Virginia

States - Big Screen

Known affectionately as "The Place for Lovers," individuals with disabilities in the Commonwealth have the opportunity with the right supports and services to Live Passionately by having careers in competitive integrated employment and being full participants in their communities. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.56%
Change from
2017 to 2018
8,517,685
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.15%
Change from
2017 to 2018
485,460
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.78%
Change from
2017 to 2018
194,796
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.57%
Change from
2017 to 2018
40.13%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.24%
Change from
2017 to 2018
79.16%

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 8,411,808 8,470,020 8,517,685
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 496,928 500,771 485,460
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 193,632 204,103 194,796
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,647,462 3,669,633 3,686,152
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 38.97% 40.76% 40.13%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.66% 78.97% 79.16%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.00% 3.80% 3.00%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.10% 17.60% 17.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.10% 9.80% 9.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 466,393 462,932 482,577
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 498,192 516,107 511,887
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 675,120 686,273 698,138
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 213,359 222,654 214,002
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 46,107 45,140 52,632
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,829 3,549 3,911
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 32,472 28,994 35,040
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 957 N/A 924
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,133 27,801 30,912
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 10,715 9,532 11,537

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,657 6,877 6,857
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.80% 4.90% 4.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 211,614 210,694 207,901

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 14,753 14,919 15,650
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 31,011 30,594 31,285
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 77,519 70,510 70,376
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 19.00% 21.20% 22.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 2.10% 1.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 4.50% 3.20%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.00% 3.10% 3.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 7.80% 43.40% 27.60%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 388 1,243 1,113
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 329 2,600 1,903
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,691 1,788 2,066
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 4,485 25,180 16,651

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 13,591 12,668 12,496
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 109 150 150
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 60 85 80
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 57.00% 53.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.72 1.01 0.95

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,248
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 44 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 455 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,047 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,990 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,092 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 620 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 37.60% 37.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,335 7,954 7,081
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 312,508 315,937 314,901
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 889 623 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 713 460 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $35,381,000 N/A $11,584,778
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $19,799,000 N/A $1,209,869
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $151,457,000 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 27.00% N/A 25.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 898 N/A 1,708
Number of people served in facility based work. 683 N/A 1,054
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 9,455 N/A 6,219
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 48.60 N/A 44.96

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.36% 64.01% 65.07%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.15% 10.87% 10.16%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.16% 4.26% 4.32%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.17% 99.37% 99.71%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 34.45% 32.85% 32.57%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 64.81% 63.10% 64.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.03% 71.98% 73.39%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.36% 30.25% 31.51%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 5,052,830
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 7,757
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 168,108
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 3,289,332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,457,440
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 339
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,546
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,885
AbilityOne wages (products). $831,106
AbilityOne wages (services). $43,925,206

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 21 27 18
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 22 28 19
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 14 14 14
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,398 1,579 1,277
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,412 1,593 1,291

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~(11) Providing training and implementing seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment (CE) across Virginia. This strategy is based on needs assessment and focus group recommendations from DARS' partnerships with Transcen, Inc. and George Washington University. By November 1, 2018, DARS will select and train key VR Counselors and Evaluators, AT Specialists, Business Placement and Self-Employment staff, and Partnering Employment Specialists, Behavioral Specialists, and Facilities Personnel in key concepts to implement CE approaches to DARS clients exiting institutions, sheltered workshops, high schools and adults for whom traditional supported employment services have not yielded successful outcomes. DARS will serve 20 or more clients with diverse backgrounds in order to assimilate CE best practices into our menu of services for these targeted populations. Options for self-employment will also be explored under this approach.  (Pages 315-316) Title IV

4. How the funds reserved for innovation and expansion (I&E) activities were utilized:
During FFY 2017, the funds reserved for Innovation and Expansion were used for the following activities:…
(7) Providing training and implementing seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment (CE) across Virginia. DARS is selecting and training VR staff and stakeholders in key concepts to implement CE approaches to DARS clients exiting institutions, sheltered workshops, high schools and adults for whom traditional supported employment services have not yielded successful outcomes. (Page 333) Title IV

q. Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services. Include the following: 
1. The quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities:
Supported employment (SE) services, including customized employment, provided under Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014, will be available to eligible individuals with most significant disabilities who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind, including youth, who are served by the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI). (Page 404) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~In the early stages of implementing this plan, the Commonwealth will re-convene leadership from workforce system partners to revisit the problem this plan seeks to address. The purpose of this convening will be to:

8. Emphasize transparency and shared accountability in responding to opportunities for improvement (Page 109) Title I

Manage and Develop Resources:

In order to achieve the five goals stated in Virginia’s plan, workforce partners must ensure that resources are being used efficiently and effectively, eliminating unnecessary duplication of service and redundancy in the system. As partners move towards a new vision for the workforce service delivery system, they must also establish and ensure a standard for service across programs and a rational strategy towards resource development that continuously reflects back on this plan and its goals and objectives. This strategy proposes to align staff and financial resources appropriately in the One Stop system and its centers, using a functional organizational chart approach that will leverage agency strengths and specialties to better serve customers and address Virginia’s workforce challenges. The successful execution of this plan requires Virginia to commit to the professional development of workforce practitioners, and to the braiding and management of financial resources in new ways. The Commonwealth is committed to developing staff to capitalize on investments in technology, and to realize the benefits from a common agenda with workforce system partners. Careful investments in human and financial resources ultimately reflect value to customers and to their communities across the state. (Page 110) Title I

The following are examples of local level practices impl1emented to enhance access for job seekers with disabilities made possible by leveraging the resources from the DOL Disability grants and state level cross agency partnerships:

Installed Universal Computer Workstations with Assistive Technology devices and software and conducted staff trainings in pilot LWDBAs; expanded the web-based Common Screening Tool to better identify job seekers with disabilities, track customer flow and service referrals. (The data indicated an on average a 15% increase of self-identification where this tool was piloted); incorporated Disability Resources and disseminated announcements for various activities that would benefit individuals with disabilities, such as: disability trainings and IRS free tax assistance and site locations, dedicated a page to post information about disability resources on the Virginia’s Workforce Development website, Elevate Virginia; integrated DEI strategies by adding four modules into Virginia’s Workforce Development Systems Course, which is a requirement for all front-line staff co-located at the Centers to complete. (The optional modules are Welcoming All Customers/Universal Strategies, Asset Development, Integrated Resource Teams with a Person Centered Planning approach and Mystery Shopper); coordinated local/statewide trainings (on line, in person and at state conferences) for One-Stop staff and partners and also utilized resources through the Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. Some of the topics covered were: ADA Accessibility requirements, Disability Etiquette, Access for All - Welcoming Customers at workforce centers and accommodations; implemented Social Security (SSA) - Ticket To Work Program to expand employment opportunities for SSA beneficiaries in 6 LWDB areas; facilitated certification trainings for Work Incentives Specialist Advocates who advise beneficiaries on work incentives; promoted asset development and financial capability strategies to enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency, including financial literacy training, the use of individual development accounts, tax and work incentives, and other strategies for encouraging economic advancement; and trained and provided technical assistance to businesses/employers about the use of effective hiring practices and job accommodations, including Assistive Technology trainings in collaboration with Virginia Assistive Technology System and Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center.  (Page 188) Title I

B. How the State will leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities:

DARS will continue to explore alternative funding mechanisms for long-term follow along supports for consumers needing Supported Employment (SE) services, including Social Security Work Incentives. This includes working with the Governor’s Office and the General Assembly to receive more funding for Long Term Employment Support Services and Extended Employment Services and working collaboratively with other agencies, community partners and Employment Service Organizations to leverage these funds.  (Page 314) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~8. Addressing the Accessibility of the One-Stop Delivery System for Individuals with Disabilities:…

Virginia is fortunate to have a long standing collaborative relationship with Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and other key state partners. This partnership history facilitated the leveraging and coordination of existing and added resources provided via the six DOL Workforce Disability Initiatives, the latest of which are the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants. Whereas, significant strides have been made to ensure our One-Stop Service Delivery System is accessible to all job seekers, including those with disabilities and other challenges to employment, we are committed to continuous quality improvement. These efforts are focused on physical, programmatic and communication access. We will continue these efforts and build on our existing infrastructure to encourage shared ownership; foster systems integration through cross-agency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective.  (Pages 186-187) Title I

Goal 3: Ensure that the VR Program continues to be a collaborative leader in the integration of services for people with disabilities in the Workforce Centers and the use of Social Security Work Incentives:

Indicators:
3.4 Provide Disability Resource Coordinators/Disability Program Navigators to increase access to programs and services for vocational rehabilitation consumers. DARS currently provides three Disability Resource Coordinators to two local American Job Centers (AJCs) as a part of DOL Disability Employment Initiative Round IV grant project efforts in collaboration with the VCCS/Workforce Services Division (Title I Administrator). In addition, through an Innovation and Expansion project, DARS has co-located a previous Disability Program Navigator as a VR Counselor housed in an AJC and providing VR services. Also, three workforce areas previously participating in DOL DPN/DEI grant efforts have retained three DARS staff to provide services to individuals with disabilities in AJCs. As a result DEI Round I efforts and collaborative workforce partnerships, Virginia statewide data from October 2010 through March 2014, indicated participants with disabilities active with WIA (now WIOA) intensive services increased from 1.8% to 4.9%.  (Page 325) Title IV

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~d. Coordination with Education Officials:
Describe:
2. Information on the formal interagency agreement with the State educational agency with respect to:
A. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
DARS Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Education and annual review of agreements with the Local Education Agencies (LEAs) reflect the ongoing collaboration as it relates to providing consultation and technical assistance for transition services.
B. transition planning by personnel of the designated State agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and implementation of their individualized education programs; (Pages 353-354) Title IV

In this Plan, DARS has an entire Goal and Priority and strategies dedicated to transition planning. DARS initiates an Annual Review, a survey of VR counselors and their respective LEA transition representative, to ensure effective working relationships on local levels and to support best practices in the provisions of services to students with disabilities. Follow-up services are offered and provided based on results of the Annual Review.

DARS’ policies require that for students with disabilities who i) are receiving special education services from a public school, and ii) also are determined eligible for VR services (and able to be served if DARS is on an Order of Selection), the Individualized Plan for Employment shall be completed and signed within 90 days of the eligibility determination and before the student leaves the school setting.

DARS continues to be a stakeholder in the review of data that DOE collects to report to the Office on Special Education Programs (OSEP) to support and accomplish respective post-school and employment outcomes required by the federal government and to provide meaningful data collection by each agency.

Additional DARS and DOE collaborative activities include co-chairing the Virginia Interagency Transition Council (VITC) and the statewide Community of Practice. Representatives from DARS, local education agencies (LEAs), and the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) are planning statewide trainings to discuss transition and vocational services available to students with disabilities. Both activities provide a forum for transition practitioners and other interested stakeholders from school divisions, adult agencies, and community partners to engage in professional development activities, networking opportunities, and collaborative efforts that enhance the implementation of quality transition services for secondary school students with disabilities. The VITC is comprised of representatives from 14 state agencies who have leadership roles and transition as part of their responsibility in serving youth with disabilities. The Community of Practice works to stay abreast of current transition information, to identify gaps in resources, and avoid duplication of transition services. VITC has set a priority to improve communication between the state, regional, and local transition councils. It is anticipated that information will be shared with and by VITC through the regional and local Councils. This flow of communication allows for improved responses to identified needs, as well as recommendations for future efforts.

The Department's Transition Coordinator and Pre-Employment Transition Coordinator provide training to new counselors as part of the New Counselors Skills Training. This training provides information on how to evaluate and process training cases to ensure that employment goals meet the employment needs of our communities. The training also provides information on the need for and how to complete the required RS-25 (Post-Secondary Training Comparable Benefits & Financial Assessment)

Cooperative Agreements are also conducted between DARS and state institutions of higher education to ensure that to the best of DARS abilities and within constraints of our Order of Selection that students in post-secondary training are receiving appropriate and necessary services.

The DRS Support Team utilizes an interactive webinar series to streamline processes and improve communication to/from VR counselors who serve transition-age youth. The webinar series offers a time saving alternative to the standard face-to-face training approach while simultaneously saving agency resources. Webinar topics are developed based on counselor input, leadership recommendations, and developing issues. Similar technology also is being used for an Annual Review to gather information on effective processes between the local school divisions and their corresponding DARS transition counselor. The Annual Review will also indicate any needs or concerns where the Transition Coordinator or Pre-Employment Transition Coordinator may organize a facilitated meeting by use of the Go To Meeting platform enabling teams to meet online and collaboratively to discuss programming. The Annual Review supports communication and extends support to local team members and may address specific points of the transition process and encourage VR Counselors and school partners to more clearly establish partner roles and responsibilities.

For multiple years, the Commonwealth of Virginia has been invited to bring a team to participate in the National Summit - Building State Capacity to Address Critical Issues in Deaf Education: Transition from Secondary Education to Post-Secondary Options. This was the fourth out of four Summit activities sponsored by pep net 2, which focused on improving post-secondary outcomes for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, including those with co-occurring disabilities. The focus of the Summit has been on critical issues in deaf education that address positive student outcomes, graduation, and transition to post-secondary education and training. The Department’s State Coordinator of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services and the Department of Education (DOE) Specialist of Deaf and Hard of Hearing co-chair the state team to review gaps in programs and services utilizing tools and strategies related to transition within the goals of the National Agenda: Achieving Educational Equality for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students. In 2016, the Virginia Team hosted “Opening Doors to Life Beyond High School”, a one-day event for students, parents and professionals. Topics included Life Beyond High School (transition information about DRS services), I’m Determined, and Map-It (a new tool from pep net 2). (Pages 284-286) Title IV

C. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
DARS and DOE have had a formal agreement to provide cooperation and coordination among the two agencies to facilitate effective transition services for students with disabilities to engage in competitive, integrated employment, post-secondary education, and community living. This Agreement is being updated and will contain the following provisions:

(1) DOE is designated as the lead agency to ensure that students with disabilities are properly referred to DARS and DARS will serve as the lead agency to determine eligibility for VR services and to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment. Both agencies agree to:

(1) promote the development and expansion of collaborative structures for planning and evaluating transition services; share relevant data; share contact information on school divisions’ special education directors and 504 coordinators; and explore new opportunities for collaboration and seek additional resources to improve transition services. Each agency will assign or designate primary program responsibility for transition to one individual within the agency.

(2) promote a comprehensive personnel development approach through the provision of collaboratively planned and jointly sponsored professional development activities. DOE has the responsibility for ensuring the requirements for the provision of special education services by LEAs to students with disabilities in accordance with federal and state laws, regulations, agency policies and guidelines.

(3) DOE shall commit financial resources to:

(a) teaching positions for Occupational Skills Training and Life Skills at WWRC;

(b) training and technical assistance in secondary transition programming; and

(c) activities of the Community of Practice and Transition Practitioners Council.

DARS is responsible for the coordination, provision, and/or payment of rehabilitative/transition goods and services for individuals with disabilities in accordance with applicable federal and state laws, regulations, agency policies and guidelines. DARS also commits financial resources to:

(a) transition services for youth at least three years prior to their exit from high school to include vocational evaluation, case management, career counseling, situational assessments, field transition consultant services, and technical assistance, as appropriate;

(b) the Postsecondary Education Rehabilitation and Transition Program at the Wilson Workforce and Rehabilitation Center; and

(c) activities of the Community of Practice and Transition Practitioners’ Council. (Pages 286-287) Title IV

D. procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

Specific activities related to outreach to address needs of students in transition include:

(1) providing staff support and programmatic leadership to Virginia’s Intercommunity Transition Council (VITC), a statewide Council composed of representatives of state agencies, parents, consumers and employers, and seeking to promote, in collaboration with VITC, participation of underrepresented agencies, service providers, and community/ advocacy groups in VITC;
(2) Providing staff support and programmatic leadership to the Higher Education Leadership Partners Workgroup (composed of college and university faculty and staff, the State Council on Higher Education in Virginia, the Virginia Community College System, the Association of Higher Education and Disability, consumers and disability agency personnel, secondary education personnel and representatives from DOE. Also, in collaboration with VITC, DOE, the State Council of Higher Education, the Association of Higher Education and Disability and other partners, developing statewide guidelines for Disability Documentation at the post-secondary level, as well as improvement of transition from secondary to post-secondary institutions;
(3) Promoting collaboration among DOE, the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, the Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, the Virginia Assistive Technology System, the Wilson Workforce and Rehabilitation Center, and other interested partners to increase the appropriate utilization of assistive technology for students with disabilities in Virginia; 
(4) Aligning all current and future transition activities, when appropriate, with the WIOA system;
(5) Collaborating with Adult Education and Literacy programs, DOE, the Department of Social Services and other partners in pursuing creative models of providing assessment and screening for learning disabilities among clients of the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families program;
(6) Producing transition-related products (e.g., newsletters, brochures, power point presentations, and posters) with examples of current legislative information, best practices and problem solving;
(7) Collaborating with staff of the Personal Assistance Services (PAS) Program at DARS to increase awareness of PAS services for students in transition, especially in post-secondary institutions;
(8) Collaborating with Employment Services Organizations (ESO) staff to increase awareness of local vendor programs that could provide services to schools and transition age youth;
(9) Collaborating with DOE to utilize VITC, and other venues to increase awareness and understanding of the Youth Councils that will be part of the local Workforce Investment Boards established under the WIOA system;
(10) Encouraging disability professionals, consumers and advocacy groups to submit applications for appointment to the local Youth Councils; and
(11) Continuing to provide the Youth in Transition service line to supplement and enhance services to high school youth enrolled at WWRC.  (Pages 287 – 288) Title IV

2. transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities:
Through a wide range of collaborations, DBVI’s VR Counselors and specialized Transition Counselors will ensure that students who are still in high school will have work experiences. These experiences will be accomplished by creating working partnerships with employers, students, and families to create expectations that students will participate in work experiences and to actually create those work experience opportunities, both volunteer and paid. 

To facilitate work opportunities and competitive integrated employment, Vocational Rehabilitation and specialized Transition Counselors will counsel students in career development and job exploration activities to address how students will gain employment experiences during high school. Pre-vocational and pre-employment services will include vocational interest inventories, vocational evaluations, informational interviews, and job shadowing to assist students in determining a vocational goal. Assistance will be provided in developing skills students need to complete applications and interview for work experiences while in high school. VR Counselors and specialized Transition Counselors will collaborate with itinerant Teachers for the Visually Impaired (TVIs), DBVI Educational Coordinators, and employers to integrate work experiences into the expectations and opportunities for youth. Additionally, DBVI will develop ways to enhance parental investment and explore how to best integrate transition planning, including opportunity for work experience, into Individualized Educational Program (IEP) and Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) development. Also, DBVI will continue to collaborate with Virginia Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) regarding transition resources to facilitate development of work experience opportunities with employers. 

Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, will include job exploration and counseling, work-based learning experiences, apprenticeships, counseling regarding opportunities on enrollment in transition or secondary education programs, work place readiness training, and instruction in self-advocacy. 

To enhance and facilitate job-readiness skills and career planning for students to make a successful transition from school to work and to greater independence, students will be referred to DBVI Business Relations Specialists and to Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) (also known in Virginia as Employment Services Organizations (ESOs)). Business Relations Specialists will complement preemployment transition services by delivering workplace readiness training to establish skills necessary for entry into career pathways, competitive integrated employment, and by coordinating with schools and networking with employers to establish paid and unpaid internships, including apprenticeships, specifically matched to the student’s needs, skills, interests, abilities, and informed choice. Transition services purchased from CRPs may also include On-The-Job support and extended support services for students and youth needing additional supports in the work experience setting or on the job. (Pages 360-361) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~c. State Strategy
1. Describe the strategies the State will implement, including industry or sector partnerships related to in-demand industry sectors and occupations and career pathways, as required by WIOA section 101(d)(3)(B), (D). “Career pathway” is defined at WIOA section 3(7) and includes registered apprenticeship. “In-demand industry sector or occupation” is defined at WIOA section 3(23).

How These Strategies Were Developed
These strategies were developed over the course of a year, working in concert with members of the WIOA Implementation Team, with a strategy framework provided by the state workforce board (the Virginia Board of Workforce Development). They were further refined during a facilitated 3-day retreat, which engaged stakeholders from inside and outside the partner programs listed in this plan. These stakeholders included representatives from the Virginia Economic Development Partnership (VEDP), the lead organization responsible for economic development in the Commonwealth with responsibilities for both business attraction and business retention and expansion services, and subject matter experts from other organizations.  (Page 106) Title I

Activities and practices that are continued/implemented under this DEI Round:
o Partnership with the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant to facilitate systems alignment, cross systems service delivery efforts, and co-enrollments with Workforce Partner Programs.  (Page 191) Title I

Virginia’s Combined State Plan highlights the critical role of sector strategies and career pathways development and implementation. In 2017, Virginia’s workforce partners came together to start developing a Sector Strategy and Career Pathways Academy and online Community of Practice. A key aim of this initiative is to strengthen the ability of workforce system practitioners and partners to incorporate Sector Strategies and Career Pathways strategies as integral components in Virginia’ s workforce system.

This Academy will build a statewide professional development program that will help its workforce professionals to understand how to improve services to business and job seeking customers through sector strategies and career pathways. The Academy will also increase awareness of demand-driven talent pipelines and job matching services through more cooperation and collaboration among public and private workforce partners. (Page 156) Title I

Career Pathways Workgroup
As previously mentioned, the Career Pathways Workgroup has provided a platform for cross-agency collaboration and a place for system partners to dialogue on common challenges and opportunities. Moving forward, this group will remain vital to the implementation of elements of this plan, particularly around career pathways and aligned sector strategies.  (Page 194) Title I

DARS Response 4: DARS will continue to promote career pathways and build partnerships to achieve this goal. Virginia has convened a Career Pathways Workgroup, comprised of senior staff from eight different agencies administering workforce or workforce-related programs. DARS, along with the Department of Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) also oversees the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (CPID) grant. This grant will assist Virginians with disabilities, including young adults and veterans, gain new skills and credentials through career pathways and help these individuals obtain employment in competitive, high-demand, high-quality occupations. (Page 280) Title IV

Priority 3: Partnering with the Wilson Workforce and Rehabilitation Center (WWRC), other state agencies, Supported Employment (SE) providers, and other entities in the integration of services for people with disabilities leading to competitive, integrated employment:

Strategies:
Implement the five-year Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (CPID) model demonstration program to create new career pathways and/or use existing career pathways in high-demand occupations. (Page 320) Title IV

7. Strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce development system in assisting individuals with disabilities:

Strategy 1.3: To establish and enhance entry into career pathways, DBVI will continue to utilize personnel and funds associated Virginia’s Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Grant which was jointly awarded DBVI and the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) in 2015. DBVI will:
• help individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations;
• enhance the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities;
• enhance access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities; and
• strengthen the alignment of Virginia’s VR programs with the other core programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and other Federally-funded career pathways initiatives providing self-advocacy skills training that is critical to the achievement of individuals’ personal and vocational goals. (Page 395) Title IV

1. An evaluation of the extent to which the VR program goals described in the approved VR services portion of the Unified or Combined State Plan for the most recently completed program year were achieved. The evaluation must:
A. Identify the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals:

Because of the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant, obtained jointly with the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, DBVI is focused more on helping individuals obtain credentials. DBVI and DARS have hosted one week academies which are focused on high demand occupations within the Commonwealth. One of these academies was held at the agency’s Rehabilitation Center during the summer of 2017. The focus was in the area of information technology. The students built a robot individually and programmed it to do various tasks. (Pages 398-399) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Virginia’s Registered Apprenticeship programs are administered by the Department of Labor and Industry (DOLI) through a network of regional service offices and technical outreach staff. At the LWDB level, Business Service Teams are the organizing structure used to engage business and industry and deliver workforce services to industry partners. DOLI representatives are vital members of the LWDB Business Service Teams and also work in partnership with other system partners (e.g. Virginia Employment Commission, Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education) to support their sponsor businesses and registered apprentices. DOLI and the LWDB Business Service Teams will collaborate and work in tandem identifying Registered Apprenticeship opportunities.

Additionally, Registered Apprenticeships are incorporated into its strategy and services via DOLIs participation on the State’s Career Pathways Committee, the State’s WIOA Implementation Team and other strategic Workforce Development Committees. The Commonwealth is taking further steps to strengthen partnership between Title I and DOLI Registered Apprenticeship programs. This will include making each team aware of the programs offered and providing more coordinated services to businesses. (Pages 222-223) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Goal 3: Ensure that the VR Program continues to be a collaborative leader in the integration of services for people with disabilities in the Workforce Centers and the use of Social Security Work Incentives:
Indicators:
3.5 DARS has entered into administrative Employment Network (EN) agreements with a third Administrative EN. This has increased the choices for potential EN partners in Virginia. This model has proven to be a viable option for smaller organizations that do not have the administrative capacity to become their own employment network. The three administrative ENs are collaborating with 12-organizations in Virginia. This includes Centers for Independent Living, Community Rehabilitation Programs, Brain Injury Service providers and other DARS vendors

3.6 Maintain the department’s presence in all of the State’s Comprehensive Workforce Centers. The VR program currently is co-located as a One Stop partner in Martinsville, Danville and South Boston. DARS also has a physical presence in other Workforce Board AJC’s.

3.7 Increase the number of work incentive authorizations to 600. During FFY 2017, there were 2,737 total WISA authorizations. These services were provided through over 98 different WISAs around the state, which was a significant increase which allowed DARS to significantly increase the number of authorizations. DARS has added additional WISA services to include Section 301 protection, ABLEnow accounts, and Financial Health Assessments. This brings the total number of available WISA services to 14. DARS has also facilitated increased efficiency with the WorkWORLD for the Web tool. It is now four-times faster. The rehabilitation rate for DARS clients who receive WISA services is 60% compared to a rehabilitation rate of 40% for the same population when no WISA services are provided. This growth in WISA authorizations has resulted in an opportunity to partner with the Social Security Administration on a proof of concept pilot for obtaining Benefit Planning Query’s for DARS clients. Previously, this process had to be completed through the local SSA field offices and took over four weeks. Now the turnaround is three to five business days using a secure email exchange with SSA. During the 2017 FFY, DARS affiliates which includes Partnership Plus Employment Networks and WISAs requested a total of 3,129 Benefit Planning Query’s to provide work incentive services to their clients. This includes 30 requests from WWRC. In addition, DARS counselors requested 2,730 Benefit Planning Query’s for a total of 5,859 across the Commonwealth. Thus far, DARS affiliates have requested 1,148 Benefit Planning Query’s and an additional 20 have been requested by WWRC. The average turn-around time over the span of this pilot have changed but is currently less than five-business days for the majority of requests. This is a significant difference in the processing time and has resulted in more accurate information available to both clients’ and counselors to increase informed choice related to earned income and SSA benefits.

3.8 Implement a pilot program to enhance the reassignment “handoff” process for the Partnership Plus Employment Network Partners. The Partnership Plus handoff pilot program has been completed and with the release of Social Security’s enhanced portal, Ticket To Work handoffs are achieved within three business days in the majority of cases and the planning begins while clients are in employed status. DARS partnership plus Employment Networks generated more ticket to work revenue and exceeded the national average for growth in ticket payments. The national growth rate in ticket revenue was 73% between FFY 2015 and 2016. There are 15 DARS Partnership Plus Employment Networks that were active during this reporting period and all grew in revenue by over 100%. (Pages 325-326) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~D. Coordination, Alignment and Provision of Services to Employers:  
Virginia has positioned business as co-equal customer for the workforce system. The state board has established a formal policy for the provision of business services and embedded concepts like regional workforce demand planning into local plan requirements and related policies, including those governing the state’s Eligible Training Provider List.  (Page 134) Title IV

F. Partner Engagement with Other Education and Training Providers:
Describe how the State’s Strategies will engage the State’s other education and training providers, including providers on the state’s eligible training provider list, as partners in the workforce development system to create a job-driven education and training system:
Virginia’s strategy with other education and training providers encourages customer choice, innovation in service delivery, alignment with industry needs, and quality. Virginia also embraces On-the-job training, customized training, employer-directed incumbent worker training, and paid or unpaid work experiences to develop and advance skills in the individuals served.

Eligible Training Provider List:
The state workforce board recently adopted a policy for training providers which is streamlined, open and inclusive and includes performance measures for training providers. There are five categories of providers who may apply for consideration to be included on the state eligible training provider list:
1. A postsecondary educational institution that is eligible to receive federal funds under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 and that provides a program that leads to certification or license or college certificate, associate degree, or baccalaureate degree.
2. A postsecondary school that offers formal instructional programs with curricula designed primarily for students who have completed the requirements for a high school diploma or its equivalent. Such schools include programs of academic-vocational, vocational, and continuing professional education that may lead to a certification or licensure. This category excludes avocational and adult basic education programs.
3. An entity that carries out related instruction under the National Apprenticeship Act that is recognized by the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry,
4. A provider of a program of occupational training services that under Section 23-276.2 of the Code of Virginia is exempt from certification as a postsecondary school such as a professional or occupational training program regulated by another state or federal governmental agency other than the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV), any school, institute, or course of instruction offered by any trade association or any nonprofit affiliation of a trade association on subjects related to the trade, business, or profession represented by such association, or
5. A provider of adult education and literacy activities under title II of WIOA, if these activities are provided in combination with occupational skills training.

Exemptions for category 4 providers include educational offerings or activities that meet the following:
1) A nursing education program or curriculum regulated by the Board of Nursing;
2) A professional or occupational training program regulated by another other state or federal governmental agency;
3) Those courses or programs of instruction given by or approved by any professional body that are principally for continuing or professional education and for which no degree credit is awarded;
4) Those courses or programs offered through approved multistate compacts, including, but not limited to, the Southern Regional Education Board’s Electronic Campus;
5) Those courses offered and delivered by a postsecondary school that is accredited by an entity recognized by the U.S. Department of Education for accrediting purposes, if such courses are provided, solely on a contractual basis for which no individual is charged tuition and for which there is no advertising for open enrollment;
6) Any school, institute or course of instruction offered by any trade association or any nonprofit affiliate of a trade association on subjects related to the trade, business or profession represented by such association;
7) Any public or private high school accredited or recognized by the Board of Education;
8) Tutorial instruction delivered and designed to supplement regular classes for students enrolled in any public or private school or to prepare an individual for an examination for professional practice or higher education;
9) Religious Institutions whose primary purpose is to provide religious or theological education. (Pages 138 –139) Title I

4. A provider of a program of occupational training services that under Section 23-276.2 of the Code of Virginia is exempt from certification as a postsecondary school such as a professional or occupational training program regulated by another state or federal governmental agency other than the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV), any school, institute, or course of instruction offered by any trade association or any nonprofit affiliation of a trade association on subjects related to the trade, business, or profession represented by such association, or
5. A provider of adult education and literacy activities under title II of WIOA, if these activities are provided in combination with occupational skills training.  (Page 226) Title II

Data Collection

In June 2015, a Common Intake Workgroup comprised of data professionals and partner agency thought leaders was formed. There is unanimous agreement that a common screening tool for monitoring new workforce system customers is needed, and the group is now determining the most efficient and cost-effective platform to use. Governor McAuliffe had originally requested the obligation of funds for the delivery of the common screening tool by September 1, 2016, but the procurement process and other technical considerations have pushed the timetable back to the end of calendar year 2016.

Reporting: In early June, after the original submission of Virginia’s Combined State Plan, Governor McAuliffe convened a meeting of workforce leaders and stakeholders to discuss the creation of common workforce performance measures to complement the measures outlined in Section 116 of WIOA. These state performance measures are outlined in the table below. (Page 152) Title II

i. Comprehensive System of Personnel Development; Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development (Formerly known as Attachment 4.10)).

Describe the designated State agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified State rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated State unit, including the following:

1. Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

A. Qualified Personnel Needs. Describe the development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs with respect to:

i. the number of personnel who are employed by the State agency in the provision of VR services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

The Commonwealth of Virginia maintains a personnel database including policies and procedures for the professional development of state employees that DBVI utilizes as part of its personnel development and planning. DBVI tracks personnel development as part of annual review and development of the DBVI State Plan CSPD Section I.

During FFY 2018 and FFY 2019, personnel development will continue as one of DBVI’s highest priorities. The procedures and activities outlined in this section were developed to ensure DBVI has an adequate supply of qualified rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals providing VR services to eligible Virginians who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind, including youth. DBVI will continue to assess requirements for qualified personnel, and will adapt agency training and hiring practices as necessary based on the issuance of WIOA final regulations. (Pages 363-364) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

8. Addressing the Accessibility of the One-Stop Delivery System for Individuals with Disabilities:

Foundations:

Virginia’s Workforce Development Services’ Methods of Administration (MOA) describes the nine guiding elements and requirements for Local Workforce Development Boards (LWDBs), one-stop operators and one-stop delivery system partners to comply with Section 188 of WIOA to ensure Universal Access and Equal Opportunity. Virginia’s policy and procedures are periodically reviewed and maintained current; and training and technical assistance are provided on a regular basis. WIOA state monitors conduct regular site visits to ensure compliance. (Page 187) Title I

As part of Virginia’s commitment to continuous quality improvement, a state level taskforce will be established to focus on enhancing accessibility of our one-stop service delivery system and the customer service experience. This taskforce will be composed of representatives from state level disability services agencies, workforce partners, LWDB area staff, One-Stop operators, and job seekers with disabilities.

Expected outcomes are the following: a revised ADA Accessibility guidelines and one-stop center certification process that incorporates the WIOA Section 188 Disability Reference Guide checklist for program and physical accessibility; system standards for accessible devices and software located in workforce centers to facilitate consistency; review of all policies and guidance to ensure alignment and consistency; a schedule for cross- agency training for survey providers, end users, one-stop operators and partner staff. The efforts of this Team will improve compliance and enhance communication, coordination and professional development across Virginia’s workforce system.

Update on the Accessibility Taskforce and WIOA Section 188

• Created the Accessibility Taskforce in 2016 as recommended in Virginia’s WIOA Combined State Plan’s Section to enhance accessibility of our one-stop delivery system and customer service experience, with the WIOA Title I Administrator designated as the lead role.

• The Taskforce is composed of staff from 14 workforce partners from a diverse representation of state agencies that includes, the VR Assistant Commissioner who chairs the state level Career Pathways Workgroup and is a member of the WIOA Implementation Team, Departments for the Blind and Vision Impaired, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Impaired, the Centers for Independent Living and the EEO Officers for WIOA Title I and Title III. The WIOA Adult and Dislocated Worker Programs State Coordinator participates with a policy and programs perspective. As a result a policy was developed and approved by the Virginia Board of Workforce Development on Services to Individuals with Disabilities that lays the groundwork on Section 188-ADA to achieve consistent compliance across ALL WIOA core programs. Taskforce members contributed directly to One Stop Certification Tool by developing specific criteria on Program and Programmatic Accessibility. Taskforce members participated in the evaluation of One Stop certification documents for validation and on-site validation visits to the AJCs. As a dual benefit, this allowed for significantly improved awareness and understanding of the ADA and disability challenges at the local One Stop level and the team site visits fostered technical assistance connections between state and local staff, as well as improving awareness and understanding among the state agencies on the Taskforce. (Page 189) Title I

Vets

Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants:

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually.

In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes:

a. How the State intends to provide employment, training and job placement services to veterans and eligible persons under the JVSG JVSG staff members provide services to eligible veterans according to each veteran’s needs and Significant Barrier to Employment (SBE), and the roles and responsibilities of the JVSG staff member. DVOP specialists and LVERs are fully integrated into the workforce development network. The duties of these staff members are described in the next section. (Page 566-567) Title IV

DVOP Specialists and LVERs work in One Stop offices throughout the state or with other partner agencies. One LVER is designated as the Chief of Veteran Services with the responsibility to manage the Virginia Jobs for Veterans State Grant program and to provide direct supervision and oversight for the Virginia Employment Commission’s JVSG staff. Three LVERs are designated as LVER Regional Managers responsible for providing supervision for Lead LVERS (LLVERs) and DVOPs within their assigned regional geographic areas. Fifteen LVERs are designated as Lead LVERs (LLVERs). In this role LLVERs perform their traditional statutory role within their assigned geographic area 70% of the time. The remaining time is spent performing supervisory functions for DVOP staff, thus ensuring that each staff member is performing according to expectations and increasing the integration and accountability of JVSG staff as a partner within the current workforce model. Three DVOPs are assigned as Intensive Service Coordinators (ISCs), these staff members are located in the Fredericksburg, Hampton, and Wytheville offices. (Page 567) Title IV

The VEC recently conducted an analysis of the veteran population in each local workforce development area (LWDA) to establish an equitable distribution of DVOP Specialists. Official workplaces and areas of responsibility will be adjusted in accordance with the results of that analysis. The VEC will review the distribution of the JVSG staff annually in conjunction with the Annual Funding Modification process and adjust domicile locations as necessary based on population shifts. In addition to DVOP Specialists, each One Stop will have trained case managers and business services teams. DVOP specialists coordinate closely with these One Stop Center staff members when providing intensive services to veterans with a SBE. DVOP Specialists provide advice and guidance as needed to One Stop Center staff who are providing services to other veterans and other eligible persons.

When not actively providing intensive services or reviewing open case files, DVOP Specialists and other One Stop Center workforce representatives conduct outreach at off—site locations including, but not limited to, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs offices, Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOC) for the U.S. DVA, Military Treatment facilities (MTF), Warrior Transition Units/Battalion (WTU/WTB), Local Prisons and Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program (HVRP) grantee locations. The purpose of these outreach efforts is two—fold. The first purpose is to find veterans in need of services and offer the needed services to them. The second purpose is to develop relationships with supportive services in the area so that SBE and other veterans can be referred to those agencies for services. (Page 567) Title IV

LLVER staff members work in One Stop offices throughout the state. The LVER coordinates with Regional Industry Sector Coordinators, Business Services Coordinators, and members of the Workforce Delivery Teams to advocate to employers on behalf of veterans and to develop job opportunities specifically for veterans. LLVER staff train WP funded employees to network for veterans and comply with priority of service requirements.

b. The duties assigned to DVOP specialists and LVER staff by the State; specifically implementing DVOP and LVER duties or roles and responsibilities as outlined in 38 U.S.C. § 4103A and 4104. These duties must be consistent with current guidance; The specific duties of DVOP specialists and LLVER staff throughout the state are consistent with the roles and responsibilities outlined in 38 U.S.C. § 4103A, 4104, and current guidance provided by DOL Veterans Employment and Training Services (VETS). (Page 567-568) Title IV

a. Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists The primary function of the State’s DVOP Specialist team is to provide intensive services for veterans identified to have a SBE in accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4103A, VPL 07—10 and VPL 03—14, or the most recent USDOL policy, and those veterans that are a member of a special population in accordance with VPL 04—14. Prior to conducting any other intensive service, DVOP Specialists shall conduct a comprehensive assessment, which shall be an “intensive interviewing process” and may also include the use of an Interest Inventory, or other assessment tools. Once the comprehensive assessment has been completed, the DVOP shall, with the cooperation of the veteran, develop and implement an Individual Employment Plan (IEP). DVOP Specialists shall always, and as a minimum, complete these two intensive services. Case management continues to be an appropriate delivery strategy or framework within which intensive services may be delivered and in most cases, shall be followed. To enhance the implementation of the IEP career guidance, supportive services, job development contacts, job referrals and intensive services and training may also be provided. Depending on the needs of the individual, the goal of the IEP may be to obtain education or training that lead to employment or employment. Training or education may be short or long term depending on the certification, licensing or skills being acquired to optimize successful employment outcomes. The DVOP Specialist may receive assistance with these functions by other Workforce Specialists who are trained to facilitate case management. (Page 568) Title IV

DVOP Specialists conduct outreach to locate veterans with a SBE with the purpose of providing intensive services and to form partnerships with external and internal supportive services programs that can provide those services, such as:

— VA Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment facilities

— Homeless Veteran Reintegration Programs

— VA VET Centers

— Homeless and Halfway Shelters

— Civic and Veteran Service Organizations

— Virginia Vocational Rehabilitation facilities

— Virginia Community College System

— State Veterans’ Affairs Representatives

— Universities — Veterans’ Service Organizations

— Department of Social Services TANF initiatives for veterans

— Local State Prisons

— Other WIOA partners. (Page 568) Title IV

b. Lead Local Veteran Employment Representative (LLVER) Staff: The LLVER responsibilities are specifically targeted to promote the advantages of hiring veterans to employers, employer associations, and business groups. LLVER roles and responsibilities are consistent with 38 U.S.C. § 4104, VPL 07-10 and VPL 03-14. As such, the LLVER serves an important role in Virginia’s Business Services Delivery Model. In coordination with the other members of the business services team, the LLVER advocates for employment and training opportunities through outreach to employers, training facilities, unions, apprenticeship programs, and private and government businesses. The LLVER also participates in Job Fairs, promotes programs that offer licensing and credentialing opportunities, and develops and makes presentations to employers. Each LLVER must provide a monthly report to the Regional LVER manager detailing their outreach activities. LVER Staff members conduct outreach to perform the following activities:

— Employer outreach

— Job searches and workshops, and establishing job search groups

— Coordinating with apprenticeship programs, and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans

— Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans;

— Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and

— Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts.

Within each One Stop Center, LVER staff coordinate closely with the One Stop managers to provide training and technical assistance on priority of service, best practices for providing effective services to veterans, relevant external partners, the role of DVOP Specialists, integration of DVOP Specialists into Virginia’s service delivery model, and best practices for conducting outreach to employers. LLVER Staff coordinate with their business service team partners and other state agencies or programs such as Virginia Values Veterans (V3), to conduct outreach to employer associations at the state and regional level. In this way the many more employers can be reached and persuaded to hire veterans. This outreach will educate employers on the advantages of hiring veterans, and inform employers on how to find qualified veteran applicants by leveraging Virginia’s workforce system. The VEC will increase veteran employment by making a sound business case to employers about the advantages of hiring veterans and providing tools to do so effectively. (Page 569) Title IV

c. The manner in which DVOP specialists and LVER staff are integrated into the State’s employment service delivery system or one-stop delivery system partner network;

Virginia provides employment, training, and placement services to all veterans through a network of strategically located One Stop Centers operated by 15 Regional Workforce Development Boards (WDB) and supported by the State’s proprietary Virginia Workforce Connection database system. The VEC, One Stop Centers and each local WDB, have implemented a standardized framework for customer flow. This flow determines the method through which all clients (both job seeker and employer) are integrated into the system and how they are assessed to identify their service needs. All programs are coordinated through a joint referral process described in each LWIA’s Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between partners. Each partner performs the services pursuant to their authorizing legislation or policy.

Collaboration is also enforced via program updates and other workforce system policies shared among partners at regularly scheduled staff meetings and training. During those meetings, all staff members share information about new employers and job orders received, One Stop Center scheduled activities, and positive recruitment activities taking place in the region.

All DVOP Specialists are full time employees, including the DVOP Specialist ISC. Although DVOP Specialists are responsible for case management and facilitating intensive services for veterans with significant barriers, they are not alone in this effort. Providing services to veterans with SBEs takes a team effort and as such, all services available in any particular One Stop are available to veterans on a priority of service basis. Non—JVSG funded staff provide intensive services and case management as appropriate to veterans and other eligible persons when no DVOP Specialist is available.

In most cases, the LVER serves as a member of the Business Services Team in their respective WDB. The team’s primary focus is to conduct job development and outreach to employers. LVER Staff responsibilities include operating targeted hiring events and veteran’s job fairs. LVER Staff provides program continuity by acting as the technical program advisor and trainer for One Stop Center staff. (Pages 569-570) Title IV

Virginia has adopted a demand—driven approach to all workforce and employment programs to focus services and training toward high demand jobs. The State promotes employment and job training opportunities through the use of several specialized programs. The Virginia Community College System (VCCS) operates various veterans’ programs throughout the state to promote education and other customized training for veterans to succeed in the civilian workplace. These programs are designed to help the veteran earn a degree or certification. These opportunities are presented to veterans through office visits and presentations at Veterans Workshops.

The local One Stop Centers act as the central hub for all workforce activities and associated training within the state. The State’s strategy for the leveraging of other state and federal education and training programs to develop skills necessary to prepare veterans for in—demand jobs is therefore focused on, and operated in, close cooperation with our One Stop Center partners. The combined efforts of the effective integration of the JVSG into the One Stop Center service delivery model, outreach to and relationship building with relevant partners, and comprehensive up—to—date information on in—demand jobs and skills, produces a coordination of programs and services that reduces or eliminates duplication, closes gaps in service, and identifies the program or service best suited to the individual veteran being served. In this way, the State leverages a wide range of state and federal training programs to efficiently and effectively provide veterans with the specific skills necessary to secure and succeed in current in—demand jobs.

The State’s outreach efforts and public information activities are used to inform veterans of the services available at their local One Stop Centers and the training opportunities that are available in their area and within the state. These outreach efforts, as described in Section B above, are focused on key service providers likely to interact with SBE veterans. The intent of this outreach is to educate service providers about job training and other services available to veterans at their local One Stop Center. In turn, the State’s partner service providers can encourage veterans to seek services at s or VEC offices. Due to the complexity of eligibility criteria and the variance of programs offered in disparate areas, public information systems usually do not provide specifics on particular programs but does direct veterans and other eligible persons into the local One Stop Center. (Pages 570-571)

The State is actively engaged in promoting the development of high demand job—driven training opportunities for veterans and other eligible persons within the education community. Business Services Teams partner with WIOA staff members, advise and collaborate with employers and educational institutions, (particularly the Virginia Community College System), to promote access to, retention in, and completion of individual training and education.

d. The Incentive Award program implemented using the 1% grant allocation set aside for this purpose, as applicable;

The State shall request one (1) percent of its annual allocation for each year’s JVSG grant as a Performance Incentive award for eligible staff. This award shall be used in accordance with VPL 02—07, or the most recent guidance from USDOL—VETS. The objective of the VEC incentive award program is to recognize, promote, and reward superlative and exceptional performance in the provision of service to veterans within the context of statutes and regulations. The basic objective of the awards program is to create an awareness and continuous level of interest in the importance of priority of service for veterans and an environment that engenders continuous improvement in serving veterans across the spectrum of service. The award system shall continue to operate as defined in the applicable State Policy and as approved by USDOL. The State anticipates that individuals and teams will recognize the value and process of the awards program and will, as a result, develop a competitive attitude within the agency that supports esprit de corps within the team while sharpening the focus on service to other eligible persons.

Incentive awards shall be expended up to and including one (1) percent of the total grant amount for the fiscal year, which is set aside strictly for this purpose in the annual grant budget. Awards shall be determined based on a percentage of total award available for that fiscal year but shall not (in total) exceed one (1) percent of the total available funds for a given fiscal year or the most current USDOL guidance on grant funded incentive award amounts. Exceptional merit is based on a number of factors, with the overriding concept being the value of the process. In essence this is determining both a quantitative and qualitative rating and merit based on the following factors:

— Total numbers of veterans served and total services rendered to those veterans within the parameters of these areas;

— Outreach to veterans and subsequent flow of core services that result in veterans becoming job ready, or the need for intensive services; — Outreach to and the comprehensive assessment of special target groups within the veteran community;

— Intensive servicesular job developments, for veterans and veterans with disabilities; 

, case management, and outcomes of those efforts; 

— Job placements, in partic— Other successful outcomes for veterans who may not return to employment, but through community partner referral developed an improved situation and/or economic stability;

— Outreach to and partner development with employers and federal contractors in the support of creating job opportunities for veterans;

— Outreach to and partner development with community service agencies, other state and federal programs, and internal agency components in creating a supportive service network for veterans with barriers to employment and who may need case management;

— Organizations, participation, and success in job fairs and other veteran center community activities;

— Any other innovative veteran related activity. (Page 571-572) Title IV

By state law, all awards must be cash, and all cash awards must be presented directly to individuals in the amount of $1,000. This means that offices (teams) receiving incentive recognition shall share equally in the overall office award, and the individual award amount shall be determined by the team composition. For state merit staff awardees, the incentive will be paid out through the payroll system. For non—state merit employee, a separate payroll check will be issued to the individual. Any employee contributions that result from the payment of the incentive will be charged to the JVSG grant.

On 1 March and 1 August first of each year, supervisors will submit recommendations of names and amount not to exceed $1,000 per individual and/or per incident of achievement to the Chief, Veteran Services. There will be three level of awards designated: Gold ($1,000), Silver ($750) and Bronze ($500). This submission will also include a narrative report that identifies the number and type of activities extended to veterans and their outcome in no more than one page, not including additional documentation in the form of VWC or other data can be attached. The criteria for the award type will include, but is not limited to, Department of Labor performance measures for LVERs and DVOPs and performance measures established by the Virginia Employment Commission and partner agencies. (Page 572) Title IV

Determination of the award shall be by a combination of objective and subjective data. Data compilation, analysis, and award determination shall be by a team proposed by of the Chief, Veterans Services. The final award approval shall be by the Appointing Authority, Commissioner of VEC, who is also the signatory authority for the JVSG grant relationship with USDOL. Incentive award funds distributed shall be obligated by September 30, each fiscal year and distributed not later than December 31, of the same year in accordance with the regulation. The Incentive award report shall be in compliance with USDOL VETS reporting requirements.

e. The populations of veterans to be served, including any additional populations designated by the Secretary as eligible for services, and any additional populations specifically targeted by the State Workforce Agency for services from one-stop delivery system partners (e.g., Native American veterans; veterans in remote rural counties or parishes); DVOP Specialists target veterans who attest to having one or more of the six significant barriers to employment listed below ongoing to at least one of the six criteria listed below:

— A special disabled or disabled veteran, as defined in 38 U.S.C. § 4211(10) and (3);

— Homeless, as defined in Sections 103(a) and (b) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11302(a) and (b)), as amended;

— A recently-separated service member, as defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(6), who has been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months;

— An offender, as defined by WIOA Section 3 (38), who is currently incarcerated or who has been released from incarceration;

— Lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; and/or

— Low—income, as defined by WIOA Section 3(36).

DVOP Specialists also provide services to priority category populations identified by the Secretary under 38 U.S.C. § 4103A (a)(1)(C). Currently, the Secretary has identified four such populations. These populations are:

— Transitioning service members who have participated in the Transition Assistance Program and have been identified as in need of intensive services as indicated by issuance of DD form 2978 ;

— Service members who are wounded, ill, or injured and receiving treatment in military treatment facilities or warrior transition units;

— The spouses or other family caregivers of such wounded, ill, or injured service members; and — Veterans, as defined in 38 U.S.C. § 4211, aged 18 to 24.

f. How the State implements and monitors the administration of priority of service to covered persons; 

Priority of Service is one of the most important elements of service for veterans, as prescribed by 38 U.S.C. § 4215(b) and 20 CFR Parts 1001 and 1010 and reinforced through the State issued Workforce Development Policy 18.

During the reception process, a series of questions are used to identify veteran or eligibility status. Qualified veterans and/or qualified spouses are provided services prior to other customers and an initial assessment is completed by the first available One Stop Center staff member. If during the initial assessment it is determined that the veteran has a SBE or is a member of another special category, the veteran is immediately referred to a DVOP specialist. (Pages 572-573) Title I

The State provides priority of service in accordance with TEGL 05—03. When a veteran is identified as having barriers to employment, they are fast—tracked to ensure that those barriers are resolved as expeditiously as possible. The VEC has agreements with the USDOL—funded programs covered by 38 U.S.C. § 4215(b) on veterans’ priority and refers veterans to training and supportive services within that network on a priority basis. The VEC has partnered with educational entities within the state and the vocational/technical institutions, which also provide priority service for veterans. Veterans receive priority for employment and job training opportunities available through WIOA funding, on the job training, skills development training, and youth training contracts. Veterans’ can locate training opportunities through use of the Virginia Workforce Connection data base and receive training at private facilities, which have been approved through either through the individual WDBs or the Virginia Department of Veteran Services. Training costs for eligible veterans are paid by the WIOA program or through Individual Training Accounts. Veterans take priority in instances of training fund shortages. (Page 573-574) Title IV

Each WDB coordinates available funds with those provided by the Virginia Department of Veterans Affairs Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) program to prevent duplication of services. When VR&E is providing training and supportive services, WIOA can provide services to spouses or services that were not covered by the VR&E program.

The VEC closely monitors programs to ensure that veterans are given priority of service. Both JVSG management and Regional Directors periodically conduct site checks to ensure all required priority of service signs are present and properly displayed, and that One Stop Center staff understand both the requirement of priority of service and its proper implementation. During these site visits, monitors pay particular attention to the implementation of priority of service beyond core services, particularly in the allocation of training funds.

The VEC analyzes data from Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) reports in conjunction with Virginia Workforce Connection data in order to compare outcomes by veterans and other eligible persons to the outcomes of non—veteran populations. This ongoing analysis supports the VEC’s continuous improvement process. Specifically, this is the relative rates of referral to USDOL funded training, referral to employment by One Stop Center staff, and job placement activities provided by One Stop Center staff. The VEC considers a referral rate in any program that is lower for eligible veterans than for nonveterans, evidence of a potential priority of service problem. In these cases, The VEC immediately places the affected region under examination and corrective action measures.

g. How the State provides or intends to provide and measure, through both the DVOP and one-stop delivery system partner staff:

1. job and job training individualized career services,

The VEC will use reports from the Virginia Workforce Connection (VWC) to ascertain services provided. Reports are generated monthly and quarterly. Reports are sorted by Region, Local Offices and Individual DVOPS. Capability exists to also view and track individual veterans and eligible spouses. In addition VEC conducts an Intensive Services Analysis on a monthly basis in which we review the raw number of veterans provided intensive services and the percentage of Veterans provided intensive services in comparison to the total number of veterans served. VEC will also monitor on a quarterly and semi-annual basis veteran’s average earnings and veteran’s retention rate (6 months). (Page 574-575)

Mental Health

~~3. the State agency responsible for providing mental health services:

The Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) maintains collaborative relationships with state agencies providing services to individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind with intellectual/developmental disabilities and mental health issues to include the Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) and the Virginia Department of Medical Assistant Services (DMAS).

As discussed in Section C, during this State Plan cycle, DBVI will establish or re—establish Memorandum of Understandings or interagency agreements outlining the commitment of the agencies to work together to create opportunities to exchange information, resolve issues, and provide resources statewide in order to increase the pre—employment and competitive integrated employment opportunities for individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind with intellectual/developmental disabilities and mental health issues.

Interagency Collaboration regarding providing services for individuals with Developmental Disabilities and Mental Health Services:

The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) provides services and supports to individuals who have developmental disabilities, intellectual disabilities, and mental health concerns, also known as behavioral health in Virginia. Services to these individuals are provided by regional and local Community Services Boards (CSBs). DBVI will establish or reestablish collaborative relationships with Virginia DBHDS and CSBs to include participating in interagency workgroups with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the Intellectual Disability (ID)/Developmental Disability (DD) CSB Case Managers with the goal of providing information related to allowable employment activities including Virginia’s Employment First initiative, Medicaid Waiver programs, and the provision of supported and extended support services. Collaboration with DBHDS also provides information on services and resources that support pre—employment transition programs and positive employment outcomes. The DBVI Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor will work with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the ID/DD CSB Case Managers to specifically ensure that issues related to work benefits, supports, and available resources are addressed.  (Pages 362) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Goal 7: Utilize WWRC’s comprehensive programs and services to address the unique needs of VR consumers with multiple and complex disabilities to help them overcome barriers to employment and obtain a job and/or regain independence to return to work. Indicators: 7.1 Increase the number of consumers referred by VR counselors to WWRC by 1%. There were 2,616 referrals in FFY 2017, there were 2,597 in FFY 2016. 7.2 Expand WWRC’s medical outreach to increase access for potential VR consumers with an emphasis in ‘return to work’. WWRC continues to build its capacity for statewide referral development to Rothrock Hall’s medical rehabilitation services. (Page 329) Title IV

States that elect to include UI in the Combined State Plan must: 1. Submit an SQSP in the following manner depending on their timing in the SQSP cycle: A. If a State is in the first year of their 2-year cycle, a complete SQSP package must be submitted. A complete SQSP package will include the Transmittal Letter, Budget Worksheets/Forms, State Plan Narrative, CAPs (including the milestones and the completion date for each milestone), the UI IAP, Organizational Chart, and the SQSP Signature Page. One of the key goals for the UI program is to ensure that claimants are able to successfully return to work. As such, the SQSP State Narrative must provide a discussion of the plan coordination with other WIOA Combined Plan programs to ensure a coordinated effort and integrated service delivery. (Pages 601-602) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 
Displaying 1 - 10 of 77

H 1025 An Act to require the Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services and law-enforcement agencies in the Commonwealth to make information about vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to certain law-enforcement officer - 03/31/2020

“1. § 1. That the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services shall make information regarding vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to assist former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service with preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining suitable employment, including information on the types of programs available and the process by which former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service can access such programs and services, available to law-enforcement agencies in the Commonwealth.

 

§ 2. That every law-enforcement agency in the Commonwealth shall provide to every law-enforcement officer who separates from the agency due to a disability resulting from his service information regarding vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to assist former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service with preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining suitable employment, including information on the types of programs available and the process by which such law-enforcement officers may access such programs and services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

HB 1078 An Act relating to the Virginia Public Procurement Act; process for competitive negotiation; including employment of persons with a disability as a factor that will be used in evaluating a proposal - 03/12/2020

“A. The process for competitive negotiation shall include the following:

1. Issuance of a written Request for Proposal indicating in general terms that which is sought to be procured, specifying the factors that will be used in evaluating the proposal, indicating whether a numerical scoring system will be used in evaluation of the proposal, and containing or incorporating by reference the other applicable contractual terms and conditions, including any unique capabilities, specifications or qualifications that will be required. Except with regard to contracts for architectural, professional engineering, transportation construction, or transportation-related construction services, a public body may include as a factor that will be used in evaluating a proposal the proposer's employment of persons with disabilities to perform the specifications of the contract. In the event that a numerical scoring system will be used in the evaluation of proposals,”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Directive Six (2020) Continuing the Community Integration Team - 01/02/2020

"By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor under Article V, Section 1 of the Constitution of Virginia and § 2.2-103 and § 2.2-104 of the Code of Virginia, I hereby direct the following Cabinet Secretaries and their respective executive branch agencies and councils to continue their collaborative efforts to complete and update a comprehensive, cross-governmental strategic plan designed to ensure continued community integration of Virginians with disabilities:

Secretary of Commerce and Trade

Department of Housing and Community Development

Secretary of Education

Department of Education

Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind

Secretary of Health and Human Resources

Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services

Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired

Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services

Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Department of Medical Assistance Services

Virginia Board for People with Disabilities

Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs

Department of Veterans’ Services

Secretary of Transportation

Department of Rail and Public Transportation

Chief Workforce Development Officer”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order No. 47 - Expanding Opportunities for Virginians with Disabilities - 01/02/2020

“Directive

Therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor under Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth, including but not limited to § 2.2-103 of the Code of Virginia, I hereby direct the Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion to provide leadership and coordinate across Secretariats the following actions:

1. The Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion shall work with the Secretary of Administration to implement § 2.2-203.2:3 of the Code of Virginia, to increase the employment of individuals within state government, including but not limited to the exploration and implementation of the following initiatives to: 3

a. Use available hiring authorities, consistent with statutes, regulations, and prior executive orders;

b. Increase efforts to accommodate individuals with disabilities within state government employment by increasing the retention and return to work of individuals with disabilities; and

c. Expand existing efforts for the recruitment, accommodation, retention, and advancement of individuals with disabilities for positions available in state government.

2. The Secretary of Education and Chief Workforce Advisor, in coordination with the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) shall identify opportunities and current best practices at institutions of higher education, community colleges, and vocational training programs to increase the number of Virginians with disabilities who are able to participate actively in advanced training and education programs they choose.

3. The Chief Workforce Advisor, in conjunction with the Secretaries of Commerce and Trade and Education, shall work with the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, who will direct DARS, and DBVI, and the Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing to strengthen and develop workforce pipelines for individuals with disabilities and promote the hiring of qualified individuals with disabilities by new and existing Virginia businesses as well as companies seeking to locate to the Commonwealth.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Virginia Poverty Law Center, Inc. (VPLC) - 09/03/2019

~~“Virginia Poverty Law Center, Inc. (VPLC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Current enrollees and uninsured and “left-behind” individuals and families who lack affordable coverage options in their area or are unaware of the full range of health coverage options available. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are: Blue Ridge Legal Services, Central Virginia Legal Aid Society, Legal Aid Justice Center, Legal Aid Society of Eastern Virginia, Legal Aid Society of Roanoke Valley, Legal Services of Northern Virginia, Southwest Virginia Legal Aid Society, and Virginia Legal Aid Society. They will partner with: Rapid Response Program, Telehealth Enrollment Assistance Service, State and local government agencies, Community libraries, food banks, and tax preparers, Faith-based organizations, Chambers of Commerce, Hospitals, Native American tribes, Military and veterans' groups, Remote Access Medical clinics, and the Parole office.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Jill HankenPhone: (804) 782-9430 Ext. 104Email: jill@vplc.org .” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Boat People SOS, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Boat People SOS, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving small business owners and self-employed individuals; part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment service; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is the Korean Community Service Center of Greater Washington (KCSC). They will partner with Behavioral health and sustenance centers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Veteran’s service organizations, Chambers of Commerce, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and rural hospitals •Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, and Post-secondary Educational Institutions. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Dr. Thang NguyenPhone: (703) 538-2190Email: thang.nguyen@bpsos.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Americans with Disabilities Act - 06/21/2019

~~“In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Virginians with Disabilities Act, offenders with disabilities housed in a Virginia Department of Corrections (VADOC) facility or under state community supervision can request reasonable accommodations and provisions.

Our facilities and probation and parole offices have a common authority and set of operating procedures for ADA compliance. Various factors can affect an offender’s housing assignment based on their medical classification, needs, and the security measures required.

Every VADOC facility and probation and parole office has a designated ADA coordinator to assist with requests and grievances regarding disability concerns. Our trained ADA coordinator manages those requests and grievances throughout the system.

Learn more in Operating Procedure 801.3.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia State Plan for Aging Services “No Wrong Door" - 05/13/2019

~~‘Virginia’s NWD System offers electronic tools from case management intake to com-plex  care  coordination  to  hospital  and  care  transitions.  NWD  partners  include  all  25 AAAs,  120 local departments of social  services (LDSS), CILs  and an array  of providers ranging from  hospitals to  home health  organizations who can access an electronic re-source database of over 26,600 public and private  health and human supports maintained by Virginia Navigator. 

No Wrong Door is locally led and managed by 25 AAAs across the Commonwealth. Each unique local community has an advisory group and network of partners who contribute their expertise, collaborate and share client-level data, with consent, through a secure system to streamline access and support.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Developmental Disability Services - 05/09/2019

~~“Person centered services are available to residents of the City of Alexandria with a diagnosis of developmental disability. Support Coordination, Residential and Vocational or Day Support services are offered to enable individuals to successfully live in the community as independently as possible with the necessary supports.”

 More information about the services we provide is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training and Education Alliance - 04/30/2019

~~“The Training and Education Alliance uses a three-pronged approach to assist transitioning veterans that have chosen educational institutions as their preferred path to employment. Identifying and promoting employment pipelines, providing military cultural sensitivity training to education staff, and highlighting community service initiatives are three methods used by the TEA Alliance program to support Virginia’s Veterans on their path to employment.  Connectivity to fellow directorate programs such as Virginia Transition Assistance Program(VTAP) and Virginia Values Veterans(V3) also serve to ensure valuable services are available throughout the entirety of our veterans journeys to their education and employment goals.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

H 1025 An Act to require the Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services and law-enforcement agencies in the Commonwealth to make information about vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to certain law-enforcement officer - 03/31/2020

“1. § 1. That the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services shall make information regarding vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to assist former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service with preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining suitable employment, including information on the types of programs available and the process by which former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service can access such programs and services, available to law-enforcement agencies in the Commonwealth.

 

§ 2. That every law-enforcement agency in the Commonwealth shall provide to every law-enforcement officer who separates from the agency due to a disability resulting from his service information regarding vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to assist former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service with preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining suitable employment, including information on the types of programs available and the process by which such law-enforcement officers may access such programs and services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

HB 1078 An Act relating to the Virginia Public Procurement Act; process for competitive negotiation; including employment of persons with a disability as a factor that will be used in evaluating a proposal - 03/12/2020

“A. The process for competitive negotiation shall include the following:

1. Issuance of a written Request for Proposal indicating in general terms that which is sought to be procured, specifying the factors that will be used in evaluating the proposal, indicating whether a numerical scoring system will be used in evaluation of the proposal, and containing or incorporating by reference the other applicable contractual terms and conditions, including any unique capabilities, specifications or qualifications that will be required. Except with regard to contracts for architectural, professional engineering, transportation construction, or transportation-related construction services, a public body may include as a factor that will be used in evaluating a proposal the proposer's employment of persons with disabilities to perform the specifications of the contract. In the event that a numerical scoring system will be used in the evaluation of proposals,”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

SENATE BILL NO. 1485 Long-Term Employment Support Services and Extended Employment Services - 04/29/2019

~~“Directs the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services to make referrals to any employment services organization that provides competitive or commensurate wages and is eligible to receive state-funded Long-Term Employment Support Services or Extended Employment Services. The bill also requires the Department to develop and implement a referral process for individuals who make an informed choice to pursue an employment outcome that is not considered a competitive integrated employment setting by the Department. The bill also establishes the Employment Service Organization Steering Committee as an advisory board in the executive branch of state government. The bill provides that the purpose of the Committee shall be to report to and advise the Commissioner for Aging and Rehabilitative Services on policy, funding, and the allocation of funds to employment services organizations for Long-Term Employment Support Services and Extended Employment Services.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Values Veterans (V3) - 04/04/2019

~~“HB1641 passed the House of Delegates and the Senate unanimously, and was signed into law by Governor McAuliffe on March 17, 2015. It states: “All agencies in the executive branch of state government and all public institutions of higher education shall, to the maximum extent possible, be certified in accordance with this section." The process for state agencies to meet the requirements of this legislation can be found here on the V3 website.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Acts of Assembly: An Act to Amend and Reenact §§ 51.5-41, 51.5-120, 51.5-163, 51.5-164, and 51.5-172 through 51.5-176 of the Code of Virginia - 02/25/2016

Discrimination against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities by employers prohibited A.No employer shall discriminate in employment or promotion practices against an otherwise qualified person with a disability solely because of such disability. For the purposes of this section, an "otherwise qualified person with a disability" means a person qualified to perform the duties of a particular job or position and whose disability is unrelated to the person's ability to perform such duties or position or is unrelated to the person's qualifications for employment or promotion. B. It is the policy of the Commonwealth that persons with disabilities shall be employed in the state service, the service of the political subdivisions of the Commonwealth, in the public schools, and in all other employment supported in whole or in part by public funds on the same terms and conditions as other persons unless it is shown that the particular disability prevents the performance of the work involved. C. An employer shall make reasonable accommodation to the known physical and mental impairments of an otherwise qualified person with a disability, if necessary to assist such person in performing a particular job, unless the employer can demonstrate that the accommodation would impose an undue burden on the employer. For the purposes of this section, "mental impairment" does not include active alcoholism or current drug addiction and does not include any mental impairment, disease, or defect that has been successfully asserted by an individual as a defense to any criminal charge. 1. Individualized plan for employment. A written individualized plan for employment for each recipient of vocational rehabilitation services provided or funded by the Department, in whole or in part, shall be developed within a reasonable time and as soon as possible, but not later than 90 days after the due date of the determination of eligibility, unless an extension is agreed to by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and the Department. The plan shall be agreed to and signed by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and a qualified vocational rehabilitation counselor employed by the Department

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia SB 1404 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia HB 2306 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia 2012 Senate Joint Resolution No. 127 - 02/25/2012

“Encouraging the Secretary of Health and Human Resources and the Superintendent of Public Instruction to adopt and implement Employment First practices...” Employment First is defined as a policy is grounded in a framework of increased integration, independence, productivity and employment that is based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, abilities, and informed choice of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia 2012 House Joint Resolution No. 23 - 01/11/2012

“WHEREAS, implementation of an Employment First initiative in Virginia will lead to increased employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, resulting in benefits for individuals, families, employers, and communities across the Commonwealth; now, therefore, be it resolved by the House of Delegates, the Senate concurring, That the Secretary of Health and Human Resources be requested to develop and implement an Employment First initiative in the Commonwealth, which shall identify employment in an integrated, community setting earning an amount that is equal to or greater than minimum-wage rates as the first goal for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving services through state agencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Virginians with Disabilities Act ( 51.5-1) of 1989 - 05/01/1989

“ It is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment. To these ends, the General Assembly directs the Governor, the Virginia Office for Protection and Advocacy, the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities, the Departments of Education, Health, Housing and Community Development, Behavioral Health and Developmental Services, and Social Services, and the Departments for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, the Blind and Vision Impaired, and the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing and such other agencies as the Governor deems appropriate, to provide, in a comprehensive and coordinated manner which makes the best use of available resources, those services necessary to assure equal opportunity to persons with disabilities in the Commonwealth.The provisions of this title shall be known and may be cited as “‘The Virginians with Disabilities Act.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Executive Directive Six (2020) Continuing the Community Integration Team - 01/02/2020

"By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor under Article V, Section 1 of the Constitution of Virginia and § 2.2-103 and § 2.2-104 of the Code of Virginia, I hereby direct the following Cabinet Secretaries and their respective executive branch agencies and councils to continue their collaborative efforts to complete and update a comprehensive, cross-governmental strategic plan designed to ensure continued community integration of Virginians with disabilities:

Secretary of Commerce and Trade

Department of Housing and Community Development

Secretary of Education

Department of Education

Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind

Secretary of Health and Human Resources

Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services

Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired

Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services

Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Department of Medical Assistance Services

Virginia Board for People with Disabilities

Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs

Department of Veterans’ Services

Secretary of Transportation

Department of Rail and Public Transportation

Chief Workforce Development Officer”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order No. 47 - Expanding Opportunities for Virginians with Disabilities - 01/02/2020

“Directive

Therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor under Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth, including but not limited to § 2.2-103 of the Code of Virginia, I hereby direct the Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion to provide leadership and coordinate across Secretariats the following actions:

1. The Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion shall work with the Secretary of Administration to implement § 2.2-203.2:3 of the Code of Virginia, to increase the employment of individuals within state government, including but not limited to the exploration and implementation of the following initiatives to: 3

a. Use available hiring authorities, consistent with statutes, regulations, and prior executive orders;

b. Increase efforts to accommodate individuals with disabilities within state government employment by increasing the retention and return to work of individuals with disabilities; and

c. Expand existing efforts for the recruitment, accommodation, retention, and advancement of individuals with disabilities for positions available in state government.

2. The Secretary of Education and Chief Workforce Advisor, in coordination with the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) shall identify opportunities and current best practices at institutions of higher education, community colleges, and vocational training programs to increase the number of Virginians with disabilities who are able to participate actively in advanced training and education programs they choose.

3. The Chief Workforce Advisor, in conjunction with the Secretaries of Commerce and Trade and Education, shall work with the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, who will direct DARS, and DBVI, and the Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing to strengthen and develop workforce pipelines for individuals with disabilities and promote the hiring of qualified individuals with disabilities by new and existing Virginia businesses as well as companies seeking to locate to the Commonwealth.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/01/2018

~~"WHEREAS, all Virginians should be given the opportunity to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment to drive Virginia’s economy;NOW, THEREFORE, I, Ralph S. Northam, do hereby recognize October 2018 as DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH in our COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, and I call this observance to the attention of all our citizens." 

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order Number One (2018) Equal Opportunity - 01/13/2018

~~‘By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor, I hereby declare that it is the firm and unwavering policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to ensure equal opportunity in all facets of state government.  The foundational tenet of this Executive Order is premised upon a steadfast commitment to foster a culture of inclusion, diversity, and mutual respect for all Virginians. This policy specifically prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, political affiliation, or against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities.  The policy permits appropriate employment preferences for veterans and specifically prohibits discrimination against veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 46: Supporting Virginians with Disabilities in the New Virginia Economy - 07/27/2015

“The Chief Workforce Development Advisor, in conjunction with the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, shall work with DARS and DBVI to offer to all executive branch agencies (including institutions of higher education, boards, and commissions) training designed to expand existing efforts to recruit, accommodate, retain and advance Virginians with disabilities in the Commonwealth’s workforce. Training shall commence no later than October 1, 2015...”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order (Executive Order #55 (2012)) - 11/16/2012 - 11/16/2012

“The last United States Census concluded that out of 3.6 million Virginia residents who were employed, 154,985 Virginians with disabilities were included in that total. These numbers indicate an under representation of people with disabilities among the gainfully employed. The Commonwealth of Virginia should work to provide a Commonwealth of Opportunity for all Virginians; therefore it is appropriate to initiate steps in order to expand employment opportunities for its citizens who are disabled….”

“By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor by Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth…and in conjunction with… the Code of Virginia which states that it is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities, including our wounded soldiers, to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment, with the goal of enhancing the employment opportunities for Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 23

Americans with Disabilities Act - 06/21/2019

~~“In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Virginians with Disabilities Act, offenders with disabilities housed in a Virginia Department of Corrections (VADOC) facility or under state community supervision can request reasonable accommodations and provisions.

Our facilities and probation and parole offices have a common authority and set of operating procedures for ADA compliance. Various factors can affect an offender’s housing assignment based on their medical classification, needs, and the security measures required.

Every VADOC facility and probation and parole office has a designated ADA coordinator to assist with requests and grievances regarding disability concerns. Our trained ADA coordinator manages those requests and grievances throughout the system.

Learn more in Operating Procedure 801.3.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia State Plan for Aging Services “No Wrong Door" - 05/13/2019

~~‘Virginia’s NWD System offers electronic tools from case management intake to com-plex  care  coordination  to  hospital  and  care  transitions.  NWD  partners  include  all  25 AAAs,  120 local departments of social  services (LDSS), CILs  and an array  of providers ranging from  hospitals to  home health  organizations who can access an electronic re-source database of over 26,600 public and private  health and human supports maintained by Virginia Navigator. 

No Wrong Door is locally led and managed by 25 AAAs across the Commonwealth. Each unique local community has an advisory group and network of partners who contribute their expertise, collaborate and share client-level data, with consent, through a secure system to streamline access and support.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Developmental Disability Services - 05/09/2019

~~“Person centered services are available to residents of the City of Alexandria with a diagnosis of developmental disability. Support Coordination, Residential and Vocational or Day Support services are offered to enable individuals to successfully live in the community as independently as possible with the necessary supports.”

 More information about the services we provide is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Veterans Services FY2018 Annual Report - 12/17/2018

~~” One of the many services Virginia provides to veterans and transitioning service members (TSMs) is a suite of services applicable to their unique journey. The Virginia Transition Assistance Program (VTAP) provides transition resources and assistance to all Virginia veterans and their spouses. More resources and information about VTAP assistance for veterans’ employment and education are available by accessing the web link. “

Systems
  • Other

Division of Rehabilitative Services - 12/07/2018

~~“Our division offers vocational rehabilitation programs and services to assist people with disabilities to prepare for, secure, retain or regain employment. More information about DRS services can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Services Offered by the Roanoke Regional Office - 11/20/2018

~~“VA’s Roanoke Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Virginia and the District of Columbia. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs• Assistance with applying for Specially Adapted Housing grants• Administration of VA’s Home Loan Guaranty program for Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, and the District of Columbia.” 

Systems
  • Other

Provider Development - 11/05/2018

~~“The Office of Provider Development focuses on developing and sustaining a qualified community of providers in Virginia so that people who have developmental disabilities and their families have choice and access to options that meet their needs. Here you will find resources including information on becoming a provider, information about Virginia’s Person-Centered ISP, who to contact for technical assistance, and various training resources.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Special Education Requirements Under the Workforce Innovations and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 11/02/2018

~~” This memorandum will address certain school division responsibilities under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), a federal law that reauthorized the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.  In general, it enhances the Virginia Department on Aging and Rehabilitative Services’ (DARS) role as a secondary transition partner with school divisions.  Through Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS), DARS will provide additional supports and services to students with disabilities, and will provide those services at an earlier age.  While most provisions of WIOA affect DARS, it does include new requirements for school divisions, in partnership with DARS, as both agencies work to transition students with disabilities from secondary school to postsecondary education, training, and/or integrated competitive employment.  Specifically, Section 511 of Title IV of WIOA (i) restricts school divisions from contracting with certain entities and (ii) requires school divisions to maintain and transmit additional documentation in certain instances.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Individual and Family Support Program (IFSP) - 09/10/2018

~~The Individual and Family Support Program (IFSP) assists individuals with developmental disabilities and their families with accessing person-centered and family-centered resources, supports, services and other assistance. The program's primary target population is individuals on the waiting list for Virginia's Developmental Disabilities (DD) Medicaid waivers.The goal of the program is to support continued community living. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Secondary Transition: Consent for Inviting Participating Agency Representatives - 09/02/2018

~~“Are school personnel required to obtain written consent from the parent to invite a participating agency representative to an IEP meeting before they invite the agency representative?

Yes, the local school division must acquire written consent from the parent (or a student who has reached the age of majority) for each agency that is invited to attend an IEP meeting to discuss the provision or payment of transition services. (34 CFR § 300.321(b)(3); corresponding Virginia Regulations at 8 VAC 20-81-170 E.1.h). The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) provides the rationale and context for this mandate”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Review of Virginia’s Plan to Increase Employment First Plan: FY 2016-FY2018-Goals, Strategies, and Action Items - 12/13/2018

~~“DBHDS, with the input of the E1AG (formerly the SELN-VA Advisory Committee) has revised the FY16-FY18 plan to increase employment opportunities. It was provided with the Status Report as of 6/30/18. The Plan includes five goal areas each of which has sub-goals. The plan’s goals and status in achieving goals can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia DBHDS: Strategic Plan for Employment First - 10/01/2012

To facilitate interagency collaboration the Strategic Plan for Employment First establishes an Employment First Summit Meeting, which will gather leadership from various department committed to upholding Employment First principles, and orders for the creation of a high level administrative leadership body including (DBHDS, DARS, DOE, DMAS, Virginia Employment Commission (VEC), Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council) and Virginia Community College System (VCCS).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Virginia State Employment Leadership Network - 10/01/2012

Virginia is a part of this multi-state technical assistance collaborative whose aim is to improve integrated employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities. “In 2008, DBHDS joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) sponsored by the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services and the University of Massachusetts-Boston Institute for Community Inclusion. DBHDS developed a Virginia-specific SELN Advisory Group made up of over 30 members representing a variety of organizations involved in providing employment services to Virginians. Members include community service boards (CSBs), the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (VBPD), the Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention (VCU/RRTC), and vendor organizations such as the Virginia Association of Community Rehabilitation Programs (vaACCSES), the Arc of Virginia, and the Virginia Association of Providers of Supported Employment (VaAPSE). DBHDS continues to be an active, contributing participant in the monthly National SELN web-based meetings. Virginia is now one of 30 states in the SELN. The Virginia SELN Advisory Group, made up of advocates, providers, and state agencies, continues to identify roadblocks and disincentives in our state system. The group is developing specific strategies for implementation of a system that prioritizes employment as an outcome of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Intercommunity Transition Council

Virginia's Intercommunity Transition Council is committed to promoting partnerships and influencing linkages that result in transition service networks for coordinating person-centered services. Their fact sheet on employment cites Customized Employment as a successful strategy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Olmstead Settlement Agreement

“The Commonwealth shall establish a state policy on Employment First for the target population and include a term in the CSB Performance Contract requiring application of this policy. The Employment First policy shall, at a minimum, be based on the following principles: (1) individual supported employment in integrated work settings is the first and priority service option for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities receiving day program or employment services from or funded by theCommonwealth; (2) the goal of employment services is to support individuals in integrated work settings where they are paid minimum or competitive wages; and (3) employment services and goals must be developed and discussed at least annually through a person-centered planning process and included in ISPs. The Commonwealth shall have at least one employment service coordinator to monitor implementation of Employment First practices for individuals in the target population”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

What is No Wrong Door Virginia? - 04/18/2019

~~“No Wrong Door is a person-centered system designed to streamline individuals’ access to community services and supports. The program operates through a statewide network of partners supporting older adults, caregivers, individuals with disabilities, veterans and all other populations seeking services and supports. It uses secure technology to link providers who collaboratively connect individuals to the supports and services in which they are in need.To date, the expanding No Wrong Door network has offered:• Access to 26,000+ programs and services• Options provided by 600+ professionals• Answers for more than 50,000 Virginians” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Disability Employment Initiative Round VIII - 10/01/2017

“VA DEI will fund four Disability Resource Coordinators and implement activities in the Northern Virginia Region that will build on existing career pathways with a focus on the Information Technology (IT) sector that have been developed by the local partners. The project will also expand on work currently underway by Northern Virginia Community College and its adult education partners to customize a bridge program that will connect low-skilled adults to college level IT programming through an integrated education and training program. Key activities will include the analysis of existing adult education and community college IT curricula and instructional practices to ensure accessibility according to Universal Design Principles, development of fully accessible career assessments for use by local partners, and alignment across all instructional programs that lead to ever higher levels of credential attainment among program participants. The regional industry sector model will be applicable to other career pathways. Targeted industry sectors will include Information Technology.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Virginia Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities - 07/18/2017

“Led by the Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, this grant will help nearly 500 Virginians with disabilities, including young adults and veterans, gain new skills and credentials through Career Pathways to seek employment in competitive, high-demand, high-quality occupations.

Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities has 10 project partners in education, workforce development and business. These partners focus on strategies to:

meet business needs in high-demand occupations meet career seekers' needs to attain marketable credentials and find middle-skilled jobs train vocational rehabilitation counselors to work with potential clients”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Virginia No Wrong Door System Grant - 10/01/2015

~~“Virginia will provide a high-quality, sustainable, person-centered, single statewide No Wrong Door system of long-term services and supports. No Wrong Door will support individuals of all ages  and disabilities in achieving their unique goals for community living; streamline access to community supports; and promote efficiencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia: Fairfax Customized Employment Grant - 07/01/2007

“The Customized Employment grant initiative was a product of the Northern Virginia Workforce Investment Board. The goal of the group was to build the capacity of the local One-Stop Center to use Customized Employment services to increase employment outcomes, choice, and wages for people with disabilities who resided in Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the cities of Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas, and Manassas Park.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Disability Employment Initiative (Round Four)

As a past Round 1 grantee, VA DEI will continue to build on existing infrastructure to develop shared ownership; foster systems integration, through cross-interagency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. Three Disability Resource Coordinators and a DRC State Lead will facilitate the implementation of the service delivery strategies. The pilot sites will receive the services of a Ticket consultant, who has been successful at engaging Round I pilot LWIBs in the EN process and in increasing ticket activity. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Virginia Ticket to Work

“Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for people with disabilities who want to work. Social Security disability beneficiaries age 18 through 64 qualify. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket Program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence…“The Ticket program is a good fit for people who want to improve their earning potential and who are committed to preparing for long-term success in the workforce. Ticket to Work offers beneficiaries with disabilities access to meaningful employment with the assistance of Ticket to Work employment service providers.”Virginia has had Ticket to Work Since 2002.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Virginia National Association of State Mental Health Program Director’s (NASMHPD) Employment Development Initiative (EDI)

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).”

“This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

Virginia is using its funds to support their Employment First Initiative. They have conducted multiple Employment First Summits, and developed an Employment First Advisory group.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Virginia Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

Note: This program ended on December 31, 2009 according to this site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Virginia - Richmond Customized Employment Project

“The grant worked to strengthen the linkages of the Richmond-area One-Stop system with schools, VR, and the Virginia Business Leadership Network, a business-directed group designed to encourage other businesses to hire people with disabilities. The project focused on expanding the reach and scope of existing service programs, such as a WIA youth project, to make them more appropriate for job seekers with multiple barriers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Virginia Poverty Law Center, Inc. (VPLC) - 09/03/2019

~~“Virginia Poverty Law Center, Inc. (VPLC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Current enrollees and uninsured and “left-behind” individuals and families who lack affordable coverage options in their area or are unaware of the full range of health coverage options available. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are: Blue Ridge Legal Services, Central Virginia Legal Aid Society, Legal Aid Justice Center, Legal Aid Society of Eastern Virginia, Legal Aid Society of Roanoke Valley, Legal Services of Northern Virginia, Southwest Virginia Legal Aid Society, and Virginia Legal Aid Society. They will partner with: Rapid Response Program, Telehealth Enrollment Assistance Service, State and local government agencies, Community libraries, food banks, and tax preparers, Faith-based organizations, Chambers of Commerce, Hospitals, Native American tribes, Military and veterans' groups, Remote Access Medical clinics, and the Parole office.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Jill HankenPhone: (804) 782-9430 Ext. 104Email: jill@vplc.org .” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Boat People SOS, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Boat People SOS, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving small business owners and self-employed individuals; part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment service; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is the Korean Community Service Center of Greater Washington (KCSC). They will partner with Behavioral health and sustenance centers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Veteran’s service organizations, Chambers of Commerce, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and rural hospitals •Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, and Post-secondary Educational Institutions. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Dr. Thang NguyenPhone: (703) 538-2190Email: thang.nguyen@bpsos.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training and Education Alliance - 04/30/2019

~~“The Training and Education Alliance uses a three-pronged approach to assist transitioning veterans that have chosen educational institutions as their preferred path to employment. Identifying and promoting employment pipelines, providing military cultural sensitivity training to education staff, and highlighting community service initiatives are three methods used by the TEA Alliance program to support Virginia’s Veterans on their path to employment.  Connectivity to fellow directorate programs such as Virginia Transition Assistance Program(VTAP) and Virginia Values Veterans(V3) also serve to ensure valuable services are available throughout the entirety of our veterans journeys to their education and employment goals.”

Systems
  • Other

Handbook for Educators of English Learners with Suspected Disabilities - 04/23/2019

~~“The purpose of the Handbook for Educators of English Learners with Suspected Disabilities is to provide school divisions with guidance on a multi-step process to appropriately identify and evaluate ELs who may have a disability for possible eligibility for special education and related services.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Veteran Entrepreneurship - 11/07/2018

~~“The Virginia Department of Veterans Services is excited to announce the hiring of a Veteran Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Coordinator (VEEC).  The VEEC will connect veterans and military spouses to a plethora of entrepreneurship resources and events! Whether you are a seasoned entrepreneur or just considering what that path may look like, the VEEC can share an extensive list of programs, events and resources all for entrepreneurs.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Special Education Technical Assistance & Professional Development

“These resources were developed to provide professional development and technical assistance to parents, school personnel and other consumers. All resources are intended to provide guidance for addressing the regulatory requirements and instructional elements needed for a student’s free appropriate public education (FAPE).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Virginia Transition Services for Students with Disabilities

“VDOE's Transition Services website provides support, information and resources designed to improve the outcomes of students with disabilities in transition from middle / secondary education to postsecondary education and employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Consumer's Guide to Self-Employment

This guide is written for consumers within the Virginia Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (Vocational Rehabilitation) who wish to pursue Self Employment as a career goal. It describes many of the Department's policies, as well as offering guidance on how to succeed in the business development process.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

DRS Guide to Supported Employment and Job Coach Training Services

“The purpose of the Guide to Supported Employment and Job Coach Training Services is to provide practical and specific information to supplement the Virginia DRS Policy and Procedure Manual. Where possible, the Guide seeks to illustrate evolving best practices gleaned from case examples and data gathered in Virginia. Specifically, the Guide is intended to provide supported employment practitioners with guidance in:

Achieving a customer-oriented environment that promotes consumer choice and participation, individual responsibility, practitioner excellence and sensitive delivery of quality services; Enhancing understanding of operational procedures and the need for cooperation, collaboration, and coordination; Clarifying and expanding on the roles, responsibilities, and expectations among supported employment practitioners; and Planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating supported employment programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Report of the Independent Reviewer on Compliance with the Consent Agreement US v. VA, Civil Action No. 3:12 CV 059 - 10/07/2014

“The IR reported in the last Report to the Court that the Commonwealth had achieved compliance with certain requirements of the Agreement. During this, the sixth review period, the Commonwealth through its lead agency, DBHDS, and its sister agencies has maintained compliance with these same provisions and has come into compliance with additional requirements. The Commonwealths leaders have continued to meet regularly and to collaborate to develop and implement plans to address the Agreement’s requirements and to improve people’s lives. The IR also reported in the last Report to the Court that the Commonwealth lagged significantly behind schedule. It continues to do so. There have been significant delays in the it’s (sic) compliance with requirements that are critical to an effective community-based services system for individuals with ID/DD. For two years, the Commonwealth’s primary strategy to come into compliance has been the redesign of it HCBS waiver program."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other

Virginia Consent Decree allowing for more waivers and less training Centers - 08/23/2012

“Under the proposed settlement, Virginia has agreed to provide 4170 additional waiver slots, divided among current Training Center residents, disabled people in various segregated facilities other than the Training Centers, and people on the waiting list for services…The settlement also prescribes in great detail how Virginia will administer the services it provides to disabled citizens. This process will be a shared responsibility of the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services and local community service boards ("CSBs")...”“The decree also provides for changed procedures at the Training Centers and spells out how the Commonwealth will assist the CSBs with technical assistance. Each Training Center resident will have a discharge plan crafted by the professionals at the facility. Virginia will set up case-management teams, crisis teams, and plans for supported day services in the community. Essentially, the Commonwealth's efforts—and those of the CSBs—will all be focused on keeping disabled people in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ADA Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 01/26/2012

“The fundamental goals of the Agreement are to prevent the unnecessary institutionalization of individuals with developmental disabilities who are living in the community, including thousands of individuals on waitlists for community-based services, and ensure that people who are currently in institutions - at the Commonwealth's training centers or in other private but state-funded facilities - have a meaningful opportunity to receive services that meet their needs in the community…Pursuant to the Interim Settlement Agreement, the State and City will give TTP and Birch service recipients the opportunity to receive integrated supported employment and integrated daytime services that will enable them to interact with the broader community to the fullest extent possible.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

TEEOP Employment Supports - 10/18/2018

~~“Training, education, employment and othercommunity engagement opportunities (TEEOP) Employment SupportsThe web link includes information about how the State will provide assessments and referrals for employment.Employment Support Services for MedicaidParticipants to Achieve Self-Sufficiency” (COMPASS) Waiver.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Commonwealth Coordinated Care (CCC) Plus Waiver - 08/01/2018

~~The CCC Plus Waiver (also known as the Commonwealth Coordinated Care Plus Waiver), is a combination of the formerly known waivers titled: EDCD (Elderly or Disabled with Consumer Direction) waiver and the Technology Assisted (Tech) waiver. All of the waivers offer CD or AD services depending on individualized needs and program criteria met.

From the Fact Sheet:“The Commonwealth Coordinated Care (CCC) Plus Waiver [1915 (c)] provides care in the home and community rather than in a  nursing facility (NF) or other specialized care medical facility “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

VA Community Living Waiver (0372.R03.00) - 07/01/2014

~~Waiver Authority 1915 (c)Date Originally Approved 07/01/2001Implementation Date 07/01/2014Expiration Date 06/30/2019Summary Provides day support, personal assistance, prevocational, residential support, respite, supported employment, consumer directed services facilitation, assistive technology, companion services, crisis stabilization, crisis supervision, environmental mods, PERS, skilled nursing, therapeutic consultation, transition for individuals w/IID ages 0 - no max age

From the Fact Sheet:“Formerly the Intellectual Disability Waiver, the purpose of the Community Living home and community-based 1915 (c) waiveris to provide support in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) or related condition.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Building Independence home and community-based 1915 (c) waiver (0430.R02.00) - 07/01/2013

~~Waiver Authority1915 (c)Date Originally Approved07/01/2005Implementation Date07/01/2013Expiration Date06/30/2018Summary Provides day support, prevocational, supported employment for individuals w/ID ages 6 - no max age

From the Fact Sheet:“Formerly called the Day Support Waiver, the purpose of this Building Independence home and community-based 1915 (c) waiver is to provide support in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disability (ICF/IID”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Family and Individual Support home and community-based (1915(c)) waiver (0358.R03.00) - 07/01/2013

~~Expiration Date06/30/2018Summary Provides day support, in-home residential, personal care, prevocational, respite care, supported employment - group/individual, services facilitation, adult companion, assistive technology, crisis stablization, crisis supervision, environmental mods, family/caregiver training, PERS, skilled nursing, therapeutic consultation, transition for individuals w/autism and DD ages 6 - no max age

Formerly the Individual and Family Developmental Disabilities Support Waiver, the purpose of the Family and Individual Support home and community-based (1915(c)) waiver is to provide supports and services in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) or related condition.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia Department of Education ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/27/2012

“For students with disabilities who have the most intensive support needs, there are two model initiatives supported by the Virginia Department of Education: Project SEARCH and the Post-High School Community College Program. Project SEARCH, a business-led model, is a collaborative between school divisions and local businesses that provide employability skills training and workplace internships that occur entirely in the workplace. The Post-High School Community College Program is a supported education model that provides individualized supports to students with significant disabilities seeking postsecondary education to enhance their skills for employment, in an age-appropriate setting. The Department of Education provides support and technical assistance to increase the number of partnerships between school divisions and institutions of higher education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

MEDICAID WORKS (Virginia Medicaid Buy-in)

“MEDICAID WORKS is a work incentive opportunity offered by the Virginia Medicaid program for individuals with disabilities who are employed or who want to go to work. MEDICAID WORKS is a Medicaid plan option that will enable workers with disabilities to earn higher income and retain more in savings, or resources, while ensuring continued Medicaid coverage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Virginia Olmstead Settlement Agreement

“The Commonwealth shall establish a state policy on Employment First for the target population and include a term in the CSB Performance Contract requiring application of this policy. The Employment First policy shall, at a minimum, be based on the following principles: (1) individual supported employment in integrated work settings is the first and priority service option for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities receiving day program or employment services from or funded by the Commonwealth; (2) the goal of employment services is to support individuals in integrated work settings where they are paid minimum or competitive wages; and (3) employment services and goals must be developed and discussed at least annually through a person-centered planning process and included in ISPs. The Commonwealth shall have at least one employment service coordinator to monitor implementation of Employment First practices for individuals in the target population

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

Note: This program ended on December 31, 2009 according to this site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Virginia Statewide HCBS Transition Plan

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule for home and community based services (HCBS) that requires states to review and evaluate home and community based (HCB) settings, including residential and non-residential settings. The HCBS final regulation requires states to prepare and submit a Statewide Transition Plan. CMS asks that statewide transition plans specifically address only the setting requirements of the final rule for home and community based services (The Rule).  Therefore, this Statewide Transition Plan is specific to the analysis and recommendations regarding the settings for home and community based services. 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Known affectionately as "The Place for Lovers," individuals with disabilities in the Commonwealth have the opportunity with the right supports and services to Live Passionately by having careers in competitive integrated employment and being full participants in their communities. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.56%
Change from
2017 to 2018
8,517,685
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.15%
Change from
2017 to 2018
485,460
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.78%
Change from
2017 to 2018
194,796
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.57%
Change from
2017 to 2018
40.13%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.24%
Change from
2017 to 2018
79.16%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 8,411,808 8,470,020 8,517,685
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 496,928 500,771 485,460
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 193,632 204,103 194,796
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,647,462 3,669,633 3,686,152
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 38.97% 40.76% 40.13%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.66% 78.97% 79.16%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.00% 3.80% 3.00%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.10% 17.60% 17.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.10% 9.80% 9.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 466,393 462,932 482,577
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 498,192 516,107 511,887
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 675,120 686,273 698,138
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 213,359 222,654 214,002
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 46,107 45,140 52,632
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,829 3,549 3,911
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 32,472 28,994 35,040
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 957 N/A 924
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,133 27,801 30,912
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 10,715 9,532 11,537

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,657 6,877 6,857
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.80% 4.90% 4.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 211,614 210,694 207,901

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 14,753 14,919 15,650
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 31,011 30,594 31,285
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 77,519 70,510 70,376
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 19.00% 21.20% 22.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 2.10% 1.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 4.50% 3.20%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.00% 3.10% 3.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 7.80% 43.40% 27.60%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 388 1,243 1,113
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 329 2,600 1,903
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,691 1,788 2,066
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 4,485 25,180 16,651

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 13,591 12,668 12,496
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 109 150 150
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 60 85 80
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 57.00% 53.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.72 1.01 0.95

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,248
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 44 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 455 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,047 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,990 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,092 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 620 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 37.60% 37.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,335 7,954 7,081
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 312,508 315,937 314,901
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 889 623 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 713 460 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $35,381,000 N/A $11,584,778
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $19,799,000 N/A $1,209,869
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $151,457,000 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 27.00% N/A 25.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 898 N/A 1,708
Number of people served in facility based work. 683 N/A 1,054
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 9,455 N/A 6,219
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 48.60 N/A 44.96

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.36% 64.01% 65.07%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.15% 10.87% 10.16%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.16% 4.26% 4.32%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.17% 99.37% 99.71%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 34.45% 32.85% 32.57%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 64.81% 63.10% 64.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.03% 71.98% 73.39%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.36% 30.25% 31.51%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 5,052,830
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 7,757
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 168,108
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 3,289,332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,457,440
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 339
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,546
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,885
AbilityOne wages (products). $831,106
AbilityOne wages (services). $43,925,206

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 21 27 18
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 22 28 19
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 14 14 14
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,398 1,579 1,277
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,412 1,593 1,291

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~(11) Providing training and implementing seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment (CE) across Virginia. This strategy is based on needs assessment and focus group recommendations from DARS' partnerships with Transcen, Inc. and George Washington University. By November 1, 2018, DARS will select and train key VR Counselors and Evaluators, AT Specialists, Business Placement and Self-Employment staff, and Partnering Employment Specialists, Behavioral Specialists, and Facilities Personnel in key concepts to implement CE approaches to DARS clients exiting institutions, sheltered workshops, high schools and adults for whom traditional supported employment services have not yielded successful outcomes. DARS will serve 20 or more clients with diverse backgrounds in order to assimilate CE best practices into our menu of services for these targeted populations. Options for self-employment will also be explored under this approach.  (Pages 315-316) Title IV

4. How the funds reserved for innovation and expansion (I&E) activities were utilized:
During FFY 2017, the funds reserved for Innovation and Expansion were used for the following activities:…
(7) Providing training and implementing seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment (CE) across Virginia. DARS is selecting and training VR staff and stakeholders in key concepts to implement CE approaches to DARS clients exiting institutions, sheltered workshops, high schools and adults for whom traditional supported employment services have not yielded successful outcomes. (Page 333) Title IV

q. Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services. Include the following: 
1. The quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities:
Supported employment (SE) services, including customized employment, provided under Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014, will be available to eligible individuals with most significant disabilities who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind, including youth, who are served by the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI). (Page 404) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~In the early stages of implementing this plan, the Commonwealth will re-convene leadership from workforce system partners to revisit the problem this plan seeks to address. The purpose of this convening will be to:

8. Emphasize transparency and shared accountability in responding to opportunities for improvement (Page 109) Title I

Manage and Develop Resources:

In order to achieve the five goals stated in Virginia’s plan, workforce partners must ensure that resources are being used efficiently and effectively, eliminating unnecessary duplication of service and redundancy in the system. As partners move towards a new vision for the workforce service delivery system, they must also establish and ensure a standard for service across programs and a rational strategy towards resource development that continuously reflects back on this plan and its goals and objectives. This strategy proposes to align staff and financial resources appropriately in the One Stop system and its centers, using a functional organizational chart approach that will leverage agency strengths and specialties to better serve customers and address Virginia’s workforce challenges. The successful execution of this plan requires Virginia to commit to the professional development of workforce practitioners, and to the braiding and management of financial resources in new ways. The Commonwealth is committed to developing staff to capitalize on investments in technology, and to realize the benefits from a common agenda with workforce system partners. Careful investments in human and financial resources ultimately reflect value to customers and to their communities across the state. (Page 110) Title I

The following are examples of local level practices impl1emented to enhance access for job seekers with disabilities made possible by leveraging the resources from the DOL Disability grants and state level cross agency partnerships:

Installed Universal Computer Workstations with Assistive Technology devices and software and conducted staff trainings in pilot LWDBAs; expanded the web-based Common Screening Tool to better identify job seekers with disabilities, track customer flow and service referrals. (The data indicated an on average a 15% increase of self-identification where this tool was piloted); incorporated Disability Resources and disseminated announcements for various activities that would benefit individuals with disabilities, such as: disability trainings and IRS free tax assistance and site locations, dedicated a page to post information about disability resources on the Virginia’s Workforce Development website, Elevate Virginia; integrated DEI strategies by adding four modules into Virginia’s Workforce Development Systems Course, which is a requirement for all front-line staff co-located at the Centers to complete. (The optional modules are Welcoming All Customers/Universal Strategies, Asset Development, Integrated Resource Teams with a Person Centered Planning approach and Mystery Shopper); coordinated local/statewide trainings (on line, in person and at state conferences) for One-Stop staff and partners and also utilized resources through the Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. Some of the topics covered were: ADA Accessibility requirements, Disability Etiquette, Access for All - Welcoming Customers at workforce centers and accommodations; implemented Social Security (SSA) - Ticket To Work Program to expand employment opportunities for SSA beneficiaries in 6 LWDB areas; facilitated certification trainings for Work Incentives Specialist Advocates who advise beneficiaries on work incentives; promoted asset development and financial capability strategies to enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency, including financial literacy training, the use of individual development accounts, tax and work incentives, and other strategies for encouraging economic advancement; and trained and provided technical assistance to businesses/employers about the use of effective hiring practices and job accommodations, including Assistive Technology trainings in collaboration with Virginia Assistive Technology System and Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center.  (Page 188) Title I

B. How the State will leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities:

DARS will continue to explore alternative funding mechanisms for long-term follow along supports for consumers needing Supported Employment (SE) services, including Social Security Work Incentives. This includes working with the Governor’s Office and the General Assembly to receive more funding for Long Term Employment Support Services and Extended Employment Services and working collaboratively with other agencies, community partners and Employment Service Organizations to leverage these funds.  (Page 314) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~8. Addressing the Accessibility of the One-Stop Delivery System for Individuals with Disabilities:…

Virginia is fortunate to have a long standing collaborative relationship with Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and other key state partners. This partnership history facilitated the leveraging and coordination of existing and added resources provided via the six DOL Workforce Disability Initiatives, the latest of which are the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants. Whereas, significant strides have been made to ensure our One-Stop Service Delivery System is accessible to all job seekers, including those with disabilities and other challenges to employment, we are committed to continuous quality improvement. These efforts are focused on physical, programmatic and communication access. We will continue these efforts and build on our existing infrastructure to encourage shared ownership; foster systems integration through cross-agency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective.  (Pages 186-187) Title I

Goal 3: Ensure that the VR Program continues to be a collaborative leader in the integration of services for people with disabilities in the Workforce Centers and the use of Social Security Work Incentives:

Indicators:
3.4 Provide Disability Resource Coordinators/Disability Program Navigators to increase access to programs and services for vocational rehabilitation consumers. DARS currently provides three Disability Resource Coordinators to two local American Job Centers (AJCs) as a part of DOL Disability Employment Initiative Round IV grant project efforts in collaboration with the VCCS/Workforce Services Division (Title I Administrator). In addition, through an Innovation and Expansion project, DARS has co-located a previous Disability Program Navigator as a VR Counselor housed in an AJC and providing VR services. Also, three workforce areas previously participating in DOL DPN/DEI grant efforts have retained three DARS staff to provide services to individuals with disabilities in AJCs. As a result DEI Round I efforts and collaborative workforce partnerships, Virginia statewide data from October 2010 through March 2014, indicated participants with disabilities active with WIA (now WIOA) intensive services increased from 1.8% to 4.9%.  (Page 325) Title IV

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~d. Coordination with Education Officials:
Describe:
2. Information on the formal interagency agreement with the State educational agency with respect to:
A. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
DARS Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Education and annual review of agreements with the Local Education Agencies (LEAs) reflect the ongoing collaboration as it relates to providing consultation and technical assistance for transition services.
B. transition planning by personnel of the designated State agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and implementation of their individualized education programs; (Pages 353-354) Title IV

In this Plan, DARS has an entire Goal and Priority and strategies dedicated to transition planning. DARS initiates an Annual Review, a survey of VR counselors and their respective LEA transition representative, to ensure effective working relationships on local levels and to support best practices in the provisions of services to students with disabilities. Follow-up services are offered and provided based on results of the Annual Review.

DARS’ policies require that for students with disabilities who i) are receiving special education services from a public school, and ii) also are determined eligible for VR services (and able to be served if DARS is on an Order of Selection), the Individualized Plan for Employment shall be completed and signed within 90 days of the eligibility determination and before the student leaves the school setting.

DARS continues to be a stakeholder in the review of data that DOE collects to report to the Office on Special Education Programs (OSEP) to support and accomplish respective post-school and employment outcomes required by the federal government and to provide meaningful data collection by each agency.

Additional DARS and DOE collaborative activities include co-chairing the Virginia Interagency Transition Council (VITC) and the statewide Community of Practice. Representatives from DARS, local education agencies (LEAs), and the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) are planning statewide trainings to discuss transition and vocational services available to students with disabilities. Both activities provide a forum for transition practitioners and other interested stakeholders from school divisions, adult agencies, and community partners to engage in professional development activities, networking opportunities, and collaborative efforts that enhance the implementation of quality transition services for secondary school students with disabilities. The VITC is comprised of representatives from 14 state agencies who have leadership roles and transition as part of their responsibility in serving youth with disabilities. The Community of Practice works to stay abreast of current transition information, to identify gaps in resources, and avoid duplication of transition services. VITC has set a priority to improve communication between the state, regional, and local transition councils. It is anticipated that information will be shared with and by VITC through the regional and local Councils. This flow of communication allows for improved responses to identified needs, as well as recommendations for future efforts.

The Department's Transition Coordinator and Pre-Employment Transition Coordinator provide training to new counselors as part of the New Counselors Skills Training. This training provides information on how to evaluate and process training cases to ensure that employment goals meet the employment needs of our communities. The training also provides information on the need for and how to complete the required RS-25 (Post-Secondary Training Comparable Benefits & Financial Assessment)

Cooperative Agreements are also conducted between DARS and state institutions of higher education to ensure that to the best of DARS abilities and within constraints of our Order of Selection that students in post-secondary training are receiving appropriate and necessary services.

The DRS Support Team utilizes an interactive webinar series to streamline processes and improve communication to/from VR counselors who serve transition-age youth. The webinar series offers a time saving alternative to the standard face-to-face training approach while simultaneously saving agency resources. Webinar topics are developed based on counselor input, leadership recommendations, and developing issues. Similar technology also is being used for an Annual Review to gather information on effective processes between the local school divisions and their corresponding DARS transition counselor. The Annual Review will also indicate any needs or concerns where the Transition Coordinator or Pre-Employment Transition Coordinator may organize a facilitated meeting by use of the Go To Meeting platform enabling teams to meet online and collaboratively to discuss programming. The Annual Review supports communication and extends support to local team members and may address specific points of the transition process and encourage VR Counselors and school partners to more clearly establish partner roles and responsibilities.

For multiple years, the Commonwealth of Virginia has been invited to bring a team to participate in the National Summit - Building State Capacity to Address Critical Issues in Deaf Education: Transition from Secondary Education to Post-Secondary Options. This was the fourth out of four Summit activities sponsored by pep net 2, which focused on improving post-secondary outcomes for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, including those with co-occurring disabilities. The focus of the Summit has been on critical issues in deaf education that address positive student outcomes, graduation, and transition to post-secondary education and training. The Department’s State Coordinator of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services and the Department of Education (DOE) Specialist of Deaf and Hard of Hearing co-chair the state team to review gaps in programs and services utilizing tools and strategies related to transition within the goals of the National Agenda: Achieving Educational Equality for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students. In 2016, the Virginia Team hosted “Opening Doors to Life Beyond High School”, a one-day event for students, parents and professionals. Topics included Life Beyond High School (transition information about DRS services), I’m Determined, and Map-It (a new tool from pep net 2). (Pages 284-286) Title IV

C. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
DARS and DOE have had a formal agreement to provide cooperation and coordination among the two agencies to facilitate effective transition services for students with disabilities to engage in competitive, integrated employment, post-secondary education, and community living. This Agreement is being updated and will contain the following provisions:

(1) DOE is designated as the lead agency to ensure that students with disabilities are properly referred to DARS and DARS will serve as the lead agency to determine eligibility for VR services and to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment. Both agencies agree to:

(1) promote the development and expansion of collaborative structures for planning and evaluating transition services; share relevant data; share contact information on school divisions’ special education directors and 504 coordinators; and explore new opportunities for collaboration and seek additional resources to improve transition services. Each agency will assign or designate primary program responsibility for transition to one individual within the agency.

(2) promote a comprehensive personnel development approach through the provision of collaboratively planned and jointly sponsored professional development activities. DOE has the responsibility for ensuring the requirements for the provision of special education services by LEAs to students with disabilities in accordance with federal and state laws, regulations, agency policies and guidelines.

(3) DOE shall commit financial resources to:

(a) teaching positions for Occupational Skills Training and Life Skills at WWRC;

(b) training and technical assistance in secondary transition programming; and

(c) activities of the Community of Practice and Transition Practitioners Council.

DARS is responsible for the coordination, provision, and/or payment of rehabilitative/transition goods and services for individuals with disabilities in accordance with applicable federal and state laws, regulations, agency policies and guidelines. DARS also commits financial resources to:

(a) transition services for youth at least three years prior to their exit from high school to include vocational evaluation, case management, career counseling, situational assessments, field transition consultant services, and technical assistance, as appropriate;

(b) the Postsecondary Education Rehabilitation and Transition Program at the Wilson Workforce and Rehabilitation Center; and

(c) activities of the Community of Practice and Transition Practitioners’ Council. (Pages 286-287) Title IV

D. procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

Specific activities related to outreach to address needs of students in transition include:

(1) providing staff support and programmatic leadership to Virginia’s Intercommunity Transition Council (VITC), a statewide Council composed of representatives of state agencies, parents, consumers and employers, and seeking to promote, in collaboration with VITC, participation of underrepresented agencies, service providers, and community/ advocacy groups in VITC;
(2) Providing staff support and programmatic leadership to the Higher Education Leadership Partners Workgroup (composed of college and university faculty and staff, the State Council on Higher Education in Virginia, the Virginia Community College System, the Association of Higher Education and Disability, consumers and disability agency personnel, secondary education personnel and representatives from DOE. Also, in collaboration with VITC, DOE, the State Council of Higher Education, the Association of Higher Education and Disability and other partners, developing statewide guidelines for Disability Documentation at the post-secondary level, as well as improvement of transition from secondary to post-secondary institutions;
(3) Promoting collaboration among DOE, the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, the Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, the Virginia Assistive Technology System, the Wilson Workforce and Rehabilitation Center, and other interested partners to increase the appropriate utilization of assistive technology for students with disabilities in Virginia; 
(4) Aligning all current and future transition activities, when appropriate, with the WIOA system;
(5) Collaborating with Adult Education and Literacy programs, DOE, the Department of Social Services and other partners in pursuing creative models of providing assessment and screening for learning disabilities among clients of the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families program;
(6) Producing transition-related products (e.g., newsletters, brochures, power point presentations, and posters) with examples of current legislative information, best practices and problem solving;
(7) Collaborating with staff of the Personal Assistance Services (PAS) Program at DARS to increase awareness of PAS services for students in transition, especially in post-secondary institutions;
(8) Collaborating with Employment Services Organizations (ESO) staff to increase awareness of local vendor programs that could provide services to schools and transition age youth;
(9) Collaborating with DOE to utilize VITC, and other venues to increase awareness and understanding of the Youth Councils that will be part of the local Workforce Investment Boards established under the WIOA system;
(10) Encouraging disability professionals, consumers and advocacy groups to submit applications for appointment to the local Youth Councils; and
(11) Continuing to provide the Youth in Transition service line to supplement and enhance services to high school youth enrolled at WWRC.  (Pages 287 – 288) Title IV

2. transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities:
Through a wide range of collaborations, DBVI’s VR Counselors and specialized Transition Counselors will ensure that students who are still in high school will have work experiences. These experiences will be accomplished by creating working partnerships with employers, students, and families to create expectations that students will participate in work experiences and to actually create those work experience opportunities, both volunteer and paid. 

To facilitate work opportunities and competitive integrated employment, Vocational Rehabilitation and specialized Transition Counselors will counsel students in career development and job exploration activities to address how students will gain employment experiences during high school. Pre-vocational and pre-employment services will include vocational interest inventories, vocational evaluations, informational interviews, and job shadowing to assist students in determining a vocational goal. Assistance will be provided in developing skills students need to complete applications and interview for work experiences while in high school. VR Counselors and specialized Transition Counselors will collaborate with itinerant Teachers for the Visually Impaired (TVIs), DBVI Educational Coordinators, and employers to integrate work experiences into the expectations and opportunities for youth. Additionally, DBVI will develop ways to enhance parental investment and explore how to best integrate transition planning, including opportunity for work experience, into Individualized Educational Program (IEP) and Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) development. Also, DBVI will continue to collaborate with Virginia Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) regarding transition resources to facilitate development of work experience opportunities with employers. 

Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, will include job exploration and counseling, work-based learning experiences, apprenticeships, counseling regarding opportunities on enrollment in transition or secondary education programs, work place readiness training, and instruction in self-advocacy. 

To enhance and facilitate job-readiness skills and career planning for students to make a successful transition from school to work and to greater independence, students will be referred to DBVI Business Relations Specialists and to Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) (also known in Virginia as Employment Services Organizations (ESOs)). Business Relations Specialists will complement preemployment transition services by delivering workplace readiness training to establish skills necessary for entry into career pathways, competitive integrated employment, and by coordinating with schools and networking with employers to establish paid and unpaid internships, including apprenticeships, specifically matched to the student’s needs, skills, interests, abilities, and informed choice. Transition services purchased from CRPs may also include On-The-Job support and extended support services for students and youth needing additional supports in the work experience setting or on the job. (Pages 360-361) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~c. State Strategy
1. Describe the strategies the State will implement, including industry or sector partnerships related to in-demand industry sectors and occupations and career pathways, as required by WIOA section 101(d)(3)(B), (D). “Career pathway” is defined at WIOA section 3(7) and includes registered apprenticeship. “In-demand industry sector or occupation” is defined at WIOA section 3(23).

How These Strategies Were Developed
These strategies were developed over the course of a year, working in concert with members of the WIOA Implementation Team, with a strategy framework provided by the state workforce board (the Virginia Board of Workforce Development). They were further refined during a facilitated 3-day retreat, which engaged stakeholders from inside and outside the partner programs listed in this plan. These stakeholders included representatives from the Virginia Economic Development Partnership (VEDP), the lead organization responsible for economic development in the Commonwealth with responsibilities for both business attraction and business retention and expansion services, and subject matter experts from other organizations.  (Page 106) Title I

Activities and practices that are continued/implemented under this DEI Round:
o Partnership with the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant to facilitate systems alignment, cross systems service delivery efforts, and co-enrollments with Workforce Partner Programs.  (Page 191) Title I

Virginia’s Combined State Plan highlights the critical role of sector strategies and career pathways development and implementation. In 2017, Virginia’s workforce partners came together to start developing a Sector Strategy and Career Pathways Academy and online Community of Practice. A key aim of this initiative is to strengthen the ability of workforce system practitioners and partners to incorporate Sector Strategies and Career Pathways strategies as integral components in Virginia’ s workforce system.

This Academy will build a statewide professional development program that will help its workforce professionals to understand how to improve services to business and job seeking customers through sector strategies and career pathways. The Academy will also increase awareness of demand-driven talent pipelines and job matching services through more cooperation and collaboration among public and private workforce partners. (Page 156) Title I

Career Pathways Workgroup
As previously mentioned, the Career Pathways Workgroup has provided a platform for cross-agency collaboration and a place for system partners to dialogue on common challenges and opportunities. Moving forward, this group will remain vital to the implementation of elements of this plan, particularly around career pathways and aligned sector strategies.  (Page 194) Title I

DARS Response 4: DARS will continue to promote career pathways and build partnerships to achieve this goal. Virginia has convened a Career Pathways Workgroup, comprised of senior staff from eight different agencies administering workforce or workforce-related programs. DARS, along with the Department of Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) also oversees the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (CPID) grant. This grant will assist Virginians with disabilities, including young adults and veterans, gain new skills and credentials through career pathways and help these individuals obtain employment in competitive, high-demand, high-quality occupations. (Page 280) Title IV

Priority 3: Partnering with the Wilson Workforce and Rehabilitation Center (WWRC), other state agencies, Supported Employment (SE) providers, and other entities in the integration of services for people with disabilities leading to competitive, integrated employment:

Strategies:
Implement the five-year Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (CPID) model demonstration program to create new career pathways and/or use existing career pathways in high-demand occupations. (Page 320) Title IV

7. Strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce development system in assisting individuals with disabilities:

Strategy 1.3: To establish and enhance entry into career pathways, DBVI will continue to utilize personnel and funds associated Virginia’s Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Grant which was jointly awarded DBVI and the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) in 2015. DBVI will:
• help individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations;
• enhance the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities;
• enhance access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities; and
• strengthen the alignment of Virginia’s VR programs with the other core programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and other Federally-funded career pathways initiatives providing self-advocacy skills training that is critical to the achievement of individuals’ personal and vocational goals. (Page 395) Title IV

1. An evaluation of the extent to which the VR program goals described in the approved VR services portion of the Unified or Combined State Plan for the most recently completed program year were achieved. The evaluation must:
A. Identify the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals:

Because of the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant, obtained jointly with the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, DBVI is focused more on helping individuals obtain credentials. DBVI and DARS have hosted one week academies which are focused on high demand occupations within the Commonwealth. One of these academies was held at the agency’s Rehabilitation Center during the summer of 2017. The focus was in the area of information technology. The students built a robot individually and programmed it to do various tasks. (Pages 398-399) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Virginia’s Registered Apprenticeship programs are administered by the Department of Labor and Industry (DOLI) through a network of regional service offices and technical outreach staff. At the LWDB level, Business Service Teams are the organizing structure used to engage business and industry and deliver workforce services to industry partners. DOLI representatives are vital members of the LWDB Business Service Teams and also work in partnership with other system partners (e.g. Virginia Employment Commission, Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education) to support their sponsor businesses and registered apprentices. DOLI and the LWDB Business Service Teams will collaborate and work in tandem identifying Registered Apprenticeship opportunities.

Additionally, Registered Apprenticeships are incorporated into its strategy and services via DOLIs participation on the State’s Career Pathways Committee, the State’s WIOA Implementation Team and other strategic Workforce Development Committees. The Commonwealth is taking further steps to strengthen partnership between Title I and DOLI Registered Apprenticeship programs. This will include making each team aware of the programs offered and providing more coordinated services to businesses. (Pages 222-223) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Goal 3: Ensure that the VR Program continues to be a collaborative leader in the integration of services for people with disabilities in the Workforce Centers and the use of Social Security Work Incentives:
Indicators:
3.5 DARS has entered into administrative Employment Network (EN) agreements with a third Administrative EN. This has increased the choices for potential EN partners in Virginia. This model has proven to be a viable option for smaller organizations that do not have the administrative capacity to become their own employment network. The three administrative ENs are collaborating with 12-organizations in Virginia. This includes Centers for Independent Living, Community Rehabilitation Programs, Brain Injury Service providers and other DARS vendors

3.6 Maintain the department’s presence in all of the State’s Comprehensive Workforce Centers. The VR program currently is co-located as a One Stop partner in Martinsville, Danville and South Boston. DARS also has a physical presence in other Workforce Board AJC’s.

3.7 Increase the number of work incentive authorizations to 600. During FFY 2017, there were 2,737 total WISA authorizations. These services were provided through over 98 different WISAs around the state, which was a significant increase which allowed DARS to significantly increase the number of authorizations. DARS has added additional WISA services to include Section 301 protection, ABLEnow accounts, and Financial Health Assessments. This brings the total number of available WISA services to 14. DARS has also facilitated increased efficiency with the WorkWORLD for the Web tool. It is now four-times faster. The rehabilitation rate for DARS clients who receive WISA services is 60% compared to a rehabilitation rate of 40% for the same population when no WISA services are provided. This growth in WISA authorizations has resulted in an opportunity to partner with the Social Security Administration on a proof of concept pilot for obtaining Benefit Planning Query’s for DARS clients. Previously, this process had to be completed through the local SSA field offices and took over four weeks. Now the turnaround is three to five business days using a secure email exchange with SSA. During the 2017 FFY, DARS affiliates which includes Partnership Plus Employment Networks and WISAs requested a total of 3,129 Benefit Planning Query’s to provide work incentive services to their clients. This includes 30 requests from WWRC. In addition, DARS counselors requested 2,730 Benefit Planning Query’s for a total of 5,859 across the Commonwealth. Thus far, DARS affiliates have requested 1,148 Benefit Planning Query’s and an additional 20 have been requested by WWRC. The average turn-around time over the span of this pilot have changed but is currently less than five-business days for the majority of requests. This is a significant difference in the processing time and has resulted in more accurate information available to both clients’ and counselors to increase informed choice related to earned income and SSA benefits.

3.8 Implement a pilot program to enhance the reassignment “handoff” process for the Partnership Plus Employment Network Partners. The Partnership Plus handoff pilot program has been completed and with the release of Social Security’s enhanced portal, Ticket To Work handoffs are achieved within three business days in the majority of cases and the planning begins while clients are in employed status. DARS partnership plus Employment Networks generated more ticket to work revenue and exceeded the national average for growth in ticket payments. The national growth rate in ticket revenue was 73% between FFY 2015 and 2016. There are 15 DARS Partnership Plus Employment Networks that were active during this reporting period and all grew in revenue by over 100%. (Pages 325-326) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~D. Coordination, Alignment and Provision of Services to Employers:  
Virginia has positioned business as co-equal customer for the workforce system. The state board has established a formal policy for the provision of business services and embedded concepts like regional workforce demand planning into local plan requirements and related policies, including those governing the state’s Eligible Training Provider List.  (Page 134) Title IV

F. Partner Engagement with Other Education and Training Providers:
Describe how the State’s Strategies will engage the State’s other education and training providers, including providers on the state’s eligible training provider list, as partners in the workforce development system to create a job-driven education and training system:
Virginia’s strategy with other education and training providers encourages customer choice, innovation in service delivery, alignment with industry needs, and quality. Virginia also embraces On-the-job training, customized training, employer-directed incumbent worker training, and paid or unpaid work experiences to develop and advance skills in the individuals served.

Eligible Training Provider List:
The state workforce board recently adopted a policy for training providers which is streamlined, open and inclusive and includes performance measures for training providers. There are five categories of providers who may apply for consideration to be included on the state eligible training provider list:
1. A postsecondary educational institution that is eligible to receive federal funds under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 and that provides a program that leads to certification or license or college certificate, associate degree, or baccalaureate degree.
2. A postsecondary school that offers formal instructional programs with curricula designed primarily for students who have completed the requirements for a high school diploma or its equivalent. Such schools include programs of academic-vocational, vocational, and continuing professional education that may lead to a certification or licensure. This category excludes avocational and adult basic education programs.
3. An entity that carries out related instruction under the National Apprenticeship Act that is recognized by the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry,
4. A provider of a program of occupational training services that under Section 23-276.2 of the Code of Virginia is exempt from certification as a postsecondary school such as a professional or occupational training program regulated by another state or federal governmental agency other than the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV), any school, institute, or course of instruction offered by any trade association or any nonprofit affiliation of a trade association on subjects related to the trade, business, or profession represented by such association, or
5. A provider of adult education and literacy activities under title II of WIOA, if these activities are provided in combination with occupational skills training.

Exemptions for category 4 providers include educational offerings or activities that meet the following:
1) A nursing education program or curriculum regulated by the Board of Nursing;
2) A professional or occupational training program regulated by another other state or federal governmental agency;
3) Those courses or programs of instruction given by or approved by any professional body that are principally for continuing or professional education and for which no degree credit is awarded;
4) Those courses or programs offered through approved multistate compacts, including, but not limited to, the Southern Regional Education Board’s Electronic Campus;
5) Those courses offered and delivered by a postsecondary school that is accredited by an entity recognized by the U.S. Department of Education for accrediting purposes, if such courses are provided, solely on a contractual basis for which no individual is charged tuition and for which there is no advertising for open enrollment;
6) Any school, institute or course of instruction offered by any trade association or any nonprofit affiliate of a trade association on subjects related to the trade, business or profession represented by such association;
7) Any public or private high school accredited or recognized by the Board of Education;
8) Tutorial instruction delivered and designed to supplement regular classes for students enrolled in any public or private school or to prepare an individual for an examination for professional practice or higher education;
9) Religious Institutions whose primary purpose is to provide religious or theological education. (Pages 138 –139) Title I

4. A provider of a program of occupational training services that under Section 23-276.2 of the Code of Virginia is exempt from certification as a postsecondary school such as a professional or occupational training program regulated by another state or federal governmental agency other than the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV), any school, institute, or course of instruction offered by any trade association or any nonprofit affiliation of a trade association on subjects related to the trade, business, or profession represented by such association, or
5. A provider of adult education and literacy activities under title II of WIOA, if these activities are provided in combination with occupational skills training.  (Page 226) Title II

Data Collection

In June 2015, a Common Intake Workgroup comprised of data professionals and partner agency thought leaders was formed. There is unanimous agreement that a common screening tool for monitoring new workforce system customers is needed, and the group is now determining the most efficient and cost-effective platform to use. Governor McAuliffe had originally requested the obligation of funds for the delivery of the common screening tool by September 1, 2016, but the procurement process and other technical considerations have pushed the timetable back to the end of calendar year 2016.

Reporting: In early June, after the original submission of Virginia’s Combined State Plan, Governor McAuliffe convened a meeting of workforce leaders and stakeholders to discuss the creation of common workforce performance measures to complement the measures outlined in Section 116 of WIOA. These state performance measures are outlined in the table below. (Page 152) Title II

i. Comprehensive System of Personnel Development; Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development (Formerly known as Attachment 4.10)).

Describe the designated State agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified State rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated State unit, including the following:

1. Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

A. Qualified Personnel Needs. Describe the development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs with respect to:

i. the number of personnel who are employed by the State agency in the provision of VR services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

The Commonwealth of Virginia maintains a personnel database including policies and procedures for the professional development of state employees that DBVI utilizes as part of its personnel development and planning. DBVI tracks personnel development as part of annual review and development of the DBVI State Plan CSPD Section I.

During FFY 2018 and FFY 2019, personnel development will continue as one of DBVI’s highest priorities. The procedures and activities outlined in this section were developed to ensure DBVI has an adequate supply of qualified rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals providing VR services to eligible Virginians who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind, including youth. DBVI will continue to assess requirements for qualified personnel, and will adapt agency training and hiring practices as necessary based on the issuance of WIOA final regulations. (Pages 363-364) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

8. Addressing the Accessibility of the One-Stop Delivery System for Individuals with Disabilities:

Foundations:

Virginia’s Workforce Development Services’ Methods of Administration (MOA) describes the nine guiding elements and requirements for Local Workforce Development Boards (LWDBs), one-stop operators and one-stop delivery system partners to comply with Section 188 of WIOA to ensure Universal Access and Equal Opportunity. Virginia’s policy and procedures are periodically reviewed and maintained current; and training and technical assistance are provided on a regular basis. WIOA state monitors conduct regular site visits to ensure compliance. (Page 187) Title I

As part of Virginia’s commitment to continuous quality improvement, a state level taskforce will be established to focus on enhancing accessibility of our one-stop service delivery system and the customer service experience. This taskforce will be composed of representatives from state level disability services agencies, workforce partners, LWDB area staff, One-Stop operators, and job seekers with disabilities.

Expected outcomes are the following: a revised ADA Accessibility guidelines and one-stop center certification process that incorporates the WIOA Section 188 Disability Reference Guide checklist for program and physical accessibility; system standards for accessible devices and software located in workforce centers to facilitate consistency; review of all policies and guidance to ensure alignment and consistency; a schedule for cross- agency training for survey providers, end users, one-stop operators and partner staff. The efforts of this Team will improve compliance and enhance communication, coordination and professional development across Virginia’s workforce system.

Update on the Accessibility Taskforce and WIOA Section 188

• Created the Accessibility Taskforce in 2016 as recommended in Virginia’s WIOA Combined State Plan’s Section to enhance accessibility of our one-stop delivery system and customer service experience, with the WIOA Title I Administrator designated as the lead role.

• The Taskforce is composed of staff from 14 workforce partners from a diverse representation of state agencies that includes, the VR Assistant Commissioner who chairs the state level Career Pathways Workgroup and is a member of the WIOA Implementation Team, Departments for the Blind and Vision Impaired, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Impaired, the Centers for Independent Living and the EEO Officers for WIOA Title I and Title III. The WIOA Adult and Dislocated Worker Programs State Coordinator participates with a policy and programs perspective. As a result a policy was developed and approved by the Virginia Board of Workforce Development on Services to Individuals with Disabilities that lays the groundwork on Section 188-ADA to achieve consistent compliance across ALL WIOA core programs. Taskforce members contributed directly to One Stop Certification Tool by developing specific criteria on Program and Programmatic Accessibility. Taskforce members participated in the evaluation of One Stop certification documents for validation and on-site validation visits to the AJCs. As a dual benefit, this allowed for significantly improved awareness and understanding of the ADA and disability challenges at the local One Stop level and the team site visits fostered technical assistance connections between state and local staff, as well as improving awareness and understanding among the state agencies on the Taskforce. (Page 189) Title I

Vets

Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants:

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually.

In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes:

a. How the State intends to provide employment, training and job placement services to veterans and eligible persons under the JVSG JVSG staff members provide services to eligible veterans according to each veteran’s needs and Significant Barrier to Employment (SBE), and the roles and responsibilities of the JVSG staff member. DVOP specialists and LVERs are fully integrated into the workforce development network. The duties of these staff members are described in the next section. (Page 566-567) Title IV

DVOP Specialists and LVERs work in One Stop offices throughout the state or with other partner agencies. One LVER is designated as the Chief of Veteran Services with the responsibility to manage the Virginia Jobs for Veterans State Grant program and to provide direct supervision and oversight for the Virginia Employment Commission’s JVSG staff. Three LVERs are designated as LVER Regional Managers responsible for providing supervision for Lead LVERS (LLVERs) and DVOPs within their assigned regional geographic areas. Fifteen LVERs are designated as Lead LVERs (LLVERs). In this role LLVERs perform their traditional statutory role within their assigned geographic area 70% of the time. The remaining time is spent performing supervisory functions for DVOP staff, thus ensuring that each staff member is performing according to expectations and increasing the integration and accountability of JVSG staff as a partner within the current workforce model. Three DVOPs are assigned as Intensive Service Coordinators (ISCs), these staff members are located in the Fredericksburg, Hampton, and Wytheville offices. (Page 567) Title IV

The VEC recently conducted an analysis of the veteran population in each local workforce development area (LWDA) to establish an equitable distribution of DVOP Specialists. Official workplaces and areas of responsibility will be adjusted in accordance with the results of that analysis. The VEC will review the distribution of the JVSG staff annually in conjunction with the Annual Funding Modification process and adjust domicile locations as necessary based on population shifts. In addition to DVOP Specialists, each One Stop will have trained case managers and business services teams. DVOP specialists coordinate closely with these One Stop Center staff members when providing intensive services to veterans with a SBE. DVOP Specialists provide advice and guidance as needed to One Stop Center staff who are providing services to other veterans and other eligible persons.

When not actively providing intensive services or reviewing open case files, DVOP Specialists and other One Stop Center workforce representatives conduct outreach at off—site locations including, but not limited to, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs offices, Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOC) for the U.S. DVA, Military Treatment facilities (MTF), Warrior Transition Units/Battalion (WTU/WTB), Local Prisons and Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program (HVRP) grantee locations. The purpose of these outreach efforts is two—fold. The first purpose is to find veterans in need of services and offer the needed services to them. The second purpose is to develop relationships with supportive services in the area so that SBE and other veterans can be referred to those agencies for services. (Page 567) Title IV

LLVER staff members work in One Stop offices throughout the state. The LVER coordinates with Regional Industry Sector Coordinators, Business Services Coordinators, and members of the Workforce Delivery Teams to advocate to employers on behalf of veterans and to develop job opportunities specifically for veterans. LLVER staff train WP funded employees to network for veterans and comply with priority of service requirements.

b. The duties assigned to DVOP specialists and LVER staff by the State; specifically implementing DVOP and LVER duties or roles and responsibilities as outlined in 38 U.S.C. § 4103A and 4104. These duties must be consistent with current guidance; The specific duties of DVOP specialists and LLVER staff throughout the state are consistent with the roles and responsibilities outlined in 38 U.S.C. § 4103A, 4104, and current guidance provided by DOL Veterans Employment and Training Services (VETS). (Page 567-568) Title IV

a. Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists The primary function of the State’s DVOP Specialist team is to provide intensive services for veterans identified to have a SBE in accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4103A, VPL 07—10 and VPL 03—14, or the most recent USDOL policy, and those veterans that are a member of a special population in accordance with VPL 04—14. Prior to conducting any other intensive service, DVOP Specialists shall conduct a comprehensive assessment, which shall be an “intensive interviewing process” and may also include the use of an Interest Inventory, or other assessment tools. Once the comprehensive assessment has been completed, the DVOP shall, with the cooperation of the veteran, develop and implement an Individual Employment Plan (IEP). DVOP Specialists shall always, and as a minimum, complete these two intensive services. Case management continues to be an appropriate delivery strategy or framework within which intensive services may be delivered and in most cases, shall be followed. To enhance the implementation of the IEP career guidance, supportive services, job development contacts, job referrals and intensive services and training may also be provided. Depending on the needs of the individual, the goal of the IEP may be to obtain education or training that lead to employment or employment. Training or education may be short or long term depending on the certification, licensing or skills being acquired to optimize successful employment outcomes. The DVOP Specialist may receive assistance with these functions by other Workforce Specialists who are trained to facilitate case management. (Page 568) Title IV

DVOP Specialists conduct outreach to locate veterans with a SBE with the purpose of providing intensive services and to form partnerships with external and internal supportive services programs that can provide those services, such as:

— VA Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment facilities

— Homeless Veteran Reintegration Programs

— VA VET Centers

— Homeless and Halfway Shelters

— Civic and Veteran Service Organizations

— Virginia Vocational Rehabilitation facilities

— Virginia Community College System

— State Veterans’ Affairs Representatives

— Universities — Veterans’ Service Organizations

— Department of Social Services TANF initiatives for veterans

— Local State Prisons

— Other WIOA partners. (Page 568) Title IV

b. Lead Local Veteran Employment Representative (LLVER) Staff: The LLVER responsibilities are specifically targeted to promote the advantages of hiring veterans to employers, employer associations, and business groups. LLVER roles and responsibilities are consistent with 38 U.S.C. § 4104, VPL 07-10 and VPL 03-14. As such, the LLVER serves an important role in Virginia’s Business Services Delivery Model. In coordination with the other members of the business services team, the LLVER advocates for employment and training opportunities through outreach to employers, training facilities, unions, apprenticeship programs, and private and government businesses. The LLVER also participates in Job Fairs, promotes programs that offer licensing and credentialing opportunities, and develops and makes presentations to employers. Each LLVER must provide a monthly report to the Regional LVER manager detailing their outreach activities. LVER Staff members conduct outreach to perform the following activities:

— Employer outreach

— Job searches and workshops, and establishing job search groups

— Coordinating with apprenticeship programs, and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans

— Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans;

— Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and

— Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts.

Within each One Stop Center, LVER staff coordinate closely with the One Stop managers to provide training and technical assistance on priority of service, best practices for providing effective services to veterans, relevant external partners, the role of DVOP Specialists, integration of DVOP Specialists into Virginia’s service delivery model, and best practices for conducting outreach to employers. LLVER Staff coordinate with their business service team partners and other state agencies or programs such as Virginia Values Veterans (V3), to conduct outreach to employer associations at the state and regional level. In this way the many more employers can be reached and persuaded to hire veterans. This outreach will educate employers on the advantages of hiring veterans, and inform employers on how to find qualified veteran applicants by leveraging Virginia’s workforce system. The VEC will increase veteran employment by making a sound business case to employers about the advantages of hiring veterans and providing tools to do so effectively. (Page 569) Title IV

c. The manner in which DVOP specialists and LVER staff are integrated into the State’s employment service delivery system or one-stop delivery system partner network;

Virginia provides employment, training, and placement services to all veterans through a network of strategically located One Stop Centers operated by 15 Regional Workforce Development Boards (WDB) and supported by the State’s proprietary Virginia Workforce Connection database system. The VEC, One Stop Centers and each local WDB, have implemented a standardized framework for customer flow. This flow determines the method through which all clients (both job seeker and employer) are integrated into the system and how they are assessed to identify their service needs. All programs are coordinated through a joint referral process described in each LWIA’s Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between partners. Each partner performs the services pursuant to their authorizing legislation or policy.

Collaboration is also enforced via program updates and other workforce system policies shared among partners at regularly scheduled staff meetings and training. During those meetings, all staff members share information about new employers and job orders received, One Stop Center scheduled activities, and positive recruitment activities taking place in the region.

All DVOP Specialists are full time employees, including the DVOP Specialist ISC. Although DVOP Specialists are responsible for case management and facilitating intensive services for veterans with significant barriers, they are not alone in this effort. Providing services to veterans with SBEs takes a team effort and as such, all services available in any particular One Stop are available to veterans on a priority of service basis. Non—JVSG funded staff provide intensive services and case management as appropriate to veterans and other eligible persons when no DVOP Specialist is available.

In most cases, the LVER serves as a member of the Business Services Team in their respective WDB. The team’s primary focus is to conduct job development and outreach to employers. LVER Staff responsibilities include operating targeted hiring events and veteran’s job fairs. LVER Staff provides program continuity by acting as the technical program advisor and trainer for One Stop Center staff. (Pages 569-570) Title IV

Virginia has adopted a demand—driven approach to all workforce and employment programs to focus services and training toward high demand jobs. The State promotes employment and job training opportunities through the use of several specialized programs. The Virginia Community College System (VCCS) operates various veterans’ programs throughout the state to promote education and other customized training for veterans to succeed in the civilian workplace. These programs are designed to help the veteran earn a degree or certification. These opportunities are presented to veterans through office visits and presentations at Veterans Workshops.

The local One Stop Centers act as the central hub for all workforce activities and associated training within the state. The State’s strategy for the leveraging of other state and federal education and training programs to develop skills necessary to prepare veterans for in—demand jobs is therefore focused on, and operated in, close cooperation with our One Stop Center partners. The combined efforts of the effective integration of the JVSG into the One Stop Center service delivery model, outreach to and relationship building with relevant partners, and comprehensive up—to—date information on in—demand jobs and skills, produces a coordination of programs and services that reduces or eliminates duplication, closes gaps in service, and identifies the program or service best suited to the individual veteran being served. In this way, the State leverages a wide range of state and federal training programs to efficiently and effectively provide veterans with the specific skills necessary to secure and succeed in current in—demand jobs.

The State’s outreach efforts and public information activities are used to inform veterans of the services available at their local One Stop Centers and the training opportunities that are available in their area and within the state. These outreach efforts, as described in Section B above, are focused on key service providers likely to interact with SBE veterans. The intent of this outreach is to educate service providers about job training and other services available to veterans at their local One Stop Center. In turn, the State’s partner service providers can encourage veterans to seek services at s or VEC offices. Due to the complexity of eligibility criteria and the variance of programs offered in disparate areas, public information systems usually do not provide specifics on particular programs but does direct veterans and other eligible persons into the local One Stop Center. (Pages 570-571)

The State is actively engaged in promoting the development of high demand job—driven training opportunities for veterans and other eligible persons within the education community. Business Services Teams partner with WIOA staff members, advise and collaborate with employers and educational institutions, (particularly the Virginia Community College System), to promote access to, retention in, and completion of individual training and education.

d. The Incentive Award program implemented using the 1% grant allocation set aside for this purpose, as applicable;

The State shall request one (1) percent of its annual allocation for each year’s JVSG grant as a Performance Incentive award for eligible staff. This award shall be used in accordance with VPL 02—07, or the most recent guidance from USDOL—VETS. The objective of the VEC incentive award program is to recognize, promote, and reward superlative and exceptional performance in the provision of service to veterans within the context of statutes and regulations. The basic objective of the awards program is to create an awareness and continuous level of interest in the importance of priority of service for veterans and an environment that engenders continuous improvement in serving veterans across the spectrum of service. The award system shall continue to operate as defined in the applicable State Policy and as approved by USDOL. The State anticipates that individuals and teams will recognize the value and process of the awards program and will, as a result, develop a competitive attitude within the agency that supports esprit de corps within the team while sharpening the focus on service to other eligible persons.

Incentive awards shall be expended up to and including one (1) percent of the total grant amount for the fiscal year, which is set aside strictly for this purpose in the annual grant budget. Awards shall be determined based on a percentage of total award available for that fiscal year but shall not (in total) exceed one (1) percent of the total available funds for a given fiscal year or the most current USDOL guidance on grant funded incentive award amounts. Exceptional merit is based on a number of factors, with the overriding concept being the value of the process. In essence this is determining both a quantitative and qualitative rating and merit based on the following factors:

— Total numbers of veterans served and total services rendered to those veterans within the parameters of these areas;

— Outreach to veterans and subsequent flow of core services that result in veterans becoming job ready, or the need for intensive services; — Outreach to and the comprehensive assessment of special target groups within the veteran community;

— Intensive servicesular job developments, for veterans and veterans with disabilities; 

, case management, and outcomes of those efforts; 

— Job placements, in partic— Other successful outcomes for veterans who may not return to employment, but through community partner referral developed an improved situation and/or economic stability;

— Outreach to and partner development with employers and federal contractors in the support of creating job opportunities for veterans;

— Outreach to and partner development with community service agencies, other state and federal programs, and internal agency components in creating a supportive service network for veterans with barriers to employment and who may need case management;

— Organizations, participation, and success in job fairs and other veteran center community activities;

— Any other innovative veteran related activity. (Page 571-572) Title IV

By state law, all awards must be cash, and all cash awards must be presented directly to individuals in the amount of $1,000. This means that offices (teams) receiving incentive recognition shall share equally in the overall office award, and the individual award amount shall be determined by the team composition. For state merit staff awardees, the incentive will be paid out through the payroll system. For non—state merit employee, a separate payroll check will be issued to the individual. Any employee contributions that result from the payment of the incentive will be charged to the JVSG grant.

On 1 March and 1 August first of each year, supervisors will submit recommendations of names and amount not to exceed $1,000 per individual and/or per incident of achievement to the Chief, Veteran Services. There will be three level of awards designated: Gold ($1,000), Silver ($750) and Bronze ($500). This submission will also include a narrative report that identifies the number and type of activities extended to veterans and their outcome in no more than one page, not including additional documentation in the form of VWC or other data can be attached. The criteria for the award type will include, but is not limited to, Department of Labor performance measures for LVERs and DVOPs and performance measures established by the Virginia Employment Commission and partner agencies. (Page 572) Title IV

Determination of the award shall be by a combination of objective and subjective data. Data compilation, analysis, and award determination shall be by a team proposed by of the Chief, Veterans Services. The final award approval shall be by the Appointing Authority, Commissioner of VEC, who is also the signatory authority for the JVSG grant relationship with USDOL. Incentive award funds distributed shall be obligated by September 30, each fiscal year and distributed not later than December 31, of the same year in accordance with the regulation. The Incentive award report shall be in compliance with USDOL VETS reporting requirements.

e. The populations of veterans to be served, including any additional populations designated by the Secretary as eligible for services, and any additional populations specifically targeted by the State Workforce Agency for services from one-stop delivery system partners (e.g., Native American veterans; veterans in remote rural counties or parishes); DVOP Specialists target veterans who attest to having one or more of the six significant barriers to employment listed below ongoing to at least one of the six criteria listed below:

— A special disabled or disabled veteran, as defined in 38 U.S.C. § 4211(10) and (3);

— Homeless, as defined in Sections 103(a) and (b) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11302(a) and (b)), as amended;

— A recently-separated service member, as defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(6), who has been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months;

— An offender, as defined by WIOA Section 3 (38), who is currently incarcerated or who has been released from incarceration;

— Lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; and/or

— Low—income, as defined by WIOA Section 3(36).

DVOP Specialists also provide services to priority category populations identified by the Secretary under 38 U.S.C. § 4103A (a)(1)(C). Currently, the Secretary has identified four such populations. These populations are:

— Transitioning service members who have participated in the Transition Assistance Program and have been identified as in need of intensive services as indicated by issuance of DD form 2978 ;

— Service members who are wounded, ill, or injured and receiving treatment in military treatment facilities or warrior transition units;

— The spouses or other family caregivers of such wounded, ill, or injured service members; and — Veterans, as defined in 38 U.S.C. § 4211, aged 18 to 24.

f. How the State implements and monitors the administration of priority of service to covered persons; 

Priority of Service is one of the most important elements of service for veterans, as prescribed by 38 U.S.C. § 4215(b) and 20 CFR Parts 1001 and 1010 and reinforced through the State issued Workforce Development Policy 18.

During the reception process, a series of questions are used to identify veteran or eligibility status. Qualified veterans and/or qualified spouses are provided services prior to other customers and an initial assessment is completed by the first available One Stop Center staff member. If during the initial assessment it is determined that the veteran has a SBE or is a member of another special category, the veteran is immediately referred to a DVOP specialist. (Pages 572-573) Title I

The State provides priority of service in accordance with TEGL 05—03. When a veteran is identified as having barriers to employment, they are fast—tracked to ensure that those barriers are resolved as expeditiously as possible. The VEC has agreements with the USDOL—funded programs covered by 38 U.S.C. § 4215(b) on veterans’ priority and refers veterans to training and supportive services within that network on a priority basis. The VEC has partnered with educational entities within the state and the vocational/technical institutions, which also provide priority service for veterans. Veterans receive priority for employment and job training opportunities available through WIOA funding, on the job training, skills development training, and youth training contracts. Veterans’ can locate training opportunities through use of the Virginia Workforce Connection data base and receive training at private facilities, which have been approved through either through the individual WDBs or the Virginia Department of Veteran Services. Training costs for eligible veterans are paid by the WIOA program or through Individual Training Accounts. Veterans take priority in instances of training fund shortages. (Page 573-574) Title IV

Each WDB coordinates available funds with those provided by the Virginia Department of Veterans Affairs Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) program to prevent duplication of services. When VR&E is providing training and supportive services, WIOA can provide services to spouses or services that were not covered by the VR&E program.

The VEC closely monitors programs to ensure that veterans are given priority of service. Both JVSG management and Regional Directors periodically conduct site checks to ensure all required priority of service signs are present and properly displayed, and that One Stop Center staff understand both the requirement of priority of service and its proper implementation. During these site visits, monitors pay particular attention to the implementation of priority of service beyond core services, particularly in the allocation of training funds.

The VEC analyzes data from Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) reports in conjunction with Virginia Workforce Connection data in order to compare outcomes by veterans and other eligible persons to the outcomes of non—veteran populations. This ongoing analysis supports the VEC’s continuous improvement process. Specifically, this is the relative rates of referral to USDOL funded training, referral to employment by One Stop Center staff, and job placement activities provided by One Stop Center staff. The VEC considers a referral rate in any program that is lower for eligible veterans than for nonveterans, evidence of a potential priority of service problem. In these cases, The VEC immediately places the affected region under examination and corrective action measures.

g. How the State provides or intends to provide and measure, through both the DVOP and one-stop delivery system partner staff:

1. job and job training individualized career services,

The VEC will use reports from the Virginia Workforce Connection (VWC) to ascertain services provided. Reports are generated monthly and quarterly. Reports are sorted by Region, Local Offices and Individual DVOPS. Capability exists to also view and track individual veterans and eligible spouses. In addition VEC conducts an Intensive Services Analysis on a monthly basis in which we review the raw number of veterans provided intensive services and the percentage of Veterans provided intensive services in comparison to the total number of veterans served. VEC will also monitor on a quarterly and semi-annual basis veteran’s average earnings and veteran’s retention rate (6 months). (Page 574-575)

Mental Health

~~3. the State agency responsible for providing mental health services:

The Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) maintains collaborative relationships with state agencies providing services to individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind with intellectual/developmental disabilities and mental health issues to include the Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) and the Virginia Department of Medical Assistant Services (DMAS).

As discussed in Section C, during this State Plan cycle, DBVI will establish or re—establish Memorandum of Understandings or interagency agreements outlining the commitment of the agencies to work together to create opportunities to exchange information, resolve issues, and provide resources statewide in order to increase the pre—employment and competitive integrated employment opportunities for individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind with intellectual/developmental disabilities and mental health issues.

Interagency Collaboration regarding providing services for individuals with Developmental Disabilities and Mental Health Services:

The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) provides services and supports to individuals who have developmental disabilities, intellectual disabilities, and mental health concerns, also known as behavioral health in Virginia. Services to these individuals are provided by regional and local Community Services Boards (CSBs). DBVI will establish or reestablish collaborative relationships with Virginia DBHDS and CSBs to include participating in interagency workgroups with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the Intellectual Disability (ID)/Developmental Disability (DD) CSB Case Managers with the goal of providing information related to allowable employment activities including Virginia’s Employment First initiative, Medicaid Waiver programs, and the provision of supported and extended support services. Collaboration with DBHDS also provides information on services and resources that support pre—employment transition programs and positive employment outcomes. The DBVI Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor will work with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the ID/DD CSB Case Managers to specifically ensure that issues related to work benefits, supports, and available resources are addressed.  (Pages 362) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Goal 7: Utilize WWRC’s comprehensive programs and services to address the unique needs of VR consumers with multiple and complex disabilities to help them overcome barriers to employment and obtain a job and/or regain independence to return to work. Indicators: 7.1 Increase the number of consumers referred by VR counselors to WWRC by 1%. There were 2,616 referrals in FFY 2017, there were 2,597 in FFY 2016. 7.2 Expand WWRC’s medical outreach to increase access for potential VR consumers with an emphasis in ‘return to work’. WWRC continues to build its capacity for statewide referral development to Rothrock Hall’s medical rehabilitation services. (Page 329) Title IV

States that elect to include UI in the Combined State Plan must: 1. Submit an SQSP in the following manner depending on their timing in the SQSP cycle: A. If a State is in the first year of their 2-year cycle, a complete SQSP package must be submitted. A complete SQSP package will include the Transmittal Letter, Budget Worksheets/Forms, State Plan Narrative, CAPs (including the milestones and the completion date for each milestone), the UI IAP, Organizational Chart, and the SQSP Signature Page. One of the key goals for the UI program is to ensure that claimants are able to successfully return to work. As such, the SQSP State Narrative must provide a discussion of the plan coordination with other WIOA Combined Plan programs to ensure a coordinated effort and integrated service delivery. (Pages 601-602) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 77

H 1025 An Act to require the Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services and law-enforcement agencies in the Commonwealth to make information about vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to certain law-enforcement officer - 03/31/2020

“1. § 1. That the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services shall make information regarding vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to assist former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service with preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining suitable employment, including information on the types of programs available and the process by which former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service can access such programs and services, available to law-enforcement agencies in the Commonwealth.

 

§ 2. That every law-enforcement agency in the Commonwealth shall provide to every law-enforcement officer who separates from the agency due to a disability resulting from his service information regarding vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to assist former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service with preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining suitable employment, including information on the types of programs available and the process by which such law-enforcement officers may access such programs and services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

HB 1078 An Act relating to the Virginia Public Procurement Act; process for competitive negotiation; including employment of persons with a disability as a factor that will be used in evaluating a proposal - 03/12/2020

“A. The process for competitive negotiation shall include the following:

1. Issuance of a written Request for Proposal indicating in general terms that which is sought to be procured, specifying the factors that will be used in evaluating the proposal, indicating whether a numerical scoring system will be used in evaluation of the proposal, and containing or incorporating by reference the other applicable contractual terms and conditions, including any unique capabilities, specifications or qualifications that will be required. Except with regard to contracts for architectural, professional engineering, transportation construction, or transportation-related construction services, a public body may include as a factor that will be used in evaluating a proposal the proposer's employment of persons with disabilities to perform the specifications of the contract. In the event that a numerical scoring system will be used in the evaluation of proposals,”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Directive Six (2020) Continuing the Community Integration Team - 01/02/2020

"By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor under Article V, Section 1 of the Constitution of Virginia and § 2.2-103 and § 2.2-104 of the Code of Virginia, I hereby direct the following Cabinet Secretaries and their respective executive branch agencies and councils to continue their collaborative efforts to complete and update a comprehensive, cross-governmental strategic plan designed to ensure continued community integration of Virginians with disabilities:

Secretary of Commerce and Trade

Department of Housing and Community Development

Secretary of Education

Department of Education

Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind

Secretary of Health and Human Resources

Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services

Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired

Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services

Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Department of Medical Assistance Services

Virginia Board for People with Disabilities

Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs

Department of Veterans’ Services

Secretary of Transportation

Department of Rail and Public Transportation

Chief Workforce Development Officer”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order No. 47 - Expanding Opportunities for Virginians with Disabilities - 01/02/2020

“Directive

Therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor under Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth, including but not limited to § 2.2-103 of the Code of Virginia, I hereby direct the Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion to provide leadership and coordinate across Secretariats the following actions:

1. The Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion shall work with the Secretary of Administration to implement § 2.2-203.2:3 of the Code of Virginia, to increase the employment of individuals within state government, including but not limited to the exploration and implementation of the following initiatives to: 3

a. Use available hiring authorities, consistent with statutes, regulations, and prior executive orders;

b. Increase efforts to accommodate individuals with disabilities within state government employment by increasing the retention and return to work of individuals with disabilities; and

c. Expand existing efforts for the recruitment, accommodation, retention, and advancement of individuals with disabilities for positions available in state government.

2. The Secretary of Education and Chief Workforce Advisor, in coordination with the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) shall identify opportunities and current best practices at institutions of higher education, community colleges, and vocational training programs to increase the number of Virginians with disabilities who are able to participate actively in advanced training and education programs they choose.

3. The Chief Workforce Advisor, in conjunction with the Secretaries of Commerce and Trade and Education, shall work with the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, who will direct DARS, and DBVI, and the Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing to strengthen and develop workforce pipelines for individuals with disabilities and promote the hiring of qualified individuals with disabilities by new and existing Virginia businesses as well as companies seeking to locate to the Commonwealth.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Virginia Poverty Law Center, Inc. (VPLC) - 09/03/2019

~~“Virginia Poverty Law Center, Inc. (VPLC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Current enrollees and uninsured and “left-behind” individuals and families who lack affordable coverage options in their area or are unaware of the full range of health coverage options available. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are: Blue Ridge Legal Services, Central Virginia Legal Aid Society, Legal Aid Justice Center, Legal Aid Society of Eastern Virginia, Legal Aid Society of Roanoke Valley, Legal Services of Northern Virginia, Southwest Virginia Legal Aid Society, and Virginia Legal Aid Society. They will partner with: Rapid Response Program, Telehealth Enrollment Assistance Service, State and local government agencies, Community libraries, food banks, and tax preparers, Faith-based organizations, Chambers of Commerce, Hospitals, Native American tribes, Military and veterans' groups, Remote Access Medical clinics, and the Parole office.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Jill HankenPhone: (804) 782-9430 Ext. 104Email: jill@vplc.org .” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Boat People SOS, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Boat People SOS, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving small business owners and self-employed individuals; part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment service; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is the Korean Community Service Center of Greater Washington (KCSC). They will partner with Behavioral health and sustenance centers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Veteran’s service organizations, Chambers of Commerce, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and rural hospitals •Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, and Post-secondary Educational Institutions. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Dr. Thang NguyenPhone: (703) 538-2190Email: thang.nguyen@bpsos.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Americans with Disabilities Act - 06/21/2019

~~“In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Virginians with Disabilities Act, offenders with disabilities housed in a Virginia Department of Corrections (VADOC) facility or under state community supervision can request reasonable accommodations and provisions.

Our facilities and probation and parole offices have a common authority and set of operating procedures for ADA compliance. Various factors can affect an offender’s housing assignment based on their medical classification, needs, and the security measures required.

Every VADOC facility and probation and parole office has a designated ADA coordinator to assist with requests and grievances regarding disability concerns. Our trained ADA coordinator manages those requests and grievances throughout the system.

Learn more in Operating Procedure 801.3.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia State Plan for Aging Services “No Wrong Door" - 05/13/2019

~~‘Virginia’s NWD System offers electronic tools from case management intake to com-plex  care  coordination  to  hospital  and  care  transitions.  NWD  partners  include  all  25 AAAs,  120 local departments of social  services (LDSS), CILs  and an array  of providers ranging from  hospitals to  home health  organizations who can access an electronic re-source database of over 26,600 public and private  health and human supports maintained by Virginia Navigator. 

No Wrong Door is locally led and managed by 25 AAAs across the Commonwealth. Each unique local community has an advisory group and network of partners who contribute their expertise, collaborate and share client-level data, with consent, through a secure system to streamline access and support.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Developmental Disability Services - 05/09/2019

~~“Person centered services are available to residents of the City of Alexandria with a diagnosis of developmental disability. Support Coordination, Residential and Vocational or Day Support services are offered to enable individuals to successfully live in the community as independently as possible with the necessary supports.”

 More information about the services we provide is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training and Education Alliance - 04/30/2019

~~“The Training and Education Alliance uses a three-pronged approach to assist transitioning veterans that have chosen educational institutions as their preferred path to employment. Identifying and promoting employment pipelines, providing military cultural sensitivity training to education staff, and highlighting community service initiatives are three methods used by the TEA Alliance program to support Virginia’s Veterans on their path to employment.  Connectivity to fellow directorate programs such as Virginia Transition Assistance Program(VTAP) and Virginia Values Veterans(V3) also serve to ensure valuable services are available throughout the entirety of our veterans journeys to their education and employment goals.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

H 1025 An Act to require the Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services and law-enforcement agencies in the Commonwealth to make information about vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to certain law-enforcement officer - 03/31/2020

“1. § 1. That the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services shall make information regarding vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to assist former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service with preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining suitable employment, including information on the types of programs available and the process by which former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service can access such programs and services, available to law-enforcement agencies in the Commonwealth.

 

§ 2. That every law-enforcement agency in the Commonwealth shall provide to every law-enforcement officer who separates from the agency due to a disability resulting from his service information regarding vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to assist former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service with preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining suitable employment, including information on the types of programs available and the process by which such law-enforcement officers may access such programs and services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

HB 1078 An Act relating to the Virginia Public Procurement Act; process for competitive negotiation; including employment of persons with a disability as a factor that will be used in evaluating a proposal - 03/12/2020

“A. The process for competitive negotiation shall include the following:

1. Issuance of a written Request for Proposal indicating in general terms that which is sought to be procured, specifying the factors that will be used in evaluating the proposal, indicating whether a numerical scoring system will be used in evaluation of the proposal, and containing or incorporating by reference the other applicable contractual terms and conditions, including any unique capabilities, specifications or qualifications that will be required. Except with regard to contracts for architectural, professional engineering, transportation construction, or transportation-related construction services, a public body may include as a factor that will be used in evaluating a proposal the proposer's employment of persons with disabilities to perform the specifications of the contract. In the event that a numerical scoring system will be used in the evaluation of proposals,”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

SENATE BILL NO. 1485 Long-Term Employment Support Services and Extended Employment Services - 04/29/2019

~~“Directs the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services to make referrals to any employment services organization that provides competitive or commensurate wages and is eligible to receive state-funded Long-Term Employment Support Services or Extended Employment Services. The bill also requires the Department to develop and implement a referral process for individuals who make an informed choice to pursue an employment outcome that is not considered a competitive integrated employment setting by the Department. The bill also establishes the Employment Service Organization Steering Committee as an advisory board in the executive branch of state government. The bill provides that the purpose of the Committee shall be to report to and advise the Commissioner for Aging and Rehabilitative Services on policy, funding, and the allocation of funds to employment services organizations for Long-Term Employment Support Services and Extended Employment Services.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Values Veterans (V3) - 04/04/2019

~~“HB1641 passed the House of Delegates and the Senate unanimously, and was signed into law by Governor McAuliffe on March 17, 2015. It states: “All agencies in the executive branch of state government and all public institutions of higher education shall, to the maximum extent possible, be certified in accordance with this section." The process for state agencies to meet the requirements of this legislation can be found here on the V3 website.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Acts of Assembly: An Act to Amend and Reenact §§ 51.5-41, 51.5-120, 51.5-163, 51.5-164, and 51.5-172 through 51.5-176 of the Code of Virginia - 02/25/2016

Discrimination against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities by employers prohibited A.No employer shall discriminate in employment or promotion practices against an otherwise qualified person with a disability solely because of such disability. For the purposes of this section, an "otherwise qualified person with a disability" means a person qualified to perform the duties of a particular job or position and whose disability is unrelated to the person's ability to perform such duties or position or is unrelated to the person's qualifications for employment or promotion. B. It is the policy of the Commonwealth that persons with disabilities shall be employed in the state service, the service of the political subdivisions of the Commonwealth, in the public schools, and in all other employment supported in whole or in part by public funds on the same terms and conditions as other persons unless it is shown that the particular disability prevents the performance of the work involved. C. An employer shall make reasonable accommodation to the known physical and mental impairments of an otherwise qualified person with a disability, if necessary to assist such person in performing a particular job, unless the employer can demonstrate that the accommodation would impose an undue burden on the employer. For the purposes of this section, "mental impairment" does not include active alcoholism or current drug addiction and does not include any mental impairment, disease, or defect that has been successfully asserted by an individual as a defense to any criminal charge. 1. Individualized plan for employment. A written individualized plan for employment for each recipient of vocational rehabilitation services provided or funded by the Department, in whole or in part, shall be developed within a reasonable time and as soon as possible, but not later than 90 days after the due date of the determination of eligibility, unless an extension is agreed to by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and the Department. The plan shall be agreed to and signed by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and a qualified vocational rehabilitation counselor employed by the Department

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia SB 1404 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia HB 2306 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia 2012 Senate Joint Resolution No. 127 - 02/25/2012

“Encouraging the Secretary of Health and Human Resources and the Superintendent of Public Instruction to adopt and implement Employment First practices...” Employment First is defined as a policy is grounded in a framework of increased integration, independence, productivity and employment that is based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, abilities, and informed choice of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia 2012 House Joint Resolution No. 23 - 01/11/2012

“WHEREAS, implementation of an Employment First initiative in Virginia will lead to increased employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, resulting in benefits for individuals, families, employers, and communities across the Commonwealth; now, therefore, be it resolved by the House of Delegates, the Senate concurring, That the Secretary of Health and Human Resources be requested to develop and implement an Employment First initiative in the Commonwealth, which shall identify employment in an integrated, community setting earning an amount that is equal to or greater than minimum-wage rates as the first goal for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving services through state agencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Virginians with Disabilities Act ( 51.5-1) of 1989 - 05/01/1989

“ It is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment. To these ends, the General Assembly directs the Governor, the Virginia Office for Protection and Advocacy, the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities, the Departments of Education, Health, Housing and Community Development, Behavioral Health and Developmental Services, and Social Services, and the Departments for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, the Blind and Vision Impaired, and the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing and such other agencies as the Governor deems appropriate, to provide, in a comprehensive and coordinated manner which makes the best use of available resources, those services necessary to assure equal opportunity to persons with disabilities in the Commonwealth.The provisions of this title shall be known and may be cited as “‘The Virginians with Disabilities Act.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Executive Directive Six (2020) Continuing the Community Integration Team - 01/02/2020

"By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor under Article V, Section 1 of the Constitution of Virginia and § 2.2-103 and § 2.2-104 of the Code of Virginia, I hereby direct the following Cabinet Secretaries and their respective executive branch agencies and councils to continue their collaborative efforts to complete and update a comprehensive, cross-governmental strategic plan designed to ensure continued community integration of Virginians with disabilities:

Secretary of Commerce and Trade

Department of Housing and Community Development

Secretary of Education

Department of Education

Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind

Secretary of Health and Human Resources

Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services

Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired

Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services

Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Department of Medical Assistance Services

Virginia Board for People with Disabilities

Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs

Department of Veterans’ Services

Secretary of Transportation

Department of Rail and Public Transportation

Chief Workforce Development Officer”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order No. 47 - Expanding Opportunities for Virginians with Disabilities - 01/02/2020

“Directive

Therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor under Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth, including but not limited to § 2.2-103 of the Code of Virginia, I hereby direct the Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion to provide leadership and coordinate across Secretariats the following actions:

1. The Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion shall work with the Secretary of Administration to implement § 2.2-203.2:3 of the Code of Virginia, to increase the employment of individuals within state government, including but not limited to the exploration and implementation of the following initiatives to: 3

a. Use available hiring authorities, consistent with statutes, regulations, and prior executive orders;

b. Increase efforts to accommodate individuals with disabilities within state government employment by increasing the retention and return to work of individuals with disabilities; and

c. Expand existing efforts for the recruitment, accommodation, retention, and advancement of individuals with disabilities for positions available in state government.

2. The Secretary of Education and Chief Workforce Advisor, in coordination with the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) shall identify opportunities and current best practices at institutions of higher education, community colleges, and vocational training programs to increase the number of Virginians with disabilities who are able to participate actively in advanced training and education programs they choose.

3. The Chief Workforce Advisor, in conjunction with the Secretaries of Commerce and Trade and Education, shall work with the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, who will direct DARS, and DBVI, and the Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing to strengthen and develop workforce pipelines for individuals with disabilities and promote the hiring of qualified individuals with disabilities by new and existing Virginia businesses as well as companies seeking to locate to the Commonwealth.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/01/2018

~~"WHEREAS, all Virginians should be given the opportunity to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment to drive Virginia’s economy;NOW, THEREFORE, I, Ralph S. Northam, do hereby recognize October 2018 as DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH in our COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, and I call this observance to the attention of all our citizens." 

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order Number One (2018) Equal Opportunity - 01/13/2018

~~‘By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor, I hereby declare that it is the firm and unwavering policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to ensure equal opportunity in all facets of state government.  The foundational tenet of this Executive Order is premised upon a steadfast commitment to foster a culture of inclusion, diversity, and mutual respect for all Virginians. This policy specifically prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, political affiliation, or against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities.  The policy permits appropriate employment preferences for veterans and specifically prohibits discrimination against veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 46: Supporting Virginians with Disabilities in the New Virginia Economy - 07/27/2015

“The Chief Workforce Development Advisor, in conjunction with the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, shall work with DARS and DBVI to offer to all executive branch agencies (including institutions of higher education, boards, and commissions) training designed to expand existing efforts to recruit, accommodate, retain and advance Virginians with disabilities in the Commonwealth’s workforce. Training shall commence no later than October 1, 2015...”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order (Executive Order #55 (2012)) - 11/16/2012 - 11/16/2012

“The last United States Census concluded that out of 3.6 million Virginia residents who were employed, 154,985 Virginians with disabilities were included in that total. These numbers indicate an under representation of people with disabilities among the gainfully employed. The Commonwealth of Virginia should work to provide a Commonwealth of Opportunity for all Virginians; therefore it is appropriate to initiate steps in order to expand employment opportunities for its citizens who are disabled….”

“By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor by Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth…and in conjunction with… the Code of Virginia which states that it is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities, including our wounded soldiers, to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment, with the goal of enhancing the employment opportunities for Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 23

Americans with Disabilities Act - 06/21/2019

~~“In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Virginians with Disabilities Act, offenders with disabilities housed in a Virginia Department of Corrections (VADOC) facility or under state community supervision can request reasonable accommodations and provisions.

Our facilities and probation and parole offices have a common authority and set of operating procedures for ADA compliance. Various factors can affect an offender’s housing assignment based on their medical classification, needs, and the security measures required.

Every VADOC facility and probation and parole office has a designated ADA coordinator to assist with requests and grievances regarding disability concerns. Our trained ADA coordinator manages those requests and grievances throughout the system.

Learn more in Operating Procedure 801.3.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia State Plan for Aging Services “No Wrong Door" - 05/13/2019

~~‘Virginia’s NWD System offers electronic tools from case management intake to com-plex  care  coordination  to  hospital  and  care  transitions.  NWD  partners  include  all  25 AAAs,  120 local departments of social  services (LDSS), CILs  and an array  of providers ranging from  hospitals to  home health  organizations who can access an electronic re-source database of over 26,600 public and private  health and human supports maintained by Virginia Navigator. 

No Wrong Door is locally led and managed by 25 AAAs across the Commonwealth. Each unique local community has an advisory group and network of partners who contribute their expertise, collaborate and share client-level data, with consent, through a secure system to streamline access and support.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Developmental Disability Services - 05/09/2019

~~“Person centered services are available to residents of the City of Alexandria with a diagnosis of developmental disability. Support Coordination, Residential and Vocational or Day Support services are offered to enable individuals to successfully live in the community as independently as possible with the necessary supports.”

 More information about the services we provide is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Veterans Services FY2018 Annual Report - 12/17/2018

~~” One of the many services Virginia provides to veterans and transitioning service members (TSMs) is a suite of services applicable to their unique journey. The Virginia Transition Assistance Program (VTAP) provides transition resources and assistance to all Virginia veterans and their spouses. More resources and information about VTAP assistance for veterans’ employment and education are available by accessing the web link. “

Systems
  • Other

Division of Rehabilitative Services - 12/07/2018

~~“Our division offers vocational rehabilitation programs and services to assist people with disabilities to prepare for, secure, retain or regain employment. More information about DRS services can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Services Offered by the Roanoke Regional Office - 11/20/2018

~~“VA’s Roanoke Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Virginia and the District of Columbia. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs• Assistance with applying for Specially Adapted Housing grants• Administration of VA’s Home Loan Guaranty program for Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, and the District of Columbia.” 

Systems
  • Other

Provider Development - 11/05/2018

~~“The Office of Provider Development focuses on developing and sustaining a qualified community of providers in Virginia so that people who have developmental disabilities and their families have choice and access to options that meet their needs. Here you will find resources including information on becoming a provider, information about Virginia’s Person-Centered ISP, who to contact for technical assistance, and various training resources.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Special Education Requirements Under the Workforce Innovations and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 11/02/2018

~~” This memorandum will address certain school division responsibilities under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), a federal law that reauthorized the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.  In general, it enhances the Virginia Department on Aging and Rehabilitative Services’ (DARS) role as a secondary transition partner with school divisions.  Through Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS), DARS will provide additional supports and services to students with disabilities, and will provide those services at an earlier age.  While most provisions of WIOA affect DARS, it does include new requirements for school divisions, in partnership with DARS, as both agencies work to transition students with disabilities from secondary school to postsecondary education, training, and/or integrated competitive employment.  Specifically, Section 511 of Title IV of WIOA (i) restricts school divisions from contracting with certain entities and (ii) requires school divisions to maintain and transmit additional documentation in certain instances.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Individual and Family Support Program (IFSP) - 09/10/2018

~~The Individual and Family Support Program (IFSP) assists individuals with developmental disabilities and their families with accessing person-centered and family-centered resources, supports, services and other assistance. The program's primary target population is individuals on the waiting list for Virginia's Developmental Disabilities (DD) Medicaid waivers.The goal of the program is to support continued community living. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Secondary Transition: Consent for Inviting Participating Agency Representatives - 09/02/2018

~~“Are school personnel required to obtain written consent from the parent to invite a participating agency representative to an IEP meeting before they invite the agency representative?

Yes, the local school division must acquire written consent from the parent (or a student who has reached the age of majority) for each agency that is invited to attend an IEP meeting to discuss the provision or payment of transition services. (34 CFR § 300.321(b)(3); corresponding Virginia Regulations at 8 VAC 20-81-170 E.1.h). The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) provides the rationale and context for this mandate”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Review of Virginia’s Plan to Increase Employment First Plan: FY 2016-FY2018-Goals, Strategies, and Action Items - 12/13/2018

~~“DBHDS, with the input of the E1AG (formerly the SELN-VA Advisory Committee) has revised the FY16-FY18 plan to increase employment opportunities. It was provided with the Status Report as of 6/30/18. The Plan includes five goal areas each of which has sub-goals. The plan’s goals and status in achieving goals can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia DBHDS: Strategic Plan for Employment First - 10/01/2012

To facilitate interagency collaboration the Strategic Plan for Employment First establishes an Employment First Summit Meeting, which will gather leadership from various department committed to upholding Employment First principles, and orders for the creation of a high level administrative leadership body including (DBHDS, DARS, DOE, DMAS, Virginia Employment Commission (VEC), Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council) and Virginia Community College System (VCCS).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Virginia State Employment Leadership Network - 10/01/2012

Virginia is a part of this multi-state technical assistance collaborative whose aim is to improve integrated employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities. “In 2008, DBHDS joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) sponsored by the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services and the University of Massachusetts-Boston Institute for Community Inclusion. DBHDS developed a Virginia-specific SELN Advisory Group made up of over 30 members representing a variety of organizations involved in providing employment services to Virginians. Members include community service boards (CSBs), the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (VBPD), the Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention (VCU/RRTC), and vendor organizations such as the Virginia Association of Community Rehabilitation Programs (vaACCSES), the Arc of Virginia, and the Virginia Association of Providers of Supported Employment (VaAPSE). DBHDS continues to be an active, contributing participant in the monthly National SELN web-based meetings. Virginia is now one of 30 states in the SELN. The Virginia SELN Advisory Group, made up of advocates, providers, and state agencies, continues to identify roadblocks and disincentives in our state system. The group is developing specific strategies for implementation of a system that prioritizes employment as an outcome of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Intercommunity Transition Council

Virginia's Intercommunity Transition Council is committed to promoting partnerships and influencing linkages that result in transition service networks for coordinating person-centered services. Their fact sheet on employment cites Customized Employment as a successful strategy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Olmstead Settlement Agreement

“The Commonwealth shall establish a state policy on Employment First for the target population and include a term in the CSB Performance Contract requiring application of this policy. The Employment First policy shall, at a minimum, be based on the following principles: (1) individual supported employment in integrated work settings is the first and priority service option for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities receiving day program or employment services from or funded by theCommonwealth; (2) the goal of employment services is to support individuals in integrated work settings where they are paid minimum or competitive wages; and (3) employment services and goals must be developed and discussed at least annually through a person-centered planning process and included in ISPs. The Commonwealth shall have at least one employment service coordinator to monitor implementation of Employment First practices for individuals in the target population”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

What is No Wrong Door Virginia? - 04/18/2019

~~“No Wrong Door is a person-centered system designed to streamline individuals’ access to community services and supports. The program operates through a statewide network of partners supporting older adults, caregivers, individuals with disabilities, veterans and all other populations seeking services and supports. It uses secure technology to link providers who collaboratively connect individuals to the supports and services in which they are in need.To date, the expanding No Wrong Door network has offered:• Access to 26,000+ programs and services• Options provided by 600+ professionals• Answers for more than 50,000 Virginians” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Disability Employment Initiative Round VIII - 10/01/2017

“VA DEI will fund four Disability Resource Coordinators and implement activities in the Northern Virginia Region that will build on existing career pathways with a focus on the Information Technology (IT) sector that have been developed by the local partners. The project will also expand on work currently underway by Northern Virginia Community College and its adult education partners to customize a bridge program that will connect low-skilled adults to college level IT programming through an integrated education and training program. Key activities will include the analysis of existing adult education and community college IT curricula and instructional practices to ensure accessibility according to Universal Design Principles, development of fully accessible career assessments for use by local partners, and alignment across all instructional programs that lead to ever higher levels of credential attainment among program participants. The regional industry sector model will be applicable to other career pathways. Targeted industry sectors will include Information Technology.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Virginia Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities - 07/18/2017

“Led by the Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, this grant will help nearly 500 Virginians with disabilities, including young adults and veterans, gain new skills and credentials through Career Pathways to seek employment in competitive, high-demand, high-quality occupations.

Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities has 10 project partners in education, workforce development and business. These partners focus on strategies to:

meet business needs in high-demand occupations meet career seekers' needs to attain marketable credentials and find middle-skilled jobs train vocational rehabilitation counselors to work with potential clients”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Virginia No Wrong Door System Grant - 10/01/2015

~~“Virginia will provide a high-quality, sustainable, person-centered, single statewide No Wrong Door system of long-term services and supports. No Wrong Door will support individuals of all ages  and disabilities in achieving their unique goals for community living; streamline access to community supports; and promote efficiencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia: Fairfax Customized Employment Grant - 07/01/2007

“The Customized Employment grant initiative was a product of the Northern Virginia Workforce Investment Board. The goal of the group was to build the capacity of the local One-Stop Center to use Customized Employment services to increase employment outcomes, choice, and wages for people with disabilities who resided in Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the cities of Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas, and Manassas Park.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Disability Employment Initiative (Round Four)

As a past Round 1 grantee, VA DEI will continue to build on existing infrastructure to develop shared ownership; foster systems integration, through cross-interagency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. Three Disability Resource Coordinators and a DRC State Lead will facilitate the implementation of the service delivery strategies. The pilot sites will receive the services of a Ticket consultant, who has been successful at engaging Round I pilot LWIBs in the EN process and in increasing ticket activity. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Virginia Ticket to Work

“Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for people with disabilities who want to work. Social Security disability beneficiaries age 18 through 64 qualify. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket Program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence…“The Ticket program is a good fit for people who want to improve their earning potential and who are committed to preparing for long-term success in the workforce. Ticket to Work offers beneficiaries with disabilities access to meaningful employment with the assistance of Ticket to Work employment service providers.”Virginia has had Ticket to Work Since 2002.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Virginia National Association of State Mental Health Program Director’s (NASMHPD) Employment Development Initiative (EDI)

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).”

“This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

Virginia is using its funds to support their Employment First Initiative. They have conducted multiple Employment First Summits, and developed an Employment First Advisory group.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Virginia Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

Note: This program ended on December 31, 2009 according to this site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Virginia - Richmond Customized Employment Project

“The grant worked to strengthen the linkages of the Richmond-area One-Stop system with schools, VR, and the Virginia Business Leadership Network, a business-directed group designed to encourage other businesses to hire people with disabilities. The project focused on expanding the reach and scope of existing service programs, such as a WIA youth project, to make them more appropriate for job seekers with multiple barriers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Virginia Poverty Law Center, Inc. (VPLC) - 09/03/2019

~~“Virginia Poverty Law Center, Inc. (VPLC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Current enrollees and uninsured and “left-behind” individuals and families who lack affordable coverage options in their area or are unaware of the full range of health coverage options available. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are: Blue Ridge Legal Services, Central Virginia Legal Aid Society, Legal Aid Justice Center, Legal Aid Society of Eastern Virginia, Legal Aid Society of Roanoke Valley, Legal Services of Northern Virginia, Southwest Virginia Legal Aid Society, and Virginia Legal Aid Society. They will partner with: Rapid Response Program, Telehealth Enrollment Assistance Service, State and local government agencies, Community libraries, food banks, and tax preparers, Faith-based organizations, Chambers of Commerce, Hospitals, Native American tribes, Military and veterans' groups, Remote Access Medical clinics, and the Parole office.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Jill HankenPhone: (804) 782-9430 Ext. 104Email: jill@vplc.org .” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Boat People SOS, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Boat People SOS, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving small business owners and self-employed individuals; part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment service; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is the Korean Community Service Center of Greater Washington (KCSC). They will partner with Behavioral health and sustenance centers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Veteran’s service organizations, Chambers of Commerce, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and rural hospitals •Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, and Post-secondary Educational Institutions. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Dr. Thang NguyenPhone: (703) 538-2190Email: thang.nguyen@bpsos.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training and Education Alliance - 04/30/2019

~~“The Training and Education Alliance uses a three-pronged approach to assist transitioning veterans that have chosen educational institutions as their preferred path to employment. Identifying and promoting employment pipelines, providing military cultural sensitivity training to education staff, and highlighting community service initiatives are three methods used by the TEA Alliance program to support Virginia’s Veterans on their path to employment.  Connectivity to fellow directorate programs such as Virginia Transition Assistance Program(VTAP) and Virginia Values Veterans(V3) also serve to ensure valuable services are available throughout the entirety of our veterans journeys to their education and employment goals.”

Systems
  • Other

Handbook for Educators of English Learners with Suspected Disabilities - 04/23/2019

~~“The purpose of the Handbook for Educators of English Learners with Suspected Disabilities is to provide school divisions with guidance on a multi-step process to appropriately identify and evaluate ELs who may have a disability for possible eligibility for special education and related services.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Veteran Entrepreneurship - 11/07/2018

~~“The Virginia Department of Veterans Services is excited to announce the hiring of a Veteran Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Coordinator (VEEC).  The VEEC will connect veterans and military spouses to a plethora of entrepreneurship resources and events! Whether you are a seasoned entrepreneur or just considering what that path may look like, the VEEC can share an extensive list of programs, events and resources all for entrepreneurs.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Special Education Technical Assistance & Professional Development

“These resources were developed to provide professional development and technical assistance to parents, school personnel and other consumers. All resources are intended to provide guidance for addressing the regulatory requirements and instructional elements needed for a student’s free appropriate public education (FAPE).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Virginia Transition Services for Students with Disabilities

“VDOE's Transition Services website provides support, information and resources designed to improve the outcomes of students with disabilities in transition from middle / secondary education to postsecondary education and employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Consumer's Guide to Self-Employment

This guide is written for consumers within the Virginia Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (Vocational Rehabilitation) who wish to pursue Self Employment as a career goal. It describes many of the Department's policies, as well as offering guidance on how to succeed in the business development process.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

DRS Guide to Supported Employment and Job Coach Training Services

“The purpose of the Guide to Supported Employment and Job Coach Training Services is to provide practical and specific information to supplement the Virginia DRS Policy and Procedure Manual. Where possible, the Guide seeks to illustrate evolving best practices gleaned from case examples and data gathered in Virginia. Specifically, the Guide is intended to provide supported employment practitioners with guidance in:

Achieving a customer-oriented environment that promotes consumer choice and participation, individual responsibility, practitioner excellence and sensitive delivery of quality services; Enhancing understanding of operational procedures and the need for cooperation, collaboration, and coordination; Clarifying and expanding on the roles, responsibilities, and expectations among supported employment practitioners; and Planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating supported employment programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Report of the Independent Reviewer on Compliance with the Consent Agreement US v. VA, Civil Action No. 3:12 CV 059 - 10/07/2014

“The IR reported in the last Report to the Court that the Commonwealth had achieved compliance with certain requirements of the Agreement. During this, the sixth review period, the Commonwealth through its lead agency, DBHDS, and its sister agencies has maintained compliance with these same provisions and has come into compliance with additional requirements. The Commonwealths leaders have continued to meet regularly and to collaborate to develop and implement plans to address the Agreement’s requirements and to improve people’s lives. The IR also reported in the last Report to the Court that the Commonwealth lagged significantly behind schedule. It continues to do so. There have been significant delays in the it’s (sic) compliance with requirements that are critical to an effective community-based services system for individuals with ID/DD. For two years, the Commonwealth’s primary strategy to come into compliance has been the redesign of it HCBS waiver program."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other

Virginia Consent Decree allowing for more waivers and less training Centers - 08/23/2012

“Under the proposed settlement, Virginia has agreed to provide 4170 additional waiver slots, divided among current Training Center residents, disabled people in various segregated facilities other than the Training Centers, and people on the waiting list for services…The settlement also prescribes in great detail how Virginia will administer the services it provides to disabled citizens. This process will be a shared responsibility of the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services and local community service boards ("CSBs")...”“The decree also provides for changed procedures at the Training Centers and spells out how the Commonwealth will assist the CSBs with technical assistance. Each Training Center resident will have a discharge plan crafted by the professionals at the facility. Virginia will set up case-management teams, crisis teams, and plans for supported day services in the community. Essentially, the Commonwealth's efforts—and those of the CSBs—will all be focused on keeping disabled people in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ADA Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 01/26/2012

“The fundamental goals of the Agreement are to prevent the unnecessary institutionalization of individuals with developmental disabilities who are living in the community, including thousands of individuals on waitlists for community-based services, and ensure that people who are currently in institutions - at the Commonwealth's training centers or in other private but state-funded facilities - have a meaningful opportunity to receive services that meet their needs in the community…Pursuant to the Interim Settlement Agreement, the State and City will give TTP and Birch service recipients the opportunity to receive integrated supported employment and integrated daytime services that will enable them to interact with the broader community to the fullest extent possible.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

TEEOP Employment Supports - 10/18/2018

~~“Training, education, employment and othercommunity engagement opportunities (TEEOP) Employment SupportsThe web link includes information about how the State will provide assessments and referrals for employment.Employment Support Services for MedicaidParticipants to Achieve Self-Sufficiency” (COMPASS) Waiver.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Commonwealth Coordinated Care (CCC) Plus Waiver - 08/01/2018

~~The CCC Plus Waiver (also known as the Commonwealth Coordinated Care Plus Waiver), is a combination of the formerly known waivers titled: EDCD (Elderly or Disabled with Consumer Direction) waiver and the Technology Assisted (Tech) waiver. All of the waivers offer CD or AD services depending on individualized needs and program criteria met.

From the Fact Sheet:“The Commonwealth Coordinated Care (CCC) Plus Waiver [1915 (c)] provides care in the home and community rather than in a  nursing facility (NF) or other specialized care medical facility “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

VA Community Living Waiver (0372.R03.00) - 07/01/2014

~~Waiver Authority 1915 (c)Date Originally Approved 07/01/2001Implementation Date 07/01/2014Expiration Date 06/30/2019Summary Provides day support, personal assistance, prevocational, residential support, respite, supported employment, consumer directed services facilitation, assistive technology, companion services, crisis stabilization, crisis supervision, environmental mods, PERS, skilled nursing, therapeutic consultation, transition for individuals w/IID ages 0 - no max age

From the Fact Sheet:“Formerly the Intellectual Disability Waiver, the purpose of the Community Living home and community-based 1915 (c) waiveris to provide support in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) or related condition.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Building Independence home and community-based 1915 (c) waiver (0430.R02.00) - 07/01/2013

~~Waiver Authority1915 (c)Date Originally Approved07/01/2005Implementation Date07/01/2013Expiration Date06/30/2018Summary Provides day support, prevocational, supported employment for individuals w/ID ages 6 - no max age

From the Fact Sheet:“Formerly called the Day Support Waiver, the purpose of this Building Independence home and community-based 1915 (c) waiver is to provide support in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disability (ICF/IID”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Family and Individual Support home and community-based (1915(c)) waiver (0358.R03.00) - 07/01/2013

~~Expiration Date06/30/2018Summary Provides day support, in-home residential, personal care, prevocational, respite care, supported employment - group/individual, services facilitation, adult companion, assistive technology, crisis stablization, crisis supervision, environmental mods, family/caregiver training, PERS, skilled nursing, therapeutic consultation, transition for individuals w/autism and DD ages 6 - no max age

Formerly the Individual and Family Developmental Disabilities Support Waiver, the purpose of the Family and Individual Support home and community-based (1915(c)) waiver is to provide supports and services in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) or related condition.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia Department of Education ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/27/2012

“For students with disabilities who have the most intensive support needs, there are two model initiatives supported by the Virginia Department of Education: Project SEARCH and the Post-High School Community College Program. Project SEARCH, a business-led model, is a collaborative between school divisions and local businesses that provide employability skills training and workplace internships that occur entirely in the workplace. The Post-High School Community College Program is a supported education model that provides individualized supports to students with significant disabilities seeking postsecondary education to enhance their skills for employment, in an age-appropriate setting. The Department of Education provides support and technical assistance to increase the number of partnerships between school divisions and institutions of higher education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

MEDICAID WORKS (Virginia Medicaid Buy-in)

“MEDICAID WORKS is a work incentive opportunity offered by the Virginia Medicaid program for individuals with disabilities who are employed or who want to go to work. MEDICAID WORKS is a Medicaid plan option that will enable workers with disabilities to earn higher income and retain more in savings, or resources, while ensuring continued Medicaid coverage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Virginia Olmstead Settlement Agreement

“The Commonwealth shall establish a state policy on Employment First for the target population and include a term in the CSB Performance Contract requiring application of this policy. The Employment First policy shall, at a minimum, be based on the following principles: (1) individual supported employment in integrated work settings is the first and priority service option for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities receiving day program or employment services from or funded by the Commonwealth; (2) the goal of employment services is to support individuals in integrated work settings where they are paid minimum or competitive wages; and (3) employment services and goals must be developed and discussed at least annually through a person-centered planning process and included in ISPs. The Commonwealth shall have at least one employment service coordinator to monitor implementation of Employment First practices for individuals in the target population

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

Note: This program ended on December 31, 2009 according to this site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Virginia Statewide HCBS Transition Plan

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule for home and community based services (HCBS) that requires states to review and evaluate home and community based (HCB) settings, including residential and non-residential settings. The HCBS final regulation requires states to prepare and submit a Statewide Transition Plan. CMS asks that statewide transition plans specifically address only the setting requirements of the final rule for home and community based services (The Rule).  Therefore, this Statewide Transition Plan is specific to the analysis and recommendations regarding the settings for home and community based services. 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Known affectionately as "The Place for Lovers," individuals with disabilities in the Commonwealth have the opportunity with the right supports and services to Live Passionately by having careers in competitive integrated employment and being full participants in their communities. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2018 State Population.
0.56%
Change from
2017 to 2018
8,517,685
2018 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-3.15%
Change from
2017 to 2018
485,460
2018 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
-4.78%
Change from
2017 to 2018
194,796
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
-1.57%
Change from
2017 to 2018
40.13%
2018 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.24%
Change from
2017 to 2018
79.16%

State Data

General

2016 2017 2018
Population. 8,411,808 8,470,020 8,517,685
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 496,928 500,771 485,460
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 193,632 204,103 194,796
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,647,462 3,669,633 3,686,152
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 38.97% 40.76% 40.13%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.66% 78.97% 79.16%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.00% 3.80% 3.00%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 18.10% 17.60% 17.90%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.10% 9.80% 9.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 466,393 462,932 482,577
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 498,192 516,107 511,887
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 675,120 686,273 698,138
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 213,359 222,654 214,002
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 46,107 45,140 52,632
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 4,829 3,549 3,911
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 32,472 28,994 35,040
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 957 N/A 924
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,133 27,801 30,912
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 10,715 9,532 11,537

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,657 6,877 6,857
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.80% 4.90% 4.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 211,614 210,694 207,901

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 14,753 14,919 15,650
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 31,011 30,594 31,285
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 77,519 70,510 70,376
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 19.00% 21.20% 22.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.70% 2.10% 1.80%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 4.50% 3.20%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.00% 3.10% 3.40%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 7.80% 43.40% 27.60%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 388 1,243 1,113
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 329 2,600 1,903
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,691 1,788 2,066
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 4,485 25,180 16,651

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 13,591 12,668 12,496
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 109 150 150
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 60 85 80
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 57.00% 53.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.72 1.01 0.95

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016 2017 2018
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,248
N/A
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 44 N/A N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 455 N/A N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,047 N/A N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,990 N/A N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,092 N/A N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 620 N/A N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 37.60% 37.00% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,335 7,954 7,081
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 312,508 315,937 314,901
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 889 623 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 713 460 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $35,381,000 N/A $11,584,778
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $19,799,000 N/A $1,209,869
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $151,457,000 N/A N/A
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 N/A N/A
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 27.00% N/A 25.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 898 N/A 1,708
Number of people served in facility based work. 683 N/A 1,054
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 9,455 N/A 6,219
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 48.60 N/A 44.96

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 63.36% 64.01% 65.07%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.15% 10.87% 10.16%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.16% 4.26% 4.32%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.17% 99.37% 99.71%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 34.45% 32.85% 32.57%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 64.81% 63.10% 64.08%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 73.03% 71.98% 73.39%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.36% 30.25% 31.51%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 5,052,830
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 7,757
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 168,108
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 3,289,332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,457,440
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 339
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,546
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,885
AbilityOne wages (products). $831,106
AbilityOne wages (services). $43,925,206

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 1
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 21 27 18
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 22 28 19
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 14 14 14
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,398 1,579 1,277
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,412 1,593 1,291

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Customized Employment

~~(11) Providing training and implementing seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment (CE) across Virginia. This strategy is based on needs assessment and focus group recommendations from DARS' partnerships with Transcen, Inc. and George Washington University. By November 1, 2018, DARS will select and train key VR Counselors and Evaluators, AT Specialists, Business Placement and Self-Employment staff, and Partnering Employment Specialists, Behavioral Specialists, and Facilities Personnel in key concepts to implement CE approaches to DARS clients exiting institutions, sheltered workshops, high schools and adults for whom traditional supported employment services have not yielded successful outcomes. DARS will serve 20 or more clients with diverse backgrounds in order to assimilate CE best practices into our menu of services for these targeted populations. Options for self-employment will also be explored under this approach.  (Pages 315-316) Title IV

4. How the funds reserved for innovation and expansion (I&E) activities were utilized:
During FFY 2017, the funds reserved for Innovation and Expansion were used for the following activities:…
(7) Providing training and implementing seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment (CE) across Virginia. DARS is selecting and training VR staff and stakeholders in key concepts to implement CE approaches to DARS clients exiting institutions, sheltered workshops, high schools and adults for whom traditional supported employment services have not yielded successful outcomes. (Page 333) Title IV

q. Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services. Include the following: 
1. The quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including youth with the most significant disabilities:
Supported employment (SE) services, including customized employment, provided under Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014, will be available to eligible individuals with most significant disabilities who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind, including youth, who are served by the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI). (Page 404) Title IV

Blending/ Braiding Resources

~~In the early stages of implementing this plan, the Commonwealth will re-convene leadership from workforce system partners to revisit the problem this plan seeks to address. The purpose of this convening will be to:

8. Emphasize transparency and shared accountability in responding to opportunities for improvement (Page 109) Title I

Manage and Develop Resources:

In order to achieve the five goals stated in Virginia’s plan, workforce partners must ensure that resources are being used efficiently and effectively, eliminating unnecessary duplication of service and redundancy in the system. As partners move towards a new vision for the workforce service delivery system, they must also establish and ensure a standard for service across programs and a rational strategy towards resource development that continuously reflects back on this plan and its goals and objectives. This strategy proposes to align staff and financial resources appropriately in the One Stop system and its centers, using a functional organizational chart approach that will leverage agency strengths and specialties to better serve customers and address Virginia’s workforce challenges. The successful execution of this plan requires Virginia to commit to the professional development of workforce practitioners, and to the braiding and management of financial resources in new ways. The Commonwealth is committed to developing staff to capitalize on investments in technology, and to realize the benefits from a common agenda with workforce system partners. Careful investments in human and financial resources ultimately reflect value to customers and to their communities across the state. (Page 110) Title I

The following are examples of local level practices impl1emented to enhance access for job seekers with disabilities made possible by leveraging the resources from the DOL Disability grants and state level cross agency partnerships:

Installed Universal Computer Workstations with Assistive Technology devices and software and conducted staff trainings in pilot LWDBAs; expanded the web-based Common Screening Tool to better identify job seekers with disabilities, track customer flow and service referrals. (The data indicated an on average a 15% increase of self-identification where this tool was piloted); incorporated Disability Resources and disseminated announcements for various activities that would benefit individuals with disabilities, such as: disability trainings and IRS free tax assistance and site locations, dedicated a page to post information about disability resources on the Virginia’s Workforce Development website, Elevate Virginia; integrated DEI strategies by adding four modules into Virginia’s Workforce Development Systems Course, which is a requirement for all front-line staff co-located at the Centers to complete. (The optional modules are Welcoming All Customers/Universal Strategies, Asset Development, Integrated Resource Teams with a Person Centered Planning approach and Mystery Shopper); coordinated local/statewide trainings (on line, in person and at state conferences) for One-Stop staff and partners and also utilized resources through the Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. Some of the topics covered were: ADA Accessibility requirements, Disability Etiquette, Access for All - Welcoming Customers at workforce centers and accommodations; implemented Social Security (SSA) - Ticket To Work Program to expand employment opportunities for SSA beneficiaries in 6 LWDB areas; facilitated certification trainings for Work Incentives Specialist Advocates who advise beneficiaries on work incentives; promoted asset development and financial capability strategies to enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency, including financial literacy training, the use of individual development accounts, tax and work incentives, and other strategies for encouraging economic advancement; and trained and provided technical assistance to businesses/employers about the use of effective hiring practices and job accommodations, including Assistive Technology trainings in collaboration with Virginia Assistive Technology System and Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center.  (Page 188) Title I

B. How the State will leverage other public and private funds to increase resources for extended services and expanded supported employment opportunities for youth with the most significant disabilities:

DARS will continue to explore alternative funding mechanisms for long-term follow along supports for consumers needing Supported Employment (SE) services, including Social Security Work Incentives. This includes working with the Governor’s Office and the General Assembly to receive more funding for Long Term Employment Support Services and Extended Employment Services and working collaboratively with other agencies, community partners and Employment Service Organizations to leverage these funds.  (Page 314) Title IV

DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

~~8. Addressing the Accessibility of the One-Stop Delivery System for Individuals with Disabilities:…

Virginia is fortunate to have a long standing collaborative relationship with Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and other key state partners. This partnership history facilitated the leveraging and coordination of existing and added resources provided via the six DOL Workforce Disability Initiatives, the latest of which are the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants. Whereas, significant strides have been made to ensure our One-Stop Service Delivery System is accessible to all job seekers, including those with disabilities and other challenges to employment, we are committed to continuous quality improvement. These efforts are focused on physical, programmatic and communication access. We will continue these efforts and build on our existing infrastructure to encourage shared ownership; foster systems integration through cross-agency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective.  (Pages 186-187) Title I

Goal 3: Ensure that the VR Program continues to be a collaborative leader in the integration of services for people with disabilities in the Workforce Centers and the use of Social Security Work Incentives:

Indicators:
3.4 Provide Disability Resource Coordinators/Disability Program Navigators to increase access to programs and services for vocational rehabilitation consumers. DARS currently provides three Disability Resource Coordinators to two local American Job Centers (AJCs) as a part of DOL Disability Employment Initiative Round IV grant project efforts in collaboration with the VCCS/Workforce Services Division (Title I Administrator). In addition, through an Innovation and Expansion project, DARS has co-located a previous Disability Program Navigator as a VR Counselor housed in an AJC and providing VR services. Also, three workforce areas previously participating in DOL DPN/DEI grant efforts have retained three DARS staff to provide services to individuals with disabilities in AJCs. As a result DEI Round I efforts and collaborative workforce partnerships, Virginia statewide data from October 2010 through March 2014, indicated participants with disabilities active with WIA (now WIOA) intensive services increased from 1.8% to 4.9%.  (Page 325) Title IV

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

School to Work Transition

~~d. Coordination with Education Officials:
Describe:
2. Information on the formal interagency agreement with the State educational agency with respect to:
A. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
DARS Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Education and annual review of agreements with the Local Education Agencies (LEAs) reflect the ongoing collaboration as it relates to providing consultation and technical assistance for transition services.
B. transition planning by personnel of the designated State agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and implementation of their individualized education programs; (Pages 353-354) Title IV

In this Plan, DARS has an entire Goal and Priority and strategies dedicated to transition planning. DARS initiates an Annual Review, a survey of VR counselors and their respective LEA transition representative, to ensure effective working relationships on local levels and to support best practices in the provisions of services to students with disabilities. Follow-up services are offered and provided based on results of the Annual Review.

DARS’ policies require that for students with disabilities who i) are receiving special education services from a public school, and ii) also are determined eligible for VR services (and able to be served if DARS is on an Order of Selection), the Individualized Plan for Employment shall be completed and signed within 90 days of the eligibility determination and before the student leaves the school setting.

DARS continues to be a stakeholder in the review of data that DOE collects to report to the Office on Special Education Programs (OSEP) to support and accomplish respective post-school and employment outcomes required by the federal government and to provide meaningful data collection by each agency.

Additional DARS and DOE collaborative activities include co-chairing the Virginia Interagency Transition Council (VITC) and the statewide Community of Practice. Representatives from DARS, local education agencies (LEAs), and the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) are planning statewide trainings to discuss transition and vocational services available to students with disabilities. Both activities provide a forum for transition practitioners and other interested stakeholders from school divisions, adult agencies, and community partners to engage in professional development activities, networking opportunities, and collaborative efforts that enhance the implementation of quality transition services for secondary school students with disabilities. The VITC is comprised of representatives from 14 state agencies who have leadership roles and transition as part of their responsibility in serving youth with disabilities. The Community of Practice works to stay abreast of current transition information, to identify gaps in resources, and avoid duplication of transition services. VITC has set a priority to improve communication between the state, regional, and local transition councils. It is anticipated that information will be shared with and by VITC through the regional and local Councils. This flow of communication allows for improved responses to identified needs, as well as recommendations for future efforts.

The Department's Transition Coordinator and Pre-Employment Transition Coordinator provide training to new counselors as part of the New Counselors Skills Training. This training provides information on how to evaluate and process training cases to ensure that employment goals meet the employment needs of our communities. The training also provides information on the need for and how to complete the required RS-25 (Post-Secondary Training Comparable Benefits & Financial Assessment)

Cooperative Agreements are also conducted between DARS and state institutions of higher education to ensure that to the best of DARS abilities and within constraints of our Order of Selection that students in post-secondary training are receiving appropriate and necessary services.

The DRS Support Team utilizes an interactive webinar series to streamline processes and improve communication to/from VR counselors who serve transition-age youth. The webinar series offers a time saving alternative to the standard face-to-face training approach while simultaneously saving agency resources. Webinar topics are developed based on counselor input, leadership recommendations, and developing issues. Similar technology also is being used for an Annual Review to gather information on effective processes between the local school divisions and their corresponding DARS transition counselor. The Annual Review will also indicate any needs or concerns where the Transition Coordinator or Pre-Employment Transition Coordinator may organize a facilitated meeting by use of the Go To Meeting platform enabling teams to meet online and collaboratively to discuss programming. The Annual Review supports communication and extends support to local team members and may address specific points of the transition process and encourage VR Counselors and school partners to more clearly establish partner roles and responsibilities.

For multiple years, the Commonwealth of Virginia has been invited to bring a team to participate in the National Summit - Building State Capacity to Address Critical Issues in Deaf Education: Transition from Secondary Education to Post-Secondary Options. This was the fourth out of four Summit activities sponsored by pep net 2, which focused on improving post-secondary outcomes for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, including those with co-occurring disabilities. The focus of the Summit has been on critical issues in deaf education that address positive student outcomes, graduation, and transition to post-secondary education and training. The Department’s State Coordinator of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services and the Department of Education (DOE) Specialist of Deaf and Hard of Hearing co-chair the state team to review gaps in programs and services utilizing tools and strategies related to transition within the goals of the National Agenda: Achieving Educational Equality for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students. In 2016, the Virginia Team hosted “Opening Doors to Life Beyond High School”, a one-day event for students, parents and professionals. Topics included Life Beyond High School (transition information about DRS services), I’m Determined, and Map-It (a new tool from pep net 2). (Pages 284-286) Title IV

C. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
DARS and DOE have had a formal agreement to provide cooperation and coordination among the two agencies to facilitate effective transition services for students with disabilities to engage in competitive, integrated employment, post-secondary education, and community living. This Agreement is being updated and will contain the following provisions:

(1) DOE is designated as the lead agency to ensure that students with disabilities are properly referred to DARS and DARS will serve as the lead agency to determine eligibility for VR services and to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment. Both agencies agree to:

(1) promote the development and expansion of collaborative structures for planning and evaluating transition services; share relevant data; share contact information on school divisions’ special education directors and 504 coordinators; and explore new opportunities for collaboration and seek additional resources to improve transition services. Each agency will assign or designate primary program responsibility for transition to one individual within the agency.

(2) promote a comprehensive personnel development approach through the provision of collaboratively planned and jointly sponsored professional development activities. DOE has the responsibility for ensuring the requirements for the provision of special education services by LEAs to students with disabilities in accordance with federal and state laws, regulations, agency policies and guidelines.

(3) DOE shall commit financial resources to:

(a) teaching positions for Occupational Skills Training and Life Skills at WWRC;

(b) training and technical assistance in secondary transition programming; and

(c) activities of the Community of Practice and Transition Practitioners Council.

DARS is responsible for the coordination, provision, and/or payment of rehabilitative/transition goods and services for individuals with disabilities in accordance with applicable federal and state laws, regulations, agency policies and guidelines. DARS also commits financial resources to:

(a) transition services for youth at least three years prior to their exit from high school to include vocational evaluation, case management, career counseling, situational assessments, field transition consultant services, and technical assistance, as appropriate;

(b) the Postsecondary Education Rehabilitation and Transition Program at the Wilson Workforce and Rehabilitation Center; and

(c) activities of the Community of Practice and Transition Practitioners’ Council. (Pages 286-287) Title IV

D. procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

Specific activities related to outreach to address needs of students in transition include:

(1) providing staff support and programmatic leadership to Virginia’s Intercommunity Transition Council (VITC), a statewide Council composed of representatives of state agencies, parents, consumers and employers, and seeking to promote, in collaboration with VITC, participation of underrepresented agencies, service providers, and community/ advocacy groups in VITC;
(2) Providing staff support and programmatic leadership to the Higher Education Leadership Partners Workgroup (composed of college and university faculty and staff, the State Council on Higher Education in Virginia, the Virginia Community College System, the Association of Higher Education and Disability, consumers and disability agency personnel, secondary education personnel and representatives from DOE. Also, in collaboration with VITC, DOE, the State Council of Higher Education, the Association of Higher Education and Disability and other partners, developing statewide guidelines for Disability Documentation at the post-secondary level, as well as improvement of transition from secondary to post-secondary institutions;
(3) Promoting collaboration among DOE, the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, the Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, the Virginia Assistive Technology System, the Wilson Workforce and Rehabilitation Center, and other interested partners to increase the appropriate utilization of assistive technology for students with disabilities in Virginia; 
(4) Aligning all current and future transition activities, when appropriate, with the WIOA system;
(5) Collaborating with Adult Education and Literacy programs, DOE, the Department of Social Services and other partners in pursuing creative models of providing assessment and screening for learning disabilities among clients of the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families program;
(6) Producing transition-related products (e.g., newsletters, brochures, power point presentations, and posters) with examples of current legislative information, best practices and problem solving;
(7) Collaborating with staff of the Personal Assistance Services (PAS) Program at DARS to increase awareness of PAS services for students in transition, especially in post-secondary institutions;
(8) Collaborating with Employment Services Organizations (ESO) staff to increase awareness of local vendor programs that could provide services to schools and transition age youth;
(9) Collaborating with DOE to utilize VITC, and other venues to increase awareness and understanding of the Youth Councils that will be part of the local Workforce Investment Boards established under the WIOA system;
(10) Encouraging disability professionals, consumers and advocacy groups to submit applications for appointment to the local Youth Councils; and
(11) Continuing to provide the Youth in Transition service line to supplement and enhance services to high school youth enrolled at WWRC.  (Pages 287 – 288) Title IV

2. transition services, including pre-employment transition services, for students and youth with disabilities:
Through a wide range of collaborations, DBVI’s VR Counselors and specialized Transition Counselors will ensure that students who are still in high school will have work experiences. These experiences will be accomplished by creating working partnerships with employers, students, and families to create expectations that students will participate in work experiences and to actually create those work experience opportunities, both volunteer and paid. 

To facilitate work opportunities and competitive integrated employment, Vocational Rehabilitation and specialized Transition Counselors will counsel students in career development and job exploration activities to address how students will gain employment experiences during high school. Pre-vocational and pre-employment services will include vocational interest inventories, vocational evaluations, informational interviews, and job shadowing to assist students in determining a vocational goal. Assistance will be provided in developing skills students need to complete applications and interview for work experiences while in high school. VR Counselors and specialized Transition Counselors will collaborate with itinerant Teachers for the Visually Impaired (TVIs), DBVI Educational Coordinators, and employers to integrate work experiences into the expectations and opportunities for youth. Additionally, DBVI will develop ways to enhance parental investment and explore how to best integrate transition planning, including opportunity for work experience, into Individualized Educational Program (IEP) and Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) development. Also, DBVI will continue to collaborate with Virginia Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) regarding transition resources to facilitate development of work experience opportunities with employers. 

Transition services, including pre-employment transition services, will include job exploration and counseling, work-based learning experiences, apprenticeships, counseling regarding opportunities on enrollment in transition or secondary education programs, work place readiness training, and instruction in self-advocacy. 

To enhance and facilitate job-readiness skills and career planning for students to make a successful transition from school to work and to greater independence, students will be referred to DBVI Business Relations Specialists and to Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) (also known in Virginia as Employment Services Organizations (ESOs)). Business Relations Specialists will complement preemployment transition services by delivering workplace readiness training to establish skills necessary for entry into career pathways, competitive integrated employment, and by coordinating with schools and networking with employers to establish paid and unpaid internships, including apprenticeships, specifically matched to the student’s needs, skills, interests, abilities, and informed choice. Transition services purchased from CRPs may also include On-The-Job support and extended support services for students and youth needing additional supports in the work experience setting or on the job. (Pages 360-361) Title IV

Career Pathways

~~c. State Strategy
1. Describe the strategies the State will implement, including industry or sector partnerships related to in-demand industry sectors and occupations and career pathways, as required by WIOA section 101(d)(3)(B), (D). “Career pathway” is defined at WIOA section 3(7) and includes registered apprenticeship. “In-demand industry sector or occupation” is defined at WIOA section 3(23).

How These Strategies Were Developed
These strategies were developed over the course of a year, working in concert with members of the WIOA Implementation Team, with a strategy framework provided by the state workforce board (the Virginia Board of Workforce Development). They were further refined during a facilitated 3-day retreat, which engaged stakeholders from inside and outside the partner programs listed in this plan. These stakeholders included representatives from the Virginia Economic Development Partnership (VEDP), the lead organization responsible for economic development in the Commonwealth with responsibilities for both business attraction and business retention and expansion services, and subject matter experts from other organizations.  (Page 106) Title I

Activities and practices that are continued/implemented under this DEI Round:
o Partnership with the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant to facilitate systems alignment, cross systems service delivery efforts, and co-enrollments with Workforce Partner Programs.  (Page 191) Title I

Virginia’s Combined State Plan highlights the critical role of sector strategies and career pathways development and implementation. In 2017, Virginia’s workforce partners came together to start developing a Sector Strategy and Career Pathways Academy and online Community of Practice. A key aim of this initiative is to strengthen the ability of workforce system practitioners and partners to incorporate Sector Strategies and Career Pathways strategies as integral components in Virginia’ s workforce system.

This Academy will build a statewide professional development program that will help its workforce professionals to understand how to improve services to business and job seeking customers through sector strategies and career pathways. The Academy will also increase awareness of demand-driven talent pipelines and job matching services through more cooperation and collaboration among public and private workforce partners. (Page 156) Title I

Career Pathways Workgroup
As previously mentioned, the Career Pathways Workgroup has provided a platform for cross-agency collaboration and a place for system partners to dialogue on common challenges and opportunities. Moving forward, this group will remain vital to the implementation of elements of this plan, particularly around career pathways and aligned sector strategies.  (Page 194) Title I

DARS Response 4: DARS will continue to promote career pathways and build partnerships to achieve this goal. Virginia has convened a Career Pathways Workgroup, comprised of senior staff from eight different agencies administering workforce or workforce-related programs. DARS, along with the Department of Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) also oversees the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (CPID) grant. This grant will assist Virginians with disabilities, including young adults and veterans, gain new skills and credentials through career pathways and help these individuals obtain employment in competitive, high-demand, high-quality occupations. (Page 280) Title IV

Priority 3: Partnering with the Wilson Workforce and Rehabilitation Center (WWRC), other state agencies, Supported Employment (SE) providers, and other entities in the integration of services for people with disabilities leading to competitive, integrated employment:

Strategies:
Implement the five-year Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (CPID) model demonstration program to create new career pathways and/or use existing career pathways in high-demand occupations. (Page 320) Title IV

7. Strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce development system in assisting individuals with disabilities:

Strategy 1.3: To establish and enhance entry into career pathways, DBVI will continue to utilize personnel and funds associated Virginia’s Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Grant which was jointly awarded DBVI and the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) in 2015. DBVI will:
• help individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations;
• enhance the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities;
• enhance access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities; and
• strengthen the alignment of Virginia’s VR programs with the other core programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and other Federally-funded career pathways initiatives providing self-advocacy skills training that is critical to the achievement of individuals’ personal and vocational goals. (Page 395) Title IV

1. An evaluation of the extent to which the VR program goals described in the approved VR services portion of the Unified or Combined State Plan for the most recently completed program year were achieved. The evaluation must:
A. Identify the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals:

Because of the Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant, obtained jointly with the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, DBVI is focused more on helping individuals obtain credentials. DBVI and DARS have hosted one week academies which are focused on high demand occupations within the Commonwealth. One of these academies was held at the agency’s Rehabilitation Center during the summer of 2017. The focus was in the area of information technology. The students built a robot individually and programmed it to do various tasks. (Pages 398-399) Title IV

Apprenticeship

Virginia’s Registered Apprenticeship programs are administered by the Department of Labor and Industry (DOLI) through a network of regional service offices and technical outreach staff. At the LWDB level, Business Service Teams are the organizing structure used to engage business and industry and deliver workforce services to industry partners. DOLI representatives are vital members of the LWDB Business Service Teams and also work in partnership with other system partners (e.g. Virginia Employment Commission, Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education) to support their sponsor businesses and registered apprentices. DOLI and the LWDB Business Service Teams will collaborate and work in tandem identifying Registered Apprenticeship opportunities.

Additionally, Registered Apprenticeships are incorporated into its strategy and services via DOLIs participation on the State’s Career Pathways Committee, the State’s WIOA Implementation Team and other strategic Workforce Development Committees. The Commonwealth is taking further steps to strengthen partnership between Title I and DOLI Registered Apprenticeship programs. This will include making each team aware of the programs offered and providing more coordinated services to businesses. (Pages 222-223) Title IV

Work Incentives & Benefits

~~Goal 3: Ensure that the VR Program continues to be a collaborative leader in the integration of services for people with disabilities in the Workforce Centers and the use of Social Security Work Incentives:
Indicators:
3.5 DARS has entered into administrative Employment Network (EN) agreements with a third Administrative EN. This has increased the choices for potential EN partners in Virginia. This model has proven to be a viable option for smaller organizations that do not have the administrative capacity to become their own employment network. The three administrative ENs are collaborating with 12-organizations in Virginia. This includes Centers for Independent Living, Community Rehabilitation Programs, Brain Injury Service providers and other DARS vendors

3.6 Maintain the department’s presence in all of the State’s Comprehensive Workforce Centers. The VR program currently is co-located as a One Stop partner in Martinsville, Danville and South Boston. DARS also has a physical presence in other Workforce Board AJC’s.

3.7 Increase the number of work incentive authorizations to 600. During FFY 2017, there were 2,737 total WISA authorizations. These services were provided through over 98 different WISAs around the state, which was a significant increase which allowed DARS to significantly increase the number of authorizations. DARS has added additional WISA services to include Section 301 protection, ABLEnow accounts, and Financial Health Assessments. This brings the total number of available WISA services to 14. DARS has also facilitated increased efficiency with the WorkWORLD for the Web tool. It is now four-times faster. The rehabilitation rate for DARS clients who receive WISA services is 60% compared to a rehabilitation rate of 40% for the same population when no WISA services are provided. This growth in WISA authorizations has resulted in an opportunity to partner with the Social Security Administration on a proof of concept pilot for obtaining Benefit Planning Query’s for DARS clients. Previously, this process had to be completed through the local SSA field offices and took over four weeks. Now the turnaround is three to five business days using a secure email exchange with SSA. During the 2017 FFY, DARS affiliates which includes Partnership Plus Employment Networks and WISAs requested a total of 3,129 Benefit Planning Query’s to provide work incentive services to their clients. This includes 30 requests from WWRC. In addition, DARS counselors requested 2,730 Benefit Planning Query’s for a total of 5,859 across the Commonwealth. Thus far, DARS affiliates have requested 1,148 Benefit Planning Query’s and an additional 20 have been requested by WWRC. The average turn-around time over the span of this pilot have changed but is currently less than five-business days for the majority of requests. This is a significant difference in the processing time and has resulted in more accurate information available to both clients’ and counselors to increase informed choice related to earned income and SSA benefits.

3.8 Implement a pilot program to enhance the reassignment “handoff” process for the Partnership Plus Employment Network Partners. The Partnership Plus handoff pilot program has been completed and with the release of Social Security’s enhanced portal, Ticket To Work handoffs are achieved within three business days in the majority of cases and the planning begins while clients are in employed status. DARS partnership plus Employment Networks generated more ticket to work revenue and exceeded the national average for growth in ticket payments. The national growth rate in ticket revenue was 73% between FFY 2015 and 2016. There are 15 DARS Partnership Plus Employment Networks that were active during this reporting period and all grew in revenue by over 100%. (Pages 325-326) Title IV

Employer/ Business

~~D. Coordination, Alignment and Provision of Services to Employers:  
Virginia has positioned business as co-equal customer for the workforce system. The state board has established a formal policy for the provision of business services and embedded concepts like regional workforce demand planning into local plan requirements and related policies, including those governing the state’s Eligible Training Provider List.  (Page 134) Title IV

F. Partner Engagement with Other Education and Training Providers:
Describe how the State’s Strategies will engage the State’s other education and training providers, including providers on the state’s eligible training provider list, as partners in the workforce development system to create a job-driven education and training system:
Virginia’s strategy with other education and training providers encourages customer choice, innovation in service delivery, alignment with industry needs, and quality. Virginia also embraces On-the-job training, customized training, employer-directed incumbent worker training, and paid or unpaid work experiences to develop and advance skills in the individuals served.

Eligible Training Provider List:
The state workforce board recently adopted a policy for training providers which is streamlined, open and inclusive and includes performance measures for training providers. There are five categories of providers who may apply for consideration to be included on the state eligible training provider list:
1. A postsecondary educational institution that is eligible to receive federal funds under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 and that provides a program that leads to certification or license or college certificate, associate degree, or baccalaureate degree.
2. A postsecondary school that offers formal instructional programs with curricula designed primarily for students who have completed the requirements for a high school diploma or its equivalent. Such schools include programs of academic-vocational, vocational, and continuing professional education that may lead to a certification or licensure. This category excludes avocational and adult basic education programs.
3. An entity that carries out related instruction under the National Apprenticeship Act that is recognized by the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry,
4. A provider of a program of occupational training services that under Section 23-276.2 of the Code of Virginia is exempt from certification as a postsecondary school such as a professional or occupational training program regulated by another state or federal governmental agency other than the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV), any school, institute, or course of instruction offered by any trade association or any nonprofit affiliation of a trade association on subjects related to the trade, business, or profession represented by such association, or
5. A provider of adult education and literacy activities under title II of WIOA, if these activities are provided in combination with occupational skills training.

Exemptions for category 4 providers include educational offerings or activities that meet the following:
1) A nursing education program or curriculum regulated by the Board of Nursing;
2) A professional or occupational training program regulated by another other state or federal governmental agency;
3) Those courses or programs of instruction given by or approved by any professional body that are principally for continuing or professional education and for which no degree credit is awarded;
4) Those courses or programs offered through approved multistate compacts, including, but not limited to, the Southern Regional Education Board’s Electronic Campus;
5) Those courses offered and delivered by a postsecondary school that is accredited by an entity recognized by the U.S. Department of Education for accrediting purposes, if such courses are provided, solely on a contractual basis for which no individual is charged tuition and for which there is no advertising for open enrollment;
6) Any school, institute or course of instruction offered by any trade association or any nonprofit affiliate of a trade association on subjects related to the trade, business or profession represented by such association;
7) Any public or private high school accredited or recognized by the Board of Education;
8) Tutorial instruction delivered and designed to supplement regular classes for students enrolled in any public or private school or to prepare an individual for an examination for professional practice or higher education;
9) Religious Institutions whose primary purpose is to provide religious or theological education. (Pages 138 –139) Title I

4. A provider of a program of occupational training services that under Section 23-276.2 of the Code of Virginia is exempt from certification as a postsecondary school such as a professional or occupational training program regulated by another state or federal governmental agency other than the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV), any school, institute, or course of instruction offered by any trade association or any nonprofit affiliation of a trade association on subjects related to the trade, business, or profession represented by such association, or
5. A provider of adult education and literacy activities under title II of WIOA, if these activities are provided in combination with occupational skills training.  (Page 226) Title II

Data Collection

In June 2015, a Common Intake Workgroup comprised of data professionals and partner agency thought leaders was formed. There is unanimous agreement that a common screening tool for monitoring new workforce system customers is needed, and the group is now determining the most efficient and cost-effective platform to use. Governor McAuliffe had originally requested the obligation of funds for the delivery of the common screening tool by September 1, 2016, but the procurement process and other technical considerations have pushed the timetable back to the end of calendar year 2016.

Reporting: In early June, after the original submission of Virginia’s Combined State Plan, Governor McAuliffe convened a meeting of workforce leaders and stakeholders to discuss the creation of common workforce performance measures to complement the measures outlined in Section 116 of WIOA. These state performance measures are outlined in the table below. (Page 152) Title II

i. Comprehensive System of Personnel Development; Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development (Formerly known as Attachment 4.10)).

Describe the designated State agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified State rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated State unit, including the following:

1. Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

A. Qualified Personnel Needs. Describe the development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs with respect to:

i. the number of personnel who are employed by the State agency in the provision of VR services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

The Commonwealth of Virginia maintains a personnel database including policies and procedures for the professional development of state employees that DBVI utilizes as part of its personnel development and planning. DBVI tracks personnel development as part of annual review and development of the DBVI State Plan CSPD Section I.

During FFY 2018 and FFY 2019, personnel development will continue as one of DBVI’s highest priorities. The procedures and activities outlined in this section were developed to ensure DBVI has an adequate supply of qualified rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals providing VR services to eligible Virginians who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind, including youth. DBVI will continue to assess requirements for qualified personnel, and will adapt agency training and hiring practices as necessary based on the issuance of WIOA final regulations. (Pages 363-364) Title IV

511

~~No disability specific information found regarding this element.

Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination: Section 188

8. Addressing the Accessibility of the One-Stop Delivery System for Individuals with Disabilities:

Foundations:

Virginia’s Workforce Development Services’ Methods of Administration (MOA) describes the nine guiding elements and requirements for Local Workforce Development Boards (LWDBs), one-stop operators and one-stop delivery system partners to comply with Section 188 of WIOA to ensure Universal Access and Equal Opportunity. Virginia’s policy and procedures are periodically reviewed and maintained current; and training and technical assistance are provided on a regular basis. WIOA state monitors conduct regular site visits to ensure compliance. (Page 187) Title I

As part of Virginia’s commitment to continuous quality improvement, a state level taskforce will be established to focus on enhancing accessibility of our one-stop service delivery system and the customer service experience. This taskforce will be composed of representatives from state level disability services agencies, workforce partners, LWDB area staff, One-Stop operators, and job seekers with disabilities.

Expected outcomes are the following: a revised ADA Accessibility guidelines and one-stop center certification process that incorporates the WIOA Section 188 Disability Reference Guide checklist for program and physical accessibility; system standards for accessible devices and software located in workforce centers to facilitate consistency; review of all policies and guidance to ensure alignment and consistency; a schedule for cross- agency training for survey providers, end users, one-stop operators and partner staff. The efforts of this Team will improve compliance and enhance communication, coordination and professional development across Virginia’s workforce system.

Update on the Accessibility Taskforce and WIOA Section 188

• Created the Accessibility Taskforce in 2016 as recommended in Virginia’s WIOA Combined State Plan’s Section to enhance accessibility of our one-stop delivery system and customer service experience, with the WIOA Title I Administrator designated as the lead role.

• The Taskforce is composed of staff from 14 workforce partners from a diverse representation of state agencies that includes, the VR Assistant Commissioner who chairs the state level Career Pathways Workgroup and is a member of the WIOA Implementation Team, Departments for the Blind and Vision Impaired, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Impaired, the Centers for Independent Living and the EEO Officers for WIOA Title I and Title III. The WIOA Adult and Dislocated Worker Programs State Coordinator participates with a policy and programs perspective. As a result a policy was developed and approved by the Virginia Board of Workforce Development on Services to Individuals with Disabilities that lays the groundwork on Section 188-ADA to achieve consistent compliance across ALL WIOA core programs. Taskforce members contributed directly to One Stop Certification Tool by developing specific criteria on Program and Programmatic Accessibility. Taskforce members participated in the evaluation of One Stop certification documents for validation and on-site validation visits to the AJCs. As a dual benefit, this allowed for significantly improved awareness and understanding of the ADA and disability challenges at the local One Stop level and the team site visits fostered technical assistance connections between state and local staff, as well as improving awareness and understanding among the state agencies on the Taskforce. (Page 189) Title I

Vets

Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants:

The Jobs for Veterans’ State Grants (JVSG) are mandatory, formula-based staffing grants to (including DC, PR, VI and Guam). The JVSG is funded annually in accordance with a funding formula defined in the statute (38 U.S.C. 4102A (c) (2) (B) and regulation and operates on a fiscal year (not program year) basis, however, performance metrics are collected and reported (VETS-200 Series Reports) quarterly (using four “rolling quarters”) on a Program Year basis (as with the ETA-9002 Series). Currently, VETS JVSG operates on a five-year (FY 2015-2019), multi-year grant approval cycle modified and funded annually.

In accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(b)(5) and § 4102A(c), the Assistant Secretary for Veterans' Employment and Training (ASVET) makes grant funds available for use in each State to support Disabled Veterans' Outreach Program (DVOP) specialists and Local Veterans' Employment Representatives (LVER) staff. As a condition to receive funding, 38 U.S.C. § 4102A(c)(2) requires States to submit an application for a grant that contains a State Plan narrative, which includes:

a. How the State intends to provide employment, training and job placement services to veterans and eligible persons under the JVSG JVSG staff members provide services to eligible veterans according to each veteran’s needs and Significant Barrier to Employment (SBE), and the roles and responsibilities of the JVSG staff member. DVOP specialists and LVERs are fully integrated into the workforce development network. The duties of these staff members are described in the next section. (Page 566-567) Title IV

DVOP Specialists and LVERs work in One Stop offices throughout the state or with other partner agencies. One LVER is designated as the Chief of Veteran Services with the responsibility to manage the Virginia Jobs for Veterans State Grant program and to provide direct supervision and oversight for the Virginia Employment Commission’s JVSG staff. Three LVERs are designated as LVER Regional Managers responsible for providing supervision for Lead LVERS (LLVERs) and DVOPs within their assigned regional geographic areas. Fifteen LVERs are designated as Lead LVERs (LLVERs). In this role LLVERs perform their traditional statutory role within their assigned geographic area 70% of the time. The remaining time is spent performing supervisory functions for DVOP staff, thus ensuring that each staff member is performing according to expectations and increasing the integration and accountability of JVSG staff as a partner within the current workforce model. Three DVOPs are assigned as Intensive Service Coordinators (ISCs), these staff members are located in the Fredericksburg, Hampton, and Wytheville offices. (Page 567) Title IV

The VEC recently conducted an analysis of the veteran population in each local workforce development area (LWDA) to establish an equitable distribution of DVOP Specialists. Official workplaces and areas of responsibility will be adjusted in accordance with the results of that analysis. The VEC will review the distribution of the JVSG staff annually in conjunction with the Annual Funding Modification process and adjust domicile locations as necessary based on population shifts. In addition to DVOP Specialists, each One Stop will have trained case managers and business services teams. DVOP specialists coordinate closely with these One Stop Center staff members when providing intensive services to veterans with a SBE. DVOP Specialists provide advice and guidance as needed to One Stop Center staff who are providing services to other veterans and other eligible persons.

When not actively providing intensive services or reviewing open case files, DVOP Specialists and other One Stop Center workforce representatives conduct outreach at off—site locations including, but not limited to, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs offices, Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOC) for the U.S. DVA, Military Treatment facilities (MTF), Warrior Transition Units/Battalion (WTU/WTB), Local Prisons and Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program (HVRP) grantee locations. The purpose of these outreach efforts is two—fold. The first purpose is to find veterans in need of services and offer the needed services to them. The second purpose is to develop relationships with supportive services in the area so that SBE and other veterans can be referred to those agencies for services. (Page 567) Title IV

LLVER staff members work in One Stop offices throughout the state. The LVER coordinates with Regional Industry Sector Coordinators, Business Services Coordinators, and members of the Workforce Delivery Teams to advocate to employers on behalf of veterans and to develop job opportunities specifically for veterans. LLVER staff train WP funded employees to network for veterans and comply with priority of service requirements.

b. The duties assigned to DVOP specialists and LVER staff by the State; specifically implementing DVOP and LVER duties or roles and responsibilities as outlined in 38 U.S.C. § 4103A and 4104. These duties must be consistent with current guidance; The specific duties of DVOP specialists and LLVER staff throughout the state are consistent with the roles and responsibilities outlined in 38 U.S.C. § 4103A, 4104, and current guidance provided by DOL Veterans Employment and Training Services (VETS). (Page 567-568) Title IV

a. Disabled Veteran Outreach Program (DVOP) Specialists The primary function of the State’s DVOP Specialist team is to provide intensive services for veterans identified to have a SBE in accordance with 38 U.S.C. § 4103A, VPL 07—10 and VPL 03—14, or the most recent USDOL policy, and those veterans that are a member of a special population in accordance with VPL 04—14. Prior to conducting any other intensive service, DVOP Specialists shall conduct a comprehensive assessment, which shall be an “intensive interviewing process” and may also include the use of an Interest Inventory, or other assessment tools. Once the comprehensive assessment has been completed, the DVOP shall, with the cooperation of the veteran, develop and implement an Individual Employment Plan (IEP). DVOP Specialists shall always, and as a minimum, complete these two intensive services. Case management continues to be an appropriate delivery strategy or framework within which intensive services may be delivered and in most cases, shall be followed. To enhance the implementation of the IEP career guidance, supportive services, job development contacts, job referrals and intensive services and training may also be provided. Depending on the needs of the individual, the goal of the IEP may be to obtain education or training that lead to employment or employment. Training or education may be short or long term depending on the certification, licensing or skills being acquired to optimize successful employment outcomes. The DVOP Specialist may receive assistance with these functions by other Workforce Specialists who are trained to facilitate case management. (Page 568) Title IV

DVOP Specialists conduct outreach to locate veterans with a SBE with the purpose of providing intensive services and to form partnerships with external and internal supportive services programs that can provide those services, such as:

— VA Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment facilities

— Homeless Veteran Reintegration Programs

— VA VET Centers

— Homeless and Halfway Shelters

— Civic and Veteran Service Organizations

— Virginia Vocational Rehabilitation facilities

— Virginia Community College System

— State Veterans’ Affairs Representatives

— Universities — Veterans’ Service Organizations

— Department of Social Services TANF initiatives for veterans

— Local State Prisons

— Other WIOA partners. (Page 568) Title IV

b. Lead Local Veteran Employment Representative (LLVER) Staff: The LLVER responsibilities are specifically targeted to promote the advantages of hiring veterans to employers, employer associations, and business groups. LLVER roles and responsibilities are consistent with 38 U.S.C. § 4104, VPL 07-10 and VPL 03-14. As such, the LLVER serves an important role in Virginia’s Business Services Delivery Model. In coordination with the other members of the business services team, the LLVER advocates for employment and training opportunities through outreach to employers, training facilities, unions, apprenticeship programs, and private and government businesses. The LLVER also participates in Job Fairs, promotes programs that offer licensing and credentialing opportunities, and develops and makes presentations to employers. Each LLVER must provide a monthly report to the Regional LVER manager detailing their outreach activities. LVER Staff members conduct outreach to perform the following activities:

— Employer outreach

— Job searches and workshops, and establishing job search groups

— Coordinating with apprenticeship programs, and businesses or business organizations to promote and secure employment and training programs for veterans

— Informing Federal contractors of the process to recruit qualified veterans;

— Promoting credentialing and licensing opportunities for veterans; and

— Coordinating and participating with other business outreach efforts.

Within each One Stop Center, LVER staff coordinate closely with the One Stop managers to provide training and technical assistance on priority of service, best practices for providing effective services to veterans, relevant external partners, the role of DVOP Specialists, integration of DVOP Specialists into Virginia’s service delivery model, and best practices for conducting outreach to employers. LLVER Staff coordinate with their business service team partners and other state agencies or programs such as Virginia Values Veterans (V3), to conduct outreach to employer associations at the state and regional level. In this way the many more employers can be reached and persuaded to hire veterans. This outreach will educate employers on the advantages of hiring veterans, and inform employers on how to find qualified veteran applicants by leveraging Virginia’s workforce system. The VEC will increase veteran employment by making a sound business case to employers about the advantages of hiring veterans and providing tools to do so effectively. (Page 569) Title IV

c. The manner in which DVOP specialists and LVER staff are integrated into the State’s employment service delivery system or one-stop delivery system partner network;

Virginia provides employment, training, and placement services to all veterans through a network of strategically located One Stop Centers operated by 15 Regional Workforce Development Boards (WDB) and supported by the State’s proprietary Virginia Workforce Connection database system. The VEC, One Stop Centers and each local WDB, have implemented a standardized framework for customer flow. This flow determines the method through which all clients (both job seeker and employer) are integrated into the system and how they are assessed to identify their service needs. All programs are coordinated through a joint referral process described in each LWIA’s Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between partners. Each partner performs the services pursuant to their authorizing legislation or policy.

Collaboration is also enforced via program updates and other workforce system policies shared among partners at regularly scheduled staff meetings and training. During those meetings, all staff members share information about new employers and job orders received, One Stop Center scheduled activities, and positive recruitment activities taking place in the region.

All DVOP Specialists are full time employees, including the DVOP Specialist ISC. Although DVOP Specialists are responsible for case management and facilitating intensive services for veterans with significant barriers, they are not alone in this effort. Providing services to veterans with SBEs takes a team effort and as such, all services available in any particular One Stop are available to veterans on a priority of service basis. Non—JVSG funded staff provide intensive services and case management as appropriate to veterans and other eligible persons when no DVOP Specialist is available.

In most cases, the LVER serves as a member of the Business Services Team in their respective WDB. The team’s primary focus is to conduct job development and outreach to employers. LVER Staff responsibilities include operating targeted hiring events and veteran’s job fairs. LVER Staff provides program continuity by acting as the technical program advisor and trainer for One Stop Center staff. (Pages 569-570) Title IV

Virginia has adopted a demand—driven approach to all workforce and employment programs to focus services and training toward high demand jobs. The State promotes employment and job training opportunities through the use of several specialized programs. The Virginia Community College System (VCCS) operates various veterans’ programs throughout the state to promote education and other customized training for veterans to succeed in the civilian workplace. These programs are designed to help the veteran earn a degree or certification. These opportunities are presented to veterans through office visits and presentations at Veterans Workshops.

The local One Stop Centers act as the central hub for all workforce activities and associated training within the state. The State’s strategy for the leveraging of other state and federal education and training programs to develop skills necessary to prepare veterans for in—demand jobs is therefore focused on, and operated in, close cooperation with our One Stop Center partners. The combined efforts of the effective integration of the JVSG into the One Stop Center service delivery model, outreach to and relationship building with relevant partners, and comprehensive up—to—date information on in—demand jobs and skills, produces a coordination of programs and services that reduces or eliminates duplication, closes gaps in service, and identifies the program or service best suited to the individual veteran being served. In this way, the State leverages a wide range of state and federal training programs to efficiently and effectively provide veterans with the specific skills necessary to secure and succeed in current in—demand jobs.

The State’s outreach efforts and public information activities are used to inform veterans of the services available at their local One Stop Centers and the training opportunities that are available in their area and within the state. These outreach efforts, as described in Section B above, are focused on key service providers likely to interact with SBE veterans. The intent of this outreach is to educate service providers about job training and other services available to veterans at their local One Stop Center. In turn, the State’s partner service providers can encourage veterans to seek services at s or VEC offices. Due to the complexity of eligibility criteria and the variance of programs offered in disparate areas, public information systems usually do not provide specifics on particular programs but does direct veterans and other eligible persons into the local One Stop Center. (Pages 570-571)

The State is actively engaged in promoting the development of high demand job—driven training opportunities for veterans and other eligible persons within the education community. Business Services Teams partner with WIOA staff members, advise and collaborate with employers and educational institutions, (particularly the Virginia Community College System), to promote access to, retention in, and completion of individual training and education.

d. The Incentive Award program implemented using the 1% grant allocation set aside for this purpose, as applicable;

The State shall request one (1) percent of its annual allocation for each year’s JVSG grant as a Performance Incentive award for eligible staff. This award shall be used in accordance with VPL 02—07, or the most recent guidance from USDOL—VETS. The objective of the VEC incentive award program is to recognize, promote, and reward superlative and exceptional performance in the provision of service to veterans within the context of statutes and regulations. The basic objective of the awards program is to create an awareness and continuous level of interest in the importance of priority of service for veterans and an environment that engenders continuous improvement in serving veterans across the spectrum of service. The award system shall continue to operate as defined in the applicable State Policy and as approved by USDOL. The State anticipates that individuals and teams will recognize the value and process of the awards program and will, as a result, develop a competitive attitude within the agency that supports esprit de corps within the team while sharpening the focus on service to other eligible persons.

Incentive awards shall be expended up to and including one (1) percent of the total grant amount for the fiscal year, which is set aside strictly for this purpose in the annual grant budget. Awards shall be determined based on a percentage of total award available for that fiscal year but shall not (in total) exceed one (1) percent of the total available funds for a given fiscal year or the most current USDOL guidance on grant funded incentive award amounts. Exceptional merit is based on a number of factors, with the overriding concept being the value of the process. In essence this is determining both a quantitative and qualitative rating and merit based on the following factors:

— Total numbers of veterans served and total services rendered to those veterans within the parameters of these areas;

— Outreach to veterans and subsequent flow of core services that result in veterans becoming job ready, or the need for intensive services; — Outreach to and the comprehensive assessment of special target groups within the veteran community;

— Intensive servicesular job developments, for veterans and veterans with disabilities; 

, case management, and outcomes of those efforts; 

— Job placements, in partic— Other successful outcomes for veterans who may not return to employment, but through community partner referral developed an improved situation and/or economic stability;

— Outreach to and partner development with employers and federal contractors in the support of creating job opportunities for veterans;

— Outreach to and partner development with community service agencies, other state and federal programs, and internal agency components in creating a supportive service network for veterans with barriers to employment and who may need case management;

— Organizations, participation, and success in job fairs and other veteran center community activities;

— Any other innovative veteran related activity. (Page 571-572) Title IV

By state law, all awards must be cash, and all cash awards must be presented directly to individuals in the amount of $1,000. This means that offices (teams) receiving incentive recognition shall share equally in the overall office award, and the individual award amount shall be determined by the team composition. For state merit staff awardees, the incentive will be paid out through the payroll system. For non—state merit employee, a separate payroll check will be issued to the individual. Any employee contributions that result from the payment of the incentive will be charged to the JVSG grant.

On 1 March and 1 August first of each year, supervisors will submit recommendations of names and amount not to exceed $1,000 per individual and/or per incident of achievement to the Chief, Veteran Services. There will be three level of awards designated: Gold ($1,000), Silver ($750) and Bronze ($500). This submission will also include a narrative report that identifies the number and type of activities extended to veterans and their outcome in no more than one page, not including additional documentation in the form of VWC or other data can be attached. The criteria for the award type will include, but is not limited to, Department of Labor performance measures for LVERs and DVOPs and performance measures established by the Virginia Employment Commission and partner agencies. (Page 572) Title IV

Determination of the award shall be by a combination of objective and subjective data. Data compilation, analysis, and award determination shall be by a team proposed by of the Chief, Veterans Services. The final award approval shall be by the Appointing Authority, Commissioner of VEC, who is also the signatory authority for the JVSG grant relationship with USDOL. Incentive award funds distributed shall be obligated by September 30, each fiscal year and distributed not later than December 31, of the same year in accordance with the regulation. The Incentive award report shall be in compliance with USDOL VETS reporting requirements.

e. The populations of veterans to be served, including any additional populations designated by the Secretary as eligible for services, and any additional populations specifically targeted by the State Workforce Agency for services from one-stop delivery system partners (e.g., Native American veterans; veterans in remote rural counties or parishes); DVOP Specialists target veterans who attest to having one or more of the six significant barriers to employment listed below ongoing to at least one of the six criteria listed below:

— A special disabled or disabled veteran, as defined in 38 U.S.C. § 4211(10) and (3);

— Homeless, as defined in Sections 103(a) and (b) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11302(a) and (b)), as amended;

— A recently-separated service member, as defined in 38 U.S.C § 4211(6), who has been unemployed for 27 or more weeks in the previous 12 months;

— An offender, as defined by WIOA Section 3 (38), who is currently incarcerated or who has been released from incarceration;

— Lacking a high school diploma or equivalent certificate; and/or

— Low—income, as defined by WIOA Section 3(36).

DVOP Specialists also provide services to priority category populations identified by the Secretary under 38 U.S.C. § 4103A (a)(1)(C). Currently, the Secretary has identified four such populations. These populations are:

— Transitioning service members who have participated in the Transition Assistance Program and have been identified as in need of intensive services as indicated by issuance of DD form 2978 ;

— Service members who are wounded, ill, or injured and receiving treatment in military treatment facilities or warrior transition units;

— The spouses or other family caregivers of such wounded, ill, or injured service members; and — Veterans, as defined in 38 U.S.C. § 4211, aged 18 to 24.

f. How the State implements and monitors the administration of priority of service to covered persons; 

Priority of Service is one of the most important elements of service for veterans, as prescribed by 38 U.S.C. § 4215(b) and 20 CFR Parts 1001 and 1010 and reinforced through the State issued Workforce Development Policy 18.

During the reception process, a series of questions are used to identify veteran or eligibility status. Qualified veterans and/or qualified spouses are provided services prior to other customers and an initial assessment is completed by the first available One Stop Center staff member. If during the initial assessment it is determined that the veteran has a SBE or is a member of another special category, the veteran is immediately referred to a DVOP specialist. (Pages 572-573) Title I

The State provides priority of service in accordance with TEGL 05—03. When a veteran is identified as having barriers to employment, they are fast—tracked to ensure that those barriers are resolved as expeditiously as possible. The VEC has agreements with the USDOL—funded programs covered by 38 U.S.C. § 4215(b) on veterans’ priority and refers veterans to training and supportive services within that network on a priority basis. The VEC has partnered with educational entities within the state and the vocational/technical institutions, which also provide priority service for veterans. Veterans receive priority for employment and job training opportunities available through WIOA funding, on the job training, skills development training, and youth training contracts. Veterans’ can locate training opportunities through use of the Virginia Workforce Connection data base and receive training at private facilities, which have been approved through either through the individual WDBs or the Virginia Department of Veteran Services. Training costs for eligible veterans are paid by the WIOA program or through Individual Training Accounts. Veterans take priority in instances of training fund shortages. (Page 573-574) Title IV

Each WDB coordinates available funds with those provided by the Virginia Department of Veterans Affairs Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E) program to prevent duplication of services. When VR&E is providing training and supportive services, WIOA can provide services to spouses or services that were not covered by the VR&E program.

The VEC closely monitors programs to ensure that veterans are given priority of service. Both JVSG management and Regional Directors periodically conduct site checks to ensure all required priority of service signs are present and properly displayed, and that One Stop Center staff understand both the requirement of priority of service and its proper implementation. During these site visits, monitors pay particular attention to the implementation of priority of service beyond core services, particularly in the allocation of training funds.

The VEC analyzes data from Participant Individual Record Layout (PIRL) reports in conjunction with Virginia Workforce Connection data in order to compare outcomes by veterans and other eligible persons to the outcomes of non—veteran populations. This ongoing analysis supports the VEC’s continuous improvement process. Specifically, this is the relative rates of referral to USDOL funded training, referral to employment by One Stop Center staff, and job placement activities provided by One Stop Center staff. The VEC considers a referral rate in any program that is lower for eligible veterans than for nonveterans, evidence of a potential priority of service problem. In these cases, The VEC immediately places the affected region under examination and corrective action measures.

g. How the State provides or intends to provide and measure, through both the DVOP and one-stop delivery system partner staff:

1. job and job training individualized career services,

The VEC will use reports from the Virginia Workforce Connection (VWC) to ascertain services provided. Reports are generated monthly and quarterly. Reports are sorted by Region, Local Offices and Individual DVOPS. Capability exists to also view and track individual veterans and eligible spouses. In addition VEC conducts an Intensive Services Analysis on a monthly basis in which we review the raw number of veterans provided intensive services and the percentage of Veterans provided intensive services in comparison to the total number of veterans served. VEC will also monitor on a quarterly and semi-annual basis veteran’s average earnings and veteran’s retention rate (6 months). (Page 574-575)

Mental Health

~~3. the State agency responsible for providing mental health services:

The Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) maintains collaborative relationships with state agencies providing services to individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind with intellectual/developmental disabilities and mental health issues to include the Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) and the Virginia Department of Medical Assistant Services (DMAS).

As discussed in Section C, during this State Plan cycle, DBVI will establish or re—establish Memorandum of Understandings or interagency agreements outlining the commitment of the agencies to work together to create opportunities to exchange information, resolve issues, and provide resources statewide in order to increase the pre—employment and competitive integrated employment opportunities for individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind with intellectual/developmental disabilities and mental health issues.

Interagency Collaboration regarding providing services for individuals with Developmental Disabilities and Mental Health Services:

The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) provides services and supports to individuals who have developmental disabilities, intellectual disabilities, and mental health concerns, also known as behavioral health in Virginia. Services to these individuals are provided by regional and local Community Services Boards (CSBs). DBVI will establish or reestablish collaborative relationships with Virginia DBHDS and CSBs to include participating in interagency workgroups with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the Intellectual Disability (ID)/Developmental Disability (DD) CSB Case Managers with the goal of providing information related to allowable employment activities including Virginia’s Employment First initiative, Medicaid Waiver programs, and the provision of supported and extended support services. Collaboration with DBHDS also provides information on services and resources that support pre—employment transition programs and positive employment outcomes. The DBVI Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor will work with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the ID/DD CSB Case Managers to specifically ensure that issues related to work benefits, supports, and available resources are addressed.  (Pages 362) Title IV
 

Return to Work/Stay at Work (RTW/SAW)

Goal 7: Utilize WWRC’s comprehensive programs and services to address the unique needs of VR consumers with multiple and complex disabilities to help them overcome barriers to employment and obtain a job and/or regain independence to return to work. Indicators: 7.1 Increase the number of consumers referred by VR counselors to WWRC by 1%. There were 2,616 referrals in FFY 2017, there were 2,597 in FFY 2016. 7.2 Expand WWRC’s medical outreach to increase access for potential VR consumers with an emphasis in ‘return to work’. WWRC continues to build its capacity for statewide referral development to Rothrock Hall’s medical rehabilitation services. (Page 329) Title IV

States that elect to include UI in the Combined State Plan must: 1. Submit an SQSP in the following manner depending on their timing in the SQSP cycle: A. If a State is in the first year of their 2-year cycle, a complete SQSP package must be submitted. A complete SQSP package will include the Transmittal Letter, Budget Worksheets/Forms, State Plan Narrative, CAPs (including the milestones and the completion date for each milestone), the UI IAP, Organizational Chart, and the SQSP Signature Page. One of the key goals for the UI program is to ensure that claimants are able to successfully return to work. As such, the SQSP State Narrative must provide a discussion of the plan coordination with other WIOA Combined Plan programs to ensure a coordinated effort and integrated service delivery. (Pages 601-602) Title IV

Past WIOA Profiles Year
Past WIOA Profile Year: 
2017
Past WIOA Profile Attachment : 

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 1 - 10 of 77

H 1025 An Act to require the Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services and law-enforcement agencies in the Commonwealth to make information about vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to certain law-enforcement officer - 03/31/2020

“1. § 1. That the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services shall make information regarding vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to assist former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service with preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining suitable employment, including information on the types of programs available and the process by which former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service can access such programs and services, available to law-enforcement agencies in the Commonwealth.

 

§ 2. That every law-enforcement agency in the Commonwealth shall provide to every law-enforcement officer who separates from the agency due to a disability resulting from his service information regarding vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to assist former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service with preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining suitable employment, including information on the types of programs available and the process by which such law-enforcement officers may access such programs and services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

HB 1078 An Act relating to the Virginia Public Procurement Act; process for competitive negotiation; including employment of persons with a disability as a factor that will be used in evaluating a proposal - 03/12/2020

“A. The process for competitive negotiation shall include the following:

1. Issuance of a written Request for Proposal indicating in general terms that which is sought to be procured, specifying the factors that will be used in evaluating the proposal, indicating whether a numerical scoring system will be used in evaluation of the proposal, and containing or incorporating by reference the other applicable contractual terms and conditions, including any unique capabilities, specifications or qualifications that will be required. Except with regard to contracts for architectural, professional engineering, transportation construction, or transportation-related construction services, a public body may include as a factor that will be used in evaluating a proposal the proposer's employment of persons with disabilities to perform the specifications of the contract. In the event that a numerical scoring system will be used in the evaluation of proposals,”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Directive Six (2020) Continuing the Community Integration Team - 01/02/2020

"By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor under Article V, Section 1 of the Constitution of Virginia and § 2.2-103 and § 2.2-104 of the Code of Virginia, I hereby direct the following Cabinet Secretaries and their respective executive branch agencies and councils to continue their collaborative efforts to complete and update a comprehensive, cross-governmental strategic plan designed to ensure continued community integration of Virginians with disabilities:

Secretary of Commerce and Trade

Department of Housing and Community Development

Secretary of Education

Department of Education

Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind

Secretary of Health and Human Resources

Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services

Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired

Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services

Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Department of Medical Assistance Services

Virginia Board for People with Disabilities

Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs

Department of Veterans’ Services

Secretary of Transportation

Department of Rail and Public Transportation

Chief Workforce Development Officer”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order No. 47 - Expanding Opportunities for Virginians with Disabilities - 01/02/2020

“Directive

Therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor under Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth, including but not limited to § 2.2-103 of the Code of Virginia, I hereby direct the Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion to provide leadership and coordinate across Secretariats the following actions:

1. The Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion shall work with the Secretary of Administration to implement § 2.2-203.2:3 of the Code of Virginia, to increase the employment of individuals within state government, including but not limited to the exploration and implementation of the following initiatives to: 3

a. Use available hiring authorities, consistent with statutes, regulations, and prior executive orders;

b. Increase efforts to accommodate individuals with disabilities within state government employment by increasing the retention and return to work of individuals with disabilities; and

c. Expand existing efforts for the recruitment, accommodation, retention, and advancement of individuals with disabilities for positions available in state government.

2. The Secretary of Education and Chief Workforce Advisor, in coordination with the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) shall identify opportunities and current best practices at institutions of higher education, community colleges, and vocational training programs to increase the number of Virginians with disabilities who are able to participate actively in advanced training and education programs they choose.

3. The Chief Workforce Advisor, in conjunction with the Secretaries of Commerce and Trade and Education, shall work with the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, who will direct DARS, and DBVI, and the Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing to strengthen and develop workforce pipelines for individuals with disabilities and promote the hiring of qualified individuals with disabilities by new and existing Virginia businesses as well as companies seeking to locate to the Commonwealth.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Virginia Poverty Law Center, Inc. (VPLC) - 09/03/2019

~~“Virginia Poverty Law Center, Inc. (VPLC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Current enrollees and uninsured and “left-behind” individuals and families who lack affordable coverage options in their area or are unaware of the full range of health coverage options available. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are: Blue Ridge Legal Services, Central Virginia Legal Aid Society, Legal Aid Justice Center, Legal Aid Society of Eastern Virginia, Legal Aid Society of Roanoke Valley, Legal Services of Northern Virginia, Southwest Virginia Legal Aid Society, and Virginia Legal Aid Society. They will partner with: Rapid Response Program, Telehealth Enrollment Assistance Service, State and local government agencies, Community libraries, food banks, and tax preparers, Faith-based organizations, Chambers of Commerce, Hospitals, Native American tribes, Military and veterans' groups, Remote Access Medical clinics, and the Parole office.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Jill HankenPhone: (804) 782-9430 Ext. 104Email: jill@vplc.org .” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Boat People SOS, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Boat People SOS, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving small business owners and self-employed individuals; part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment service; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is the Korean Community Service Center of Greater Washington (KCSC). They will partner with Behavioral health and sustenance centers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Veteran’s service organizations, Chambers of Commerce, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and rural hospitals •Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, and Post-secondary Educational Institutions. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Dr. Thang NguyenPhone: (703) 538-2190Email: thang.nguyen@bpsos.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Americans with Disabilities Act - 06/21/2019

~~“In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Virginians with Disabilities Act, offenders with disabilities housed in a Virginia Department of Corrections (VADOC) facility or under state community supervision can request reasonable accommodations and provisions.

Our facilities and probation and parole offices have a common authority and set of operating procedures for ADA compliance. Various factors can affect an offender’s housing assignment based on their medical classification, needs, and the security measures required.

Every VADOC facility and probation and parole office has a designated ADA coordinator to assist with requests and grievances regarding disability concerns. Our trained ADA coordinator manages those requests and grievances throughout the system.

Learn more in Operating Procedure 801.3.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia State Plan for Aging Services “No Wrong Door" - 05/13/2019

~~‘Virginia’s NWD System offers electronic tools from case management intake to com-plex  care  coordination  to  hospital  and  care  transitions.  NWD  partners  include  all  25 AAAs,  120 local departments of social  services (LDSS), CILs  and an array  of providers ranging from  hospitals to  home health  organizations who can access an electronic re-source database of over 26,600 public and private  health and human supports maintained by Virginia Navigator. 

No Wrong Door is locally led and managed by 25 AAAs across the Commonwealth. Each unique local community has an advisory group and network of partners who contribute their expertise, collaborate and share client-level data, with consent, through a secure system to streamline access and support.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Developmental Disability Services - 05/09/2019

~~“Person centered services are available to residents of the City of Alexandria with a diagnosis of developmental disability. Support Coordination, Residential and Vocational or Day Support services are offered to enable individuals to successfully live in the community as independently as possible with the necessary supports.”

 More information about the services we provide is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training and Education Alliance - 04/30/2019

~~“The Training and Education Alliance uses a three-pronged approach to assist transitioning veterans that have chosen educational institutions as their preferred path to employment. Identifying and promoting employment pipelines, providing military cultural sensitivity training to education staff, and highlighting community service initiatives are three methods used by the TEA Alliance program to support Virginia’s Veterans on their path to employment.  Connectivity to fellow directorate programs such as Virginia Transition Assistance Program(VTAP) and Virginia Values Veterans(V3) also serve to ensure valuable services are available throughout the entirety of our veterans journeys to their education and employment goals.”

Systems
  • Other
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

H 1025 An Act to require the Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services and law-enforcement agencies in the Commonwealth to make information about vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to certain law-enforcement officer - 03/31/2020

“1. § 1. That the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services shall make information regarding vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to assist former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service with preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining suitable employment, including information on the types of programs available and the process by which former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service can access such programs and services, available to law-enforcement agencies in the Commonwealth.

 

§ 2. That every law-enforcement agency in the Commonwealth shall provide to every law-enforcement officer who separates from the agency due to a disability resulting from his service information regarding vocational rehabilitation programs and employment services available to assist former law-enforcement officers who have a disability as a result of their service with preparing for, obtaining, and maintaining suitable employment, including information on the types of programs available and the process by which such law-enforcement officers may access such programs and services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Resource Leveraging
Citations

HB 1078 An Act relating to the Virginia Public Procurement Act; process for competitive negotiation; including employment of persons with a disability as a factor that will be used in evaluating a proposal - 03/12/2020

“A. The process for competitive negotiation shall include the following:

1. Issuance of a written Request for Proposal indicating in general terms that which is sought to be procured, specifying the factors that will be used in evaluating the proposal, indicating whether a numerical scoring system will be used in evaluation of the proposal, and containing or incorporating by reference the other applicable contractual terms and conditions, including any unique capabilities, specifications or qualifications that will be required. Except with regard to contracts for architectural, professional engineering, transportation construction, or transportation-related construction services, a public body may include as a factor that will be used in evaluating a proposal the proposer's employment of persons with disabilities to perform the specifications of the contract. In the event that a numerical scoring system will be used in the evaluation of proposals,”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Resource Leveraging

SENATE BILL NO. 1485 Long-Term Employment Support Services and Extended Employment Services - 04/29/2019

~~“Directs the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services to make referrals to any employment services organization that provides competitive or commensurate wages and is eligible to receive state-funded Long-Term Employment Support Services or Extended Employment Services. The bill also requires the Department to develop and implement a referral process for individuals who make an informed choice to pursue an employment outcome that is not considered a competitive integrated employment setting by the Department. The bill also establishes the Employment Service Organization Steering Committee as an advisory board in the executive branch of state government. The bill provides that the purpose of the Committee shall be to report to and advise the Commissioner for Aging and Rehabilitative Services on policy, funding, and the allocation of funds to employment services organizations for Long-Term Employment Support Services and Extended Employment Services.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Values Veterans (V3) - 04/04/2019

~~“HB1641 passed the House of Delegates and the Senate unanimously, and was signed into law by Governor McAuliffe on March 17, 2015. It states: “All agencies in the executive branch of state government and all public institutions of higher education shall, to the maximum extent possible, be certified in accordance with this section." The process for state agencies to meet the requirements of this legislation can be found here on the V3 website.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Acts of Assembly: An Act to Amend and Reenact §§ 51.5-41, 51.5-120, 51.5-163, 51.5-164, and 51.5-172 through 51.5-176 of the Code of Virginia - 02/25/2016

Discrimination against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities by employers prohibited A.No employer shall discriminate in employment or promotion practices against an otherwise qualified person with a disability solely because of such disability. For the purposes of this section, an "otherwise qualified person with a disability" means a person qualified to perform the duties of a particular job or position and whose disability is unrelated to the person's ability to perform such duties or position or is unrelated to the person's qualifications for employment or promotion. B. It is the policy of the Commonwealth that persons with disabilities shall be employed in the state service, the service of the political subdivisions of the Commonwealth, in the public schools, and in all other employment supported in whole or in part by public funds on the same terms and conditions as other persons unless it is shown that the particular disability prevents the performance of the work involved. C. An employer shall make reasonable accommodation to the known physical and mental impairments of an otherwise qualified person with a disability, if necessary to assist such person in performing a particular job, unless the employer can demonstrate that the accommodation would impose an undue burden on the employer. For the purposes of this section, "mental impairment" does not include active alcoholism or current drug addiction and does not include any mental impairment, disease, or defect that has been successfully asserted by an individual as a defense to any criminal charge. 1. Individualized plan for employment. A written individualized plan for employment for each recipient of vocational rehabilitation services provided or funded by the Department, in whole or in part, shall be developed within a reasonable time and as soon as possible, but not later than 90 days after the due date of the determination of eligibility, unless an extension is agreed to by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and the Department. The plan shall be agreed to and signed by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and a qualified vocational rehabilitation counselor employed by the Department

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia SB 1404 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia HB 2306 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia 2012 Senate Joint Resolution No. 127 - 02/25/2012

“Encouraging the Secretary of Health and Human Resources and the Superintendent of Public Instruction to adopt and implement Employment First practices...” Employment First is defined as a policy is grounded in a framework of increased integration, independence, productivity and employment that is based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, abilities, and informed choice of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia 2012 House Joint Resolution No. 23 - 01/11/2012

“WHEREAS, implementation of an Employment First initiative in Virginia will lead to increased employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, resulting in benefits for individuals, families, employers, and communities across the Commonwealth; now, therefore, be it resolved by the House of Delegates, the Senate concurring, That the Secretary of Health and Human Resources be requested to develop and implement an Employment First initiative in the Commonwealth, which shall identify employment in an integrated, community setting earning an amount that is equal to or greater than minimum-wage rates as the first goal for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving services through state agencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Virginians with Disabilities Act ( 51.5-1) of 1989 - 05/01/1989

“ It is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment. To these ends, the General Assembly directs the Governor, the Virginia Office for Protection and Advocacy, the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities, the Departments of Education, Health, Housing and Community Development, Behavioral Health and Developmental Services, and Social Services, and the Departments for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, the Blind and Vision Impaired, and the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing and such other agencies as the Governor deems appropriate, to provide, in a comprehensive and coordinated manner which makes the best use of available resources, those services necessary to assure equal opportunity to persons with disabilities in the Commonwealth.The provisions of this title shall be known and may be cited as “‘The Virginians with Disabilities Act.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Executive Directive Six (2020) Continuing the Community Integration Team - 01/02/2020

"By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor under Article V, Section 1 of the Constitution of Virginia and § 2.2-103 and § 2.2-104 of the Code of Virginia, I hereby direct the following Cabinet Secretaries and their respective executive branch agencies and councils to continue their collaborative efforts to complete and update a comprehensive, cross-governmental strategic plan designed to ensure continued community integration of Virginians with disabilities:

Secretary of Commerce and Trade

Department of Housing and Community Development

Secretary of Education

Department of Education

Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind

Secretary of Health and Human Resources

Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services

Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired

Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services

Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Department of Medical Assistance Services

Virginia Board for People with Disabilities

Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs

Department of Veterans’ Services

Secretary of Transportation

Department of Rail and Public Transportation

Chief Workforce Development Officer”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Executive Order No. 47 - Expanding Opportunities for Virginians with Disabilities - 01/02/2020

“Directive

Therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor under Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth, including but not limited to § 2.2-103 of the Code of Virginia, I hereby direct the Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion to provide leadership and coordinate across Secretariats the following actions:

1. The Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion shall work with the Secretary of Administration to implement § 2.2-203.2:3 of the Code of Virginia, to increase the employment of individuals within state government, including but not limited to the exploration and implementation of the following initiatives to: 3

a. Use available hiring authorities, consistent with statutes, regulations, and prior executive orders;

b. Increase efforts to accommodate individuals with disabilities within state government employment by increasing the retention and return to work of individuals with disabilities; and

c. Expand existing efforts for the recruitment, accommodation, retention, and advancement of individuals with disabilities for positions available in state government.

2. The Secretary of Education and Chief Workforce Advisor, in coordination with the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) shall identify opportunities and current best practices at institutions of higher education, community colleges, and vocational training programs to increase the number of Virginians with disabilities who are able to participate actively in advanced training and education programs they choose.

3. The Chief Workforce Advisor, in conjunction with the Secretaries of Commerce and Trade and Education, shall work with the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, who will direct DARS, and DBVI, and the Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing to strengthen and develop workforce pipelines for individuals with disabilities and promote the hiring of qualified individuals with disabilities by new and existing Virginia businesses as well as companies seeking to locate to the Commonwealth.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
  • Veterans

Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/01/2018

~~"WHEREAS, all Virginians should be given the opportunity to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment to drive Virginia’s economy;NOW, THEREFORE, I, Ralph S. Northam, do hereby recognize October 2018 as DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH in our COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, and I call this observance to the attention of all our citizens." 

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order Number One (2018) Equal Opportunity - 01/13/2018

~~‘By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor, I hereby declare that it is the firm and unwavering policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to ensure equal opportunity in all facets of state government.  The foundational tenet of this Executive Order is premised upon a steadfast commitment to foster a culture of inclusion, diversity, and mutual respect for all Virginians. This policy specifically prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, political affiliation, or against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities.  The policy permits appropriate employment preferences for veterans and specifically prohibits discrimination against veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 46: Supporting Virginians with Disabilities in the New Virginia Economy - 07/27/2015

“The Chief Workforce Development Advisor, in conjunction with the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, shall work with DARS and DBVI to offer to all executive branch agencies (including institutions of higher education, boards, and commissions) training designed to expand existing efforts to recruit, accommodate, retain and advance Virginians with disabilities in the Commonwealth’s workforce. Training shall commence no later than October 1, 2015...”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order (Executive Order #55 (2012)) - 11/16/2012 - 11/16/2012

“The last United States Census concluded that out of 3.6 million Virginia residents who were employed, 154,985 Virginians with disabilities were included in that total. These numbers indicate an under representation of people with disabilities among the gainfully employed. The Commonwealth of Virginia should work to provide a Commonwealth of Opportunity for all Virginians; therefore it is appropriate to initiate steps in order to expand employment opportunities for its citizens who are disabled….”

“By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor by Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth…and in conjunction with… the Code of Virginia which states that it is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities, including our wounded soldiers, to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment, with the goal of enhancing the employment opportunities for Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 10 of 23

Americans with Disabilities Act - 06/21/2019

~~“In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Virginians with Disabilities Act, offenders with disabilities housed in a Virginia Department of Corrections (VADOC) facility or under state community supervision can request reasonable accommodations and provisions.

Our facilities and probation and parole offices have a common authority and set of operating procedures for ADA compliance. Various factors can affect an offender’s housing assignment based on their medical classification, needs, and the security measures required.

Every VADOC facility and probation and parole office has a designated ADA coordinator to assist with requests and grievances regarding disability concerns. Our trained ADA coordinator manages those requests and grievances throughout the system.

Learn more in Operating Procedure 801.3.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia State Plan for Aging Services “No Wrong Door" - 05/13/2019

~~‘Virginia’s NWD System offers electronic tools from case management intake to com-plex  care  coordination  to  hospital  and  care  transitions.  NWD  partners  include  all  25 AAAs,  120 local departments of social  services (LDSS), CILs  and an array  of providers ranging from  hospitals to  home health  organizations who can access an electronic re-source database of over 26,600 public and private  health and human supports maintained by Virginia Navigator. 

No Wrong Door is locally led and managed by 25 AAAs across the Commonwealth. Each unique local community has an advisory group and network of partners who contribute their expertise, collaborate and share client-level data, with consent, through a secure system to streamline access and support.’"

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Developmental Disability Services - 05/09/2019

~~“Person centered services are available to residents of the City of Alexandria with a diagnosis of developmental disability. Support Coordination, Residential and Vocational or Day Support services are offered to enable individuals to successfully live in the community as independently as possible with the necessary supports.”

 More information about the services we provide is available by accessing the web link

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Department of Veterans Services FY2018 Annual Report - 12/17/2018

~~” One of the many services Virginia provides to veterans and transitioning service members (TSMs) is a suite of services applicable to their unique journey. The Virginia Transition Assistance Program (VTAP) provides transition resources and assistance to all Virginia veterans and their spouses. More resources and information about VTAP assistance for veterans’ employment and education are available by accessing the web link. “

Systems
  • Other

Division of Rehabilitative Services - 12/07/2018

~~“Our division offers vocational rehabilitation programs and services to assist people with disabilities to prepare for, secure, retain or regain employment. More information about DRS services can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Services Offered by the Roanoke Regional Office - 11/20/2018

~~“VA’s Roanoke Regional Office (RO) administers a variety of services, including Compensation, Education, Insurance, Loan Guaranty, Pension, and Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment for Veterans, Servicemembers, their families and survivors in Virginia and the District of Columbia. We offer the following additional services:• Counseling about eligibility for VA benefits and how to apply• Information about VA health care and memorial benefits• Outreach to Veterans, including those who are homeless or at risk for homelessness and older, minority, and women Veterans• Public affairs• Assistance with applying for Specially Adapted Housing grants• Administration of VA’s Home Loan Guaranty program for Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, and the District of Columbia.” 

Systems
  • Other

Provider Development - 11/05/2018

~~“The Office of Provider Development focuses on developing and sustaining a qualified community of providers in Virginia so that people who have developmental disabilities and their families have choice and access to options that meet their needs. Here you will find resources including information on becoming a provider, information about Virginia’s Person-Centered ISP, who to contact for technical assistance, and various training resources.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation

Special Education Requirements Under the Workforce Innovations and Opportunity Act (WIOA) - 11/02/2018

~~” This memorandum will address certain school division responsibilities under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), a federal law that reauthorized the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.  In general, it enhances the Virginia Department on Aging and Rehabilitative Services’ (DARS) role as a secondary transition partner with school divisions.  Through Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS), DARS will provide additional supports and services to students with disabilities, and will provide those services at an earlier age.  While most provisions of WIOA affect DARS, it does include new requirements for school divisions, in partnership with DARS, as both agencies work to transition students with disabilities from secondary school to postsecondary education, training, and/or integrated competitive employment.  Specifically, Section 511 of Title IV of WIOA (i) restricts school divisions from contracting with certain entities and (ii) requires school divisions to maintain and transmit additional documentation in certain instances.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • WIOA

Individual and Family Support Program (IFSP) - 09/10/2018

~~The Individual and Family Support Program (IFSP) assists individuals with developmental disabilities and their families with accessing person-centered and family-centered resources, supports, services and other assistance. The program's primary target population is individuals on the waiting list for Virginia's Developmental Disabilities (DD) Medicaid waivers.The goal of the program is to support continued community living. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Secondary Transition: Consent for Inviting Participating Agency Representatives - 09/02/2018

~~“Are school personnel required to obtain written consent from the parent to invite a participating agency representative to an IEP meeting before they invite the agency representative?

Yes, the local school division must acquire written consent from the parent (or a student who has reached the age of majority) for each agency that is invited to attend an IEP meeting to discuss the provision or payment of transition services. (34 CFR § 300.321(b)(3); corresponding Virginia Regulations at 8 VAC 20-81-170 E.1.h). The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) provides the rationale and context for this mandate”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Review of Virginia’s Plan to Increase Employment First Plan: FY 2016-FY2018-Goals, Strategies, and Action Items - 12/13/2018

~~“DBHDS, with the input of the E1AG (formerly the SELN-VA Advisory Committee) has revised the FY16-FY18 plan to increase employment opportunities. It was provided with the Status Report as of 6/30/18. The Plan includes five goal areas each of which has sub-goals. The plan’s goals and status in achieving goals can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia DBHDS: Strategic Plan for Employment First - 10/01/2012

To facilitate interagency collaboration the Strategic Plan for Employment First establishes an Employment First Summit Meeting, which will gather leadership from various department committed to upholding Employment First principles, and orders for the creation of a high level administrative leadership body including (DBHDS, DARS, DOE, DMAS, Virginia Employment Commission (VEC), Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council) and Virginia Community College System (VCCS).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Virginia State Employment Leadership Network - 10/01/2012

Virginia is a part of this multi-state technical assistance collaborative whose aim is to improve integrated employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities. “In 2008, DBHDS joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) sponsored by the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services and the University of Massachusetts-Boston Institute for Community Inclusion. DBHDS developed a Virginia-specific SELN Advisory Group made up of over 30 members representing a variety of organizations involved in providing employment services to Virginians. Members include community service boards (CSBs), the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (VBPD), the Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention (VCU/RRTC), and vendor organizations such as the Virginia Association of Community Rehabilitation Programs (vaACCSES), the Arc of Virginia, and the Virginia Association of Providers of Supported Employment (VaAPSE). DBHDS continues to be an active, contributing participant in the monthly National SELN web-based meetings. Virginia is now one of 30 states in the SELN. The Virginia SELN Advisory Group, made up of advocates, providers, and state agencies, continues to identify roadblocks and disincentives in our state system. The group is developing specific strategies for implementation of a system that prioritizes employment as an outcome of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Intercommunity Transition Council

Virginia's Intercommunity Transition Council is committed to promoting partnerships and influencing linkages that result in transition service networks for coordinating person-centered services. Their fact sheet on employment cites Customized Employment as a successful strategy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Olmstead Settlement Agreement

“The Commonwealth shall establish a state policy on Employment First for the target population and include a term in the CSB Performance Contract requiring application of this policy. The Employment First policy shall, at a minimum, be based on the following principles: (1) individual supported employment in integrated work settings is the first and priority service option for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities receiving day program or employment services from or funded by theCommonwealth; (2) the goal of employment services is to support individuals in integrated work settings where they are paid minimum or competitive wages; and (3) employment services and goals must be developed and discussed at least annually through a person-centered planning process and included in ISPs. The Commonwealth shall have at least one employment service coordinator to monitor implementation of Employment First practices for individuals in the target population”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

What is No Wrong Door Virginia? - 04/18/2019

~~“No Wrong Door is a person-centered system designed to streamline individuals’ access to community services and supports. The program operates through a statewide network of partners supporting older adults, caregivers, individuals with disabilities, veterans and all other populations seeking services and supports. It uses secure technology to link providers who collaboratively connect individuals to the supports and services in which they are in need.To date, the expanding No Wrong Door network has offered:• Access to 26,000+ programs and services• Options provided by 600+ professionals• Answers for more than 50,000 Virginians” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Disability Employment Initiative Round VIII - 10/01/2017

“VA DEI will fund four Disability Resource Coordinators and implement activities in the Northern Virginia Region that will build on existing career pathways with a focus on the Information Technology (IT) sector that have been developed by the local partners. The project will also expand on work currently underway by Northern Virginia Community College and its adult education partners to customize a bridge program that will connect low-skilled adults to college level IT programming through an integrated education and training program. Key activities will include the analysis of existing adult education and community college IT curricula and instructional practices to ensure accessibility according to Universal Design Principles, development of fully accessible career assessments for use by local partners, and alignment across all instructional programs that lead to ever higher levels of credential attainment among program participants. The regional industry sector model will be applicable to other career pathways. Targeted industry sectors will include Information Technology.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Virginia Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities - 07/18/2017

“Led by the Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, this grant will help nearly 500 Virginians with disabilities, including young adults and veterans, gain new skills and credentials through Career Pathways to seek employment in competitive, high-demand, high-quality occupations.

Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities has 10 project partners in education, workforce development and business. These partners focus on strategies to:

meet business needs in high-demand occupations meet career seekers' needs to attain marketable credentials and find middle-skilled jobs train vocational rehabilitation counselors to work with potential clients”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Virginia No Wrong Door System Grant - 10/01/2015

~~“Virginia will provide a high-quality, sustainable, person-centered, single statewide No Wrong Door system of long-term services and supports. No Wrong Door will support individuals of all ages  and disabilities in achieving their unique goals for community living; streamline access to community supports; and promote efficiencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia: Fairfax Customized Employment Grant - 07/01/2007

“The Customized Employment grant initiative was a product of the Northern Virginia Workforce Investment Board. The goal of the group was to build the capacity of the local One-Stop Center to use Customized Employment services to increase employment outcomes, choice, and wages for people with disabilities who resided in Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the cities of Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas, and Manassas Park.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Disability Employment Initiative (Round Four)

As a past Round 1 grantee, VA DEI will continue to build on existing infrastructure to develop shared ownership; foster systems integration, through cross-interagency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. Three Disability Resource Coordinators and a DRC State Lead will facilitate the implementation of the service delivery strategies. The pilot sites will receive the services of a Ticket consultant, who has been successful at engaging Round I pilot LWIBs in the EN process and in increasing ticket activity. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Virginia Ticket to Work

“Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for people with disabilities who want to work. Social Security disability beneficiaries age 18 through 64 qualify. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket Program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence…“The Ticket program is a good fit for people who want to improve their earning potential and who are committed to preparing for long-term success in the workforce. Ticket to Work offers beneficiaries with disabilities access to meaningful employment with the assistance of Ticket to Work employment service providers.”Virginia has had Ticket to Work Since 2002.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Virginia National Association of State Mental Health Program Director’s (NASMHPD) Employment Development Initiative (EDI)

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).”

“This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

Virginia is using its funds to support their Employment First Initiative. They have conducted multiple Employment First Summits, and developed an Employment First Advisory group.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Virginia Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

Note: This program ended on December 31, 2009 according to this site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Virginia - Richmond Customized Employment Project

“The grant worked to strengthen the linkages of the Richmond-area One-Stop system with schools, VR, and the Virginia Business Leadership Network, a business-directed group designed to encourage other businesses to hire people with disabilities. The project focused on expanding the reach and scope of existing service programs, such as a WIA youth project, to make them more appropriate for job seekers with multiple barriers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Virginia Poverty Law Center, Inc. (VPLC) - 09/03/2019

~~“Virginia Poverty Law Center, Inc. (VPLC) was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving Current enrollees and uninsured and “left-behind” individuals and families who lack affordable coverage options in their area or are unaware of the full range of health coverage options available. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organizations are: Blue Ridge Legal Services, Central Virginia Legal Aid Society, Legal Aid Justice Center, Legal Aid Society of Eastern Virginia, Legal Aid Society of Roanoke Valley, Legal Services of Northern Virginia, Southwest Virginia Legal Aid Society, and Virginia Legal Aid Society. They will partner with: Rapid Response Program, Telehealth Enrollment Assistance Service, State and local government agencies, Community libraries, food banks, and tax preparers, Faith-based organizations, Chambers of Commerce, Hospitals, Native American tribes, Military and veterans' groups, Remote Access Medical clinics, and the Parole office.  For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Jill HankenPhone: (804) 782-9430 Ext. 104Email: jill@vplc.org .” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement Recipient Boat People SOS, Inc. - 09/03/2019

~~“Boat People SOS, Inc. was awarded a statewide 2019 CMS Navigator Cooperative Agreement serving small business owners and self-employed individuals; part-time workers in food service and retail occupations; consumers of mental health and substance abuse treatment service; recently unemployed individuals and their families who have lost healthcare coverage. Sub-awardee/Subrecipient Contracted Organization is the Korean Community Service Center of Greater Washington (KCSC). They will partner with Behavioral health and sustenance centers, Children’s services providers, Intimate partner service organizations, Veteran’s service organizations, Chambers of Commerce, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and rural hospitals •Community Service Organizations, Faith-Based Organizations, and Post-secondary Educational Institutions. For more information, please contact the designated project lead.Contact:Dr. Thang NguyenPhone: (703) 538-2190Email: thang.nguyen@bpsos.org ” 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training and Education Alliance - 04/30/2019

~~“The Training and Education Alliance uses a three-pronged approach to assist transitioning veterans that have chosen educational institutions as their preferred path to employment. Identifying and promoting employment pipelines, providing military cultural sensitivity training to education staff, and highlighting community service initiatives are three methods used by the TEA Alliance program to support Virginia’s Veterans on their path to employment.  Connectivity to fellow directorate programs such as Virginia Transition Assistance Program(VTAP) and Virginia Values Veterans(V3) also serve to ensure valuable services are available throughout the entirety of our veterans journeys to their education and employment goals.”

Systems
  • Other

Handbook for Educators of English Learners with Suspected Disabilities - 04/23/2019

~~“The purpose of the Handbook for Educators of English Learners with Suspected Disabilities is to provide school divisions with guidance on a multi-step process to appropriately identify and evaluate ELs who may have a disability for possible eligibility for special education and related services.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics