized Education Plan) students, and that local providers comply with GEPA which requires each provider to describe the steps they propose to take to ensure equitable access to, and participation in, its federally assisted programs.

OAE monitors for compliance the written transition IEP as a part of its annual compliance process, and collaborates with the SCDE - Office of Special Education to monitor all other GEPA requirements. (Pages 170-171) Title I

SCVRD utilizes the “Guideposts for Success” (based on the work of the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth — NCWD/Y) as a framework for school-to-work transition services. This includes regular activities that focus on each of the required pre-employment transition service activities: job exploration counseling, work-based learning, counseling on opportunities for comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living skills, and instruction in self-advocacy. Group activities provide opportunities to not only facilitate peer mentoring, but also allow transition staff to observe and cultivate students’ leadership skills, as well as communication and social skills. Mentoring is a key component of the High School High Tech (HS/HT) program, and SCVRD collaborates with organizations that have youth-led mentoring programs in place. Through the agency’s VR Ambassadors program, former clients that have successfully transitioned into employment or postsecondary activities are available to assist with mentoring and participation in transition activities such as Disability Mentoring Day, and summer transition institutes. (Pages 174-175) Title I

In collaboration with the SC Department of Employment and Workforce (SCDEW) and the SCDE, SCVRD’s school-based transition counselors work together with local education agencies, community partners, workforce development boards, SC Works Centers and business partners to advise students with disabilities, and their families, regarding available career pathways and educational/training opportunities. SCVRD maintains a Transition Services Coordinator position and additional regional Transition Specialist positions whose duties focus on the authorized activities required for effective provision of pre-employment transition services. These include:
• Coordinate all transition-related activities and projects including those that involve other agencies, community organizations and local SCVRD field offices;
• Develop, monitor and update all transition documents and cooperative agreements;
• Provide technical assistance, professional development and training on transition-related issues to field office staff, education personnel, community organizations, families, and students;
• Review and update client service policy to ensure policies and procedures are reflective of SCVRD mission and focus on quality in serving youth in transition;
• Serve on the planning committee for the interagency South Carolina Youth Leadership Forum, a summer youth development and leadership program; • Participate in TASC, an interagency initiative to create systems change and support development of local interagency transition teams. (Page 175) Title I

Strategy 1.2 Enhance school-to-work transition services.
• Objective 1.2.1 Maximize relationships with education officials in all South Carolina school districts to support development of education and career pathways. 
• Objective 1.2.2 Improve services to individuals with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual/developmental disabilities.
• Objective 1.2.3 Enhance services for at-risk youth with disabilities.
• Objective 1.2.4 Expose students with disabilities to careers in science, technology, engineering and math through High School/High Tech programs. (Page 247) Title IV

SCCB Career BOOST (Building Occupational Opportunities for Students in Transition): Is a contractual pilot program in partnership with South Carolina’s Independent Living Centers, the National Federation of the Blind of South Carolina, and LEA’s. Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided to eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities in the public schools and other settings. These services include Self-Advocacy Workshops, Work Readiness Soft Skills Workshops, Exploration of Higher Education through College Tours, and Work Based Learning Experiences. (Page 272) Title IV

SCCB Vocational Rehabilitation Comprehensive Transition Services Program: This program serves students from age 15 until exit from high school at which time they are served by the SCCB adult VR program. SCCB has four (4) dedicated Transition Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors statewide building program infrastructure and education relationships to improve services to Transition Students. The Transition Counselors primarily collaborate with education officials such as the South Carolina Department of Education (local school districts), the South Carolina School for the Deaf and Blind (SCSDB) and the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (SCDDSN). Transition Counselors develop the initial Individualized Plan of Employment (IPE) while the consumer is attending high school. The IPE includes services pertaining to the adjustment, prevention or stabilization of vision, and Pre-Employment Transition Services as defined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA). In an effort to avoid the duplication of services, low vision and assistive technology needs will be coordinated with local school districts in accordance with the student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and IPE. In such instances, the alternative service providers and funding sources will be identified on the IPE and coordinated accordingly. SCCB will conduct semiannual meetings with the statewide vision teachers in an effort to facilitate the coordination of services to the most significantly disabled students and their need for supported employment services. Discussions will include, but not be limited to, collaboration with SCDDSN, SCDOE and the SCSDB to coordinate transition services. (Page 273) Title IV

While these gaps are areas of continued focus for SCCB, much has been accomplished since the Statewide Needs Assessment. SCCB now provides Career BOOST services to students with disabilities who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services. Career BOOST provides students with instruction in self-advocacy skills, work readiness skills training, work based learning experiences, and exploration of opportunities for career training in post-secondary schools and institutions of higher education. SCCB designed and operates the Student Internship Jr. Program that provides high school transition students with a paid work experience. SCCB Transition VR Counselors have increased their involvement in IEP meetings, and SCCB has formalized memorandum of understandings with LEA's. (Page 288) Title IV

SCCB established contractual programs for Pre-Employment Transition Services with South Carolina’s Independent Living Centers and the National Federation of the Blind. Since inception Career BOOST has provided 761 students with Self-Advocacy Workshops, 494 Work Readiness Workshops, and 160 Work Based Learning Experience such as paid internships and work site tours and job shadowing. Under Career Boost 62 eligible and potentially eligible high school students have participated in college and university tours, exploration of post-secondary educational options, and counseling on financial aid opportunities. SCCB conducted public awareness outreach and implemented a social media presence to enhance agency visibility. In 2017 SCCB rewrote the curriculum and courses offered at the Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center for Employment and Independence. This new curriculum includes pre-test and post-test assessments to measure skill gains and provide for continuous improvement. Several new center programs have been implemented including a partnership with Adult Education that brings GED preparation instruction and testing to the center. SCCB added a Basic Financial Literacy course using curriculum designed by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. SCCB has also added Soft-Skills training based on the “Skills to Pay the Bills” curriculum. (Pages 322-323) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~South Carolina’s one-stop delivery system is designed to be fully accessible so that all job seekers and employers can participate in the services offered. The Methods of Administration (MOA) - a state document required by the Civil Rights Center - is a “living” document that ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level expeditiously, and details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be accomplished.

Monitoring performed at both the state and local level ensures that all SC Works Centers are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize South Carolina’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual (e.g. SC Works Online Services) to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. Complaints of discrimination are directed to the State Equal Opportunity Officer.

Per federal regulations, each LWDA must appoint a local Equal Opportunity Officer who is responsible for ensuring local WIOA Section 188 compliance. Local Equal Opportunity Officers are trained to use the “ADA Checklist for Readily Achievable Barrier Removal,” the “Checklist for Existing Facilities,” and a recommended assistive technology checklist. New local Equal Opportunity Officers are provided with detailed training on regulations, policies, and procedures following appointment. Ongoing training is provided through EO Roundtables and on-site training on such topics as, “Serving Customers with Disabilities,” “Current EO Trends,” as well as topics deemed relevant by LWDAs and designed in response to their training requests.  (Page 108) Title I

For the current Unified State Plan, SCCB identified gaps from two primary sources. The first being unmet gaps identified in the FFY 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. The second source is the South Carolina Workforce Development Board’s Economic Analysis and Strategic Plan in order to align SCCB initiatives with the goals of South Carolina's Workforce Development System. The following gaps have been identified:

Gap 1: South Carolina’s current labor force, including individuals who are blind or visually impaired, do not have industry recognized credentials, knowledge, skills, or abilities to meet current or emerging demands of the business community.

Gap 2: SCCB needs to improve alignment of policies, resources, and staff expertise to provide job driven, labor market informed, vocational counseling and guidance that aligns with South Carolina’s Talent Pipeline Project and Sector Strategies initiatives to assist eligible consumers in accessing career pathways that lead to high and middle skill/income jobs in growth sectors.

Gap 3: SCCB needs to improve partnerships with business in order to more accurately identify current and future workforce needs of business and industry to support career pathways in growth sectors and improve services to business. (Page 291) Title IV

Goal 2: Increase Quantity & Quality of Employment Outcomes

Priority 2.1: Align VR Counseling with South Carolina’s Talent Pipeline Project, Emphasizing Career Pathways, Attainment of Industry Recognized Credentials, Job Driven/Sector Strategies & Labor Market Information

Priority 2.2: Increase Employment for those with Most Significant Disabilities

Priority 2.3: Increase Vocational Exploration & Opportunities for Transition Students Priority 2.4: Increase Employment for all eligible consumers

Report of Progress Goal 2: Under the previous state plan, SCCB focused efforts on building program capacity, resources and expertise needed in order to meet goal 2. This required resource location, resource reallocation, and program building. As these programs have been built, SCCB has not experienced an increase in the number of successful employment outcomes. Under the provisions of the previous Unified State Plan, SCCB has aligned VR Counseling, career exploration, vocational goal selection, and Individualized Plan for Employment development with labor market information and sector strategies. SCCB has instituted the use of The Career Index Plus for analyzing labor market information and helping consumers make informed job driven decisions. SCCB implemented significant staff training in the area of using labor market information and understanding South Carolina’s regional economic conditions. SCCB leveraged partnerships with the Department of Employment and Workforce, and the Job Driven Technical Assistance Center to provide staff with training on sector strategies, the talent pipeline efforts, and the use of labor market information. SCCB has established program capacity and resources to better serve individuals who have Most Significant Disabilities. SCCB has established JOBS Specialists who are providing Supported Employment and Customized Employment, evidence based practices that have not been offered by SCCB in the past. In addition, SCCB has hired and trained a Certified Work Incentive Counselor to help beneficiaries understand the implications of gainful employment on their Social Security benefits. SCCB established Career BOOST, a contractual program in partnership, collaboration, and coordination with Independent Living Centers, the National Federation of the Blind, and South Carolina’s Local Education Authorities. This program provides the required Pre-Employment Transition Services to eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities. SCCB hosted the first Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Career (STEM) Exploration Week for transition students during the summer of 2017. During the STEM Career Exploration week, 9 high school students who are blind or visually impaired were provided instruction by a team of scientists from San Jose State University, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, the Space Telescope Science Institute, and the International Astronomical Union. The students explored STEM careers using 3D printed tactile models of galaxies, planets, and other astronomical phenomena. Additionally, students were exposed to “sonification” techniques used by blind and visually impaired Astronomers to study the universe. SCCB is repeating the program in the summer of 2018. (Pages 323-324) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD) offers a range of training services that include OJT, job try-out, and registered apprenticeships. For OJT, in partnership with SCVRD, a company hires and trains a client for a specific position. The training progresses according to training milestones in an established training outline. Job try-outs are a stipend-funded training service coordinated between SCVRD, the client, and a business partner. During a job try-out, a career ready client learns specific, basic skills for a job at a company’s worksite(s). (Page 29) Title I

SCVRD maintains a priority on providing work-based learning experiences for students. Following a 5-year transition demonstration grant from the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), and in keeping with evidence-based practices that support work experience to be one of the most influential factors in successful postsecondary employment outcomes, transition staff actively pursue job tryout, job shadowing, internship, and apprenticeship opportunities for students. This impacts not only the ultimate outcome of competitive, integrated employment but has been shown to be an integral support for school completion and drop-out prevention. (Page 175) Title IV

Innovation and expansion activities have been identified within these strategies and include:

  • Continued expansion of work-based learning activities for students
  • Expansion of Project SEARCH sites
  • Cooperative agreement with Project HOPE Foundation, a non-profit organization that provides a lifespan of services and activities for individuals with autism
  • Expansion of transition job coaches focused on providing supported employment services to students and youth with the most significant disabilities
  • Maintaining a full-time counselor to provide vocational rehabilitation services to incarcerated youth, which has expanded to include additional programs operated by DJJ (e.g., Camp Aspen)
  • Maintaining a staff interpreter for clients who are deaf to provide video remote interpreting, on- site services to mutual clients of SCVRD and DHHS, extend consistent access to interpreter services in rural areas, and enhance the accessibility of VR productions and client and staff training materials
  • Creation of apprenticeships tailored to increase the participation levels of clients who are deaf (Page 259) Title IV

Goal 3.1: Provide specialized training through a Pre-Apprenticeship Program to prepare adults not enrolled in college programs, as an alternative career pathway to current and future business and industry needs.

Strategy 3.1.1: Utilize the principles STEM education to develop a Pre-Apprenticeship training program for job seekers who are blind and visually impaired that will satisfy the entry level skills needed for acceptance into registered apprenticeship programs. Incorporate the use of the most current Assistive Technology that will make graduates competitive when applying to fill open apprenticeship positions. (Pages 316-317) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Able SC is a Center for Independent Living (CIL) that is designed and operated within a local community by individuals with disabilities and provides an array of independent living services, including one-on-one and group training on topics such as employment soft skills, transportation utilization, accommodation requests, and transition from high school to post-secondary life.
Through funding from the SC Department of Education, SC Commission for the Blind, and local United Ways, Able SC provides independent living skills and pre-employment transition services to current middle and high school students with disabilities in the classroom.

Able SC is approved by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) to serve ticket beneficiaries as an Employment Network (EN) under SSA’s Ticket to Work program (discussed in more detail below), and also serves as the host and facilitator for the SC Disability Employment Coalition and the SC Employment First Initiative, two collaborative efforts that addresses employment barriers for individuals with disabilities. (Pages 40-41) Title I

Ticket to Work is a voluntary program for people receiving disability benefits from Social Security and whose primary goal is to find good careers and have a better self-supporting future. Consumers may receive employment services through an employment network provider, including career counseling, socialization to the workplace, and job support advice, among others. (Page 44) Title I

SCVRD’s supported employment goals and plans regarding the Title VI program are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and the department’s performance on the common performance measures as well as agency key performance indicators. The priorities are as follows:•Strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s 110 traditional program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs;

•Providing services to people with the most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, in order to successfully achieve and maintain competitive employment in integrated work settings; and

•Providing supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities. (Pages 180-181) Title I

The provision of early intervention services is a major issue given the long application process associated with making eligibility determinations for both the SSI and SSDI programs. There will be a need for increased supported employment services to improve the employment outcomes of many SSI/SSDI recipients. As a total count, the number of SSI/SSDI recipients, who applied for services, increased to 2,256 by 2013. The trend reflects an increase of 7.3 percent from the previous three years. (Page 198) Title I

SCVRD’s supported employment goals and plans regarding the Title VI program are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and the department’s performance on the common performance measures as well as agency key performance indicators. The priorities are as follows:
•Strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s 110 traditional program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs;
•Providing services to people with the most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, in order to successfully achieve and maintain competitive employment in integrated work settings; and
•Providing supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 244) Title I

The individual placement model for competitive employment remains the primary supported employment model being used by SCVRD. Emphasis is placed upon providing services to people with most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, whose employment needs are so significant that traditional 110 program services would not be sufficient to meet them. SCVRD coordinator of supported employment services also assists area office staff to identify and serve all eligible clients with the most significant disabilities. (Page 261) Title I

During the period of the last Unified State Plan cycle, SCCB made significant progress in closing these gaps. SCCB hired, trained, and obtained certification for a Work Incentives Counselor, and established referral pathways to the WIPA grantee benefits counseling services. SCCB established JOBS Specialist positions trained to provide Supported Employment including Customized Employment. SCCB signed a Ticket to Work Partnership Plus agreement with an Employment Network to provide on-going supports for supported employment cases. And SCCB has signed a number of fee-for-service agreements throughout the state with qualified service providers in the areas of Orientation and Mobility, Braille Instruction, Independent Living Skills that Support Employment, and adjustment to blindness psychological counseling. SCCB continues to work to close these gaps, and this modified state plan reflects these goals and priorities. (Page 286) Title IV

The South Carolina Commission for the Blind has established the capacities to provide Supported Employment to youth and adults with Most Significant Disabilities in response to the findings of the FFY 2016 CSNA. Funds received under section 603 of the Rehabilitation Act for Supported Employment are utilized to fund the costs of individualized discovery assessment, job development, job placement, and on-the-job supports for Supported Employment and Customized Employment delivered internally by JOBS Specialists. SCCB provides extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement under the Ticket to Work program to provide long term on going supports through an Employment Network (Able SC). (Page 313) Title IV

As required by WIOA 50% of Supported Employment funds will be used to provide Supported Employment Services to youth with most significant disabilities. SCCB built in-house capacities and resources to meet this goal since FPY 2016. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement under the Ticket to Work program to provide long term on going supports through an Employment Network (Able SC). SCCB will look for opportunities to engage with private and public partners to fund extended and ongoing supported employment services for this population. (Page 313) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~SCVRD utilizes multiple methods of working with employers to identify competitive, integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate the provision of VR services for adults and transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities. On a statewide and local basis, the Business Partnership Network, or BPN, provides an opportunity for regular engagement with business partners to gain input on hiring needs, training curricula, and opportunities for outreach with business and industry. Business Advisory Councils (BACs) are established to provide input on specific programs, such as the IT Training Centers, in Columbia and at the Bryant Center in Lyman. Members of the BAC assist in evaluating courses of study and curricula to ensure SCVRD stays current with what is needed in the workplace for IT professionals. Also, SCVRD utilizes Business Development Specialists (BDSs) across the state whose role is to identify opportunities for training, work-based learning, job development and placement, and emerging career pathways. BDS staff participate on local business services teams, along with partners from SC Works and LWDBs, to provide a coordinated approach to business development activities. BDS staff also work with transition counselors and coaches to identify opportunities for work-based learning experiences, internships, apprenticeships, and OJT for students in conjunction with the pre-employment transition services that are provided in high school settings. (Page 182) Title I

SCCB actively engages with the South Carolina business community through services provided by the Training & Employment Division (T&E) Employment Consultants. SCCB T&E Employment Consultants build and maintain partnerships with businesses to:
o Assess and better understand the unique human resource needs of South Carolina businesses;
o To help align SCCB programs to better meet the unique and specific human resource needs of South Carolina businesses;
o To create, establish, and foster relationships with South Carolina businesses that help them meet their unique and specific human resource needs, including talent acquisition and talent retention;
o Develop opportunities for Work Based Experiences, Internships, Job Shadowing, and other work based learning experiences that provide South Carolina Businesses with opportunities to gain experience with a diverse and qualified workforce;
o Create mutually beneficial relationships and facilitate linkages of job openings to a highly skilled and diverse talent pool of candidates. Referrals of consumers who are seeking employment and who have been judged to be Job Ready are received from SCCB Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. The Employment Consultant’s role is job development and placement that meets the needs of the business and the consumer. The Consultant also provides businesses and consumers with access to services that can be provided by SCCB or other governmental agencies. Incentives that may be applicable are also presented. These include: 
o The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC). This program allows a maximum available credit of $2,400 per eligible worker. 
o Sensitivity and awareness training for employers and organizations. This training includes American Disability Act (ADA), sighted guide techniques and attitudes regarding blindness. The presentation is designed to remove myths and apprehensions about blindness.
o Technical assistance for the implementation and support of assistive technology. (Pages 276-277) Title I

Data Collection

South Carolina has a vast workforce development system consisting of multiple public and private partners, the goal of which is to facilitate financial stability and economic prosperity for employers, individuals, and communities. We will evaluate the overall effectiveness of our system using the following tools: (1) WIOA common performance measures that assess employment, earnings, credential attainment, skills gain, and employer engagement; (2) SC Works Certification Standards that assess system management, job seeker services, and employer services; and (3) SWDB Strategic Plan key performance indicators. (Page 54) Title I

Accordingly, continuous improvement initiatives to build on the agency’s long-term history of success have focused on quality. SCVRD has embarked on an initiative known as “Quality One” (or “Q1”), which has a theme of “Quality happens one person at a time.” This included the establishment of workgroups to address quality measures and provide recommendations for a cohesive system that supports the provision of quality client services and metrics to gauge success and to realize results in increased successful employment outcomes for clients. This initiative aligns with SCVRD’s longstanding commitment to its Program Integrity model, which seeks a balance among productivity, customer service, and compliance assurance. Each of those components has measurable results and can be used to evaluate the agency at levels ranging from specific caseload or work unit up to an agency-wide level. The agency is proactively integrating the new WIOA common performance measures into program evaluation, data collection, and management information reports. (Page 92) Title I

SCVRD’s supported employment goals and plans regarding the Title VI program are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and the department’s performance on the common performance measures as well as agency key performance indicators. The priorities are as follows: •Strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s 110 traditional program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs; •Providing services to people with the most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, in order to successfully achieve and maintain competitive employment in integrated work settings; and •Providing supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities. (Pages 180-181) Title I

Based on the past three years’ data on services for students and youth, SCVRD estimates it will provide services, including but not limited to pre-employment transition services, to approximately 8,480 individuals that are initially referred by the school system. Data collection for the new 911 Case Services Report will allow for better identification of students with disabilities and provision of pre-employment transition services. As the new data becomes available, projections and fiscal forecasting for the provision of pre-employment transition services will be updated. (Page 204) Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Able Access is a fee for service program offered by Able SC to promote accessible and inclusive environments within businesses and government agencies. Staff provide Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) trainings and consultations. These services include but are not limited to policy and procedure review, onsite accessibility survey, testing on online property for screen reader/magnifier accessibility, and tailored staff trainings in a wide variety of disability topics (Page 41) Title I

Most workforce, economic development, and education programs are managed locally, and the quality of service delivery may vary by area. A number of measures are underway to improve the consistency of service delivery, including: the implementation of SC Works Center Standards and WIOA Eligible Training Provider provisions. The SC Works Center Standards address service delivery to job seekers and employers and center management, and are used by LWDBs to evaluate effectiveness, programmatic and physical accessibility, and continuous improvement of the SC Works delivery system. Along the same lines, training providers are now required to submit program data and meet certain requirements to be eligible to receive WIOA training funds. This will help ensure that participants receive high-quality training in high-demand, high-wage occupations. (Page 49) Title I

Monitoring performed at both the state and local level ensures that all SC Works Centers are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize South Carolina’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual (e.g. SC Works Online Services) to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. Complaints of discrimination are directed to the State Equal Opportunity Officer. (Page 108) Title I

As part of the SC Works center certification process, LWDBs are required to evaluate accessibility of the SC Works delivery system. SC Works centers were evaluated in 2017 and will be re-evaluated every three (3) years thereafter as required by WIOA. In order to be certified according to the SC Works certification standards, each center must meet the following accessibility baseline measures:

150.The Center is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Every workforce area will work with Vocational Rehabilitation partners and SCDEW Office of Equal Opportunity, as needed, to ensure ADA compliance.

151.The Center provides assistive technology for customers to use when accessing computers and other services. This includes customers with visual impairments, physical disabilities, and hearing impairments.

152. Staff should be identified to assist people with disabilities at the first point of contact and in case of emergency.

153.There are linkages to services for people with special needs, including veterans and others, related to disability. (Page 109-110) Title I

158.SCCB is working with the SC Works system to ensure one-stop center accessibility to persons with visual impairments. SCCB Assistive Technology Staff are current evaluating centers in several areas of the state to propose and provide hardware and/or software that will enable persons who are blind or low vision to access one stop center programs. (Page 110) Title I

Innovation and expansion activities have been identified within these strategies and include: Maintaining a staff interpreter for clients who are deaf to provide video remote interpreting, on- site services to mutual clients of SCVRD and DHHS, extend consistent access to interpreter services in rural areas, and enhance the accessibility of VR productions and client and staff training materials (Page 259) Title IV

Gaps included:

• America’s Job Centers (AJCs) in South Carolina (SC Works) have not effectively served individuals with blindness and vision impairments. There have been no documented instances of SCCB cases that are jointly served by other workforce entities.

• Historically, the relationship between SCCB and the AJCs, although cordial, is primarily one of referral with no evidence of substantial services after referral;

• Although the AJCs are accessible, the technology is frequently out of date and the AJC staff lack the skills to effectively operate/demonstrate the technology; Under WIOA there are legal requirements around the development of partnerships between SCCB and entities in the greater workforce development system.

While these gaps are the focus on continuing efforts both by the AJC's (SC Works) and SCCB, much has been accomplished since the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. SCCB has improved co-location of SCCB staff in the AJC's for specific periods of time each month where space allows. SCCB has signed MOU's and Infrastructure Cost Sharing Agreements with all SC Works service areas, and has been providing technical assistance to the AJC's in regards to programmatic and physical accessibility. (Page 287) Title IV

SCCB has been an active partner in the WIOA Unified State Plan Implementation Team. South Carolina’s plans are to continue convening this group of core WIOA partners to continue to develop meaningful and effective partnerships, share expertise and knowledge, skills, and abilities, and to expand the ability of the system to serve all individuals including those with disabilities. In addition, SCCB is working to ensure that there is agency presence in the local one stop American Job Centers on a consistent basis to provide support and expertise to consumers who are blind or visually impaired. SCCB entered into MOU's and Infrastructure Cost Agreements with all SC Works service deliver areas. SCCB is currently working with SC Works to provide assessment and technical assistance to ensure programmatic and physical accessibility. (Page 320) Title IV

Veterans

SC Works representatives are available in centers throughout the state to help veterans transition into the workforce. Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVER) staff conduct employer outreach and job development in the local community to assist veterans in gaining employment, including conducting seminars for employers and, in conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups. Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists are trained to provide intensive case management services to veterans and eligible spouses with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE), and age priority veterans ages 18 to 24, including individual career coaching, job referral, resume preparation assistance, career fairs and job search workshops, jobs training programs, and referrals to supporting or training services.

SCVRD has an ongoing partnership with DEW’s LVERs and DVOPs to coordinate outreach efforts with federal contractors. Federal contractors are required to establish an annual hiring benchmark for protected veterans and individuals with disabilities, or adopt the national benchmark provided by the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP). Through this informal partnership, SCVRD and DEW LVERs and DVOPs identify work ready individuals and coordinate employment opportunities with federal contractors. (Page 39) Title I

In accordance with the Jobs for Veterans Act, veterans and eligible spouses are given priority of service in employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the USDOL. Priority of service means that veterans and eligible spouses are given priority over non-covered persons for the receipt of employment, training, and placement service and that a veteran or an eligible spouse either receives access to a service earlier in time than a non-covered person, or, if the resource is limited, the veteran or eligible spouse receives access to the services instead of the non-covered person. The state has provided guidance to local workforce boards on how to implement the priority of service provisions.

The state monitors priority of service for veterans and eligible spouses by ensuring that local workforce areas have implemented appropriate priority of service policies. Local policies are assessed to determine the following:

o whether the policy explains the differences between Veterans’ Services and priority of service for veterans and eligible spouses;

o whether the policy describes the roles and responsibilities of SC Works Center staff and management as they pertain to Veterans’ Priority of Service; and,

o whether the policy demonstrates appropriate actions for showing priority of service to veterans and eligible spouses for Department of Labor funded programs in SC Works Centers. (Page 107) Title I

The state has issued guidance regarding services under the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP). DVOP staff must limit their activities to providing services to eligible veterans and eligible spouses who:

o meet the definition of an individual with a significant barrier to employment (SBE), as defined and updated by DOL, or

o are members of a veteran population identified by the Secretary of Labor as eligible for DVOP services, currently defined as veterans aged 18 to 24.

Per state guidance, an eligible veteran or eligible spouse who is identified as having a SBE must be immediately referred to a DVOP specialist. Veterans ages 18 to 24 must also be referred to DVOP specialists. In instances where a DVOP specialist is not available, referrals to a SCDEW career development specialist will be made. DVOP specialists will conduct an initial assessment to determine if the veteran or eligible spouse will benefit from the provision of case management. In the event that case management is determined not suitable, the DVOP will refer the veteran or eligible spouse to the other program staff who would best be able to meet their needs. Veterans with a SBE and those aged 18 to 24 must have access to all appropriate SC Works services and are not limited to receiving services only from DVOP specialists. Additionally, veterans and eligible spouses who do not meet the SBE definition or are not within a specified category identified by the Secretary of Labor, are to be referred to appropriate non-JVSG SC Works staff member(s) to receive services, on a priority basis. (Pages 107-108) Title I

Another area of identified need is response to the increase of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) through outreach and a focus on serving more individuals with brain injuries. This includes the general population as well as veterans from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The number of TBIs in the general population has increased slowly over the last decade according to the CDC; however, deaths from TBI have decreased. This decrease means an increase in the number of persons who might be returning to work and requiring vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 198) Title I

SCVRD provides services to veterans with disabilities; and, efforts to increase outreach to this population are ongoing. SCVRD has established relationships with local employers in all areas of the state, and collaboration with the Veterans Administration is essential to providing the greatest outreach for veterans with disabilities. SCVRD has assigned counselors to the state’s seven VA specialty clinics and each area office has designated counselors to work with local VA offices for referrals. (Page 200) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~SCVRD works collaboratively with DMH and has an established MOA that outlines roles, responsibilities, and referral procedures. In addition, several cooperative agreements are in place across the state for IPS (Individualized Placement and Support) caseloads to provide rapid placement and job coaching for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. Transition counselors working within the schools to provide pre-employment transition services coordinate with school-based mental health counselors to identify students in need of services, whether that is VR or mental health services. Through this “no wrong door” approach, students in need of services are connected to the appropriate resources in a timely manner. (Page 184) Title I

SCCB is developing a new Cooperative Agreement with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health to collaborate, coordinate, avoid duplication of services, and enhance the employment outcomes of shared consumer populations. (Page 278) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 46

Executive Order No. 2019-39 South Carolina State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force - 12/12/2019

“WHEREAS, numerous state and federal public assistance programs currently provide support to individuals seeking education and employment, including Unemployment Insurance (“UI”), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (“SNAP”), Vocational Rehabilitation, and Medicaid benefits for qualified working disabled individuals; and…

NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of South Carolina and pursuant to the Constitution and Laws of this State and the powers conferred upon me therein, I hereby create and establish the State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“DECO Recovery Management, LLC was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Underserved and vulnerable uninsured populations: Latino/Hispanic; African Americans; Rural communities; young and “invincibles”; small employers; and self-employed individuals.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with South Carolina Chamber of Commerce, South Carolina Hospital Association, South Carolina of the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) , Carolina Chapter of the American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM), Greenville Memorial Hospital, Greer Memorial Hospital, North Greenville Hospital, Hillcrest Memorial Hospital , Patewood Memorial Hospital, Laurens County Memorial Hospital, Aiken Regional Medical Center, Oconee Memorial Hospital, and Bon Secours St. Francis Health System.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Andrew Foland \Phone: (410) 763-7475Email: afoland@decorm.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Waiver Case Management Standards - 07/01/2019

~~This document has information on how staff and providers are to operate when working with the Community Supports Waiver,  Head and Spinal Cord Injury Waiver, and Intellectual Disability/Related Disabilities Waiver.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Rehabilitative Behavioral Health Services (RBHS) - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina (South Carolina or State) State Medicaid Plan allows an array of behavioral health services under the Rehabilitative Services Option, 42 CFR 440.130(d).Rehabilitative Services are medical or remedial services that have been recommended by a Physician or other Licensed Practitioner of the Healing Arts(LPHA) within the scope of their practice under South Carolina State Law and as further determined by the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS)for maximum reduction of physical or mental disability and restoration of a beneficiary to their best possible functional level. This section describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the Providers of services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Licensed Independent Practitioner’s (LIP) Rehabilitative Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Services in this manual are intended to be delivered in an outpatient and community setting only. In accordance with 42CFR 435.1009-1011, services are not available for beneficiaries residing in an Institution of Mental Disease. Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitals and Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities (PRTFs) receive an all-inclusive, per diem rate for services. Services provided to beneficiaries in these settings are not Medicaid reimbursable”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Long-Term Care Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The mission of Long-Term Living (LTL) is to provide a cost-effective alternative to institutional placement for eligible clients with long term care needs, if they choose, allowing them to remain in a community environment. The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) Division of Long-Term Living operates several waiver programs, as well as three Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (DDSN) waivers. LTL also administers the Palmetto Senior Care (PSC) program.  More information is available by accessing the web link. .”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Local Education Agencies (LEA) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link. ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Mental Health (CMH) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Community mental health (MH) service providers must provide clinic services as defined in federal regulation42 CFR 440.90. This manual describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the providers of services.“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 06/30/2019

~~“The Client Assistance Program is also available to applicants or consumers of SCVRD. CAP is a federally funded program administered by Protection and Advocacy for People with Disabilities Inc. (P&A), a statewide non-profit that advocates for the rights of people with disabilities.

You can reach CAP by email at info@pandasc.org  .

CAP can also be reached at:

866-275-7273 (Toll-free)803-782-0639 (Columbia Area)866-232-4525 (TTY)”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veteran Services - 06/15/2019

~~“SCServes offers service members, veterans and their families access to a class-leading continuum of providers that runs the gamut from superior legal, housing and emergency service providers to employment, recreation and fitness, financial capabilities and more – all designed to provide those who serve, have served, and their families, with the most comprehensive service delivery experience available anywhere in the nation.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

South Carolina House Bill 4093: Employment First Initiative Study Committee - 05/25/2018

“An act to establish the South Carolina Employment First Study Committee for the Purpose of studying and evaluating the need for an Employment First Initiative Act, to provide expectations policies to be established by an Employment First Initiative Act, to provide for the composition of the study committee, and to provide the committee shall report its findings to the governor, President Pro Tempore of the Senate, and the Speaker of  the House of Representatives on or before May 1, 2019, at which time the study committee is dissolved.”

Systems
  • Other

South Carolina Uniform High School Diplomas Bill - 05/09/2017

“An act to amend section 59-39-100, as amended, code of laws of South Carolina, 1976, relating to the uniform diploma for graduates of accredited high schools, so as to provide personalized pathways for students to earn the diploma and to provide related course of study-based endorsements students may earn, to revise the coursework students entering ninth grade during the 2018-2019 school year must earn for graduation, to provide this revised coursework requirement must support the profile of the graduate,  to provide for a uniform employability credential available for certain students with disabilities as an alternative to diploma pathways, and to provide the State Department of Education shall monitor numbers of diplomas and employability credentials earned by students and biannually report such numbers to the State Board of Education and the General Assembly.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

South Carolina HB 3768 (ABLE legislation) - 04/29/2015

“A BILL TO AMEND THE CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, BY ADDING ARTICLE 3 TO CHAPTER 5, TITLE 11 SO AS TO ESTABLISH THE "SOUTH CAROLINA ABLE SAVINGS PROGRAM", TO ALLOW INDIVIDUALS WITH A DISABILITY AND THEIR FAMILIES TO SAVE PRIVATE FUNDS TO SUPPORT THE INDIVIDUAL WITH A DISABILITY, TO PROVIDE GUIDELINES TO THE STATE TREASURER FOR THE MAINTENANCE OF THESE ACCOUNTS, AND TO ESTABLISH THE SAVINGS PROGRAM TRUST FUND AND SAVINGS EXPENSE TRUST FUND; AND TO DESIGNATE THE EXISTING SECTIONS OF CHAPTER 5, TITLE 11 AS ARTICLE 1 AND ENTITLE THEM "GENERAL PROVISIONS".”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

S 0704 General Bill (referred to the Committee on Medical Affairs 4/2015) - 04/22/2015

 “A BILL TO AMEND CHAPTER 28, TITLE 44 OF THE 1976 CODE, RELATING TO THE SELF-SUFFICIENCY TRUST FUND; DISABILITY TRUST FUND; AID FOR DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED, MENTALLY ILL, AND PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED PERSONS, BY ADDING ARTICLE 5 TO PROVIDE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE DISABLED SELF-EMPLOYMENT DEVELOPMENT TRUST FUND FOR THE CREATION OF A PROGRAM WHICH WILL ASSIST INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES TO PURSUE ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SELF-EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES, BY PROVIDING BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT GRANTS FOR THE STARTUP, EXPANSION OR ACQUISITION OF A BUSINESS OPERATED WITHIN THE STATE…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order No. 2019-39 South Carolina State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force - 12/12/2019

“WHEREAS, numerous state and federal public assistance programs currently provide support to individuals seeking education and employment, including Unemployment Insurance (“UI”), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (“SNAP”), Vocational Rehabilitation, and Medicaid benefits for qualified working disabled individuals; and…

NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of South Carolina and pursuant to the Constitution and Laws of this State and the powers conferred upon me therein, I hereby create and establish the State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order, 2015-16 - 07/01/2015

“Governor Nikki Haley reestablishes the South Carolina Developmental Disabilities Council, which is the State's forum for developmental disabilities matters and will advocate for persons with those disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

Rehabilitative Behavioral Health Services (RBHS) - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina (South Carolina or State) State Medicaid Plan allows an array of behavioral health services under the Rehabilitative Services Option, 42 CFR 440.130(d).Rehabilitative Services are medical or remedial services that have been recommended by a Physician or other Licensed Practitioner of the Healing Arts(LPHA) within the scope of their practice under South Carolina State Law and as further determined by the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS)for maximum reduction of physical or mental disability and restoration of a beneficiary to their best possible functional level. This section describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the Providers of services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Licensed Independent Practitioner’s (LIP) Rehabilitative Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Services in this manual are intended to be delivered in an outpatient and community setting only. In accordance with 42CFR 435.1009-1011, services are not available for beneficiaries residing in an Institution of Mental Disease. Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitals and Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities (PRTFs) receive an all-inclusive, per diem rate for services. Services provided to beneficiaries in these settings are not Medicaid reimbursable”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Long-Term Care Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The mission of Long-Term Living (LTL) is to provide a cost-effective alternative to institutional placement for eligible clients with long term care needs, if they choose, allowing them to remain in a community environment. The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) Division of Long-Term Living operates several waiver programs, as well as three Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (DDSN) waivers. LTL also administers the Palmetto Senior Care (PSC) program.  More information is available by accessing the web link. .”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Local Education Agencies (LEA) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link. ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Mental Health (CMH) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Community mental health (MH) service providers must provide clinic services as defined in federal regulation42 CFR 440.90. This manual describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the providers of services.“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 06/30/2019

~~“The Client Assistance Program is also available to applicants or consumers of SCVRD. CAP is a federally funded program administered by Protection and Advocacy for People with Disabilities Inc. (P&A), a statewide non-profit that advocates for the rights of people with disabilities.

You can reach CAP by email at info@pandasc.org  .

CAP can also be reached at:

866-275-7273 (Toll-free)803-782-0639 (Columbia Area)866-232-4525 (TTY)”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Data and Technology (D&T) - 04/27/2019

~~“Data and Technology (D&T) is responsible for collecting and managing all programmatic data required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) as well as other federal and state laws and regulations relating to the provision of special education and related services for students with disabilities in the State of South Carolina. More information is available by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Transition Planning - 04/05/2019

~~This page has a collection of material to help with Secondary Transition

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department - 01/17/2019

~~“…prepares and assists eligible South Carolinians with disabilities to achieve and maintain competitive .employment. More about VR services can be found by accessing the web-link”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Services Offered by the Columbia Regional Office - 11/14/2018

~~“VA’s Columbia Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of benefits and services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in South Carolina. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Veteran Services - 06/15/2019

~~“SCServes offers service members, veterans and their families access to a class-leading continuum of providers that runs the gamut from superior legal, housing and emergency service providers to employment, recreation and fitness, financial capabilities and more – all designed to provide those who serve, have served, and their families, with the most comprehensive service delivery experience available anywhere in the nation.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Project E3 - 01/30/2019

~~“Project E3 will provide South Carolina’s state Vocational Rehabilitation agencies and their partners with the skills and competencies needed to effectively and efficiently address barriers to competitive integrated employment and community integration encountered by persons with disabilities in these regions.We will leverage promising practices, knowledge, and experience gained from this project to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities from underserved and economically disadvantaged populations throughout South Carolina and across the United States.Our specific goals for this project are to:• By the end of the first year, 25 individuals from each region will apply or return to vocational rehabilitation services.• By the end of the second year, approximately 18 individuals from each region will be found eligible for services.• By the end of the second year, the number of people who complete an Individualized plan for employment will increase by 50%. Of those, there will be an increase in the cases closed in competitive, integrated employment by 25%.• The project will develop a community consortium to direct, develop, and sustain services during the project and into the coming years.” 

Systems
  • Other
Citations

SC Employment First Initiative - 07/01/2017

“South Carolina is one of six states selected by the Administration for Community Living to receive funding in order to increase employment outcomes for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities statewide. Employment First emphasizes competitive, integrated employment as the preferred option for individuals with disabilities.

The South Carolina Disability Employment Coalition, through collaboration with thirteen Project Partners, will implement The SC Employment First Initiative to address barriers to successful employment for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

South Carolina Supported Employment Programs - 05/30/2013

• “Individual Placement and Support (IPS) is an evidenced-based supported employment best practice model. IPS is collaboration between South Carolina Department of Mental Health (SCDMH) and South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD). Since 2005 these state agencies have combined resources and personnel to implement the IPS Supported Employment model. The goal of this partnership is to place people with serve mental illness in competitive employment. Through the collaboration of this Supported Employment model, SCVRD and SCDMH are able to provide an integrated and seamless employment service delivery that results in improved employment outcomes for people with severe mental illness.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Transition Alliance of South Carolina (TASC)

"The Transition Alliance of South Carolina (TASC) is spearheaded by the Center for Disability Resources (CDR) at the University of South Carolina’s School of Medicine.

Utilizing funding and support from the South Carolina Department of Education, Office of Special Education Services, TASC partners and project staff housed at the Center for Disability Resources developed an infrastructure to support local interagency transition teams.  Project activities are focused on providing interagency teams the resources to increase their capacity to collaboratively and effectively serve young adults with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to adult-life.

Together, we build capacity for transition programming at the state level, while also serving as a bridge to and between local communities in South Carolina."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

South Carolina Disability Employment Coalition

~~“The SC Disability Employment Coalition (SCDEC) formed in the fall of 2014, through funding from the SC Developmental Disabilities  Council, to address employment barriers for individuals with disabilities in South Carolina. SCDEC stakeholders represent South Carolina employers, state and private agencies, and individuals with disabilities.

SCDEC members meet quarterly.  The SCDEC has four committees that meet on a monthly basis and is comprised of over 40 stakeholder organizations and individuals.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)

“People with all types of disabilities are employed, pursuing careers and building assets just like people without disabilities…Through advocacy and education, APSE advances employment and self-sufficiency for all people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

South Carolina Partnerships in Employment - 11/28/2016

“ACL’s Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

 

Able South Carolina received a grant for the South Carolina Employment First Initiative.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

South Carolina Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2012

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project." South Carolina received an EDI award for its program Integration Peer Support into Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Sourh Carolina SAMHSA Grant - "Health Mind Body Alliance"

“The integration model brings primary care into state community mental health clinics. Clinics are located in the underserved rural counties of Marlboro, Dillon, and Chesterfield South Carolina and the initial strategy included an FQHC [Federal Qualified Health Center]. Year two enrollment target is to serve 150 unduplicated clients (During the first quarters of year two for the grant 194 clients unduplicated clients were enrolled). Services are accessible to all consenting adult clients of TCCMHC [Tri-County Community Mental Health Center] with serious mental illness (Excepting incarcerated clients).”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person/Home Again

“Home Again is a program assisting seniors, individuals with disabilities, and children with severe emotional disturbances who currently live in facilities to transition back into their communities and receive appropriate services and supports.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“DECO Recovery Management, LLC was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Underserved and vulnerable uninsured populations: Latino/Hispanic; African Americans; Rural communities; young and “invincibles”; small employers; and self-employed individuals.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with South Carolina Chamber of Commerce, South Carolina Hospital Association, South Carolina of the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) , Carolina Chapter of the American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM), Greenville Memorial Hospital, Greer Memorial Hospital, North Greenville Hospital, Hillcrest Memorial Hospital , Patewood Memorial Hospital, Laurens County Memorial Hospital, Aiken Regional Medical Center, Oconee Memorial Hospital, and Bon Secours St. Francis Health System.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Andrew Foland \Phone: (410) 763-7475Email: afoland@decorm.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

6th Annual South Carolina State Transition Conference - 11/19/2018

~~“Join us for South Carolina’s premier interagency transition conference. Local school districts, adult service agency representatives, families and other professionals will attend this 2 day event in beautiful downtown Greenville. Early Registration ends 10/18/2019

    Lunch on both Tuesday and Wednesday is included with all exhibitor and sponsor registrations.    This year’s conference will once again include vendor breaks, breakout sessions and facilitated team planning time.    Make plans to stay over Wednesday night and join your colleagues from across the state for an evening Networking Social.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Community Employment Program Development Work Group - 03/07/2018

“This Employment Community of Practice offers an exciting opportunity for direct service providers interested in implementing customized employment practices. The community of practice builds capacity to improve the methodology and skills of employment staff to assist seekers with more significant barriers to obtain employment.”

This page is continuously updated with webinars and related resources around topics relating to community employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Waiver Case Management Standards - 07/01/2019

~~This document has information on how staff and providers are to operate when working with the Community Supports Waiver,  Head and Spinal Cord Injury Waiver, and Intellectual Disability/Related Disabilities Waiver.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Service Rate Increases - 07/01/2018

~~PROVIDER ALERTEffective for services provided on or after July 1, 2018, the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) increased reimbursement for qualified Adult Day Health Care Services, Personal Care I, Personal Care II and Attendant Care providers by approximately 8.2 percent.

For Community Long Term Care waivers, the updated fee schedule can be found at scdhhs.gov/resource/fee-schedules. For waivers operated by the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (SCDDSN), providers with questions about this action are encouraged to contact SCDDSN at (803) 898-9626.

Future updates to reimbursement rates will be communicated via the standard fee schedule update process and posted at scdhhs.gov.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Statewide Transition Plan - 03/31/2016

The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule on Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) establishing certain requirements for services that are provided through Medicaid waivers. There are specific requirements for where home and community-based services are received which will be referred to as the “settings requirements.” CMS required that each state submit a “Statewide Transition Plan” by March 17, 2015. The Statewide Transition Plan outlines how the state will come into conformance and compliance with the HCBS Rule settings requirements. States must come into full compliance with the HCBS Rule requirements by March 17, 2019. The South Carolina Department of Health and Human services (SCDHHS) has branded this effort for HCBS with the tagline: Independent•Integrated•Individual. This tagline was developed because home and community-based services help our members be independent, be integrated in the community, and are based on what is best for the individual.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

SC Community Supports (0676.R02.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day health care, personal care, respite care, waiver case management, incontinence supplies, adult day health care-nursing, adult day health care-transportation, assistive technology and appliances, behavior support, career preparation, community services, day activity, employment services, environmental mods, in-home support, PERS, private vehicle mods, support center services for individuals w/IID ages 0 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

South Carolina ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/28/2012

“South Carolina’s college and career readiness aspirations extend to all students, including those who need additional support and consideration because English is not their first language or due to a disability. To help ensure that we effectively analyze the linguistic demands of the CCSS to inform development of corresponding standards specific to these students that enable their success.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

South Carolina Statewide Transition Plan – Revised (HCBS)

The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) gives notice that the revised draft Statewide Transition Plan, required per Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Rule (42 CFR 441.301(c)(6)),was submitted on March 31, 2016 to CMS for review. It will be effective upon CMS approval.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Long Term Care - South Carolina Medicaid Waivers

“Community Long Term Care (CLTC) offers programs to help individuals who want to live at home, need assistance with their care, and are financially eligible for Medicaid."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

South Carolina Medicaid Money Follows the Person/Home Again

“Home Again is a program assisting seniors, individuals with disabilities, and children with severe emotional disturbances who currently live in facilities to transition back into their communities and receive appropriate services and supports.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

The Palmetto State is "Prepared in Mind and Resources" when it comes to improving supports for individuals with disabilities to increase access to competitive, integrated employment and socioeconomic advancement in South Carolina.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon South Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.25%
Change from
2018 to 2019
5,148,714
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.43%
Change from
2018 to 2019
357,695
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.74%
Change from
2018 to 2019
123,245
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.11%
Change from
2018 to 2019
34.46%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.62%
Change from
2018 to 2019
77.01%

State Data

General

2017 2018 2019
Population. 5,024,369 5,084,127 5,148,714
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 376,889 366,373 357,695
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 122,789 122,332 123,245
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 1,985,199 2,020,381 2,052,071
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 32.58% 33.39% 34.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 74.37% 76.53% 77.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.30% 3.40% 2.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.40% 20.70% 20.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 14.60% 14.40% 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 359,484 344,760 342,542
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 368,217 372,344 374,268
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 492,410 487,136 482,563
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 207,435 197,298 201,996
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 20,192 26,650 20,052
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,309 4,231 4,114
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 4,505 4,890 6,587
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 364 N/A N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 14,061 13,598 13,034
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 5,617 9,603 8,004

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,807 4,946 4,960
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.40% 4.60% 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 174,597 172,718 171,174

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 1,106 7,444 9,138
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 4,893 17,103 17,893
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 8,929 42,664 45,069
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 12.40% 17.40% 20.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 1.00% N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 520 N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 102,867 10,232 9,724
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.30 0.03 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 113 88 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 64 53 48
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 57.00% 60.00% 65.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 1.34 1.08 0.98

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 40.00% 42.00% 34.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 5,926 6,720 8,033
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 253,541 252,608 251,995
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 190 259 240
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 196 245 207

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $16,552,000 $13,698,891 $20,606,245
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $24,955,000 $25,631,619 $26,635,888
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $24,846,000 $25,458,826 $27,365,194
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $4,764,000 $4,926,715 $5,231,711
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 26.00% 23.00% 28.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 974 946 996
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,086 2,819 2,886
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,188 2,484 3,186
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 51.40 37.40 54.96

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 60.71% 61.61% 62.17%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 16.31% 15.84% 15.39%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.71% 1.56% 1.46%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.82% 91.90% 90.48%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 22.92% 26.21% 30.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 56.85% 57.36% 61.04%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 69.54% 84.39% 76.44%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 33.93% 31.15% 30.17%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,561,788
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 3,877
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 14,767
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 510,687
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 525,454
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 143
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 743
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 886
AbilityOne wages (products). $80,150
AbilityOne wages (services). $5,233,265

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2018 2019 2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 24 32 9
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 1 2 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 25 34 9
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 2,526 2,764 1,144
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 81 170 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 2,607 2,934 1,144

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Able SC is approved by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) to serve ticket beneficiaries as an Employment Network (EN) under SSA’s Ticket to Work program (discussed in more detail below), and also serves as the host and facilitator for the SC Disability Employment Coalition and the SC Employment First Initiative, two collaborative efforts that addresses employment barriers for individuals with disabilities. (Pages 40-41) Title I

In 2016, a consortium of partners working through the SC Disability Employment Coalition received a Partnership in Employment Systems Change grant known as the SC Employment First Initiative. The purpose of the grant is to increase competitive integrated employment outcomes for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

The initiative had three broad goals:

1.) Equip high school students and recent graduated with intellectual and development disabilities with the skills, awareness, and confidence needed to enter competitive employment.

2.) Unify and empower South Carolina education professionals, employment service providers, families, and the community at large towards support of Employment First principles.

3.) Develop and expand supports for South Carolina-based employers who hire persons with disabilities in competitive, community-based positions.

A major focus of the SC Employment First Initiative is to implement policy that competitive and integrated employment shall be considered the first option for any individual with disabilities applying for or receiving services from the state or any of its political subdivisions. In fact, Employment First legislation is pending in the South Carolina legislature which would have a positive effect on employment for people with disabilities. (Page 42) Title I

SCCB is an active member of the Employment First Initiative steering committee, an interagency partnership focused on ensuring that competitive integrated employment is the first priority for transition aged students with disabilities. SCCB is also an active member of the Advisory Council for Educating Students with Disabilities an advisory council for the Office of Special Education at the South Carolina Department of Education. All of these committees and councils create avenues for coordination and collaboration with state and local education officials. (Page 274) Title IV

SCCB is developing an updated Cooperative Agreement with the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (DDSN) to avoid duplication of services, increase coordination of employment services provided to the shared consumer populations, and to enhance Supported Employment programs. SCCB is an active partner with DDSN and both agencies are represented on the Employment First Initiative Steering Committee and the South Carolina Disability Employment Coalition. (Page 278) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~SCCB has established an internal Supported Employment program that includes Customized Employment provided by three (3) regionally assigned JOBS Specialists. During program year 2018 SCCB partnered with the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Technical Assistance Center and the Youth Technical Assistance Center to provide intensive Customized Employment training to the JOBS Specialists. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement with ABLE SC under provisions in the Ticket-to-Work program to provide ongoing supports for ticket holders. SCCB is working to establish other Cooperative Agreements with entities providing ongoing supports to consumers in Supported Employment. (Page 276) Title IV

98.SCCB did not offer supported employment or customized employment services to its consumers with most significant disabilities. This is reflected in the low numbers of employment outcomes for these individuals. (Page 286) Title IV

The South Carolina Commission for the Blind has established the capacities to provide Supported Employment to youth and adults with Most Significant Disabilities in response to the findings of the FFY 2016 CSNA. Funds received under section 603 of the Rehabilitation Act for Supported Employment are utilized to fund the costs of individualized discovery assessment, job development, job placement, and on-the-job supports for Supported Employment and Customized Employment delivered internally by JOBS Specialists. SCCB provides extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement under the Ticket to Work program to provide long term on going supports through an Employment Network (Able SC). SCCB utilizes 50% of Supported Employment funds to provide Supported Employment and Customized Employment for eligible youth. SCCB has established goals to provide Supported Employment services to 6eligible individuals during FFY 2018, 8 individuals during FFY 2019, 10individuals during FFY 2020, and 10 individuals during FFY 2021. (Page 313) Title IV

Strategy 2.2.3: Provide Customized Employment that includes intensive discovery of individualized skills, abilities, potential; and intensive customization of an existing job opening, creation of a job that fills an unmet need, and other customized options. SCCB provides Customized Employment through a qualified and trained JOBS Specialist (Job Oriented Blind Service). (Page 316) Title IV

SCCB will continue to seek opportunities and partnerships to aid in the development and establishment of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to provide community based adjustment to blindness services, supported employment (SE) services, customized employment (CE) services and life skills training. (Page 320) Title IV

CRP Establishment & Development: SCCB will continue to seek opportunities and partnerships to aid in the development and establishment of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to provide community based adjustment to blindness services, supported employment (SE) services, customized employment (CE) services, Braille training, vocational evaluation, and life skills training. (Page 321) Title IV

SCCB is committed to ensuring that services are provided in an equitable manner and are fully accessible. SCCB reviews, assesses and monitors agency programs to conduct continuous improvement activities. The greatest gap identified in the 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment pertained to the lack of a Supported Employment program at SCCB. In response SCCB established the JOBS Specialists (Job Oriented Blind Services) positons trained to provide Supported Employment (SE), Customized Employment (CE), and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) models to consumers who have Most Significant Disabilities. These positions function in a one-on-one consumer centered approach as Job Placement Specialists, On-The-Job Coaches, and in other employment related supportive roles allowed under Title VI. (Pages 321-322) Title IV

SCCB has established program capacity and resources to better serve individuals who have Most Significant Disabilities. SCCB has established JOBS Specialists who are providing Supported Employment and Customized Employment, evidence based practices that have not been offered by SCCB in the past. In addition, SCCB has hired and trained a Certified Work Incentive Counselor to help beneficiaries understand the implications of gainful employment on their Social Security benefits. (Page 323) Title IV

SCCB expended Supported Employment revenue during FFY 2017 for the first time as JOBS Specialists were on boarded and began providing Supported Employment services. Consumers being served by SE funds are currently in the placement and support phase, therefore no consumers served by Supported Employment funds have been transitioned to extended services at this time. SCCB signed a Partnership Plus Agreement with Able SC to provide on-going supports at the time when a consumer transitions from VR support. Building a quality Supported Employment program is a continued goal of SCCB for FFY 2018. Currently SCCB is undergoing extensive Customized Employment training and technical assistance to build capacity and program effectiveness. SCCB also added the capacity to provide benefit and work incentive counseling. (Page 325) Title IV

SCCB made substantial progress on creating a Supported Employment program through the establishment of the JOBS Specialists, providing both Supported Employment and Customized Employment training to these staff, and building the capacity to provide benefits and work incentive counseling services. The greatest impediment was that these resources had to be created where they did not exist prior. (Page 325) Title IV

SCCB expended Supported Employment revenue during FFY 2017 for the first time as JOBS Specialists were on boarded and began providing Supported Employment services. Consumers being served by SE funds are currently in the placement and support phase, therefore no consumers served by Supported Employment funds have been transitioned to extended services at this time. SCCB signed a Partnership Plus Agreement with Able SC to provide on-going supports at the time when a consumer transitions from VR support. Building a quality Supported Employment program is a continued goal of SCCB for FFY 2018. Currently SCCB is undergoing extensive Customized Employment training and technical assistance to build capacity and program effectiveness. (Page 326-327) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~CCB has developed a Self-Employment Toolkit intended to walk eligible consumers through the microenterprise development process. SCCB has partnered with the University of Wisconsin-Madison to provide Self-Employment and Social Security Work Incentive training to SCCB’s VR Counselors on May 17, 2018 and August 8, 2018. SCCB is working to build community partnerships to leverage resources from entities engaged in business development such as Small Business Development Centers, Business Incubator Programs, and South Carolina’s Technical College System. SCCB is also working to incorporate our Career Exploration Lab (3D Printer Lab) as a tool to assist in product development and prototyping. (Page 66) Title I

•SCVRD leverages other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services. Extended services providers are identified in each area to provide follow along and extended services following successful exit from the VR program. Partnerships at the state and local level with DDSN and the local DSN boards continue to grow and provide key linkages to extended services providers. (Page 182) Title I

SCVRD’s ongoing support services are limited to 24 months unless extended by an amendment to the IPE. Transition to extended services starts after an individual is stabilized in his/her job setting and has met the individualized work goal. The client’s employment stability is determined by the achievement of adequate job performance without a need for ongoing, intensive shadowing/mentoring from the job coach. The client, employer, job coach, and SCVRD counselor agree that this has occurred before transition to the extended service provider takes place. SCVRD continues to leverage resources for identifying extended service providers to meet long-term support needs. (Page 260) Title IV

Goal 1: Increase Program Capacity Leveraging Partnerships & Community Engagement
Priority 1.1: Improve WIOA Partnerships & One-Stop System Engagement
Priority 1.2: Improve Partnerships & Strategic Alliances to Increase Program Capacity
Priority 1.3: Increase Public Awareness & Community Engagement
Priority 1.4: Align Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center (EBMRC) Programing

Report of Progress Goal 1: SCCB achieved substantial progress on goal 1. SCCB improved WIOA partnerships and One-Stop System Engagement through the strategies of formalizing American Job Center partnerships with Memorandum’s of Understanding which include infrastructure cost agreements, specified co-located staff office times and space, center accessibility assessment and technical assistance, and staff cross training. SCCB has active MOU’s with all SC Works Centers. SCCB worked with core WIOA partner programs to create agency cross training modules for partnership workforce staff, and explored data sharing and common intake opportunities. SCCB finalized a Cooperative Agreement with SC Department of Education and is currently negotiating an update to the SC Vocational Rehabilitation Department Cooperative Agreement. SCCB negotiated and entered into a number of Cooperative Agreements with community based qualified fee-for-service vendors and other partners to expand capacity and available resources statewide. This has expanded program capacity to provide independent travel training (8 new vendors), home management training (2 new vendors), and Braille Literacy (2 new vendors) in community settings. SCCB also provides ZoomText, Jaws, and other assistive technology training through a fee-for-service contract with the National Federation of the Blind of South Carolina. (Page 322) Title IV

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.  

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Goal 1.2: Provide comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services to adult job seekers who are blind or visually impaired resulting in the attainment of industry recognized in-demand credentials required for competitive integrated employment.
Strategy 1.2.1: Provide quality Adjustment to Blindness and Pre-Vocational Training at the Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center for Employment & Independence. Adjustment to Blindness Training includes: Orientation & Mobility (Independent Travel), Independent Living Skills, Braille Literacy, Employability Soft Skills, Basic Financial Literacy, and Psychosocial Adjustment to Blindness Counseling. Pre-Vocational Training includes: Basic Keyboarding, Basic Microsoft Office Suite Training, and Assistive Technology Training such as Computer Screen Readers, Text Magnifiers, Low Vision Aids, Etc. (Page 315) Title IV

In 2017 SCCB rewrote the curriculum and courses offered at the Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center for Employment and Independence. This new curriculum includes pre-test and post-test assessments to measure skill gains and provide for continuous improvement. Several new center programs have been implemented including a partnership with Adult Education that brings GED preparation instruction and testing to the center. SCCB added a Basic Financial Literacy course using curriculum designed by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. SCCB has also added Soft-Skills training based on the “Skills to Pay the Bills” curriculum. (Page 323) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~The Transition Alliance of South Carolina is a broad systems improvement and technical assistance resource for professionals working with students with disabilities. Their primary outcome is to empower students to transition into community-based employment. Local transition programs choose to enhance their curriculum through a variety of evidence-based transition practices, including student-led IEP meetings, goal setting and attainment, socializing in the workplace, job accommodations, and other activities meant to empower students with disabilities to control their career strategy. TASC consists of a state-level interagency steering committee that supports local interagency transition teams across the state. (Page 42) Title I

SC Department of Education Office of Adult Education has a special education task force that creates and delivers training for adult education practitioners serving students with special needs. The OAE meets regularly with SCDE Office of Special Education Services to ensure compliance with all special education regulations. Additionally, OAE requires that all funded local providers have a written plan with local Special Education Departments to transition IEP (Individualized Education Plan) students, and that local providers comply with the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA) which requires each provider to describe the steps they propose to take to ensure equitable access to, and participation in, its federally assisted programs. OAE monitors for compliance with the written transition IEP as part of its annual compliance process, and collaborates with the Office of Special Education to monitor all other GEPA requirements. (Page 109) Title I

GEPA (General Education Provisions Act) 427 requirements are overseen by the SCDE-OAE in the following ways:
•In cooperation with SCDE - Office of General Counsel and the SCDE - Office of Special Education Services, OAE delivers training for adult education practitioners serving students with special needs.
•OAE meets regularly with the SCDE - Office of Special Education Services to ensure compliance with all special education regulations.
•OAE requires that all funded local providers have a written plan with local Special Education Departments to transition IEP (Individualized Education Plan) students, and that local providers comply with GEPA which requires each provider to describe the steps they propose to take to ensure equitable access to, and participation in, its federally assisted programs.

OAE monitors for compliance the written transition IEP as a part of its annual compliance process, and collaborates with the SCDE - Office of Special Education to monitor all other GEPA requirements. (Pages 170-171) Title I

SCVRD utilizes the “Guideposts for Success” (based on the work of the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth — NCWD/Y) as a framework for school-to-work transition services. This includes regular activities that focus on each of the required pre-employment transition service activities: job exploration counseling, work-based learning, counseling on opportunities for comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living skills, and instruction in self-advocacy. Group activities provide opportunities to not only facilitate peer mentoring, but also allow transition staff to observe and cultivate students’ leadership skills, as well as communication and social skills. Mentoring is a key component of the High School High Tech (HS/HT) program, and SCVRD collaborates with organizations that have youth-led mentoring programs in place. Through the agency’s VR Ambassadors program, former clients that have successfully transitioned into employment or postsecondary activities are available to assist with mentoring and participation in transition activities such as Disability Mentoring Day, and summer transition institutes. (Pages 174-175) Title I

In collaboration with the SC Department of Employment and Workforce (SCDEW) and the SCDE, SCVRD’s school-based transition counselors work together with local education agencies, community partners, workforce development boards, SC Works Centers and business partners to advise students with disabilities, and their families, regarding available career pathways and educational/training opportunities. SCVRD maintains a Transition Services Coordinator position and additional regional Transition Specialist positions whose duties focus on the authorized activities required for effective provision of pre-employment transition services. These include:
• Coordinate all transition-related activities and projects including those that involve other agencies, community organizations and local SCVRD field offices;
• Develop, monitor and update all transition documents and cooperative agreements;
• Provide technical assistance, professional development and training on transition-related issues to field office staff, education personnel, community organizations, families, and students;
• Review and update client service policy to ensure policies and procedures are reflective of SCVRD mission and focus on quality in serving youth in transition;
• Serve on the planning committee for the interagency South Carolina Youth Leadership Forum, a summer youth development and leadership program; • Participate in TASC, an interagency initiative to create systems change and support development of local interagency transition teams. (Page 175) Title I

Strategy 1.2 Enhance school-to-work transition services.
• Objective 1.2.1 Maximize relationships with education officials in all South Carolina school districts to support development of education and career pathways. 
• Objective 1.2.2 Improve services to individuals with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual/developmental disabilities.
• Objective 1.2.3 Enhance services for at-risk youth with disabilities.
• Objective 1.2.4 Expose students with disabilities to careers in science, technology, engineering and math through High School/High Tech programs. (Page 247) Title IV

SCCB Career BOOST (Building Occupational Opportunities for Students in Transition): Is a contractual pilot program in partnership with South Carolina’s Independent Living Centers, the National Federation of the Blind of South Carolina, and LEA’s. Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided to eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities in the public schools and other settings. These services include Self-Advocacy Workshops, Work Readiness Soft Skills Workshops, Exploration of Higher Education through College Tours, and Work Based Learning Experiences. (Page 272) Title IV

SCCB Vocational Rehabilitation Comprehensive Transition Services Program: This program serves students from age 15 until exit from high school at which time they are served by the SCCB adult VR program. SCCB has four (4) dedicated Transition Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors statewide building program infrastructure and education relationships to improve services to Transition Students. The Transition Counselors primarily collaborate with education officials such as the South Carolina Department of Education (local school districts), the South Carolina School for the Deaf and Blind (SCSDB) and the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (SCDDSN). Transition Counselors develop the initial Individualized Plan of Employment (IPE) while the consumer is attending high school. The IPE includes services pertaining to the adjustment, prevention or stabilization of vision, and Pre-Employment Transition Services as defined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA). In an effort to avoid the duplication of services, low vision and assistive technology needs will be coordinated with local school districts in accordance with the student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and IPE. In such instances, the alternative service providers and funding sources will be identified on the IPE and coordinated accordingly. SCCB will conduct semiannual meetings with the statewide vision teachers in an effort to facilitate the coordination of services to the most significantly disabled students and their need for supported employment services. Discussions will include, but not be limited to, collaboration with SCDDSN, SCDOE and the SCSDB to coordinate transition services. (Page 273) Title IV

While these gaps are areas of continued focus for SCCB, much has been accomplished since the Statewide Needs Assessment. SCCB now provides Career BOOST services to students with disabilities who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services. Career BOOST provides students with instruction in self-advocacy skills, work readiness skills training, work based learning experiences, and exploration of opportunities for career training in post-secondary schools and institutions of higher education. SCCB designed and operates the Student Internship Jr. Program that provides high school transition students with a paid work experience. SCCB Transition VR Counselors have increased their involvement in IEP meetings, and SCCB has formalized memorandum of understandings with LEA's. (Page 288) Title IV

SCCB established contractual programs for Pre-Employment Transition Services with South Carolina’s Independent Living Centers and the National Federation of the Blind. Since inception Career BOOST has provided 761 students with Self-Advocacy Workshops, 494 Work Readiness Workshops, and 160 Work Based Learning Experience such as paid internships and work site tours and job shadowing. Under Career Boost 62 eligible and potentially eligible high school students have participated in college and university tours, exploration of post-secondary educational options, and counseling on financial aid opportunities. SCCB conducted public awareness outreach and implemented a social media presence to enhance agency visibility. In 2017 SCCB rewrote the curriculum and courses offered at the Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center for Employment and Independence. This new curriculum includes pre-test and post-test assessments to measure skill gains and provide for continuous improvement. Several new center programs have been implemented including a partnership with Adult Education that brings GED preparation instruction and testing to the center. SCCB added a Basic Financial Literacy course using curriculum designed by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. SCCB has also added Soft-Skills training based on the “Skills to Pay the Bills” curriculum. (Pages 322-323) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~South Carolina’s one-stop delivery system is designed to be fully accessible so that all job seekers and employers can participate in the services offered. The Methods of Administration (MOA) - a state document required by the Civil Rights Center - is a “living” document that ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level expeditiously, and details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be accomplished.

Monitoring performed at both the state and local level ensures that all SC Works Centers are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize South Carolina’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual (e.g. SC Works Online Services) to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. Complaints of discrimination are directed to the State Equal Opportunity Officer.

Per federal regulations, each LWDA must appoint a local Equal Opportunity Officer who is responsible for ensuring local WIOA Section 188 compliance. Local Equal Opportunity Officers are trained to use the “ADA Checklist for Readily Achievable Barrier Removal,” the “Checklist for Existing Facilities,” and a recommended assistive technology checklist. New local Equal Opportunity Officers are provided with detailed training on regulations, policies, and procedures following appointment. Ongoing training is provided through EO Roundtables and on-site training on such topics as, “Serving Customers with Disabilities,” “Current EO Trends,” as well as topics deemed relevant by LWDAs and designed in response to their training requests.  (Page 108) Title I

For the current Unified State Plan, SCCB identified gaps from two primary sources. The first being unmet gaps identified in the FFY 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. The second source is the South Carolina Workforce Development Board’s Economic Analysis and Strategic Plan in order to align SCCB initiatives with the goals of South Carolina's Workforce Development System. The following gaps have been identified:

Gap 1: South Carolina’s current labor force, including individuals who are blind or visually impaired, do not have industry recognized credentials, knowledge, skills, or abilities to meet current or emerging demands of the business community.

Gap 2: SCCB needs to improve alignment of policies, resources, and staff expertise to provide job driven, labor market informed, vocational counseling and guidance that aligns with South Carolina’s Talent Pipeline Project and Sector Strategies initiatives to assist eligible consumers in accessing career pathways that lead to high and middle skill/income jobs in growth sectors.

Gap 3: SCCB needs to improve partnerships with business in order to more accurately identify current and future workforce needs of business and industry to support career pathways in growth sectors and improve services to business. (Page 291) Title IV

Goal 2: Increase Quantity & Quality of Employment Outcomes

Priority 2.1: Align VR Counseling with South Carolina’s Talent Pipeline Project, Emphasizing Career Pathways, Attainment of Industry Recognized Credentials, Job Driven/Sector Strategies & Labor Market Information

Priority 2.2: Increase Employment for those with Most Significant Disabilities

Priority 2.3: Increase Vocational Exploration & Opportunities for Transition Students Priority 2.4: Increase Employment for all eligible consumers

Report of Progress Goal 2: Under the previous state plan, SCCB focused efforts on building program capacity, resources and expertise needed in order to meet goal 2. This required resource location, resource reallocation, and program building. As these programs have been built, SCCB has not experienced an increase in the number of successful employment outcomes. Under the provisions of the previous Unified State Plan, SCCB has aligned VR Counseling, career exploration, vocational goal selection, and Individualized Plan for Employment development with labor market information and sector strategies. SCCB has instituted the use of The Career Index Plus for analyzing labor market information and helping consumers make informed job driven decisions. SCCB implemented significant staff training in the area of using labor market information and understanding South Carolina’s regional economic conditions. SCCB leveraged partnerships with the Department of Employment and Workforce, and the Job Driven Technical Assistance Center to provide staff with training on sector strategies, the talent pipeline efforts, and the use of labor market information. SCCB has established program capacity and resources to better serve individuals who have Most Significant Disabilities. SCCB has established JOBS Specialists who are providing Supported Employment and Customized Employment, evidence based practices that have not been offered by SCCB in the past. In addition, SCCB has hired and trained a Certified Work Incentive Counselor to help beneficiaries understand the implications of gainful employment on their Social Security benefits. SCCB established Career BOOST, a contractual program in partnership, collaboration, and coordination with Independent Living Centers, the National Federation of the Blind, and South Carolina’s Local Education Authorities. This program provides the required Pre-Employment Transition Services to eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities. SCCB hosted the first Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Career (STEM) Exploration Week for transition students during the summer of 2017. During the STEM Career Exploration week, 9 high school students who are blind or visually impaired were provided instruction by a team of scientists from San Jose State University, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, the Space Telescope Science Institute, and the International Astronomical Union. The students explored STEM careers using 3D printed tactile models of galaxies, planets, and other astronomical phenomena. Additionally, students were exposed to “sonification” techniques used by blind and visually impaired Astronomers to study the universe. SCCB is repeating the program in the summer of 2018. (Pages 323-324) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD) offers a range of training services that include OJT, job try-out, and registered apprenticeships. For OJT, in partnership with SCVRD, a company hires and trains a client for a specific position. The training progresses according to training milestones in an established training outline. Job try-outs are a stipend-funded training service coordinated between SCVRD, the client, and a business partner. During a job try-out, a career ready client learns specific, basic skills for a job at a company’s worksite(s). (Page 29) Title I

SCVRD maintains a priority on providing work-based learning experiences for students. Following a 5-year transition demonstration grant from the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), and in keeping with evidence-based practices that support work experience to be one of the most influential factors in successful postsecondary employment outcomes, transition staff actively pursue job tryout, job shadowing, internship, and apprenticeship opportunities for students. This impacts not only the ultimate outcome of competitive, integrated employment but has been shown to be an integral support for school completion and drop-out prevention. (Page 175) Title IV

Innovation and expansion activities have been identified within these strategies and include:

  • Continued expansion of work-based learning activities for students
  • Expansion of Project SEARCH sites
  • Cooperative agreement with Project HOPE Foundation, a non-profit organization that provides a lifespan of services and activities for individuals with autism
  • Expansion of transition job coaches focused on providing supported employment services to students and youth with the most significant disabilities
  • Maintaining a full-time counselor to provide vocational rehabilitation services to incarcerated youth, which has expanded to include additional programs operated by DJJ (e.g., Camp Aspen)
  • Maintaining a staff interpreter for clients who are deaf to provide video remote interpreting, on- site services to mutual clients of SCVRD and DHHS, extend consistent access to interpreter services in rural areas, and enhance the accessibility of VR productions and client and staff training materials
  • Creation of apprenticeships tailored to increase the participation levels of clients who are deaf (Page 259) Title IV

Goal 3.1: Provide specialized training through a Pre-Apprenticeship Program to prepare adults not enrolled in college programs, as an alternative career pathway to current and future business and industry needs.

Strategy 3.1.1: Utilize the principles STEM education to develop a Pre-Apprenticeship training program for job seekers who are blind and visually impaired that will satisfy the entry level skills needed for acceptance into registered apprenticeship programs. Incorporate the use of the most current Assistive Technology that will make graduates competitive when applying to fill open apprenticeship positions. (Pages 316-317) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Able SC is a Center for Independent Living (CIL) that is designed and operated within a local community by individuals with disabilities and provides an array of independent living services, including one-on-one and group training on topics such as employment soft skills, transportation utilization, accommodation requests, and transition from high school to post-secondary life.
Through funding from the SC Department of Education, SC Commission for the Blind, and local United Ways, Able SC provides independent living skills and pre-employment transition services to current middle and high school students with disabilities in the classroom.

Able SC is approved by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) to serve ticket beneficiaries as an Employment Network (EN) under SSA’s Ticket to Work program (discussed in more detail below), and also serves as the host and facilitator for the SC Disability Employment Coalition and the SC Employment First Initiative, two collaborative efforts that addresses employment barriers for individuals with disabilities. (Pages 40-41) Title I

Ticket to Work is a voluntary program for people receiving disability benefits from Social Security and whose primary goal is to find good careers and have a better self-supporting future. Consumers may receive employment services through an employment network provider, including career counseling, socialization to the workplace, and job support advice, among others. (Page 44) Title I

SCVRD’s supported employment goals and plans regarding the Title VI program are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and the department’s performance on the common performance measures as well as agency key performance indicators. The priorities are as follows:•Strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s 110 traditional program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs;

•Providing services to people with the most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, in order to successfully achieve and maintain competitive employment in integrated work settings; and

•Providing supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities. (Pages 180-181) Title I

The provision of early intervention services is a major issue given the long application process associated with making eligibility determinations for both the SSI and SSDI programs. There will be a need for increased supported employment services to improve the employment outcomes of many SSI/SSDI recipients. As a total count, the number of SSI/SSDI recipients, who applied for services, increased to 2,256 by 2013. The trend reflects an increase of 7.3 percent from the previous three years. (Page 198) Title I

SCVRD’s supported employment goals and plans regarding the Title VI program are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and the department’s performance on the common performance measures as well as agency key performance indicators. The priorities are as follows:
•Strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s 110 traditional program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs;
•Providing services to people with the most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, in order to successfully achieve and maintain competitive employment in integrated work settings; and
•Providing supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 244) Title I

The individual placement model for competitive employment remains the primary supported employment model being used by SCVRD. Emphasis is placed upon providing services to people with most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, whose employment needs are so significant that traditional 110 program services would not be sufficient to meet them. SCVRD coordinator of supported employment services also assists area office staff to identify and serve all eligible clients with the most significant disabilities. (Page 261) Title I

During the period of the last Unified State Plan cycle, SCCB made significant progress in closing these gaps. SCCB hired, trained, and obtained certification for a Work Incentives Counselor, and established referral pathways to the WIPA grantee benefits counseling services. SCCB established JOBS Specialist positions trained to provide Supported Employment including Customized Employment. SCCB signed a Ticket to Work Partnership Plus agreement with an Employment Network to provide on-going supports for supported employment cases. And SCCB has signed a number of fee-for-service agreements throughout the state with qualified service providers in the areas of Orientation and Mobility, Braille Instruction, Independent Living Skills that Support Employment, and adjustment to blindness psychological counseling. SCCB continues to work to close these gaps, and this modified state plan reflects these goals and priorities. (Page 286) Title IV

The South Carolina Commission for the Blind has established the capacities to provide Supported Employment to youth and adults with Most Significant Disabilities in response to the findings of the FFY 2016 CSNA. Funds received under section 603 of the Rehabilitation Act for Supported Employment are utilized to fund the costs of individualized discovery assessment, job development, job placement, and on-the-job supports for Supported Employment and Customized Employment delivered internally by JOBS Specialists. SCCB provides extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement under the Ticket to Work program to provide long term on going supports through an Employment Network (Able SC). (Page 313) Title IV

As required by WIOA 50% of Supported Employment funds will be used to provide Supported Employment Services to youth with most significant disabilities. SCCB built in-house capacities and resources to meet this goal since FPY 2016. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement under the Ticket to Work program to provide long term on going supports through an Employment Network (Able SC). SCCB will look for opportunities to engage with private and public partners to fund extended and ongoing supported employment services for this population. (Page 313) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~SCVRD utilizes multiple methods of working with employers to identify competitive, integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate the provision of VR services for adults and transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities. On a statewide and local basis, the Business Partnership Network, or BPN, provides an opportunity for regular engagement with business partners to gain input on hiring needs, training curricula, and opportunities for outreach with business and industry. Business Advisory Councils (BACs) are established to provide input on specific programs, such as the IT Training Centers, in Columbia and at the Bryant Center in Lyman. Members of the BAC assist in evaluating courses of study and curricula to ensure SCVRD stays current with what is needed in the workplace for IT professionals. Also, SCVRD utilizes Business Development Specialists (BDSs) across the state whose role is to identify opportunities for training, work-based learning, job development and placement, and emerging career pathways. BDS staff participate on local business services teams, along with partners from SC Works and LWDBs, to provide a coordinated approach to business development activities. BDS staff also work with transition counselors and coaches to identify opportunities for work-based learning experiences, internships, apprenticeships, and OJT for students in conjunction with the pre-employment transition services that are provided in high school settings. (Page 182) Title I

SCCB actively engages with the South Carolina business community through services provided by the Training & Employment Division (T&E) Employment Consultants. SCCB T&E Employment Consultants build and maintain partnerships with businesses to:
o Assess and better understand the unique human resource needs of South Carolina businesses;
o To help align SCCB programs to better meet the unique and specific human resource needs of South Carolina businesses;
o To create, establish, and foster relationships with South Carolina businesses that help them meet their unique and specific human resource needs, including talent acquisition and talent retention;
o Develop opportunities for Work Based Experiences, Internships, Job Shadowing, and other work based learning experiences that provide South Carolina Businesses with opportunities to gain experience with a diverse and qualified workforce;
o Create mutually beneficial relationships and facilitate linkages of job openings to a highly skilled and diverse talent pool of candidates. Referrals of consumers who are seeking employment and who have been judged to be Job Ready are received from SCCB Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. The Employment Consultant’s role is job development and placement that meets the needs of the business and the consumer. The Consultant also provides businesses and consumers with access to services that can be provided by SCCB or other governmental agencies. Incentives that may be applicable are also presented. These include: 
o The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC). This program allows a maximum available credit of $2,400 per eligible worker. 
o Sensitivity and awareness training for employers and organizations. This training includes American Disability Act (ADA), sighted guide techniques and attitudes regarding blindness. The presentation is designed to remove myths and apprehensions about blindness.
o Technical assistance for the implementation and support of assistive technology. (Pages 276-277) Title I

Data Collection

South Carolina has a vast workforce development system consisting of multiple public and private partners, the goal of which is to facilitate financial stability and economic prosperity for employers, individuals, and communities. We will evaluate the overall effectiveness of our system using the following tools: (1) WIOA common performance measures that assess employment, earnings, credential attainment, skills gain, and employer engagement; (2) SC Works Certification Standards that assess system management, job seeker services, and employer services; and (3) SWDB Strategic Plan key performance indicators. (Page 54) Title I

Accordingly, continuous improvement initiatives to build on the agency’s long-term history of success have focused on quality. SCVRD has embarked on an initiative known as “Quality One” (or “Q1”), which has a theme of “Quality happens one person at a time.” This included the establishment of workgroups to address quality measures and provide recommendations for a cohesive system that supports the provision of quality client services and metrics to gauge success and to realize results in increased successful employment outcomes for clients. This initiative aligns with SCVRD’s longstanding commitment to its Program Integrity model, which seeks a balance among productivity, customer service, and compliance assurance. Each of those components has measurable results and can be used to evaluate the agency at levels ranging from specific caseload or work unit up to an agency-wide level. The agency is proactively integrating the new WIOA common performance measures into program evaluation, data collection, and management information reports. (Page 92) Title I

SCVRD’s supported employment goals and plans regarding the Title VI program are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and the department’s performance on the common performance measures as well as agency key performance indicators. The priorities are as follows: •Strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s 110 traditional program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs; •Providing services to people with the most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, in order to successfully achieve and maintain competitive employment in integrated work settings; and •Providing supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities. (Pages 180-181) Title I

Based on the past three years’ data on services for students and youth, SCVRD estimates it will provide services, including but not limited to pre-employment transition services, to approximately 8,480 individuals that are initially referred by the school system. Data collection for the new 911 Case Services Report will allow for better identification of students with disabilities and provision of pre-employment transition services. As the new data becomes available, projections and fiscal forecasting for the provision of pre-employment transition services will be updated. (Page 204) Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Able Access is a fee for service program offered by Able SC to promote accessible and inclusive environments within businesses and government agencies. Staff provide Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) trainings and consultations. These services include but are not limited to policy and procedure review, onsite accessibility survey, testing on online property for screen reader/magnifier accessibility, and tailored staff trainings in a wide variety of disability topics (Page 41) Title I

Most workforce, economic development, and education programs are managed locally, and the quality of service delivery may vary by area. A number of measures are underway to improve the consistency of service delivery, including: the implementation of SC Works Center Standards and WIOA Eligible Training Provider provisions. The SC Works Center Standards address service delivery to job seekers and employers and center management, and are used by LWDBs to evaluate effectiveness, programmatic and physical accessibility, and continuous improvement of the SC Works delivery system. Along the same lines, training providers are now required to submit program data and meet certain requirements to be eligible to receive WIOA training funds. This will help ensure that participants receive high-quality training in high-demand, high-wage occupations. (Page 49) Title I

Monitoring performed at both the state and local level ensures that all SC Works Centers are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize South Carolina’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual (e.g. SC Works Online Services) to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. Complaints of discrimination are directed to the State Equal Opportunity Officer. (Page 108) Title I

As part of the SC Works center certification process, LWDBs are required to evaluate accessibility of the SC Works delivery system. SC Works centers were evaluated in 2017 and will be re-evaluated every three (3) years thereafter as required by WIOA. In order to be certified according to the SC Works certification standards, each center must meet the following accessibility baseline measures:

150.The Center is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Every workforce area will work with Vocational Rehabilitation partners and SCDEW Office of Equal Opportunity, as needed, to ensure ADA compliance.

151.The Center provides assistive technology for customers to use when accessing computers and other services. This includes customers with visual impairments, physical disabilities, and hearing impairments.

152. Staff should be identified to assist people with disabilities at the first point of contact and in case of emergency.

153.There are linkages to services for people with special needs, including veterans and others, related to disability. (Page 109-110) Title I

158.SCCB is working with the SC Works system to ensure one-stop center accessibility to persons with visual impairments. SCCB Assistive Technology Staff are current evaluating centers in several areas of the state to propose and provide hardware and/or software that will enable persons who are blind or low vision to access one stop center programs. (Page 110) Title I

Innovation and expansion activities have been identified within these strategies and include: Maintaining a staff interpreter for clients who are deaf to provide video remote interpreting, on- site services to mutual clients of SCVRD and DHHS, extend consistent access to interpreter services in rural areas, and enhance the accessibility of VR productions and client and staff training materials (Page 259) Title IV

Gaps included:

• America’s Job Centers (AJCs) in South Carolina (SC Works) have not effectively served individuals with blindness and vision impairments. There have been no documented instances of SCCB cases that are jointly served by other workforce entities.

• Historically, the relationship between SCCB and the AJCs, although cordial, is primarily one of referral with no evidence of substantial services after referral;

• Although the AJCs are accessible, the technology is frequently out of date and the AJC staff lack the skills to effectively operate/demonstrate the technology; Under WIOA there are legal requirements around the development of partnerships between SCCB and entities in the greater workforce development system.

While these gaps are the focus on continuing efforts both by the AJC's (SC Works) and SCCB, much has been accomplished since the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. SCCB has improved co-location of SCCB staff in the AJC's for specific periods of time each month where space allows. SCCB has signed MOU's and Infrastructure Cost Sharing Agreements with all SC Works service areas, and has been providing technical assistance to the AJC's in regards to programmatic and physical accessibility. (Page 287) Title IV

SCCB has been an active partner in the WIOA Unified State Plan Implementation Team. South Carolina’s plans are to continue convening this group of core WIOA partners to continue to develop meaningful and effective partnerships, share expertise and knowledge, skills, and abilities, and to expand the ability of the system to serve all individuals including those with disabilities. In addition, SCCB is working to ensure that there is agency presence in the local one stop American Job Centers on a consistent basis to provide support and expertise to consumers who are blind or visually impaired. SCCB entered into MOU's and Infrastructure Cost Agreements with all SC Works service deliver areas. SCCB is currently working with SC Works to provide assessment and technical assistance to ensure programmatic and physical accessibility. (Page 320) Title IV

Veterans

SC Works representatives are available in centers throughout the state to help veterans transition into the workforce. Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVER) staff conduct employer outreach and job development in the local community to assist veterans in gaining employment, including conducting seminars for employers and, in conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups. Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists are trained to provide intensive case management services to veterans and eligible spouses with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE), and age priority veterans ages 18 to 24, including individual career coaching, job referral, resume preparation assistance, career fairs and job search workshops, jobs training programs, and referrals to supporting or training services.

SCVRD has an ongoing partnership with DEW’s LVERs and DVOPs to coordinate outreach efforts with federal contractors. Federal contractors are required to establish an annual hiring benchmark for protected veterans and individuals with disabilities, or adopt the national benchmark provided by the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP). Through this informal partnership, SCVRD and DEW LVERs and DVOPs identify work ready individuals and coordinate employment opportunities with federal contractors. (Page 39) Title I

In accordance with the Jobs for Veterans Act, veterans and eligible spouses are given priority of service in employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the USDOL. Priority of service means that veterans and eligible spouses are given priority over non-covered persons for the receipt of employment, training, and placement service and that a veteran or an eligible spouse either receives access to a service earlier in time than a non-covered person, or, if the resource is limited, the veteran or eligible spouse receives access to the services instead of the non-covered person. The state has provided guidance to local workforce boards on how to implement the priority of service provisions.

The state monitors priority of service for veterans and eligible spouses by ensuring that local workforce areas have implemented appropriate priority of service policies. Local policies are assessed to determine the following:

o whether the policy explains the differences between Veterans’ Services and priority of service for veterans and eligible spouses;

o whether the policy describes the roles and responsibilities of SC Works Center staff and management as they pertain to Veterans’ Priority of Service; and,

o whether the policy demonstrates appropriate actions for showing priority of service to veterans and eligible spouses for Department of Labor funded programs in SC Works Centers. (Page 107) Title I

The state has issued guidance regarding services under the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP). DVOP staff must limit their activities to providing services to eligible veterans and eligible spouses who:

o meet the definition of an individual with a significant barrier to employment (SBE), as defined and updated by DOL, or

o are members of a veteran population identified by the Secretary of Labor as eligible for DVOP services, currently defined as veterans aged 18 to 24.

Per state guidance, an eligible veteran or eligible spouse who is identified as having a SBE must be immediately referred to a DVOP specialist. Veterans ages 18 to 24 must also be referred to DVOP specialists. In instances where a DVOP specialist is not available, referrals to a SCDEW career development specialist will be made. DVOP specialists will conduct an initial assessment to determine if the veteran or eligible spouse will benefit from the provision of case management. In the event that case management is determined not suitable, the DVOP will refer the veteran or eligible spouse to the other program staff who would best be able to meet their needs. Veterans with a SBE and those aged 18 to 24 must have access to all appropriate SC Works services and are not limited to receiving services only from DVOP specialists. Additionally, veterans and eligible spouses who do not meet the SBE definition or are not within a specified category identified by the Secretary of Labor, are to be referred to appropriate non-JVSG SC Works staff member(s) to receive services, on a priority basis. (Pages 107-108) Title I

Another area of identified need is response to the increase of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) through outreach and a focus on serving more individuals with brain injuries. This includes the general population as well as veterans from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The number of TBIs in the general population has increased slowly over the last decade according to the CDC; however, deaths from TBI have decreased. This decrease means an increase in the number of persons who might be returning to work and requiring vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 198) Title I

SCVRD provides services to veterans with disabilities; and, efforts to increase outreach to this population are ongoing. SCVRD has established relationships with local employers in all areas of the state, and collaboration with the Veterans Administration is essential to providing the greatest outreach for veterans with disabilities. SCVRD has assigned counselors to the state’s seven VA specialty clinics and each area office has designated counselors to work with local VA offices for referrals. (Page 200) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~SCVRD works collaboratively with DMH and has an established MOA that outlines roles, responsibilities, and referral procedures. In addition, several cooperative agreements are in place across the state for IPS (Individualized Placement and Support) caseloads to provide rapid placement and job coaching for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. Transition counselors working within the schools to provide pre-employment transition services coordinate with school-based mental health counselors to identify students in need of services, whether that is VR or mental health services. Through this “no wrong door” approach, students in need of services are connected to the appropriate resources in a timely manner. (Page 184) Title I

SCCB is developing a new Cooperative Agreement with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health to collaborate, coordinate, avoid duplication of services, and enhance the employment outcomes of shared consumer populations. (Page 278) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 46

Executive Order No. 2019-39 South Carolina State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force - 12/12/2019

“WHEREAS, numerous state and federal public assistance programs currently provide support to individuals seeking education and employment, including Unemployment Insurance (“UI”), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (“SNAP”), Vocational Rehabilitation, and Medicaid benefits for qualified working disabled individuals; and…

NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of South Carolina and pursuant to the Constitution and Laws of this State and the powers conferred upon me therein, I hereby create and establish the State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“DECO Recovery Management, LLC was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Underserved and vulnerable uninsured populations: Latino/Hispanic; African Americans; Rural communities; young and “invincibles”; small employers; and self-employed individuals.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with South Carolina Chamber of Commerce, South Carolina Hospital Association, South Carolina of the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) , Carolina Chapter of the American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM), Greenville Memorial Hospital, Greer Memorial Hospital, North Greenville Hospital, Hillcrest Memorial Hospital , Patewood Memorial Hospital, Laurens County Memorial Hospital, Aiken Regional Medical Center, Oconee Memorial Hospital, and Bon Secours St. Francis Health System.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Andrew Foland \Phone: (410) 763-7475Email: afoland@decorm.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Waiver Case Management Standards - 07/01/2019

~~This document has information on how staff and providers are to operate when working with the Community Supports Waiver,  Head and Spinal Cord Injury Waiver, and Intellectual Disability/Related Disabilities Waiver.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Rehabilitative Behavioral Health Services (RBHS) - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina (South Carolina or State) State Medicaid Plan allows an array of behavioral health services under the Rehabilitative Services Option, 42 CFR 440.130(d).Rehabilitative Services are medical or remedial services that have been recommended by a Physician or other Licensed Practitioner of the Healing Arts(LPHA) within the scope of their practice under South Carolina State Law and as further determined by the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS)for maximum reduction of physical or mental disability and restoration of a beneficiary to their best possible functional level. This section describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the Providers of services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Licensed Independent Practitioner’s (LIP) Rehabilitative Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Services in this manual are intended to be delivered in an outpatient and community setting only. In accordance with 42CFR 435.1009-1011, services are not available for beneficiaries residing in an Institution of Mental Disease. Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitals and Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities (PRTFs) receive an all-inclusive, per diem rate for services. Services provided to beneficiaries in these settings are not Medicaid reimbursable”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Long-Term Care Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The mission of Long-Term Living (LTL) is to provide a cost-effective alternative to institutional placement for eligible clients with long term care needs, if they choose, allowing them to remain in a community environment. The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) Division of Long-Term Living operates several waiver programs, as well as three Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (DDSN) waivers. LTL also administers the Palmetto Senior Care (PSC) program.  More information is available by accessing the web link. .”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Local Education Agencies (LEA) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link. ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Mental Health (CMH) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Community mental health (MH) service providers must provide clinic services as defined in federal regulation42 CFR 440.90. This manual describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the providers of services.“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 06/30/2019

~~“The Client Assistance Program is also available to applicants or consumers of SCVRD. CAP is a federally funded program administered by Protection and Advocacy for People with Disabilities Inc. (P&A), a statewide non-profit that advocates for the rights of people with disabilities.

You can reach CAP by email at info@pandasc.org  .

CAP can also be reached at:

866-275-7273 (Toll-free)803-782-0639 (Columbia Area)866-232-4525 (TTY)”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veteran Services - 06/15/2019

~~“SCServes offers service members, veterans and their families access to a class-leading continuum of providers that runs the gamut from superior legal, housing and emergency service providers to employment, recreation and fitness, financial capabilities and more – all designed to provide those who serve, have served, and their families, with the most comprehensive service delivery experience available anywhere in the nation.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

South Carolina House Bill 4093: Employment First Initiative Study Committee - 05/25/2018

“An act to establish the South Carolina Employment First Study Committee for the Purpose of studying and evaluating the need for an Employment First Initiative Act, to provide expectations policies to be established by an Employment First Initiative Act, to provide for the composition of the study committee, and to provide the committee shall report its findings to the governor, President Pro Tempore of the Senate, and the Speaker of  the House of Representatives on or before May 1, 2019, at which time the study committee is dissolved.”

Systems
  • Other

South Carolina Uniform High School Diplomas Bill - 05/09/2017

“An act to amend section 59-39-100, as amended, code of laws of South Carolina, 1976, relating to the uniform diploma for graduates of accredited high schools, so as to provide personalized pathways for students to earn the diploma and to provide related course of study-based endorsements students may earn, to revise the coursework students entering ninth grade during the 2018-2019 school year must earn for graduation, to provide this revised coursework requirement must support the profile of the graduate,  to provide for a uniform employability credential available for certain students with disabilities as an alternative to diploma pathways, and to provide the State Department of Education shall monitor numbers of diplomas and employability credentials earned by students and biannually report such numbers to the State Board of Education and the General Assembly.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

South Carolina HB 3768 (ABLE legislation) - 04/29/2015

“A BILL TO AMEND THE CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, BY ADDING ARTICLE 3 TO CHAPTER 5, TITLE 11 SO AS TO ESTABLISH THE "SOUTH CAROLINA ABLE SAVINGS PROGRAM", TO ALLOW INDIVIDUALS WITH A DISABILITY AND THEIR FAMILIES TO SAVE PRIVATE FUNDS TO SUPPORT THE INDIVIDUAL WITH A DISABILITY, TO PROVIDE GUIDELINES TO THE STATE TREASURER FOR THE MAINTENANCE OF THESE ACCOUNTS, AND TO ESTABLISH THE SAVINGS PROGRAM TRUST FUND AND SAVINGS EXPENSE TRUST FUND; AND TO DESIGNATE THE EXISTING SECTIONS OF CHAPTER 5, TITLE 11 AS ARTICLE 1 AND ENTITLE THEM "GENERAL PROVISIONS".”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

S 0704 General Bill (referred to the Committee on Medical Affairs 4/2015) - 04/22/2015

 “A BILL TO AMEND CHAPTER 28, TITLE 44 OF THE 1976 CODE, RELATING TO THE SELF-SUFFICIENCY TRUST FUND; DISABILITY TRUST FUND; AID FOR DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED, MENTALLY ILL, AND PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED PERSONS, BY ADDING ARTICLE 5 TO PROVIDE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE DISABLED SELF-EMPLOYMENT DEVELOPMENT TRUST FUND FOR THE CREATION OF A PROGRAM WHICH WILL ASSIST INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES TO PURSUE ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SELF-EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES, BY PROVIDING BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT GRANTS FOR THE STARTUP, EXPANSION OR ACQUISITION OF A BUSINESS OPERATED WITHIN THE STATE…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order No. 2019-39 South Carolina State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force - 12/12/2019

“WHEREAS, numerous state and federal public assistance programs currently provide support to individuals seeking education and employment, including Unemployment Insurance (“UI”), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (“SNAP”), Vocational Rehabilitation, and Medicaid benefits for qualified working disabled individuals; and…

NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of South Carolina and pursuant to the Constitution and Laws of this State and the powers conferred upon me therein, I hereby create and establish the State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order, 2015-16 - 07/01/2015

“Governor Nikki Haley reestablishes the South Carolina Developmental Disabilities Council, which is the State's forum for developmental disabilities matters and will advocate for persons with those disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

Rehabilitative Behavioral Health Services (RBHS) - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina (South Carolina or State) State Medicaid Plan allows an array of behavioral health services under the Rehabilitative Services Option, 42 CFR 440.130(d).Rehabilitative Services are medical or remedial services that have been recommended by a Physician or other Licensed Practitioner of the Healing Arts(LPHA) within the scope of their practice under South Carolina State Law and as further determined by the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS)for maximum reduction of physical or mental disability and restoration of a beneficiary to their best possible functional level. This section describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the Providers of services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Licensed Independent Practitioner’s (LIP) Rehabilitative Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Services in this manual are intended to be delivered in an outpatient and community setting only. In accordance with 42CFR 435.1009-1011, services are not available for beneficiaries residing in an Institution of Mental Disease. Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitals and Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities (PRTFs) receive an all-inclusive, per diem rate for services. Services provided to beneficiaries in these settings are not Medicaid reimbursable”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Long-Term Care Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The mission of Long-Term Living (LTL) is to provide a cost-effective alternative to institutional placement for eligible clients with long term care needs, if they choose, allowing them to remain in a community environment. The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) Division of Long-Term Living operates several waiver programs, as well as three Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (DDSN) waivers. LTL also administers the Palmetto Senior Care (PSC) program.  More information is available by accessing the web link. .”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Local Education Agencies (LEA) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link. ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Mental Health (CMH) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Community mental health (MH) service providers must provide clinic services as defined in federal regulation42 CFR 440.90. This manual describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the providers of services.“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 06/30/2019

~~“The Client Assistance Program is also available to applicants or consumers of SCVRD. CAP is a federally funded program administered by Protection and Advocacy for People with Disabilities Inc. (P&A), a statewide non-profit that advocates for the rights of people with disabilities.

You can reach CAP by email at info@pandasc.org  .

CAP can also be reached at:

866-275-7273 (Toll-free)803-782-0639 (Columbia Area)866-232-4525 (TTY)”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Data and Technology (D&T) - 04/27/2019

~~“Data and Technology (D&T) is responsible for collecting and managing all programmatic data required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) as well as other federal and state laws and regulations relating to the provision of special education and related services for students with disabilities in the State of South Carolina. More information is available by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Transition Planning - 04/05/2019

~~This page has a collection of material to help with Secondary Transition

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department - 01/17/2019

~~“…prepares and assists eligible South Carolinians with disabilities to achieve and maintain competitive .employment. More about VR services can be found by accessing the web-link”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Services Offered by the Columbia Regional Office - 11/14/2018

~~“VA’s Columbia Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of benefits and services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in South Carolina. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Veteran Services - 06/15/2019

~~“SCServes offers service members, veterans and their families access to a class-leading continuum of providers that runs the gamut from superior legal, housing and emergency service providers to employment, recreation and fitness, financial capabilities and more – all designed to provide those who serve, have served, and their families, with the most comprehensive service delivery experience available anywhere in the nation.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Project E3 - 01/30/2019

~~“Project E3 will provide South Carolina’s state Vocational Rehabilitation agencies and their partners with the skills and competencies needed to effectively and efficiently address barriers to competitive integrated employment and community integration encountered by persons with disabilities in these regions.We will leverage promising practices, knowledge, and experience gained from this project to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities from underserved and economically disadvantaged populations throughout South Carolina and across the United States.Our specific goals for this project are to:• By the end of the first year, 25 individuals from each region will apply or return to vocational rehabilitation services.• By the end of the second year, approximately 18 individuals from each region will be found eligible for services.• By the end of the second year, the number of people who complete an Individualized plan for employment will increase by 50%. Of those, there will be an increase in the cases closed in competitive, integrated employment by 25%.• The project will develop a community consortium to direct, develop, and sustain services during the project and into the coming years.” 

Systems
  • Other
Citations

SC Employment First Initiative - 07/01/2017

“South Carolina is one of six states selected by the Administration for Community Living to receive funding in order to increase employment outcomes for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities statewide. Employment First emphasizes competitive, integrated employment as the preferred option for individuals with disabilities.

The South Carolina Disability Employment Coalition, through collaboration with thirteen Project Partners, will implement The SC Employment First Initiative to address barriers to successful employment for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

South Carolina Supported Employment Programs - 05/30/2013

• “Individual Placement and Support (IPS) is an evidenced-based supported employment best practice model. IPS is collaboration between South Carolina Department of Mental Health (SCDMH) and South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD). Since 2005 these state agencies have combined resources and personnel to implement the IPS Supported Employment model. The goal of this partnership is to place people with serve mental illness in competitive employment. Through the collaboration of this Supported Employment model, SCVRD and SCDMH are able to provide an integrated and seamless employment service delivery that results in improved employment outcomes for people with severe mental illness.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Transition Alliance of South Carolina (TASC)

"The Transition Alliance of South Carolina (TASC) is spearheaded by the Center for Disability Resources (CDR) at the University of South Carolina’s School of Medicine.

Utilizing funding and support from the South Carolina Department of Education, Office of Special Education Services, TASC partners and project staff housed at the Center for Disability Resources developed an infrastructure to support local interagency transition teams.  Project activities are focused on providing interagency teams the resources to increase their capacity to collaboratively and effectively serve young adults with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to adult-life.

Together, we build capacity for transition programming at the state level, while also serving as a bridge to and between local communities in South Carolina."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

South Carolina Disability Employment Coalition

~~“The SC Disability Employment Coalition (SCDEC) formed in the fall of 2014, through funding from the SC Developmental Disabilities  Council, to address employment barriers for individuals with disabilities in South Carolina. SCDEC stakeholders represent South Carolina employers, state and private agencies, and individuals with disabilities.

SCDEC members meet quarterly.  The SCDEC has four committees that meet on a monthly basis and is comprised of over 40 stakeholder organizations and individuals.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)

“People with all types of disabilities are employed, pursuing careers and building assets just like people without disabilities…Through advocacy and education, APSE advances employment and self-sufficiency for all people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

South Carolina Partnerships in Employment - 11/28/2016

“ACL’s Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

 

Able South Carolina received a grant for the South Carolina Employment First Initiative.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

South Carolina Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2012

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project." South Carolina received an EDI award for its program Integration Peer Support into Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Sourh Carolina SAMHSA Grant - "Health Mind Body Alliance"

“The integration model brings primary care into state community mental health clinics. Clinics are located in the underserved rural counties of Marlboro, Dillon, and Chesterfield South Carolina and the initial strategy included an FQHC [Federal Qualified Health Center]. Year two enrollment target is to serve 150 unduplicated clients (During the first quarters of year two for the grant 194 clients unduplicated clients were enrolled). Services are accessible to all consenting adult clients of TCCMHC [Tri-County Community Mental Health Center] with serious mental illness (Excepting incarcerated clients).”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person/Home Again

“Home Again is a program assisting seniors, individuals with disabilities, and children with severe emotional disturbances who currently live in facilities to transition back into their communities and receive appropriate services and supports.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“DECO Recovery Management, LLC was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Underserved and vulnerable uninsured populations: Latino/Hispanic; African Americans; Rural communities; young and “invincibles”; small employers; and self-employed individuals.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with South Carolina Chamber of Commerce, South Carolina Hospital Association, South Carolina of the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) , Carolina Chapter of the American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM), Greenville Memorial Hospital, Greer Memorial Hospital, North Greenville Hospital, Hillcrest Memorial Hospital , Patewood Memorial Hospital, Laurens County Memorial Hospital, Aiken Regional Medical Center, Oconee Memorial Hospital, and Bon Secours St. Francis Health System.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Andrew Foland \Phone: (410) 763-7475Email: afoland@decorm.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

6th Annual South Carolina State Transition Conference - 11/19/2018

~~“Join us for South Carolina’s premier interagency transition conference. Local school districts, adult service agency representatives, families and other professionals will attend this 2 day event in beautiful downtown Greenville. Early Registration ends 10/18/2019

    Lunch on both Tuesday and Wednesday is included with all exhibitor and sponsor registrations.    This year’s conference will once again include vendor breaks, breakout sessions and facilitated team planning time.    Make plans to stay over Wednesday night and join your colleagues from across the state for an evening Networking Social.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Community Employment Program Development Work Group - 03/07/2018

“This Employment Community of Practice offers an exciting opportunity for direct service providers interested in implementing customized employment practices. The community of practice builds capacity to improve the methodology and skills of employment staff to assist seekers with more significant barriers to obtain employment.”

This page is continuously updated with webinars and related resources around topics relating to community employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Waiver Case Management Standards - 07/01/2019

~~This document has information on how staff and providers are to operate when working with the Community Supports Waiver,  Head and Spinal Cord Injury Waiver, and Intellectual Disability/Related Disabilities Waiver.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Service Rate Increases - 07/01/2018

~~PROVIDER ALERTEffective for services provided on or after July 1, 2018, the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) increased reimbursement for qualified Adult Day Health Care Services, Personal Care I, Personal Care II and Attendant Care providers by approximately 8.2 percent.

For Community Long Term Care waivers, the updated fee schedule can be found at scdhhs.gov/resource/fee-schedules. For waivers operated by the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (SCDDSN), providers with questions about this action are encouraged to contact SCDDSN at (803) 898-9626.

Future updates to reimbursement rates will be communicated via the standard fee schedule update process and posted at scdhhs.gov.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Statewide Transition Plan - 03/31/2016

The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule on Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) establishing certain requirements for services that are provided through Medicaid waivers. There are specific requirements for where home and community-based services are received which will be referred to as the “settings requirements.” CMS required that each state submit a “Statewide Transition Plan” by March 17, 2015. The Statewide Transition Plan outlines how the state will come into conformance and compliance with the HCBS Rule settings requirements. States must come into full compliance with the HCBS Rule requirements by March 17, 2019. The South Carolina Department of Health and Human services (SCDHHS) has branded this effort for HCBS with the tagline: Independent•Integrated•Individual. This tagline was developed because home and community-based services help our members be independent, be integrated in the community, and are based on what is best for the individual.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

SC Community Supports (0676.R02.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day health care, personal care, respite care, waiver case management, incontinence supplies, adult day health care-nursing, adult day health care-transportation, assistive technology and appliances, behavior support, career preparation, community services, day activity, employment services, environmental mods, in-home support, PERS, private vehicle mods, support center services for individuals w/IID ages 0 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

South Carolina ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/28/2012

“South Carolina’s college and career readiness aspirations extend to all students, including those who need additional support and consideration because English is not their first language or due to a disability. To help ensure that we effectively analyze the linguistic demands of the CCSS to inform development of corresponding standards specific to these students that enable their success.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

South Carolina Statewide Transition Plan – Revised (HCBS)

The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) gives notice that the revised draft Statewide Transition Plan, required per Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Rule (42 CFR 441.301(c)(6)),was submitted on March 31, 2016 to CMS for review. It will be effective upon CMS approval.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Long Term Care - South Carolina Medicaid Waivers

“Community Long Term Care (CLTC) offers programs to help individuals who want to live at home, need assistance with their care, and are financially eligible for Medicaid."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

South Carolina Medicaid Money Follows the Person/Home Again

“Home Again is a program assisting seniors, individuals with disabilities, and children with severe emotional disturbances who currently live in facilities to transition back into their communities and receive appropriate services and supports.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

States - Phablet

Snapshot

The Palmetto State is "Prepared in Mind and Resources" when it comes to improving supports for individuals with disabilities to increase access to competitive, integrated employment and socioeconomic advancement in South Carolina.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon South Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.25%
Change from
2018 to 2019
5,148,714
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.43%
Change from
2018 to 2019
357,695
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.74%
Change from
2018 to 2019
123,245
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.11%
Change from
2018 to 2019
34.46%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.62%
Change from
2018 to 2019
77.01%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 5,148,714
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 357,695
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 123,245
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,052,071
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 342,542
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 374,268
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 482,563
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 201,996
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 20,052
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,114
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,587
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 13,034
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 8,004

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2019
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 4,960
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.60%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 171,174

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2019
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 9,138
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 17,893
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 45,069
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.30%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 9,724
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.04

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 74
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 48
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 65.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.98

 

VR OUTCOMES

2019
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 34.00%
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 8,033
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 251,995
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 240
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 207

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2018
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $20,606,245
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $26,635,888
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $27,365,194
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $5,231,711
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 28.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 996
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,886
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 3,186
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 54.96

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 62.17%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.39%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.46%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 90.48%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 30.87%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.04%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 76.44%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.17%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 1,561,788
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 3,877
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 14,767
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 510,687
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 525,454
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 143
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 743
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 886
AbilityOne wages (products). $80,150
AbilityOne wages (services). $5,233,265

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2020
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 9
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 9
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,144
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,144

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First

~~Able SC is approved by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) to serve ticket beneficiaries as an Employment Network (EN) under SSA’s Ticket to Work program (discussed in more detail below), and also serves as the host and facilitator for the SC Disability Employment Coalition and the SC Employment First Initiative, two collaborative efforts that addresses employment barriers for individuals with disabilities. (Pages 40-41) Title I

In 2016, a consortium of partners working through the SC Disability Employment Coalition received a Partnership in Employment Systems Change grant known as the SC Employment First Initiative. The purpose of the grant is to increase competitive integrated employment outcomes for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

The initiative had three broad goals:

1.) Equip high school students and recent graduated with intellectual and development disabilities with the skills, awareness, and confidence needed to enter competitive employment.

2.) Unify and empower South Carolina education professionals, employment service providers, families, and the community at large towards support of Employment First principles.

3.) Develop and expand supports for South Carolina-based employers who hire persons with disabilities in competitive, community-based positions.

A major focus of the SC Employment First Initiative is to implement policy that competitive and integrated employment shall be considered the first option for any individual with disabilities applying for or receiving services from the state or any of its political subdivisions. In fact, Employment First legislation is pending in the South Carolina legislature which would have a positive effect on employment for people with disabilities. (Page 42) Title I

SCCB is an active member of the Employment First Initiative steering committee, an interagency partnership focused on ensuring that competitive integrated employment is the first priority for transition aged students with disabilities. SCCB is also an active member of the Advisory Council for Educating Students with Disabilities an advisory council for the Office of Special Education at the South Carolina Department of Education. All of these committees and councils create avenues for coordination and collaboration with state and local education officials. (Page 274) Title IV

SCCB is developing an updated Cooperative Agreement with the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (DDSN) to avoid duplication of services, increase coordination of employment services provided to the shared consumer populations, and to enhance Supported Employment programs. SCCB is an active partner with DDSN and both agencies are represented on the Employment First Initiative Steering Committee and the South Carolina Disability Employment Coalition. (Page 278) Title IV

Customized Employment

~~SCCB has established an internal Supported Employment program that includes Customized Employment provided by three (3) regionally assigned JOBS Specialists. During program year 2018 SCCB partnered with the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Technical Assistance Center and the Youth Technical Assistance Center to provide intensive Customized Employment training to the JOBS Specialists. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement with ABLE SC under provisions in the Ticket-to-Work program to provide ongoing supports for ticket holders. SCCB is working to establish other Cooperative Agreements with entities providing ongoing supports to consumers in Supported Employment. (Page 276) Title IV

98.SCCB did not offer supported employment or customized employment services to its consumers with most significant disabilities. This is reflected in the low numbers of employment outcomes for these individuals. (Page 286) Title IV

The South Carolina Commission for the Blind has established the capacities to provide Supported Employment to youth and adults with Most Significant Disabilities in response to the findings of the FFY 2016 CSNA. Funds received under section 603 of the Rehabilitation Act for Supported Employment are utilized to fund the costs of individualized discovery assessment, job development, job placement, and on-the-job supports for Supported Employment and Customized Employment delivered internally by JOBS Specialists. SCCB provides extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement under the Ticket to Work program to provide long term on going supports through an Employment Network (Able SC). SCCB utilizes 50% of Supported Employment funds to provide Supported Employment and Customized Employment for eligible youth. SCCB has established goals to provide Supported Employment services to 6eligible individuals during FFY 2018, 8 individuals during FFY 2019, 10individuals during FFY 2020, and 10 individuals during FFY 2021. (Page 313) Title IV

Strategy 2.2.3: Provide Customized Employment that includes intensive discovery of individualized skills, abilities, potential; and intensive customization of an existing job opening, creation of a job that fills an unmet need, and other customized options. SCCB provides Customized Employment through a qualified and trained JOBS Specialist (Job Oriented Blind Service). (Page 316) Title IV

SCCB will continue to seek opportunities and partnerships to aid in the development and establishment of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to provide community based adjustment to blindness services, supported employment (SE) services, customized employment (CE) services and life skills training. (Page 320) Title IV

CRP Establishment & Development: SCCB will continue to seek opportunities and partnerships to aid in the development and establishment of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to provide community based adjustment to blindness services, supported employment (SE) services, customized employment (CE) services, Braille training, vocational evaluation, and life skills training. (Page 321) Title IV

SCCB is committed to ensuring that services are provided in an equitable manner and are fully accessible. SCCB reviews, assesses and monitors agency programs to conduct continuous improvement activities. The greatest gap identified in the 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment pertained to the lack of a Supported Employment program at SCCB. In response SCCB established the JOBS Specialists (Job Oriented Blind Services) positons trained to provide Supported Employment (SE), Customized Employment (CE), and Individual Placement and Support (IPS) models to consumers who have Most Significant Disabilities. These positions function in a one-on-one consumer centered approach as Job Placement Specialists, On-The-Job Coaches, and in other employment related supportive roles allowed under Title VI. (Pages 321-322) Title IV

SCCB has established program capacity and resources to better serve individuals who have Most Significant Disabilities. SCCB has established JOBS Specialists who are providing Supported Employment and Customized Employment, evidence based practices that have not been offered by SCCB in the past. In addition, SCCB has hired and trained a Certified Work Incentive Counselor to help beneficiaries understand the implications of gainful employment on their Social Security benefits. (Page 323) Title IV

SCCB expended Supported Employment revenue during FFY 2017 for the first time as JOBS Specialists were on boarded and began providing Supported Employment services. Consumers being served by SE funds are currently in the placement and support phase, therefore no consumers served by Supported Employment funds have been transitioned to extended services at this time. SCCB signed a Partnership Plus Agreement with Able SC to provide on-going supports at the time when a consumer transitions from VR support. Building a quality Supported Employment program is a continued goal of SCCB for FFY 2018. Currently SCCB is undergoing extensive Customized Employment training and technical assistance to build capacity and program effectiveness. SCCB also added the capacity to provide benefit and work incentive counseling. (Page 325) Title IV

SCCB made substantial progress on creating a Supported Employment program through the establishment of the JOBS Specialists, providing both Supported Employment and Customized Employment training to these staff, and building the capacity to provide benefits and work incentive counseling services. The greatest impediment was that these resources had to be created where they did not exist prior. (Page 325) Title IV

SCCB expended Supported Employment revenue during FFY 2017 for the first time as JOBS Specialists were on boarded and began providing Supported Employment services. Consumers being served by SE funds are currently in the placement and support phase, therefore no consumers served by Supported Employment funds have been transitioned to extended services at this time. SCCB signed a Partnership Plus Agreement with Able SC to provide on-going supports at the time when a consumer transitions from VR support. Building a quality Supported Employment program is a continued goal of SCCB for FFY 2018. Currently SCCB is undergoing extensive Customized Employment training and technical assistance to build capacity and program effectiveness. (Page 326-327) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~CCB has developed a Self-Employment Toolkit intended to walk eligible consumers through the microenterprise development process. SCCB has partnered with the University of Wisconsin-Madison to provide Self-Employment and Social Security Work Incentive training to SCCB’s VR Counselors on May 17, 2018 and August 8, 2018. SCCB is working to build community partnerships to leverage resources from entities engaged in business development such as Small Business Development Centers, Business Incubator Programs, and South Carolina’s Technical College System. SCCB is also working to incorporate our Career Exploration Lab (3D Printer Lab) as a tool to assist in product development and prototyping. (Page 66) Title I

•SCVRD leverages other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services. Extended services providers are identified in each area to provide follow along and extended services following successful exit from the VR program. Partnerships at the state and local level with DDSN and the local DSN boards continue to grow and provide key linkages to extended services providers. (Page 182) Title I

SCVRD’s ongoing support services are limited to 24 months unless extended by an amendment to the IPE. Transition to extended services starts after an individual is stabilized in his/her job setting and has met the individualized work goal. The client’s employment stability is determined by the achievement of adequate job performance without a need for ongoing, intensive shadowing/mentoring from the job coach. The client, employer, job coach, and SCVRD counselor agree that this has occurred before transition to the extended service provider takes place. SCVRD continues to leverage resources for identifying extended service providers to meet long-term support needs. (Page 260) Title IV

Goal 1: Increase Program Capacity Leveraging Partnerships & Community Engagement
Priority 1.1: Improve WIOA Partnerships & One-Stop System Engagement
Priority 1.2: Improve Partnerships & Strategic Alliances to Increase Program Capacity
Priority 1.3: Increase Public Awareness & Community Engagement
Priority 1.4: Align Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center (EBMRC) Programing

Report of Progress Goal 1: SCCB achieved substantial progress on goal 1. SCCB improved WIOA partnerships and One-Stop System Engagement through the strategies of formalizing American Job Center partnerships with Memorandum’s of Understanding which include infrastructure cost agreements, specified co-located staff office times and space, center accessibility assessment and technical assistance, and staff cross training. SCCB has active MOU’s with all SC Works Centers. SCCB worked with core WIOA partner programs to create agency cross training modules for partnership workforce staff, and explored data sharing and common intake opportunities. SCCB finalized a Cooperative Agreement with SC Department of Education and is currently negotiating an update to the SC Vocational Rehabilitation Department Cooperative Agreement. SCCB negotiated and entered into a number of Cooperative Agreements with community based qualified fee-for-service vendors and other partners to expand capacity and available resources statewide. This has expanded program capacity to provide independent travel training (8 new vendors), home management training (2 new vendors), and Braille Literacy (2 new vendors) in community settings. SCCB also provides ZoomText, Jaws, and other assistive technology training through a fee-for-service contract with the National Federation of the Blind of South Carolina. (Page 322) Title IV

Disability Employment Initiative (DEI)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.  

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~Goal 1.2: Provide comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services to adult job seekers who are blind or visually impaired resulting in the attainment of industry recognized in-demand credentials required for competitive integrated employment.
Strategy 1.2.1: Provide quality Adjustment to Blindness and Pre-Vocational Training at the Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center for Employment & Independence. Adjustment to Blindness Training includes: Orientation & Mobility (Independent Travel), Independent Living Skills, Braille Literacy, Employability Soft Skills, Basic Financial Literacy, and Psychosocial Adjustment to Blindness Counseling. Pre-Vocational Training includes: Basic Keyboarding, Basic Microsoft Office Suite Training, and Assistive Technology Training such as Computer Screen Readers, Text Magnifiers, Low Vision Aids, Etc. (Page 315) Title IV

In 2017 SCCB rewrote the curriculum and courses offered at the Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center for Employment and Independence. This new curriculum includes pre-test and post-test assessments to measure skill gains and provide for continuous improvement. Several new center programs have been implemented including a partnership with Adult Education that brings GED preparation instruction and testing to the center. SCCB added a Basic Financial Literacy course using curriculum designed by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. SCCB has also added Soft-Skills training based on the “Skills to Pay the Bills” curriculum. (Page 323) Title IV

School to Work Transition

~~The Transition Alliance of South Carolina is a broad systems improvement and technical assistance resource for professionals working with students with disabilities. Their primary outcome is to empower students to transition into community-based employment. Local transition programs choose to enhance their curriculum through a variety of evidence-based transition practices, including student-led IEP meetings, goal setting and attainment, socializing in the workplace, job accommodations, and other activities meant to empower students with disabilities to control their career strategy. TASC consists of a state-level interagency steering committee that supports local interagency transition teams across the state. (Page 42) Title I

SC Department of Education Office of Adult Education has a special education task force that creates and delivers training for adult education practitioners serving students with special needs. The OAE meets regularly with SCDE Office of Special Education Services to ensure compliance with all special education regulations. Additionally, OAE requires that all funded local providers have a written plan with local Special Education Departments to transition IEP (Individualized Education Plan) students, and that local providers comply with the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA) which requires each provider to describe the steps they propose to take to ensure equitable access to, and participation in, its federally assisted programs. OAE monitors for compliance with the written transition IEP as part of its annual compliance process, and collaborates with the Office of Special Education to monitor all other GEPA requirements. (Page 109) Title I

GEPA (General Education Provisions Act) 427 requirements are overseen by the SCDE-OAE in the following ways:
•In cooperation with SCDE - Office of General Counsel and the SCDE - Office of Special Education Services, OAE delivers training for adult education practitioners serving students with special needs.
•OAE meets regularly with the SCDE - Office of Special Education Services to ensure compliance with all special education regulations.
•OAE requires that all funded local providers have a written plan with local Special Education Departments to transition IEP (Individualized Education Plan) students, and that local providers comply with GEPA which requires each provider to describe the steps they propose to take to ensure equitable access to, and participation in, its federally assisted programs.

OAE monitors for compliance the written transition IEP as a part of its annual compliance process, and collaborates with the SCDE - Office of Special Education to monitor all other GEPA requirements. (Pages 170-171) Title I

SCVRD utilizes the “Guideposts for Success” (based on the work of the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth — NCWD/Y) as a framework for school-to-work transition services. This includes regular activities that focus on each of the required pre-employment transition service activities: job exploration counseling, work-based learning, counseling on opportunities for comprehensive transition or postsecondary educational programs, workplace readiness training to develop social skills and independent living skills, and instruction in self-advocacy. Group activities provide opportunities to not only facilitate peer mentoring, but also allow transition staff to observe and cultivate students’ leadership skills, as well as communication and social skills. Mentoring is a key component of the High School High Tech (HS/HT) program, and SCVRD collaborates with organizations that have youth-led mentoring programs in place. Through the agency’s VR Ambassadors program, former clients that have successfully transitioned into employment or postsecondary activities are available to assist with mentoring and participation in transition activities such as Disability Mentoring Day, and summer transition institutes. (Pages 174-175) Title I

In collaboration with the SC Department of Employment and Workforce (SCDEW) and the SCDE, SCVRD’s school-based transition counselors work together with local education agencies, community partners, workforce development boards, SC Works Centers and business partners to advise students with disabilities, and their families, regarding available career pathways and educational/training opportunities. SCVRD maintains a Transition Services Coordinator position and additional regional Transition Specialist positions whose duties focus on the authorized activities required for effective provision of pre-employment transition services. These include:
• Coordinate all transition-related activities and projects including those that involve other agencies, community organizations and local SCVRD field offices;
• Develop, monitor and update all transition documents and cooperative agreements;
• Provide technical assistance, professional development and training on transition-related issues to field office staff, education personnel, community organizations, families, and students;
• Review and update client service policy to ensure policies and procedures are reflective of SCVRD mission and focus on quality in serving youth in transition;
• Serve on the planning committee for the interagency South Carolina Youth Leadership Forum, a summer youth development and leadership program; • Participate in TASC, an interagency initiative to create systems change and support development of local interagency transition teams. (Page 175) Title I

Strategy 1.2 Enhance school-to-work transition services.
• Objective 1.2.1 Maximize relationships with education officials in all South Carolina school districts to support development of education and career pathways. 
• Objective 1.2.2 Improve services to individuals with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual/developmental disabilities.
• Objective 1.2.3 Enhance services for at-risk youth with disabilities.
• Objective 1.2.4 Expose students with disabilities to careers in science, technology, engineering and math through High School/High Tech programs. (Page 247) Title IV

SCCB Career BOOST (Building Occupational Opportunities for Students in Transition): Is a contractual pilot program in partnership with South Carolina’s Independent Living Centers, the National Federation of the Blind of South Carolina, and LEA’s. Pre-Employment Transition Services are provided to eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities in the public schools and other settings. These services include Self-Advocacy Workshops, Work Readiness Soft Skills Workshops, Exploration of Higher Education through College Tours, and Work Based Learning Experiences. (Page 272) Title IV

SCCB Vocational Rehabilitation Comprehensive Transition Services Program: This program serves students from age 15 until exit from high school at which time they are served by the SCCB adult VR program. SCCB has four (4) dedicated Transition Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors statewide building program infrastructure and education relationships to improve services to Transition Students. The Transition Counselors primarily collaborate with education officials such as the South Carolina Department of Education (local school districts), the South Carolina School for the Deaf and Blind (SCSDB) and the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (SCDDSN). Transition Counselors develop the initial Individualized Plan of Employment (IPE) while the consumer is attending high school. The IPE includes services pertaining to the adjustment, prevention or stabilization of vision, and Pre-Employment Transition Services as defined in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA). In an effort to avoid the duplication of services, low vision and assistive technology needs will be coordinated with local school districts in accordance with the student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and IPE. In such instances, the alternative service providers and funding sources will be identified on the IPE and coordinated accordingly. SCCB will conduct semiannual meetings with the statewide vision teachers in an effort to facilitate the coordination of services to the most significantly disabled students and their need for supported employment services. Discussions will include, but not be limited to, collaboration with SCDDSN, SCDOE and the SCSDB to coordinate transition services. (Page 273) Title IV

While these gaps are areas of continued focus for SCCB, much has been accomplished since the Statewide Needs Assessment. SCCB now provides Career BOOST services to students with disabilities who are eligible or potentially eligible for VR services. Career BOOST provides students with instruction in self-advocacy skills, work readiness skills training, work based learning experiences, and exploration of opportunities for career training in post-secondary schools and institutions of higher education. SCCB designed and operates the Student Internship Jr. Program that provides high school transition students with a paid work experience. SCCB Transition VR Counselors have increased their involvement in IEP meetings, and SCCB has formalized memorandum of understandings with LEA's. (Page 288) Title IV

SCCB established contractual programs for Pre-Employment Transition Services with South Carolina’s Independent Living Centers and the National Federation of the Blind. Since inception Career BOOST has provided 761 students with Self-Advocacy Workshops, 494 Work Readiness Workshops, and 160 Work Based Learning Experience such as paid internships and work site tours and job shadowing. Under Career Boost 62 eligible and potentially eligible high school students have participated in college and university tours, exploration of post-secondary educational options, and counseling on financial aid opportunities. SCCB conducted public awareness outreach and implemented a social media presence to enhance agency visibility. In 2017 SCCB rewrote the curriculum and courses offered at the Ellen Beach Mack Rehabilitation Center for Employment and Independence. This new curriculum includes pre-test and post-test assessments to measure skill gains and provide for continuous improvement. Several new center programs have been implemented including a partnership with Adult Education that brings GED preparation instruction and testing to the center. SCCB added a Basic Financial Literacy course using curriculum designed by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. SCCB has also added Soft-Skills training based on the “Skills to Pay the Bills” curriculum. (Pages 322-323) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~South Carolina’s one-stop delivery system is designed to be fully accessible so that all job seekers and employers can participate in the services offered. The Methods of Administration (MOA) - a state document required by the Civil Rights Center - is a “living” document that ensures current federal regulations and directives are implemented at the state and local level expeditiously, and details how compliance with WIOA Section 188 will be accomplished.

Monitoring performed at both the state and local level ensures that all SC Works Centers are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize South Carolina’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual (e.g. SC Works Online Services) to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. Complaints of discrimination are directed to the State Equal Opportunity Officer.

Per federal regulations, each LWDA must appoint a local Equal Opportunity Officer who is responsible for ensuring local WIOA Section 188 compliance. Local Equal Opportunity Officers are trained to use the “ADA Checklist for Readily Achievable Barrier Removal,” the “Checklist for Existing Facilities,” and a recommended assistive technology checklist. New local Equal Opportunity Officers are provided with detailed training on regulations, policies, and procedures following appointment. Ongoing training is provided through EO Roundtables and on-site training on such topics as, “Serving Customers with Disabilities,” “Current EO Trends,” as well as topics deemed relevant by LWDAs and designed in response to their training requests.  (Page 108) Title I

For the current Unified State Plan, SCCB identified gaps from two primary sources. The first being unmet gaps identified in the FFY 2016 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. The second source is the South Carolina Workforce Development Board’s Economic Analysis and Strategic Plan in order to align SCCB initiatives with the goals of South Carolina's Workforce Development System. The following gaps have been identified:

Gap 1: South Carolina’s current labor force, including individuals who are blind or visually impaired, do not have industry recognized credentials, knowledge, skills, or abilities to meet current or emerging demands of the business community.

Gap 2: SCCB needs to improve alignment of policies, resources, and staff expertise to provide job driven, labor market informed, vocational counseling and guidance that aligns with South Carolina’s Talent Pipeline Project and Sector Strategies initiatives to assist eligible consumers in accessing career pathways that lead to high and middle skill/income jobs in growth sectors.

Gap 3: SCCB needs to improve partnerships with business in order to more accurately identify current and future workforce needs of business and industry to support career pathways in growth sectors and improve services to business. (Page 291) Title IV

Goal 2: Increase Quantity & Quality of Employment Outcomes

Priority 2.1: Align VR Counseling with South Carolina’s Talent Pipeline Project, Emphasizing Career Pathways, Attainment of Industry Recognized Credentials, Job Driven/Sector Strategies & Labor Market Information

Priority 2.2: Increase Employment for those with Most Significant Disabilities

Priority 2.3: Increase Vocational Exploration & Opportunities for Transition Students Priority 2.4: Increase Employment for all eligible consumers

Report of Progress Goal 2: Under the previous state plan, SCCB focused efforts on building program capacity, resources and expertise needed in order to meet goal 2. This required resource location, resource reallocation, and program building. As these programs have been built, SCCB has not experienced an increase in the number of successful employment outcomes. Under the provisions of the previous Unified State Plan, SCCB has aligned VR Counseling, career exploration, vocational goal selection, and Individualized Plan for Employment development with labor market information and sector strategies. SCCB has instituted the use of The Career Index Plus for analyzing labor market information and helping consumers make informed job driven decisions. SCCB implemented significant staff training in the area of using labor market information and understanding South Carolina’s regional economic conditions. SCCB leveraged partnerships with the Department of Employment and Workforce, and the Job Driven Technical Assistance Center to provide staff with training on sector strategies, the talent pipeline efforts, and the use of labor market information. SCCB has established program capacity and resources to better serve individuals who have Most Significant Disabilities. SCCB has established JOBS Specialists who are providing Supported Employment and Customized Employment, evidence based practices that have not been offered by SCCB in the past. In addition, SCCB has hired and trained a Certified Work Incentive Counselor to help beneficiaries understand the implications of gainful employment on their Social Security benefits. SCCB established Career BOOST, a contractual program in partnership, collaboration, and coordination with Independent Living Centers, the National Federation of the Blind, and South Carolina’s Local Education Authorities. This program provides the required Pre-Employment Transition Services to eligible and potentially eligible students with disabilities. SCCB hosted the first Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Career (STEM) Exploration Week for transition students during the summer of 2017. During the STEM Career Exploration week, 9 high school students who are blind or visually impaired were provided instruction by a team of scientists from San Jose State University, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, the Space Telescope Science Institute, and the International Astronomical Union. The students explored STEM careers using 3D printed tactile models of galaxies, planets, and other astronomical phenomena. Additionally, students were exposed to “sonification” techniques used by blind and visually impaired Astronomers to study the universe. SCCB is repeating the program in the summer of 2018. (Pages 323-324) Title IV

Apprenticeship

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD) offers a range of training services that include OJT, job try-out, and registered apprenticeships. For OJT, in partnership with SCVRD, a company hires and trains a client for a specific position. The training progresses according to training milestones in an established training outline. Job try-outs are a stipend-funded training service coordinated between SCVRD, the client, and a business partner. During a job try-out, a career ready client learns specific, basic skills for a job at a company’s worksite(s). (Page 29) Title I

SCVRD maintains a priority on providing work-based learning experiences for students. Following a 5-year transition demonstration grant from the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), and in keeping with evidence-based practices that support work experience to be one of the most influential factors in successful postsecondary employment outcomes, transition staff actively pursue job tryout, job shadowing, internship, and apprenticeship opportunities for students. This impacts not only the ultimate outcome of competitive, integrated employment but has been shown to be an integral support for school completion and drop-out prevention. (Page 175) Title IV

Innovation and expansion activities have been identified within these strategies and include:

  • Continued expansion of work-based learning activities for students
  • Expansion of Project SEARCH sites
  • Cooperative agreement with Project HOPE Foundation, a non-profit organization that provides a lifespan of services and activities for individuals with autism
  • Expansion of transition job coaches focused on providing supported employment services to students and youth with the most significant disabilities
  • Maintaining a full-time counselor to provide vocational rehabilitation services to incarcerated youth, which has expanded to include additional programs operated by DJJ (e.g., Camp Aspen)
  • Maintaining a staff interpreter for clients who are deaf to provide video remote interpreting, on- site services to mutual clients of SCVRD and DHHS, extend consistent access to interpreter services in rural areas, and enhance the accessibility of VR productions and client and staff training materials
  • Creation of apprenticeships tailored to increase the participation levels of clients who are deaf (Page 259) Title IV

Goal 3.1: Provide specialized training through a Pre-Apprenticeship Program to prepare adults not enrolled in college programs, as an alternative career pathway to current and future business and industry needs.

Strategy 3.1.1: Utilize the principles STEM education to develop a Pre-Apprenticeship training program for job seekers who are blind and visually impaired that will satisfy the entry level skills needed for acceptance into registered apprenticeship programs. Incorporate the use of the most current Assistive Technology that will make graduates competitive when applying to fill open apprenticeship positions. (Pages 316-317) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Able SC is a Center for Independent Living (CIL) that is designed and operated within a local community by individuals with disabilities and provides an array of independent living services, including one-on-one and group training on topics such as employment soft skills, transportation utilization, accommodation requests, and transition from high school to post-secondary life.
Through funding from the SC Department of Education, SC Commission for the Blind, and local United Ways, Able SC provides independent living skills and pre-employment transition services to current middle and high school students with disabilities in the classroom.

Able SC is approved by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) to serve ticket beneficiaries as an Employment Network (EN) under SSA’s Ticket to Work program (discussed in more detail below), and also serves as the host and facilitator for the SC Disability Employment Coalition and the SC Employment First Initiative, two collaborative efforts that addresses employment barriers for individuals with disabilities. (Pages 40-41) Title I

Ticket to Work is a voluntary program for people receiving disability benefits from Social Security and whose primary goal is to find good careers and have a better self-supporting future. Consumers may receive employment services through an employment network provider, including career counseling, socialization to the workplace, and job support advice, among others. (Page 44) Title I

SCVRD’s supported employment goals and plans regarding the Title VI program are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and the department’s performance on the common performance measures as well as agency key performance indicators. The priorities are as follows:•Strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s 110 traditional program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs;

•Providing services to people with the most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, in order to successfully achieve and maintain competitive employment in integrated work settings; and

•Providing supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities. (Pages 180-181) Title I

The provision of early intervention services is a major issue given the long application process associated with making eligibility determinations for both the SSI and SSDI programs. There will be a need for increased supported employment services to improve the employment outcomes of many SSI/SSDI recipients. As a total count, the number of SSI/SSDI recipients, who applied for services, increased to 2,256 by 2013. The trend reflects an increase of 7.3 percent from the previous three years. (Page 198) Title I

SCVRD’s supported employment goals and plans regarding the Title VI program are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and the department’s performance on the common performance measures as well as agency key performance indicators. The priorities are as follows:
•Strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s 110 traditional program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs;
•Providing services to people with the most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, in order to successfully achieve and maintain competitive employment in integrated work settings; and
•Providing supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 244) Title I

The individual placement model for competitive employment remains the primary supported employment model being used by SCVRD. Emphasis is placed upon providing services to people with most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, whose employment needs are so significant that traditional 110 program services would not be sufficient to meet them. SCVRD coordinator of supported employment services also assists area office staff to identify and serve all eligible clients with the most significant disabilities. (Page 261) Title I

During the period of the last Unified State Plan cycle, SCCB made significant progress in closing these gaps. SCCB hired, trained, and obtained certification for a Work Incentives Counselor, and established referral pathways to the WIPA grantee benefits counseling services. SCCB established JOBS Specialist positions trained to provide Supported Employment including Customized Employment. SCCB signed a Ticket to Work Partnership Plus agreement with an Employment Network to provide on-going supports for supported employment cases. And SCCB has signed a number of fee-for-service agreements throughout the state with qualified service providers in the areas of Orientation and Mobility, Braille Instruction, Independent Living Skills that Support Employment, and adjustment to blindness psychological counseling. SCCB continues to work to close these gaps, and this modified state plan reflects these goals and priorities. (Page 286) Title IV

The South Carolina Commission for the Blind has established the capacities to provide Supported Employment to youth and adults with Most Significant Disabilities in response to the findings of the FFY 2016 CSNA. Funds received under section 603 of the Rehabilitation Act for Supported Employment are utilized to fund the costs of individualized discovery assessment, job development, job placement, and on-the-job supports for Supported Employment and Customized Employment delivered internally by JOBS Specialists. SCCB provides extended services for a period not to exceed 4 years. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement under the Ticket to Work program to provide long term on going supports through an Employment Network (Able SC). (Page 313) Title IV

As required by WIOA 50% of Supported Employment funds will be used to provide Supported Employment Services to youth with most significant disabilities. SCCB built in-house capacities and resources to meet this goal since FPY 2016. SCCB has signed a Partnership Plus Agreement under the Ticket to Work program to provide long term on going supports through an Employment Network (Able SC). SCCB will look for opportunities to engage with private and public partners to fund extended and ongoing supported employment services for this population. (Page 313) Title IV

Employer / Business Engagement

~~SCVRD utilizes multiple methods of working with employers to identify competitive, integrated employment and career exploration opportunities to facilitate the provision of VR services for adults and transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities. On a statewide and local basis, the Business Partnership Network, or BPN, provides an opportunity for regular engagement with business partners to gain input on hiring needs, training curricula, and opportunities for outreach with business and industry. Business Advisory Councils (BACs) are established to provide input on specific programs, such as the IT Training Centers, in Columbia and at the Bryant Center in Lyman. Members of the BAC assist in evaluating courses of study and curricula to ensure SCVRD stays current with what is needed in the workplace for IT professionals. Also, SCVRD utilizes Business Development Specialists (BDSs) across the state whose role is to identify opportunities for training, work-based learning, job development and placement, and emerging career pathways. BDS staff participate on local business services teams, along with partners from SC Works and LWDBs, to provide a coordinated approach to business development activities. BDS staff also work with transition counselors and coaches to identify opportunities for work-based learning experiences, internships, apprenticeships, and OJT for students in conjunction with the pre-employment transition services that are provided in high school settings. (Page 182) Title I

SCCB actively engages with the South Carolina business community through services provided by the Training & Employment Division (T&E) Employment Consultants. SCCB T&E Employment Consultants build and maintain partnerships with businesses to:
o Assess and better understand the unique human resource needs of South Carolina businesses;
o To help align SCCB programs to better meet the unique and specific human resource needs of South Carolina businesses;
o To create, establish, and foster relationships with South Carolina businesses that help them meet their unique and specific human resource needs, including talent acquisition and talent retention;
o Develop opportunities for Work Based Experiences, Internships, Job Shadowing, and other work based learning experiences that provide South Carolina Businesses with opportunities to gain experience with a diverse and qualified workforce;
o Create mutually beneficial relationships and facilitate linkages of job openings to a highly skilled and diverse talent pool of candidates. Referrals of consumers who are seeking employment and who have been judged to be Job Ready are received from SCCB Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. The Employment Consultant’s role is job development and placement that meets the needs of the business and the consumer. The Consultant also provides businesses and consumers with access to services that can be provided by SCCB or other governmental agencies. Incentives that may be applicable are also presented. These include: 
o The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC). This program allows a maximum available credit of $2,400 per eligible worker. 
o Sensitivity and awareness training for employers and organizations. This training includes American Disability Act (ADA), sighted guide techniques and attitudes regarding blindness. The presentation is designed to remove myths and apprehensions about blindness.
o Technical assistance for the implementation and support of assistive technology. (Pages 276-277) Title I

Data Collection

South Carolina has a vast workforce development system consisting of multiple public and private partners, the goal of which is to facilitate financial stability and economic prosperity for employers, individuals, and communities. We will evaluate the overall effectiveness of our system using the following tools: (1) WIOA common performance measures that assess employment, earnings, credential attainment, skills gain, and employer engagement; (2) SC Works Certification Standards that assess system management, job seeker services, and employer services; and (3) SWDB Strategic Plan key performance indicators. (Page 54) Title I

Accordingly, continuous improvement initiatives to build on the agency’s long-term history of success have focused on quality. SCVRD has embarked on an initiative known as “Quality One” (or “Q1”), which has a theme of “Quality happens one person at a time.” This included the establishment of workgroups to address quality measures and provide recommendations for a cohesive system that supports the provision of quality client services and metrics to gauge success and to realize results in increased successful employment outcomes for clients. This initiative aligns with SCVRD’s longstanding commitment to its Program Integrity model, which seeks a balance among productivity, customer service, and compliance assurance. Each of those components has measurable results and can be used to evaluate the agency at levels ranging from specific caseload or work unit up to an agency-wide level. The agency is proactively integrating the new WIOA common performance measures into program evaluation, data collection, and management information reports. (Page 92) Title I

SCVRD’s supported employment goals and plans regarding the Title VI program are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and the department’s performance on the common performance measures as well as agency key performance indicators. The priorities are as follows: •Strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s 110 traditional program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs; •Providing services to people with the most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, in order to successfully achieve and maintain competitive employment in integrated work settings; and •Providing supported employment services to youth with the most significant disabilities. (Pages 180-181) Title I

Based on the past three years’ data on services for students and youth, SCVRD estimates it will provide services, including but not limited to pre-employment transition services, to approximately 8,480 individuals that are initially referred by the school system. Data collection for the new 911 Case Services Report will allow for better identification of students with disabilities and provision of pre-employment transition services. As the new data becomes available, projections and fiscal forecasting for the provision of pre-employment transition services will be updated. (Page 204) Title I

Subminimum Wage (Section 511)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element. 

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination (Section 188)

Able Access is a fee for service program offered by Able SC to promote accessible and inclusive environments within businesses and government agencies. Staff provide Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) trainings and consultations. These services include but are not limited to policy and procedure review, onsite accessibility survey, testing on online property for screen reader/magnifier accessibility, and tailored staff trainings in a wide variety of disability topics (Page 41) Title I

Most workforce, economic development, and education programs are managed locally, and the quality of service delivery may vary by area. A number of measures are underway to improve the consistency of service delivery, including: the implementation of SC Works Center Standards and WIOA Eligible Training Provider provisions. The SC Works Center Standards address service delivery to job seekers and employers and center management, and are used by LWDBs to evaluate effectiveness, programmatic and physical accessibility, and continuous improvement of the SC Works delivery system. Along the same lines, training providers are now required to submit program data and meet certain requirements to be eligible to receive WIOA training funds. This will help ensure that participants receive high-quality training in high-demand, high-wage occupations. (Page 49) Title I

Monitoring performed at both the state and local level ensures that all SC Works Centers are in compliance with Section 188 of WIOA, the ADA, and other applicable regulations. Individuals who seek to utilize South Carolina’s workforce system can expect facilities, whether physical or virtual (e.g. SC Works Online Services) to meet federally-mandated accessibility standards. Complaints of discrimination are directed to the State Equal Opportunity Officer. (Page 108) Title I

As part of the SC Works center certification process, LWDBs are required to evaluate accessibility of the SC Works delivery system. SC Works centers were evaluated in 2017 and will be re-evaluated every three (3) years thereafter as required by WIOA. In order to be certified according to the SC Works certification standards, each center must meet the following accessibility baseline measures:

150.The Center is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Every workforce area will work with Vocational Rehabilitation partners and SCDEW Office of Equal Opportunity, as needed, to ensure ADA compliance.

151.The Center provides assistive technology for customers to use when accessing computers and other services. This includes customers with visual impairments, physical disabilities, and hearing impairments.

152. Staff should be identified to assist people with disabilities at the first point of contact and in case of emergency.

153.There are linkages to services for people with special needs, including veterans and others, related to disability. (Page 109-110) Title I

158.SCCB is working with the SC Works system to ensure one-stop center accessibility to persons with visual impairments. SCCB Assistive Technology Staff are current evaluating centers in several areas of the state to propose and provide hardware and/or software that will enable persons who are blind or low vision to access one stop center programs. (Page 110) Title I

Innovation and expansion activities have been identified within these strategies and include: Maintaining a staff interpreter for clients who are deaf to provide video remote interpreting, on- site services to mutual clients of SCVRD and DHHS, extend consistent access to interpreter services in rural areas, and enhance the accessibility of VR productions and client and staff training materials (Page 259) Title IV

Gaps included:

• America’s Job Centers (AJCs) in South Carolina (SC Works) have not effectively served individuals with blindness and vision impairments. There have been no documented instances of SCCB cases that are jointly served by other workforce entities.

• Historically, the relationship between SCCB and the AJCs, although cordial, is primarily one of referral with no evidence of substantial services after referral;

• Although the AJCs are accessible, the technology is frequently out of date and the AJC staff lack the skills to effectively operate/demonstrate the technology; Under WIOA there are legal requirements around the development of partnerships between SCCB and entities in the greater workforce development system.

While these gaps are the focus on continuing efforts both by the AJC's (SC Works) and SCCB, much has been accomplished since the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. SCCB has improved co-location of SCCB staff in the AJC's for specific periods of time each month where space allows. SCCB has signed MOU's and Infrastructure Cost Sharing Agreements with all SC Works service areas, and has been providing technical assistance to the AJC's in regards to programmatic and physical accessibility. (Page 287) Title IV

SCCB has been an active partner in the WIOA Unified State Plan Implementation Team. South Carolina’s plans are to continue convening this group of core WIOA partners to continue to develop meaningful and effective partnerships, share expertise and knowledge, skills, and abilities, and to expand the ability of the system to serve all individuals including those with disabilities. In addition, SCCB is working to ensure that there is agency presence in the local one stop American Job Centers on a consistent basis to provide support and expertise to consumers who are blind or visually impaired. SCCB entered into MOU's and Infrastructure Cost Agreements with all SC Works service deliver areas. SCCB is currently working with SC Works to provide assessment and technical assistance to ensure programmatic and physical accessibility. (Page 320) Title IV

Veterans

SC Works representatives are available in centers throughout the state to help veterans transition into the workforce. Local Veterans’ Employment Representatives (LVER) staff conduct employer outreach and job development in the local community to assist veterans in gaining employment, including conducting seminars for employers and, in conjunction with employers, conducting job search workshops and establishing job search groups. Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists are trained to provide intensive case management services to veterans and eligible spouses with Significant Barriers to Employment (SBE), and age priority veterans ages 18 to 24, including individual career coaching, job referral, resume preparation assistance, career fairs and job search workshops, jobs training programs, and referrals to supporting or training services.

SCVRD has an ongoing partnership with DEW’s LVERs and DVOPs to coordinate outreach efforts with federal contractors. Federal contractors are required to establish an annual hiring benchmark for protected veterans and individuals with disabilities, or adopt the national benchmark provided by the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP). Through this informal partnership, SCVRD and DEW LVERs and DVOPs identify work ready individuals and coordinate employment opportunities with federal contractors. (Page 39) Title I

In accordance with the Jobs for Veterans Act, veterans and eligible spouses are given priority of service in employment and training programs funded in whole or in part by the USDOL. Priority of service means that veterans and eligible spouses are given priority over non-covered persons for the receipt of employment, training, and placement service and that a veteran or an eligible spouse either receives access to a service earlier in time than a non-covered person, or, if the resource is limited, the veteran or eligible spouse receives access to the services instead of the non-covered person. The state has provided guidance to local workforce boards on how to implement the priority of service provisions.

The state monitors priority of service for veterans and eligible spouses by ensuring that local workforce areas have implemented appropriate priority of service policies. Local policies are assessed to determine the following:

o whether the policy explains the differences between Veterans’ Services and priority of service for veterans and eligible spouses;

o whether the policy describes the roles and responsibilities of SC Works Center staff and management as they pertain to Veterans’ Priority of Service; and,

o whether the policy demonstrates appropriate actions for showing priority of service to veterans and eligible spouses for Department of Labor funded programs in SC Works Centers. (Page 107) Title I

The state has issued guidance regarding services under the Disabled Veterans’ Outreach Program (DVOP). DVOP staff must limit their activities to providing services to eligible veterans and eligible spouses who:

o meet the definition of an individual with a significant barrier to employment (SBE), as defined and updated by DOL, or

o are members of a veteran population identified by the Secretary of Labor as eligible for DVOP services, currently defined as veterans aged 18 to 24.

Per state guidance, an eligible veteran or eligible spouse who is identified as having a SBE must be immediately referred to a DVOP specialist. Veterans ages 18 to 24 must also be referred to DVOP specialists. In instances where a DVOP specialist is not available, referrals to a SCDEW career development specialist will be made. DVOP specialists will conduct an initial assessment to determine if the veteran or eligible spouse will benefit from the provision of case management. In the event that case management is determined not suitable, the DVOP will refer the veteran or eligible spouse to the other program staff who would best be able to meet their needs. Veterans with a SBE and those aged 18 to 24 must have access to all appropriate SC Works services and are not limited to receiving services only from DVOP specialists. Additionally, veterans and eligible spouses who do not meet the SBE definition or are not within a specified category identified by the Secretary of Labor, are to be referred to appropriate non-JVSG SC Works staff member(s) to receive services, on a priority basis. (Pages 107-108) Title I

Another area of identified need is response to the increase of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) through outreach and a focus on serving more individuals with brain injuries. This includes the general population as well as veterans from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The number of TBIs in the general population has increased slowly over the last decade according to the CDC; however, deaths from TBI have decreased. This decrease means an increase in the number of persons who might be returning to work and requiring vocational rehabilitation services. (Page 198) Title I

SCVRD provides services to veterans with disabilities; and, efforts to increase outreach to this population are ongoing. SCVRD has established relationships with local employers in all areas of the state, and collaboration with the Veterans Administration is essential to providing the greatest outreach for veterans with disabilities. SCVRD has assigned counselors to the state’s seven VA specialty clinics and each area office has designated counselors to work with local VA offices for referrals. (Page 200) Title I

Behavioral / Mental Health

~~SCVRD works collaboratively with DMH and has an established MOA that outlines roles, responsibilities, and referral procedures. In addition, several cooperative agreements are in place across the state for IPS (Individualized Placement and Support) caseloads to provide rapid placement and job coaching for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. Transition counselors working within the schools to provide pre-employment transition services coordinate with school-based mental health counselors to identify students in need of services, whether that is VR or mental health services. Through this “no wrong door” approach, students in need of services are connected to the appropriate resources in a timely manner. (Page 184) Title I

SCCB is developing a new Cooperative Agreement with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health to collaborate, coordinate, avoid duplication of services, and enhance the employment outcomes of shared consumer populations. (Page 278) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 46

Executive Order No. 2019-39 South Carolina State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force - 12/12/2019

“WHEREAS, numerous state and federal public assistance programs currently provide support to individuals seeking education and employment, including Unemployment Insurance (“UI”), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (“SNAP”), Vocational Rehabilitation, and Medicaid benefits for qualified working disabled individuals; and…

NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of South Carolina and pursuant to the Constitution and Laws of this State and the powers conferred upon me therein, I hereby create and establish the State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“DECO Recovery Management, LLC was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Underserved and vulnerable uninsured populations: Latino/Hispanic; African Americans; Rural communities; young and “invincibles”; small employers; and self-employed individuals.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with South Carolina Chamber of Commerce, South Carolina Hospital Association, South Carolina of the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) , Carolina Chapter of the American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM), Greenville Memorial Hospital, Greer Memorial Hospital, North Greenville Hospital, Hillcrest Memorial Hospital , Patewood Memorial Hospital, Laurens County Memorial Hospital, Aiken Regional Medical Center, Oconee Memorial Hospital, and Bon Secours St. Francis Health System.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Andrew Foland \Phone: (410) 763-7475Email: afoland@decorm.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Waiver Case Management Standards - 07/01/2019

~~This document has information on how staff and providers are to operate when working with the Community Supports Waiver,  Head and Spinal Cord Injury Waiver, and Intellectual Disability/Related Disabilities Waiver.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Rehabilitative Behavioral Health Services (RBHS) - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina (South Carolina or State) State Medicaid Plan allows an array of behavioral health services under the Rehabilitative Services Option, 42 CFR 440.130(d).Rehabilitative Services are medical or remedial services that have been recommended by a Physician or other Licensed Practitioner of the Healing Arts(LPHA) within the scope of their practice under South Carolina State Law and as further determined by the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS)for maximum reduction of physical or mental disability and restoration of a beneficiary to their best possible functional level. This section describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the Providers of services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Licensed Independent Practitioner’s (LIP) Rehabilitative Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Services in this manual are intended to be delivered in an outpatient and community setting only. In accordance with 42CFR 435.1009-1011, services are not available for beneficiaries residing in an Institution of Mental Disease. Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitals and Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities (PRTFs) receive an all-inclusive, per diem rate for services. Services provided to beneficiaries in these settings are not Medicaid reimbursable”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Long-Term Care Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The mission of Long-Term Living (LTL) is to provide a cost-effective alternative to institutional placement for eligible clients with long term care needs, if they choose, allowing them to remain in a community environment. The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) Division of Long-Term Living operates several waiver programs, as well as three Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (DDSN) waivers. LTL also administers the Palmetto Senior Care (PSC) program.  More information is available by accessing the web link. .”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Local Education Agencies (LEA) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link. ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Mental Health (CMH) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Community mental health (MH) service providers must provide clinic services as defined in federal regulation42 CFR 440.90. This manual describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the providers of services.“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 06/30/2019

~~“The Client Assistance Program is also available to applicants or consumers of SCVRD. CAP is a federally funded program administered by Protection and Advocacy for People with Disabilities Inc. (P&A), a statewide non-profit that advocates for the rights of people with disabilities.

You can reach CAP by email at info@pandasc.org  .

CAP can also be reached at:

866-275-7273 (Toll-free)803-782-0639 (Columbia Area)866-232-4525 (TTY)”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Veteran Services - 06/15/2019

~~“SCServes offers service members, veterans and their families access to a class-leading continuum of providers that runs the gamut from superior legal, housing and emergency service providers to employment, recreation and fitness, financial capabilities and more – all designed to provide those who serve, have served, and their families, with the most comprehensive service delivery experience available anywhere in the nation.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

South Carolina House Bill 4093: Employment First Initiative Study Committee - 05/25/2018

“An act to establish the South Carolina Employment First Study Committee for the Purpose of studying and evaluating the need for an Employment First Initiative Act, to provide expectations policies to be established by an Employment First Initiative Act, to provide for the composition of the study committee, and to provide the committee shall report its findings to the governor, President Pro Tempore of the Senate, and the Speaker of  the House of Representatives on or before May 1, 2019, at which time the study committee is dissolved.”

Systems
  • Other

South Carolina Uniform High School Diplomas Bill - 05/09/2017

“An act to amend section 59-39-100, as amended, code of laws of South Carolina, 1976, relating to the uniform diploma for graduates of accredited high schools, so as to provide personalized pathways for students to earn the diploma and to provide related course of study-based endorsements students may earn, to revise the coursework students entering ninth grade during the 2018-2019 school year must earn for graduation, to provide this revised coursework requirement must support the profile of the graduate,  to provide for a uniform employability credential available for certain students with disabilities as an alternative to diploma pathways, and to provide the State Department of Education shall monitor numbers of diplomas and employability credentials earned by students and biannually report such numbers to the State Board of Education and the General Assembly.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

South Carolina HB 3768 (ABLE legislation) - 04/29/2015

“A BILL TO AMEND THE CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, BY ADDING ARTICLE 3 TO CHAPTER 5, TITLE 11 SO AS TO ESTABLISH THE "SOUTH CAROLINA ABLE SAVINGS PROGRAM", TO ALLOW INDIVIDUALS WITH A DISABILITY AND THEIR FAMILIES TO SAVE PRIVATE FUNDS TO SUPPORT THE INDIVIDUAL WITH A DISABILITY, TO PROVIDE GUIDELINES TO THE STATE TREASURER FOR THE MAINTENANCE OF THESE ACCOUNTS, AND TO ESTABLISH THE SAVINGS PROGRAM TRUST FUND AND SAVINGS EXPENSE TRUST FUND; AND TO DESIGNATE THE EXISTING SECTIONS OF CHAPTER 5, TITLE 11 AS ARTICLE 1 AND ENTITLE THEM "GENERAL PROVISIONS".”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

S 0704 General Bill (referred to the Committee on Medical Affairs 4/2015) - 04/22/2015

 “A BILL TO AMEND CHAPTER 28, TITLE 44 OF THE 1976 CODE, RELATING TO THE SELF-SUFFICIENCY TRUST FUND; DISABILITY TRUST FUND; AID FOR DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED, MENTALLY ILL, AND PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED PERSONS, BY ADDING ARTICLE 5 TO PROVIDE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE DISABLED SELF-EMPLOYMENT DEVELOPMENT TRUST FUND FOR THE CREATION OF A PROGRAM WHICH WILL ASSIST INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES TO PURSUE ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SELF-EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES, BY PROVIDING BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT GRANTS FOR THE STARTUP, EXPANSION OR ACQUISITION OF A BUSINESS OPERATED WITHIN THE STATE…”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment
Displaying 1 - 2 of 2

Executive Order No. 2019-39 South Carolina State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force - 12/12/2019

“WHEREAS, numerous state and federal public assistance programs currently provide support to individuals seeking education and employment, including Unemployment Insurance (“UI”), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (“SNAP”), Vocational Rehabilitation, and Medicaid benefits for qualified working disabled individuals; and…

NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor of the State of South Carolina and pursuant to the Constitution and Laws of this State and the powers conferred upon me therein, I hereby create and establish the State Community Engagement Implementation Task Force…”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order, 2015-16 - 07/01/2015

“Governor Nikki Haley reestablishes the South Carolina Developmental Disabilities Council, which is the State's forum for developmental disabilities matters and will advocate for persons with those disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

Rehabilitative Behavioral Health Services (RBHS) - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina (South Carolina or State) State Medicaid Plan allows an array of behavioral health services under the Rehabilitative Services Option, 42 CFR 440.130(d).Rehabilitative Services are medical or remedial services that have been recommended by a Physician or other Licensed Practitioner of the Healing Arts(LPHA) within the scope of their practice under South Carolina State Law and as further determined by the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS)for maximum reduction of physical or mental disability and restoration of a beneficiary to their best possible functional level. This section describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the Providers of services.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Licensed Independent Practitioner’s (LIP) Rehabilitative Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Services in this manual are intended to be delivered in an outpatient and community setting only. In accordance with 42CFR 435.1009-1011, services are not available for beneficiaries residing in an Institution of Mental Disease. Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitals and Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities (PRTFs) receive an all-inclusive, per diem rate for services. Services provided to beneficiaries in these settings are not Medicaid reimbursable”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Long-Term Care Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The mission of Long-Term Living (LTL) is to provide a cost-effective alternative to institutional placement for eligible clients with long term care needs, if they choose, allowing them to remain in a community environment. The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) Division of Long-Term Living operates several waiver programs, as well as three Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (DDSN) waivers. LTL also administers the Palmetto Senior Care (PSC) program.  More information is available by accessing the web link. .”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Local Education Agencies (LEA) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link. ”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Mental Health (CMH) Services Provider Manual - 07/01/2019

~~“Community mental health (MH) service providers must provide clinic services as defined in federal regulation42 CFR 440.90. This manual describes these services, legal authorities and the characteristics of the providers of services.“The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) provides Medicaid reimbursement for medically necessary services provided to Medicaid-eligible individuals in the Local Education Agency (LEA). This includes, but is not limited to, children under the age of 21 years who have or are at risk of developing sensory, emotional, behavioral or social impairments, physical disabilities, medical conditions, intellectual disabilities or related disabilities, or developmental disabilities or delays. More information is available by accessing the web link.” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Client Assistance Program (CAP) - 06/30/2019

~~“The Client Assistance Program is also available to applicants or consumers of SCVRD. CAP is a federally funded program administered by Protection and Advocacy for People with Disabilities Inc. (P&A), a statewide non-profit that advocates for the rights of people with disabilities.

You can reach CAP by email at info@pandasc.org  .

CAP can also be reached at:

866-275-7273 (Toll-free)803-782-0639 (Columbia Area)866-232-4525 (TTY)”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Data and Technology (D&T) - 04/27/2019

~~“Data and Technology (D&T) is responsible for collecting and managing all programmatic data required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) as well as other federal and state laws and regulations relating to the provision of special education and related services for students with disabilities in the State of South Carolina. More information is available by accessing the web link."

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Data Sharing

Transition Planning - 04/05/2019

~~This page has a collection of material to help with Secondary Transition

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department - 01/17/2019

~~“…prepares and assists eligible South Carolinians with disabilities to achieve and maintain competitive .employment. More about VR services can be found by accessing the web-link”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Services Offered by the Columbia Regional Office - 11/14/2018

~~“VA’s Columbia Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of benefits and services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in South Carolina. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs” 

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Veteran Services - 06/15/2019

~~“SCServes offers service members, veterans and their families access to a class-leading continuum of providers that runs the gamut from superior legal, housing and emergency service providers to employment, recreation and fitness, financial capabilities and more – all designed to provide those who serve, have served, and their families, with the most comprehensive service delivery experience available anywhere in the nation.”

Systems
  • Other
Citations

Project E3 - 01/30/2019

~~“Project E3 will provide South Carolina’s state Vocational Rehabilitation agencies and their partners with the skills and competencies needed to effectively and efficiently address barriers to competitive integrated employment and community integration encountered by persons with disabilities in these regions.We will leverage promising practices, knowledge, and experience gained from this project to expand employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities from underserved and economically disadvantaged populations throughout South Carolina and across the United States.Our specific goals for this project are to:• By the end of the first year, 25 individuals from each region will apply or return to vocational rehabilitation services.• By the end of the second year, approximately 18 individuals from each region will be found eligible for services.• By the end of the second year, the number of people who complete an Individualized plan for employment will increase by 50%. Of those, there will be an increase in the cases closed in competitive, integrated employment by 25%.• The project will develop a community consortium to direct, develop, and sustain services during the project and into the coming years.” 

Systems
  • Other
Citations

SC Employment First Initiative - 07/01/2017

“South Carolina is one of six states selected by the Administration for Community Living to receive funding in order to increase employment outcomes for youth with intellectual and developmental disabilities statewide. Employment First emphasizes competitive, integrated employment as the preferred option for individuals with disabilities.

The South Carolina Disability Employment Coalition, through collaboration with thirteen Project Partners, will implement The SC Employment First Initiative to address barriers to successful employment for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

South Carolina Supported Employment Programs - 05/30/2013

• “Individual Placement and Support (IPS) is an evidenced-based supported employment best practice model. IPS is collaboration between South Carolina Department of Mental Health (SCDMH) and South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD). Since 2005 these state agencies have combined resources and personnel to implement the IPS Supported Employment model. The goal of this partnership is to place people with serve mental illness in competitive employment. Through the collaboration of this Supported Employment model, SCVRD and SCDMH are able to provide an integrated and seamless employment service delivery that results in improved employment outcomes for people with severe mental illness.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Transition Alliance of South Carolina (TASC)

"The Transition Alliance of South Carolina (TASC) is spearheaded by the Center for Disability Resources (CDR) at the University of South Carolina’s School of Medicine.

Utilizing funding and support from the South Carolina Department of Education, Office of Special Education Services, TASC partners and project staff housed at the Center for Disability Resources developed an infrastructure to support local interagency transition teams.  Project activities are focused on providing interagency teams the resources to increase their capacity to collaboratively and effectively serve young adults with disabilities who are transitioning from high school to adult-life.

Together, we build capacity for transition programming at the state level, while also serving as a bridge to and between local communities in South Carolina."

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

South Carolina Disability Employment Coalition

~~“The SC Disability Employment Coalition (SCDEC) formed in the fall of 2014, through funding from the SC Developmental Disabilities  Council, to address employment barriers for individuals with disabilities in South Carolina. SCDEC stakeholders represent South Carolina employers, state and private agencies, and individuals with disabilities.

SCDEC members meet quarterly.  The SCDEC has four committees that meet on a monthly basis and is comprised of over 40 stakeholder organizations and individuals.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE)

“People with all types of disabilities are employed, pursuing careers and building assets just like people without disabilities…Through advocacy and education, APSE advances employment and self-sufficiency for all people with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

South Carolina Partnerships in Employment - 11/28/2016

“ACL’s Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) recently awarded more than $1.8 million in funding to six states to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). The five-year grants will help enhance collaboration across existing state systems, including programs administered by state developmental disabilities agencies, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, state educational agencies, and other entities to prioritize employment as the first and preferred option for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities.”

 

Able South Carolina received a grant for the South Carolina Employment First Initiative.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

South Carolina Employment Development Initiative - 10/01/2012

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).

This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project." South Carolina received an EDI award for its program Integration Peer Support into Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Sourh Carolina SAMHSA Grant - "Health Mind Body Alliance"

“The integration model brings primary care into state community mental health clinics. Clinics are located in the underserved rural counties of Marlboro, Dillon, and Chesterfield South Carolina and the initial strategy included an FQHC [Federal Qualified Health Center]. Year two enrollment target is to serve 150 unduplicated clients (During the first quarters of year two for the grant 194 clients unduplicated clients were enrolled). Services are accessible to all consenting adult clients of TCCMHC [Tri-County Community Mental Health Center] with serious mental illness (Excepting incarcerated clients).”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Money Follows the Person/Home Again

“Home Again is a program assisting seniors, individuals with disabilities, and children with severe emotional disturbances who currently live in facilities to transition back into their communities and receive appropriate services and supports.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient - 09/03/2019

~~“DECO Recovery Management, LLC was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Underserved and vulnerable uninsured populations: Latino/Hispanic; African Americans; Rural communities; young and “invincibles”; small employers; and self-employed individuals.  There are no Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations. They will partner with South Carolina Chamber of Commerce, South Carolina Hospital Association, South Carolina of the Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) , Carolina Chapter of the American Association of Healthcare Administrative Management (AAHAM), Greenville Memorial Hospital, Greer Memorial Hospital, North Greenville Hospital, Hillcrest Memorial Hospital , Patewood Memorial Hospital, Laurens County Memorial Hospital, Aiken Regional Medical Center, Oconee Memorial Hospital, and Bon Secours St. Francis Health System.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Andrew Foland \Phone: (410) 763-7475Email: afoland@decorm.com ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

6th Annual South Carolina State Transition Conference - 11/19/2018

~~“Join us for South Carolina’s premier interagency transition conference. Local school districts, adult service agency representatives, families and other professionals will attend this 2 day event in beautiful downtown Greenville. Early Registration ends 10/18/2019

    Lunch on both Tuesday and Wednesday is included with all exhibitor and sponsor registrations.    This year’s conference will once again include vendor breaks, breakout sessions and facilitated team planning time.    Make plans to stay over Wednesday night and join your colleagues from across the state for an evening Networking Social.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Community Employment Program Development Work Group - 03/07/2018

“This Employment Community of Practice offers an exciting opportunity for direct service providers interested in implementing customized employment practices. The community of practice builds capacity to improve the methodology and skills of employment staff to assist seekers with more significant barriers to obtain employment.”

This page is continuously updated with webinars and related resources around topics relating to community employment for people with disabilities.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation

No Enforcement have been entered for this state.

Displaying 1 - 8 of 8

Waiver Case Management Standards - 07/01/2019

~~This document has information on how staff and providers are to operate when working with the Community Supports Waiver,  Head and Spinal Cord Injury Waiver, and Intellectual Disability/Related Disabilities Waiver.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Service Rate Increases - 07/01/2018

~~PROVIDER ALERTEffective for services provided on or after July 1, 2018, the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) increased reimbursement for qualified Adult Day Health Care Services, Personal Care I, Personal Care II and Attendant Care providers by approximately 8.2 percent.

For Community Long Term Care waivers, the updated fee schedule can be found at scdhhs.gov/resource/fee-schedules. For waivers operated by the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (SCDDSN), providers with questions about this action are encouraged to contact SCDDSN at (803) 898-9626.

Future updates to reimbursement rates will be communicated via the standard fee schedule update process and posted at scdhhs.gov.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Statewide Transition Plan - 03/31/2016

The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule on Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) establishing certain requirements for services that are provided through Medicaid waivers. There are specific requirements for where home and community-based services are received which will be referred to as the “settings requirements.” CMS required that each state submit a “Statewide Transition Plan” by March 17, 2015. The Statewide Transition Plan outlines how the state will come into conformance and compliance with the HCBS Rule settings requirements. States must come into full compliance with the HCBS Rule requirements by March 17, 2019. The South Carolina Department of Health and Human services (SCDHHS) has branded this effort for HCBS with the tagline: Independent•Integrated•Individual. This tagline was developed because home and community-based services help our members be independent, be integrated in the community, and are based on what is best for the individual.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

SC Community Supports (0676.R02.00) - 07/01/2012

Provides adult day health care, personal care, respite care, waiver case management, incontinence supplies, adult day health care-nursing, adult day health care-transportation, assistive technology and appliances, behavior support, career preparation, community services, day activity, employment services, environmental mods, in-home support, PERS, private vehicle mods, support center services for individuals w/IID ages 0 - no max age.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

South Carolina ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/28/2012

“South Carolina’s college and career readiness aspirations extend to all students, including those who need additional support and consideration because English is not their first language or due to a disability. To help ensure that we effectively analyze the linguistic demands of the CCSS to inform development of corresponding standards specific to these students that enable their success.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

South Carolina Statewide Transition Plan – Revised (HCBS)

The South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (SCDHHS) gives notice that the revised draft Statewide Transition Plan, required per Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) Rule (42 CFR 441.301(c)(6)),was submitted on March 31, 2016 to CMS for review. It will be effective upon CMS approval.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Community Long Term Care - South Carolina Medicaid Waivers

“Community Long Term Care (CLTC) offers programs to help individuals who want to live at home, need assistance with their care, and are financially eligible for Medicaid."

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

South Carolina Medicaid Money Follows the Person/Home Again

“Home Again is a program assisting seniors, individuals with disabilities, and children with severe emotional disturbances who currently live in facilities to transition back into their communities and receive appropriate services and supports.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Provider Transformation

States - Phone

Snapshot

The Palmetto State is "Prepared in Mind and Resources" when it comes to improving supports for individuals with disabilities to increase access to competitive, integrated employment and socioeconomic advancement in South Carolina.

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon South Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2019 State Population.
1.25%
Change from
2018 to 2019
5,148,714
2019 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-2.43%
Change from
2018 to 2019
357,695
2019 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.74%
Change from
2018 to 2019
123,245
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
3.11%
Change from
2018 to 2019
34.46%
2019 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.62%
Change from
2018 to 2019
77.01%

State Data

General

2019
Population. 5,148,714
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 357,695
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 123,245
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 2,052,071
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 34.46%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 77.01%
State/National unemployment rate. 2.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 20.50%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 12.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 342,542
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 374,268
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 482,563
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 201,996
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 20,052
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,114
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 6,587
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A