Virginia

States - Big Screen

Known affectionately as "The Place for Lovers," individuals with disabilities in the Commonwealth have the opportunity with the right supports and services to Live Passionately by having careers in competitive integrated employment and being full participants in their communities. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.69%
Change from
2016 to 2017
8,470,020
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.77%
Change from
2016 to 2017
500,771
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.13%
Change from
2016 to 2017
204,103
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.39%
Change from
2016 to 2017
40.76%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.39%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.97%

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 8,382,993 8,411,808 8,470,020
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 479,430 496,928 500,771
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 179,153 193,632 204,103
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,653,779 3,647,462 3,669,633
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 37.37% 38.97% 40.76%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.12% 78.66% 78.97%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.50% 4.00% 3.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.60% 18.10% 17.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.40% 10.10% 9.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 449,104 466,393 462,932
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 486,083 498,192 516,107
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 658,933 675,120 686,273
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 209,349 213,359 222,654
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 45,389 46,107 45,140
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,727 4,829 3,549
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 31,524 32,472 28,994
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 300 957 N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 23,693 27,133 27,801
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 8,661 10,715 9,532

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,473 6,657 6,877
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.60% 4.80% 4.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 212,711 211,614 210,694

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 14,666 14,753 14,919
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 31,199 31,011 30,594
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 73,206 77,519 70,510
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.00% 19.00% 21.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 0.70% 2.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.90% 0.60% 4.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 3.00% 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 7.80% 7.80% 43.40%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 344 388 1,243
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 496 329 2,600
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A 1,691 1,788
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 4,253 4,485 25,180

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 13,591 12,668 12,496
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 109 150 150
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 60 85 80
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 57.00% 53.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.72 1.01 0.95

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,034
7,248
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 44 44 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 438 455 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,002 1,047 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,746 2,990 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,240 2,092 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 564 620 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 39.50% 34.60% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 6,597 7,335 7,954
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 312,340 312,508 315,937
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 285 889 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 733 713 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $36,526,000 $34,044,000 $35,381,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $19,130,000 $18,506,000 $19,799,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $137,771,000 $145,494,000 $151,457,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00% 26.00% 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 631 928 898
Number of people served in facility based work. 598 724 683
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 9,546 10,112 9,455
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 40.60 49.40 48.60

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 62.79% 63.36% 64.01%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.01% 11.15% 10.87%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.06% 4.16% 4.26%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.76% 99.17% 99.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 34.13% 34.45% 32.85%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 63.24% 64.81% 63.10%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 72.57% 73.03% 71.98%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.11% 30.36% 30.25%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 5,052,830
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 7,757
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 168,108
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 3,289,332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,457,440
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 339
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,546
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,885
AbilityOne wages (products). $831,106
AbilityOne wages (services). $43,925,206

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 21 27 19
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 22 28 19
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 14 14 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,398 1,579 1,274
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,412 1,593 1,274

 

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

(10) Supporting Virginia’s Employment First initiative and implementation of the Department of Justice Settlement agreement by collaborating with the Department for Behavioral Health and Developmental Services to establish staff positions specializing in caseloads of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to enhance their employment. (Page 286)

(10) Supporting Virginia’s Employment First initiative and implementation of the Department of Justice Settlement agreement by collaborating with the Department for Behavioral Health and Developmental Services to establish staff positions specializing in caseloads of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to enhance their employment.

(11) Providing IPAD Pros for use by Rehabilitation Engineers and Assistive Technology Specialists in a “tele–rehab” environment which allows them to provide more effective on–site services to VR consumers needing these services and to interface more effectively with rehabilitation and assistive technology staff at WWRC. (Page 333) 

Customized Employment

(6) DARS, working closely with the VCU Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention, identified the need for training job coaches in basics responsibilities that would be reasonable in terms of time away from the job. VCU responded with the following: 

  1. Supported Employment Web–based Certificate Series (ACRE–certified);
  2. Supported Competitive Employment for Individuals with Mental Illness (ACRE–certified);
  3. Customized Employment; and
  4. Promoting an active network of inter–agency and inter–organizational professionals working with mutual supported employment consumers, with an emphasis on increasing linkages with rehabilitation engineering and technology experts and enhancing current linkages with employers, consumers, the education community and family members; (Page 258)

DARS is actively engaged at both the state and local level in the Workforce Development System. DARS is represented on the state Career Pathways Workgroup which advises the Governor’s Office and Workforce Board on the Workforce System issues and participates on the WIOA implementation team. A memorandum of understanding is in place with each Local Workforce Development Board and DARS works closely with the American Job Centers to assure access to individuals with disabilities. The VR program currently is co–located as a One–Stop partner in Charlottesville, Roanoke, Martinsville, Danville and South Boston. DARS also has a physical presence in other Workforce Board AJC’s. DARS is directly involved with both the state Workforce partners and local AJC’s in the Department of Labor Disability Employment Initiative grant and is lead on an RSA Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant. In the coming year, DARS will support training on career counseling, motivational interviewing as well as Customized Employment for our workforce partners.

No mechanism has been identified to track jointly enrolled Title I and VR clients. DARS is currently in the process of “on–boarding” VR RSA 911 information to the Virginia Longitudinal Data System (VLDS) to create a process to identify jointly enrolled clients. (Page 272)

(12) Providing training and implementing seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment (CE) across Virginia. This strategy is based on needs assessment and focus group recommendations from DARS Partnerships with Transcen, Inc. and George Washington University. By November 1, 2016, DARS will select and train key VR Counselors and Evaluators, AT Specialists, Business Placement and Self–Employment staff, and Partnering Employment Specialists, Behavioral Specialists, and Facilities Personnel in key concepts to implement CE approaches to DARS clients exiting institutions, sheltered workshops, high schools and adults for whom traditional supported employment services have not yielded successful outcomes. DARS will serve 20 or more clients with diverse backgrounds in order to assimilate Customized Employment best practices into our menu of services for these targeted populations. Options for self–employment will also be explored under this approach. (Page 286)

Provide training and implement seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment across Virginia.

Educate our VR counselors, vocational evaluators, consumers, and their parents (as applicable) on the current and future labor market, the availability of competitively–waged jobs and the skills needed to obtain those jobs.

Implement the Career Pathways grant to include the use of motivational interviewing techniques with our VR consumers. (Page 289)

The time limited supported employment services funded with federal/state VR Case service dollars include: 

  1. Vocational Assessment, job development, job placement, job coach training services, and training for blind, vision impaired, or deafblind individuals with most significant disabilities, including youth, who require more extensive supports than traditional VR services. The goal in providing SE services is competitive integrated employment.
  2. Support services such as adaptive equipment and assistive technology devices, interpreter services for persons with dual–sensory impairments, and other approved VR services needed to sustain the individual during the time limited phase of supported employment.

VR sponsorship for time limited SE services occurs when the individual has competitive integrated employment, including customized employment, and their VR case has been closed. Indication that it is time to end the time–limited SE phase occurs when the individual and the employer are satisfied with the individual’s job performance, when the SE services have been provided, and when job coach intervention time is less than 20 percent of the individual’s working hours over a 30 to 60–day period.

An individual’s VR case is closed when competitive integrated employment is performed for the established hours per week for a period of ninety days after the transition from the time–limited phase to the extended services phase, as specified on the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). (Page 307)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

The successful execution of this plan requires Virginia to commit to the professional development of workforce practitioners, and to the braiding and management of financial resources in new ways. The Commonwealth is committed to developing staff to capitalize on investments in technology, and to realize the benefits from a common agenda with workforce system partners. Careful investments in human and financial resources ultimately reflect value to customers and to their communities across the state. (Page 78)

Implement “Integrated Resource” team service delivery strategy for multiple–barrier customers 

  • Coordinate workforce partners around and employment/training goal for an individual customer, with no modification to provider service models;
  • Enhance cross program collaboration and service alignment by braiding and leveraging partner resources, funding and services;
  • Develop and integrated career plan that aligns with service goals;
  • Conduct partner cross–training for strategy implementation;
  • Design plan to record best practices for broader dissemination across workforce system partners;
  • Embed practices into procedures; and
  • Apply CPI. (Page 84)
DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

Virginia is fortunate to have a long standing collaborative relationship with Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and other key state partners. This partnership history facilitated the leveraging and coordination of existing and added resources provided via the six DOL Workforce Disability Initiatives, the latest of which are the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants. Whereas, significant strides have been made to ensure our One-Stop Service Delivery System is accessible to all job seekers, including those with disabilities and other challenges to employment, we are committed to continuous quality improvement. These efforts are focused on physical, programmatic and communication access. We will continue these efforts and build on our existing infrastructure to encourage shared ownership; foster systems integration through cross-agency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. (Page 154)

The following are examples of local level practices implemented to enhance access for job seekers with disabilities made possible by leveraging the resources from the DOL Disability grants and state level cross agency partnerships:

Installed Universal Computer Workstations with Assistive Technology devices and software and conducted staff trainings in pilot LWDBAs; expanded the web-based Common Screening Tool to better identify job seekers with disabilities, track customer flow and service referrals. (The data indicated an on average a 15% increase of self-identification where this tool was piloted); incorporated Disability Resources and disseminated announcements for various activities that would benefit individuals with disabilities, such as: disability trainings and IRS free tax assistance and site locations, dedicated a page to post information about disability resources on the Virginia’s Workforce Development website, Elevate Virginia; integrated DEI strategies by adding four modules into Virginia’s Workforce Development Systems Course, which is a requirement for all front-line staff co-located at the Centers to complete. (The optional modules are Welcoming All Customers/Universal Strategies, Asset Development, Integrated Resource Teams with a Person Centered Planning approach and Mystery Shopper); coordinated local/statewide trainings (on line, in person and at state conferences) for One-Stop staff and partners and also utilized resources through the Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. Some of the topics covered were: ADA Accessibility requirements, Disability Etiquette, Access for All - Welcoming Customers at workforce centers and accommodations; implemented Social Security (SSA) - Ticket To Work Program to expand employment opportunities for SSA beneficiaries in 6 LWDB areas; facilitated certification trainings for Work Incentives Specialist Advocates who advise beneficiaries on work incentives; promoted asset development and financial capability strategies to enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency, including financial literacy training, the use of individual development accounts, tax and work incentives, and other strategies for encouraging economic advancement; and trained and provided technical assistance to businesses/employers about the use of effective hiring practices and job accommodations, including Assistive Technology trainings in collaboration with Virginia Assistive Technology System and Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center.

As a result, DEI Round I efforts and collaborative workforce partnerships, Virginia statewide data from October 2010 through March 2014, indicated participants with disabilities active with WIA (now WIOA) intensive services increased from 1.8% to 4.9%. (Page 155)

3.4 Provide 7 Disability Resource Coordinators/Disability Program Navigators to increase access to programs and services for vocational rehabilitation consumers. DARS currently provides three Disability Resource Coordinators to two local American Job Centers (AJCs) as a part of DOL Disability Employment Initiative Round IV grant project efforts in collaboration with the VCCS/Workforce Services Division (Title I Administrator). In addition, through an Innovation and Expansion project, DARS has co–located a previous Disability Program Navigator as a VR Counselor housed in an AJC and providing VR services. Also, three workforce areas previously participating in DOL DPN/DEI grant efforts have retained three DARS staff to provide services to individuals with disabilities in AJCs. As a result DEI Round I efforts and collaborative workforce partnerships, Virginia statewide data from October 2010 through March 2014, indicated participants with disabilities active with WIA (now WIOA) intensive services increased from 1.8% to 4.9%. (Page 294)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

On October 1, 2014, VCCS was awarded Workforce Investment Act, Workforce Innovation funds in the amount of $11,196,152 by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration to implement the Working Families Success Network Model with 6 American Job Center (also known as One-Stop Center) sites in Virginia for 1800 participants. The model of bundled service delivery comprises three services:

  1. Workforce and education services resulting in career advancement: education and training, employability skills, job placement;
  2. Income and work supports: access to student financial aid, public benefits, free tax preparation;
  3. Financial services and asset building: financial education, financial coaching. 

A Coach will be available at each of the sites to coordinate the services. As a study project, services will be determined with a randomized control process and to those who consent to participate starting October 1, 2015 in Workforce Development Areas 3-Western Virginia, 6-Piedmont, 8-South Central, 11-Northern Virginia, 16-Hampton Roads, and 17-West Piedmont. Services will be delivered through September 30, 2018. (Page 110)

Virginia’s Workforce Development Systems Course, which is a requirement for all front-line staff co-located at the Centers to complete. (The optional modules are Welcoming All Customers/Universal Strategies, Asset Development, Integrated Resource Teams with a Person Centered Planning approach and Mystery Shopper); coordinated local/statewide trainings (on line, in person and at state conferences) for One-Stop staff and partners and also utilized resources through the Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. Some of the topics covered were: ADA Accessibility requirements, Disability Etiquette, Access for All - Welcoming Customers at workforce centers and accommodations; implemented Social Security (SSA) - Ticket To Work Program to expand employment opportunities for SSA beneficiaries in 6 LWDB areas; facilitated certification trainings for Work Incentives Specialist Advocates who advise beneficiaries on work incentives; promoted asset development and financial capability strategies to enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency, including financial literacy training, the use of individual development accounts, tax and work incentives, and other strategies for encouraging economic advancement; and trained and provided technical assistance to businesses/employers about the use of effective hiring practices and job accommodations, including Assistive Technology trainings in collaboration with Virginia Assistive Technology System and Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. (Page 155)   

School to Work Transition

School personnel represented the largest number of respondents (50%), followed by: Supported Employment Vendors–ESO’s (23.6%), Community Service Boards (17%), Centers for Independent Living (4.7%) Advocates (4.7%), individuals with a disability (3.8%), parents of children with disabilities (1.9%), and Brain Injury Organization Members (1%).

Respondents rated consumers’ barriers to employment. Transportation emerged as the number one “very significant” barrier to employment with a 73% agreement followed by: lack of jobs (61%), financial support for services (60%), housing (40%), lack of marketable job skills (35%), financial or benefits disincentives (33%), inadequate training opportunities (28%), lack of networking opportunities (28%), lack of service providers (26%), family influence (21%), and consumers unrealistic goals (16%).

Approximately, 89% of DARS consumers are most significantly disabled. DARS supplements its Title VI Supported Employment funds with Title I funds to ensure that every consumer who needs Supported Employment services receive this service. (Page 270)

Two percent of the respondents gave DARS an excellent rating regarding students’ experience with DARS. Twelve percent rated DARS as “good”, 9% “fair” and 13% responded “unsatisfactory”. The services identified as most needed were: job coaching (80%), internships (66%), job placement services (74%), skills training (66%), job seeking skills training (61%), vocational evaluation (57%), independent living skills training (54%), guidance and counseling from a vocational rehabilitation counselor (53%), college education (38%), assistive technology (38%), benefits planning (36%), physical restoration (8%) and mental restoration (7%). Fifty eight percent of the respondents stated that students did not have the skills to obtain employment in the community. Thirty percent believed the students did have the training for community employment and twelve percent did not answer the question. (Page 273)

(4) Assure a full range of choices are available in order to meet the vocational needs of consumers requiring supported employment services. Virginia uses all supported employment models, including the individual placement model, the enclave model, the entrepreneurial model and mobile work crews. Individual placement is the most widely used, and generally offers higher wage rates, better benefits and more flexibility in meeting the needs of customers and employers in an integrated work setting. The group models are important options that provide for the constant presence of the Employment Specialist at the job site to support customers who need intensive supervision in order to maintain employment. (Page 283-284)

DARS requires that each of Virginia’s ESOs vendored to provide VR services be nationally accredited through the Rehabilitation Accreditation Commission (CARF). CARF accreditation provides a host of benefits to DARS as a state–funding source, as well as to DARS consumers, and taxpayers. In addition to assuring accountability and consistent quality levels, national accreditation allows DARS to focus on program expansion, improvement and accountability.

DARS currently purchase services through 87 ESOs throughout the state. During FY 2015, these organizations provided supported employment services over 3,000 individuals, including youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 303)

The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) provides services and supports to individuals who have developmental disabilities, intellectual disabilities, and mental health concerns, also known as behavioral health in Virginia. Services to these individuals are provided by regional and local Community Services Boards (CSBs). DBVI will establish or reestablish collaborative relationships with Virginia DBHDS and CSBs to include participating in interagency workgroups with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the Intellectual Disability (ID)/Developmental Disability (DD) CSB Case Managers with the goal of providing information related to allowable employment activities including Virginia’s Employment First initiative, Medicaid Waiver programs, and the provision of supported and extended support services. Collaboration with DBHDS also provides information on services and resources that support pre-employment transition programs and positive employment outcomes. The DBVI Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor will work with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the ID/DD CSB Case Managers to specifically ensure that issues related to work benefits, supports, and available resources are addressed. (Page 333)

Lack of transportation, affordable housing, marketable work skills and training were all identified as major barriers to employment for individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind in Virginia; 

  • The Supported Employment model is not frequently used, and when it is used, it is not typically the standard SE model;
  • A large majority of individuals served receive SSA benefits and fear of benefit loss affects their return–to–work behavior; and
  • Independent living skills are a major need of individuals served. The Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired (VRCBVI) meets this need for a small percentage of individuals served, but many people would like to see VRCBVI expand its reach and provide low vision services. (Page 343)
  1. Any individuals, including all minor caretakers, under 16 years of age;
  2. Any individual at least 16, but no more than 19 years of age, who is enrolled full–time in elementary or secondary school, including vocational or technical school programs. The vocational or technical school must be equivalent to secondary school;
  3. Any individual unable to participate because of a temporary medical condition that prevents entry into at least 20 hours per week of employment or training, as determined by a medical professional;
  4. Any individual who is incapacitated, as determined by receipt of Social Security Disability benefits or Supplemental Security Income;
  5. Any individual 60 years of age or older;
  6. Any individual who is the sole care giver of another member of the household who is incapacitated, and whose presence is essential for the care of the member on a substantially continuous basis, shall be exempt from participation in VIEW. Incapacity is determined by receipt of Social Security Disability benefits or Supplemental Security Income. The sole other condition under which an individual may be determined incapacitated is by a written medical statement from a physician; and
  7. A parent or caretaker of a child under 12 months of age who personally provides care for the child. (Page 506)
Career Pathways

To enhance and facilitate job–readiness skills and career planning for students to make a successful transition from school to work and to greater independence, students will be referred to DBVI Workforce Specialists and to Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) (also known in Virginia as Employment Services Organizations (ESOs)). Workforce Specialists will complement pre–employment transition services by delivering workplace readiness training to establish skills necessary for entry into career pathways, competitive integrated employment, and by coordinating with schools and networking with employers to establish paid and unpaid internships, including apprenticeships, specifically matched to the student’s needs, skills, interests, abilities, and informed choice. Transition services purchased from CRPs may also include On–The–Job support and extended support services for students and youth needing additional supports in the work experience setting or on the job. (Page 331)

Work Incentives & Benefits

Across Virginia’s workforce system, partner agencies are engaged in operationalizing several workforce initiatives stemming from grants obtained from the federal government for specific workforce innovations. These grants include:

  • The Disability Employment Initiative Grants (The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, the Virginia Employment Commission, Virginia’s Community College System, and five Local Workforce Development Boards)
  • The Veterans’ Demonstration Grant (Virginia’s Community College System, the Virginia Employment Commission, and the Department of Veterans’ Services)
  • Local Apprenticeship Grants (Shenandoah Valley Workforce Region, the Department of Labor and Industry, and Virginia’s Community College System)
  • The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Department of the Blind and Vision Impaired jointly received a RSA funded CPID grant The grant collaborates with multiple workforce partners including adult education and two local workforce boards, other DOL grants and the Virginia Manufacturers Association to enhance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. project goals include helping individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations; enhancing the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities; (Page 88)

Manufacturers Association to enhance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. project goals include helping individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations; enhancing the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities; enhancing access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities. (Page 98)

  • The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Department of the Blind and Vision Impaired jointly received a RSA funded CPID grant The grant collaborates with multiple workforce partners including adult education and two local workforce boards, other DOL grants and the Virginia Manufacturers Association to enhance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. project goals include helping individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations; enhancing the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities; enhancing access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities. (Page 103)

DARS is actively engaged at both the state and local level in the Workforce Development System. DARS is represented on the state Career Pathways Workgroup which advises the Governor’s Office and Workforce Board on the Workforce System issues and participates on the WIOA implementation team. A memorandum of understanding is in place with each Local Workforce Development Board and DARS works closely with the American Job Centers to assure access to individuals with disabilities. The VR program currently is co–located as a One–Stop partner in Charlottesville, Roanoke, Martinsville, Danville and South Boston. DARS also has a physical presence in other Workforce Board AJC’s. DARS is directly involved with both the state Workforce partners and local AJC’s in the Department of Labor Disability Employment Initiative grant and is lead on an RSA Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant. In the coming year, DARS will support training on career counseling, motivational interviewing as well as Customized Employment for our workforce partners. (Page 272)

Provide training and implement seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment across Virginia.

Educate our VR counselors, vocational evaluators, consumers, and their parents (as applicable) on the current and future labor market, the availability of competitively–waged jobs and the skills needed to obtain those jobs.

Implement the Career Pathways grant to include the use of motivational interviewing techniques with our VR consumers.

Implement the five year Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (CPID) model demonstration program to create new career pathways and/or use existing career pathways in high–demand occupations. (Page 289)

WWRC has formalized its evolving partnership with the DARS Business Development Managers to connect classrooms to workplace standards and expectations and modify curriculum to increase the likelihood of successful placements for training graduates, with long–term retention opportunities. This has resulted in the development of several collaborative workforce initiatives with industry professional organizations and corporate networks directly benefitting VR consumer employment goals. The Hershey model is one example of this, with other corporate bodies expressing interest in replication within their organizations. The DARS partnership with the Hershey apprenticeship program offered individuals with disabilities a six–month work experience on the production line. During the apprenticeship, DARS clients could access any needed supports from WWRC to help them complete the program as long as they were able to perform the required duties at the end of the six months. During FFY 2015, an evolving partnership with CVS Health resulted in the set–up of a mock store within WWRC Materials Handling Training Program to prepare VR consumers for direct employment and career pathways within the CVS Health System across the Commonwealth of Virginia. CVS Health donated all supplies and equipment for the mock store and worked with WWRC Instructors to refine the curriculum and develop community internships to prepare students to work in the CVS Health System. (Page 298)

To enhance and facilitate job–readiness skills and career planning for students to make a successful transition from school to work and to greater independence, students will be referred to DBVI Workforce Specialists and to Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) (also known in Virginia as Employment Services Organizations (ESOs)). Workforce Specialists will complement pre–employment transition services by delivering workplace readiness training to establish skills necessary for entry into career pathways, competitive integrated employment, and by coordinating with schools and networking with employers to establish paid and unpaid internships, including apprenticeships, specifically matched to the student’s needs, skills, interests, abilities, and informed choice. Transition services purchased from CRPs may also include On–The–Job support and extended support services for students and youth needing additional supports in the work experience setting or on the job. (Page 331)

DBVI will conduct a monthly training program designed to ensure that new and seasoned VRCs and Regional Managers have a 21st Century understanding of the evolving labor force and the needs of individuals with disabilities. To facilitate this learning, DBVI will continue its Video Teleconferencing– based program entitled, ”Making a Difference” (MAD), which is conducted on a monthly basis by trainers, internal and external to the agency. Topics include a broad range of subjects including, but not limited to, the use of vocational evaluations, job placement, rehabilitation technology, vocational counseling, the Business Enterprise program, Social Security and Ticket to Work program, Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired changes and summer programs, update information regarding Workforce Development activities, utilization of Career Pathways, Medicaid Waivers, Supported Employment, review of the VR eligibility process, ethics, conflict management, self–employment, and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014. During FFY 2016, (Page 339)

  1. Expanding and enhancing workforce development activities to develop and maintain effective working relationships with Virginia business and industry at the local, regional, and state level to develop partnerships that facilitate industry recognized credential attainment, skill development, and entry into career pathways for eligible individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind leading to competitive integrated employment. (Page 348)

Goals 1 and 2 of DBVI’s six goals identifies strategies and measures that apply to methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind.

Goal 1. Expanding and enhancing workforce development activities to develop and maintain effective working relationships with Virginia business and industry at the local, regional, and state level to develop partnerships that facilitate industry recognized credential attainment, skill development, and entry into career pathways for eligible individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind leading to competitive integrated employment.

Strategy 1.1: To fully engage personnel and financial resources of DBVI’s newly established Workforce Unit to implement business support and outreach services. Personnel in the Workforce Unit include one Workforce Coordinator, four Regional Workforce Specialists, and one Director of Workforce/Vocational Rehabilitation. (Page 354)

Strategy 1.3: To establish and enhance entry into career pathways, DBVI will utilize personnel and funds associated Virginia’s Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Grant which was jointly awarded DBVI and the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) in 2015. DBVI will:

  • Help individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high–demand, high–quality occupations;
  • Enhance the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities;
  • Enhance access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities; and
  • Strengthen the alignment of Virginia’s VR programs with the other core programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and other Federally–funded career pathways initiatives providing self–advocacy skills training that is critical to the achievement of individuals’ personal and vocational goals. (Page 355)

Strategy 1.3: To establish and enhance entry into career pathways, DBVI will utilize personnel and funds associated Virginia’s Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Grant which was jointly awarded DBVI and the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) in 2015. DBVI will:

  • help individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high–demand, high–quality occupations;
  • enhance the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities;
  • enhance access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities; and
  • strengthen the alignment of Virginia’s VR programs with the other core programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and other Federally–funded career pathways initiatives providing self–advocacy skills training that is critical to the achievement of individuals’ personal and vocational goals.

Measures: Other first–year activities will include working with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling to develop and implement career pathways–focused career counseling training for VR counselors and other workforce professionals that incorporates use of labor market information and motivational interviewing techniques. (Page 362)

Employer/ Business

3.5   Enter into an Administrative Employment Network Agreement with two Employment Networks to determine the feasibility of this model for funding long term employment supports. During this reporting period, there were administrative Employment Network (EN) agreements established with two different groups so that potential EN partners in Virginia would have options when considering participation in Partnership Plus. This has resulted in seven new administrative EN agreements that will support DARS ticket holders after case closure from VR. Preliminary indication is that the administrative EN option seems to be a viable option for long term employment supports for partners that do not have the volume of tickets or administrative infrastructure to support the ticket to work program. (Page 295)

511

System-wide Data Collection and Reporting 

Virginia does not currently have the capability to get a system-wide, global view of workforce data across the various programs and agency. Data is still largely confined to programmatic siloes, and - with a few notable exceptions - agency staff is reticent about sharing data with partner agencies. WIOA has given the Commonwealth the opportunity to adopt standards data collection systems and portals, and establish protocols by which data and information can be shared responsibly. These protocols will be developed collaboratively over the coming months. (Page 119)

Commonwealth of Virginia Process for Identifying Regions: 

Reference: VBWD Policy 200-06, Designation of Regions and Planning Requirements, http://www.elevatevirginia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Policy-200-06-Designation-of-Regions-and-Planning-Requirements-FINAL-Signed.pdf

In order to identify regions, WIOA requires the state to identify factors to be used, which, when applying, may or may not align to current local workforce development areas. In Virginia, the factors were used to promote a collaborative process whereby the data collection and analysis of the factors for determination of regions are shared between state and local workforce partners. Virginia utilized the following factors in determining regions:

  1. Single Labor Market;
  2. Common Economic Development Area;
  3. Federal and Non-Federal Resources to Carry Out WIOA Activities;
  4. Population Centers;
  5. Commuting Patterns;
  6. Industrial Composition and Sector Alignment;
  7. Community College Regions. 

Utilizing these seven factors, various regional alignments may be considered and proposed by a number of workforce system stakeholders such as state policymakers, State and Local Board members, state and local workforce staff, partner program staff, business and industry partners and workforce and education associations. In order for Virginia to consider and designate regions, a formal proposal shall be submitted to the Virginia Board of Workforce Development that includes a recommendation for region designation, a rationale for the region designation recommended using the seven factors, and a description of why the regional alignment proposed is in the best interests of the state, business and industry, and workers and job seekers. (Page 167)

DARS’ policies require that for students with disabilities who

  1. are receiving special education services from a public school, and
  2. also are determined eligible for VR services (and able to be served if DARS is on an order of selection), the Individualized Plan for Employment shall be completed and signed within 90 days of the eligibility determination and before the student leaves the school setting. 

DARS continues to be a stakeholder in the review of data that DOE collects to report to the Office on Special Education Programs (OSEP) to support and accomplish respective post school and employment outcomes required by the federal government and to provide meaningful data collection by each agency. (Page 251)

DARS continues to be a stakeholder in the review of data that DOE collects to report to the Office on Special Education Programs (OSEP) to support and accomplish respective post school and employment outcomes required by the federal government and to provide meaningful data collection by each agency.

Additional DARS and DOE collaborative activities include co–chairing the Virginia Interagency Transition Council (VITC) and the regional Virginia Transition Practitioners Councils (TPC). TPC provides a forum for transition practitioners and other interested stakeholders from school divisions, adult agencies, and community partners to engage in professional development activities, networking opportunities, and collaborative efforts that enhance the implementation of quality transition services for secondary school students with disabilities. The VITC is comprised of representatives from 14 state agencies who have leadership roles and transition as part of their responsibility in serving youth with disabilities. The Council works to stay abreast of current transition information, to identify gaps in resources, and avoid duplication of transition services. VITC has set a priority to improve communication between the state, regional, and local transition councils. It is anticipated that information will be shared with and by VITC through the regional and local Councils. This flow of communication allows for improved responses to identified needs, as well as recommendations for future efforts.( Page 253)

Data collection efforts solicited input from a broad spectrum of individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind, service providers, DBVI staff, and some businesses. (Page 342)

The needs assessment approach was designed to elicit quantitative and qualitative data about the needs of persons who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind. Focus group and key informant interview activities yielded qualitative data that may be used to complement and lend depth to the findings of the survey efforts and the analysis of extant data. The use of multiple data collection strategies, both quantitative and qualitative, facilitates data collection that captures both the breadth and the depth of concerns relevant to individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or vision impaired in Virginia. (Page 343)

Measure: The DBVI/DARS project team will work with staff from the American Institutes for Research (AIR, the planned project evaluator) to develop and implement the project evaluation design and data collection plan.

Measures: Other first–year activities will include working with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling to develop and implement career pathways–focused career counseling training for VR counselors and other workforce professionals that incorporates use of labor market information and motivational interviewing techniques. (Page 353)

Measure: The DBVI/DARS project team will work with staff from the American Institutes for Research (AIR, the planned project evaluator) to develop and implement the project evaluation design and data collection plan.

Measures: Other first–year activities will include working with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling to develop and implement career pathways–focused career counseling training for VR counselors and other workforce professionals that incorporates use of labor market information and motivational interviewing techniques. (Page 362)

Mental Health

Virginia is fortunate to have a long standing collaborative relationship with Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and other key state partners. This partnership history facilitated the leveraging and coordination of existing and added resources provided via the six DOL Workforce Disability Initiatives, the latest of which are the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants. Whereas, significant strides have been made to ensure our One-Stop Service Delivery System is accessible to all job seekers, including those with disabilities and other challenges to employment, we are committed to continuous quality improvement. These efforts are focused on physical, programmatic and communication access. We will continue these efforts and build on our existing infrastructure to encourage shared ownership; foster systems integration through cross-agency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. (Page 154)

Expected outcomes are the following: a revised ADA Accessibility guidelines and one-stop center certification process that incorporates the WIOA Section 188 Disability Reference Guide checklist for program and physical accessibility; system standards for accessible devices and software located in workforce centers to facilitate consistency; review of all policies and guidance to ensure alignment and consistency; a schedule for cross- agency training for survey providers, end users, one-stop operators and partner staff. The efforts of this Team will improve compliance and enhance communication, coordination and professional development across Virginia’s workforce system. (Page 156)

This a administrative guidance document provides a reasonable guarantee that all of Virginia’s WIOA Title I financially assisted programs, activities and recipients comply with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements stipulated under Section 188 of the WIOA. (Page 171)

Displaying 31 - 40 of 63

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services State Board Policy 1036 - 12/04/2012

“It is the policy of the Board that in the development and implementation of policies and procedures and the delivery of services, the Department and CSBs shall ensure that community-based individual supported employment in integrated work settings is presented as the first and priority service option among available day service options offered by case managers and support coordinators to individuals receiving mental health, developmental, or substance abuse day support or employment services and shall expand access to integrated, community-based employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders, intellectual disability, or co-occurring disabilities…”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order (Executive Order #55 (2012)) - 11/16/2012 - 11/16/2012

“The last United States Census concluded that out of 3.6 million Virginia residents who were employed, 154,985 Virginians with disabilities were included in that total. These numbers indicate an under representation of people with disabilities among the gainfully employed. The Commonwealth of Virginia should work to provide a Commonwealth of Opportunity for all Virginians; therefore it is appropriate to initiate steps in order to expand employment opportunities for its citizens who are disabled….”

“By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor by Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth…and in conjunction with… the Code of Virginia which states that it is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities, including our wounded soldiers, to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment, with the goal of enhancing the employment opportunities for Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia DBHDS: Strategic Plan for Employment First - 10/01/2012

To facilitate interagency collaboration the Strategic Plan for Employment First establishes an Employment First Summit Meeting, which will gather leadership from various department committed to upholding Employment First principles, and orders for the creation of a high level administrative leadership body including (DBHDS, DARS, DOE, DMAS, Virginia Employment Commission (VEC), Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council) and Virginia Community College System (VCCS).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Virginia State Employment Leadership Network - 10/01/2012

Virginia is a part of this multi-state technical assistance collaborative whose aim is to improve integrated employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities. “In 2008, DBHDS joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) sponsored by the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services and the University of Massachusetts-Boston Institute for Community Inclusion. DBHDS developed a Virginia-specific SELN Advisory Group made up of over 30 members representing a variety of organizations involved in providing employment services to Virginians. Members include community service boards (CSBs), the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (VBPD), the Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention (VCU/RRTC), and vendor organizations such as the Virginia Association of Community Rehabilitation Programs (vaACCSES), the Arc of Virginia, and the Virginia Association of Providers of Supported Employment (VaAPSE). DBHDS continues to be an active, contributing participant in the monthly National SELN web-based meetings. Virginia is now one of 30 states in the SELN. The Virginia SELN Advisory Group, made up of advocates, providers, and state agencies, continues to identify roadblocks and disincentives in our state system. The group is developing specific strategies for implementation of a system that prioritizes employment as an outcome of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services Employment First Strategic Plan - 10/01/2012

“This document outlines the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services’ (DBHDS or ‘the department’) Strategic Plan for Employment First. The strategic plan was formulated in response to efforts in recent years to build and expand integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in Virginia. DBHDS supports individuals with serious mental illness, substance use disorders, and intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The strategic plan establishes annual goals for DBHDS to collaborate with other state agencies and organizations to expand opportunities for employment for all Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Consent Decree allowing for more waivers and less training Centers - 08/23/2012

“Under the proposed settlement, Virginia has agreed to provide 4170 additional waiver slots, divided among current Training Center residents, disabled people in various segregated facilities other than the Training Centers, and people on the waiting list for services…The settlement also prescribes in great detail how Virginia will administer the services it provides to disabled citizens. This process will be a shared responsibility of the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services and local community service boards ("CSBs")...”“The decree also provides for changed procedures at the Training Centers and spells out how the Commonwealth will assist the CSBs with technical assistance. Each Training Center resident will have a discharge plan crafted by the professionals at the facility. Virginia will set up case-management teams, crisis teams, and plans for supported day services in the community. Essentially, the Commonwealth's efforts—and those of the CSBs—will all be focused on keeping disabled people in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Education ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/27/2012

“For students with disabilities who have the most intensive support needs, there are two model initiatives supported by the Virginia Department of Education: Project SEARCH and the Post-High School Community College Program. Project SEARCH, a business-led model, is a collaborative between school divisions and local businesses that provide employability skills training and workplace internships that occur entirely in the workplace. The Post-High School Community College Program is a supported education model that provides individualized supports to students with significant disabilities seeking postsecondary education to enhance their skills for employment, in an age-appropriate setting. The Department of Education provides support and technical assistance to increase the number of partnerships between school divisions and institutions of higher education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia 2012 Senate Joint Resolution No. 127 - 02/25/2012

“Encouraging the Secretary of Health and Human Resources and the Superintendent of Public Instruction to adopt and implement Employment First practices...” Employment First is defined as a policy is grounded in a framework of increased integration, independence, productivity and employment that is based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, abilities, and informed choice of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ADA Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 01/26/2012

“The fundamental goals of the Agreement are to prevent the unnecessary institutionalization of individuals with developmental disabilities who are living in the community, including thousands of individuals on waitlists for community-based services, and ensure that people who are currently in institutions - at the Commonwealth's training centers or in other private but state-funded facilities - have a meaningful opportunity to receive services that meet their needs in the community…Pursuant to the Interim Settlement Agreement, the State and City will give TTP and Birch service recipients the opportunity to receive integrated supported employment and integrated daytime services that will enable them to interact with the broader community to the fullest extent possible.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Virginia 2012 House Joint Resolution No. 23 - 01/11/2012

“WHEREAS, implementation of an Employment First initiative in Virginia will lead to increased employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, resulting in benefits for individuals, families, employers, and communities across the Commonwealth; now, therefore, be it resolved by the House of Delegates, the Senate concurring, That the Secretary of Health and Human Resources be requested to develop and implement an Employment First initiative in the Commonwealth, which shall identify employment in an integrated, community setting earning an amount that is equal to or greater than minimum-wage rates as the first goal for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving services through state agencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Virginia Acts of Assembly: An Act to Amend and Reenact §§ 51.5-41, 51.5-120, 51.5-163, 51.5-164, and 51.5-172 through 51.5-176 of the Code of Virginia - 02/25/2016

Discrimination against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities by employers prohibited A.No employer shall discriminate in employment or promotion practices against an otherwise qualified person with a disability solely because of such disability. For the purposes of this section, an "otherwise qualified person with a disability" means a person qualified to perform the duties of a particular job or position and whose disability is unrelated to the person's ability to perform such duties or position or is unrelated to the person's qualifications for employment or promotion. B. It is the policy of the Commonwealth that persons with disabilities shall be employed in the state service, the service of the political subdivisions of the Commonwealth, in the public schools, and in all other employment supported in whole or in part by public funds on the same terms and conditions as other persons unless it is shown that the particular disability prevents the performance of the work involved. C. An employer shall make reasonable accommodation to the known physical and mental impairments of an otherwise qualified person with a disability, if necessary to assist such person in performing a particular job, unless the employer can demonstrate that the accommodation would impose an undue burden on the employer. For the purposes of this section, "mental impairment" does not include active alcoholism or current drug addiction and does not include any mental impairment, disease, or defect that has been successfully asserted by an individual as a defense to any criminal charge. 1. Individualized plan for employment. A written individualized plan for employment for each recipient of vocational rehabilitation services provided or funded by the Department, in whole or in part, shall be developed within a reasonable time and as soon as possible, but not later than 90 days after the due date of the determination of eligibility, unless an extension is agreed to by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and the Department. The plan shall be agreed to and signed by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and a qualified vocational rehabilitation counselor employed by the Department

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia SB 1404 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia HB 2306 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia 2012 Senate Joint Resolution No. 127 - 02/25/2012

“Encouraging the Secretary of Health and Human Resources and the Superintendent of Public Instruction to adopt and implement Employment First practices...” Employment First is defined as a policy is grounded in a framework of increased integration, independence, productivity and employment that is based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, abilities, and informed choice of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia 2012 House Joint Resolution No. 23 - 01/11/2012

“WHEREAS, implementation of an Employment First initiative in Virginia will lead to increased employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, resulting in benefits for individuals, families, employers, and communities across the Commonwealth; now, therefore, be it resolved by the House of Delegates, the Senate concurring, That the Secretary of Health and Human Resources be requested to develop and implement an Employment First initiative in the Commonwealth, which shall identify employment in an integrated, community setting earning an amount that is equal to or greater than minimum-wage rates as the first goal for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving services through state agencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Virginians with Disabilities Act ( 51.5-1) of 1989 - 05/01/1989

“ It is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment. To these ends, the General Assembly directs the Governor, the Virginia Office for Protection and Advocacy, the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities, the Departments of Education, Health, Housing and Community Development, Behavioral Health and Developmental Services, and Social Services, and the Departments for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, the Blind and Vision Impaired, and the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing and such other agencies as the Governor deems appropriate, to provide, in a comprehensive and coordinated manner which makes the best use of available resources, those services necessary to assure equal opportunity to persons with disabilities in the Commonwealth.The provisions of this title shall be known and may be cited as “‘The Virginians with Disabilities Act.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/01/2018

~~"WHEREAS, all Virginians should be given the opportunity to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment to drive Virginia’s economy;NOW, THEREFORE, I, Ralph S. Northam, do hereby recognize October 2018 as DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH in our COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, and I call this observance to the attention of all our citizens." 

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order Number One (2018) Equal Opportunity - 01/13/2018

~~‘By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor, I hereby declare that it is the firm and unwavering policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to ensure equal opportunity in all facets of state government.  The foundational tenet of this Executive Order is premised upon a steadfast commitment to foster a culture of inclusion, diversity, and mutual respect for all Virginians. This policy specifically prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, political affiliation, or against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities.  The policy permits appropriate employment preferences for veterans and specifically prohibits discrimination against veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 46: Supporting Virginians with Disabilities in the New Virginia Economy - 07/27/2015

“The Chief Workforce Development Advisor, in conjunction with the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, shall work with DARS and DBVI to offer to all executive branch agencies (including institutions of higher education, boards, and commissions) training designed to expand existing efforts to recruit, accommodate, retain and advance Virginians with disabilities in the Commonwealth’s workforce. Training shall commence no later than October 1, 2015...”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order (Executive Order #55 (2012)) - 11/16/2012 - 11/16/2012

“The last United States Census concluded that out of 3.6 million Virginia residents who were employed, 154,985 Virginians with disabilities were included in that total. These numbers indicate an under representation of people with disabilities among the gainfully employed. The Commonwealth of Virginia should work to provide a Commonwealth of Opportunity for all Virginians; therefore it is appropriate to initiate steps in order to expand employment opportunities for its citizens who are disabled….”

“By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor by Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth…and in conjunction with… the Code of Virginia which states that it is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities, including our wounded soldiers, to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment, with the goal of enhancing the employment opportunities for Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired Business Relations Services - 10/15/2017

“The Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) is pleased to announce the addition of the new DBVI Business Relations Unit. The unit will have a statewide impact on individuals with vision impairments in reaching their career goal of sustainable employment. The Business Relations Specialists will work with employers in recruiting a highly skilled, pre-screened pipeline of talent. The team is well versed in services for employers including, federal contractor hiring (503c), corporate initiatives, workforce diversity and inclusion, worksite consultations, job retention and the many incentives for hiring individuals with abilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia Board for People with Disabilities State Plan 2017-2021 - 10/01/2016

“The Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (the Board) serves as the Commonwealth’s Developmental Disabilities (DD) Planning Council and as the Governor’s Advisory Council on issues affecting individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Under the federal law, each state is authorized to establish a DD Council, which receives funds to carry out initiatives for systems change, capacity-building, and advocacy. Through these activities, the Board seeks to impact the independence, productivity, inclusion, and integration of people with disabilities in their communities.

The Board’s activities are organized in a five-year State Plan which serves as a framework for the Board’s funding initiatives, staff work priorities, and Board member activities. The state plan was developed through Board and stakeholder input, which included focus groups and a survey of people with DD, their families, advocacy organizations and state agencies to assess how well Virginia is doing in supporting children and their families to lead the lives they want with the support they need. The Board was also informed by the findings and recommendations contained in its 2014 Assessment of the Disability Services System in Virginia.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia Dept of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services Employment First Policy Statement - 12/04/2012

“It is the policy of the Board that in the development and implementation of policies and procedures and the delivery of services, the Department and CSB shall ensure that community-based individual supported employment in integrated work settings is presented as the first and priority service option among available day service options offered by case managers and support coordinators to individuals receiving mental health, developmental, or substance abuse day support or employment services and shall expand access to integrated, community-based employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders, intellectual disability, or co-occurring disabilities. … 

Provide training and consultation to service providers on implementing evidence-based supported employment practice models and establishing integrated supported employment teams that include CSBs, the Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), and employment services organizations (ESOs) and work with CSBs and ESOs to incorporate evidence-based supported employment practice models in the day services  they offer, including psychosocial rehabilitation;   

Work with the Department of Medical Assistance Services (DMAS) to identify ways to incorporate integrated, community-based employment services in the Medicaid Intellectual Disability and Individual and Family Developmental Disability Services Waivers."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services State Board Policy 1036 - 12/04/2012

“It is the policy of the Board that in the development and implementation of policies and procedures and the delivery of services, the Department and CSBs shall ensure that community-based individual supported employment in integrated work settings is presented as the first and priority service option among available day service options offered by case managers and support coordinators to individuals receiving mental health, developmental, or substance abuse day support or employment services and shall expand access to integrated, community-based employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders, intellectual disability, or co-occurring disabilities…”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services Employment First Strategic Plan - 10/01/2012

“This document outlines the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services’ (DBHDS or ‘the department’) Strategic Plan for Employment First. The strategic plan was formulated in response to efforts in recent years to build and expand integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in Virginia. DBHDS supports individuals with serious mental illness, substance use disorders, and intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The strategic plan establishes annual goals for DBHDS to collaborate with other state agencies and organizations to expand opportunities for employment for all Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia - A Plan for Advancing Community Focused Services in Virginia. - 06/25/2010

An overall strategic plan with 12 foci that includes an outline that addresses the need for, objectives in, and priorities for creating employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders and those with developmental disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DRS Policy and Procedure Manual: Chapter 8.17. - Self Employment and SEE

This chapter of the Virginia Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (Vocational Rehabilitation) manual precisely defines how to deliver Self-Employment and Supported Self Employment services to customers of the system. Including how to approve and fund such services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Supported Employment

~~“Supported employment is one of many effective ways of assisting persons with disabilities in gaining and maintaining employment.  DARS partners with over 75 Employment Service Organizations in providing situational assessment, job development, placement and training services and long term follow along.DARS provides supported employment or job coach training services, if appropriate and with agreement of their DARS counselor, to eligible consumers regardless of an individual’s impairment or disability cause.All Employment Service Organizations that provide supported employment and job coaching services are CARF accredited to ensure that consumers are receiving quality services"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Virginia Intercommunity Transition Council (VITC)

 “The mission of the Virginia's Intercommunity Transition Council is to promote successful transition outcomes for youth and young adults with disabilities by providing leadership and innovation in employment, education, training, living independently, community participation, and community support systems that influence success for all students.” Contains fact sheets to “assist others in understanding the various facets that promote exemplary transition for Virginia’s youth.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Services for Students with Disabilities

“VDOE's Transition Services website provides support, information and resources designed to improve the outcomes of students with disabilities in transition from middle / secondary education to postsecondary education and employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Review of Virginia’s Plan to Increase Employment First Plan: FY 2016-FY2018-Goals, Strategies, and Action Items - 12/13/2018

~~“DBHDS, with the input of the E1AG (formerly the SELN-VA Advisory Committee) has revised the FY16-FY18 plan to increase employment opportunities. It was provided with the Status Report as of 6/30/18. The Plan includes five goal areas each of which has sub-goals. The plan’s goals and status in achieving goals can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia DBHDS: Strategic Plan for Employment First - 10/01/2012

To facilitate interagency collaboration the Strategic Plan for Employment First establishes an Employment First Summit Meeting, which will gather leadership from various department committed to upholding Employment First principles, and orders for the creation of a high level administrative leadership body including (DBHDS, DARS, DOE, DMAS, Virginia Employment Commission (VEC), Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council) and Virginia Community College System (VCCS).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Virginia State Employment Leadership Network - 10/01/2012

Virginia is a part of this multi-state technical assistance collaborative whose aim is to improve integrated employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities. “In 2008, DBHDS joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) sponsored by the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services and the University of Massachusetts-Boston Institute for Community Inclusion. DBHDS developed a Virginia-specific SELN Advisory Group made up of over 30 members representing a variety of organizations involved in providing employment services to Virginians. Members include community service boards (CSBs), the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (VBPD), the Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention (VCU/RRTC), and vendor organizations such as the Virginia Association of Community Rehabilitation Programs (vaACCSES), the Arc of Virginia, and the Virginia Association of Providers of Supported Employment (VaAPSE). DBHDS continues to be an active, contributing participant in the monthly National SELN web-based meetings. Virginia is now one of 30 states in the SELN. The Virginia SELN Advisory Group, made up of advocates, providers, and state agencies, continues to identify roadblocks and disincentives in our state system. The group is developing specific strategies for implementation of a system that prioritizes employment as an outcome of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Intercommunity Transition Council

Virginia's Intercommunity Transition Council is committed to promoting partnerships and influencing linkages that result in transition service networks for coordinating person-centered services. Their fact sheet on employment cites Customized Employment as a successful strategy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Olmstead Settlement Agreement

“The Commonwealth shall establish a state policy on Employment First for the target population and include a term in the CSB Performance Contract requiring application of this policy. The Employment First policy shall, at a minimum, be based on the following principles: (1) individual supported employment in integrated work settings is the first and priority service option for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities receiving day program or employment services from or funded by theCommonwealth; (2) the goal of employment services is to support individuals in integrated work settings where they are paid minimum or competitive wages; and (3) employment services and goals must be developed and discussed at least annually through a person-centered planning process and included in ISPs. The Commonwealth shall have at least one employment service coordinator to monitor implementation of Employment First practices for individuals in the target population”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Virginia Disability Employment Initiative Round VIII - 10/01/2017

“VA DEI will fund four Disability Resource Coordinators and implement activities in the Northern Virginia Region that will build on existing career pathways with a focus on the Information Technology (IT) sector that have been developed by the local partners. The project will also expand on work currently underway by Northern Virginia Community College and its adult education partners to customize a bridge program that will connect low-skilled adults to college level IT programming through an integrated education and training program. Key activities will include the analysis of existing adult education and community college IT curricula and instructional practices to ensure accessibility according to Universal Design Principles, development of fully accessible career assessments for use by local partners, and alignment across all instructional programs that lead to ever higher levels of credential attainment among program participants. The regional industry sector model will be applicable to other career pathways. Targeted industry sectors will include Information Technology.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Virginia Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities - 07/18/2017

“Led by the Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, this grant will help nearly 500 Virginians with disabilities, including young adults and veterans, gain new skills and credentials through Career Pathways to seek employment in competitive, high-demand, high-quality occupations.

Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities has 10 project partners in education, workforce development and business. These partners focus on strategies to:

meet business needs in high-demand occupations meet career seekers' needs to attain marketable credentials and find middle-skilled jobs train vocational rehabilitation counselors to work with potential clients”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Virginia No Wrong Door System Grant - 10/01/2015

~~“Virginia will provide a high-quality, sustainable, person-centered, single statewide No Wrong Door system of long-term services and supports. No Wrong Door will support individuals of all ages  and disabilities in achieving their unique goals for community living; streamline access to community supports; and promote efficiencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia: Fairfax Customized Employment Grant - 07/01/2007

“The Customized Employment grant initiative was a product of the Northern Virginia Workforce Investment Board. The goal of the group was to build the capacity of the local One-Stop Center to use Customized Employment services to increase employment outcomes, choice, and wages for people with disabilities who resided in Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the cities of Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas, and Manassas Park.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Disability Employment Initiative (Round Four)

As a past Round 1 grantee, VA DEI will continue to build on existing infrastructure to develop shared ownership; foster systems integration, through cross-interagency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. Three Disability Resource Coordinators and a DRC State Lead will facilitate the implementation of the service delivery strategies. The pilot sites will receive the services of a Ticket consultant, who has been successful at engaging Round I pilot LWIBs in the EN process and in increasing ticket activity. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Virginia Ticket to Work

“Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for people with disabilities who want to work. Social Security disability beneficiaries age 18 through 64 qualify. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket Program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence…“The Ticket program is a good fit for people who want to improve their earning potential and who are committed to preparing for long-term success in the workforce. Ticket to Work offers beneficiaries with disabilities access to meaningful employment with the assistance of Ticket to Work employment service providers.”Virginia has had Ticket to Work Since 2002.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Virginia National Association of State Mental Health Program Director’s (NASMHPD) Employment Development Initiative (EDI)

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).”

“This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

Virginia is using its funds to support their Employment First Initiative. They have conducted multiple Employment First Summits, and developed an Employment First Advisory group.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Virginia Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

Note: This program ended on December 31, 2009 according to this site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Virginia - Richmond Customized Employment Project

“The grant worked to strengthen the linkages of the Richmond-area One-Stop system with schools, VR, and the Virginia Business Leadership Network, a business-directed group designed to encourage other businesses to hire people with disabilities. The project focused on expanding the reach and scope of existing service programs, such as a WIA youth project, to make them more appropriate for job seekers with multiple barriers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Virginia Disability Employment Initiative (Round One)

“The Virginia Community College System, the administrator of the Workforce Investment Act in Virginia, will enter into a Memorandum of Agreement with the Virginia Department of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) to provide co-leadership in order to coordinate DEI project activities with DRS-funded Disability Program Navigators (DPNs). The DEI project will build on the strengths and lessons learned from the activities of its DPNs and will support the continuation of those activities in conjunction with the enhanced activities related to five strategic components. DEI flexible funding will be used as the “first dollar down” to leverage partner funds and services. The Virginia DEI will incorporate resource mapping in each workforce area to identify all available resources and career assessment vehicles to support the needs of the job seeker, and will assure quality services through the deployment of mystery shopper protocols. Participating Workforce Investment Boards will be fully engaged as Employment Networks under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Veteran Entrepreneurship - 11/07/2018

~~“The Virginia Department of Veterans Services is excited to announce the hiring of a Veteran Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Coordinator (VEEC).  The VEEC will connect veterans and military spouses to a plethora of entrepreneurship resources and events! Whether you are a seasoned entrepreneur or just considering what that path may look like, the VEEC can share an extensive list of programs, events and resources all for entrepreneurs.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Special Education Technical Assistance & Professional Development

“These resources were developed to provide professional development and technical assistance to parents, school personnel and other consumers. All resources are intended to provide guidance for addressing the regulatory requirements and instructional elements needed for a student’s free appropriate public education (FAPE).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Virginia Transition Services for Students with Disabilities

“VDOE's Transition Services website provides support, information and resources designed to improve the outcomes of students with disabilities in transition from middle / secondary education to postsecondary education and employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Consumer's Guide to Self-Employment

This guide is written for consumers within the Virginia Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (Vocational Rehabilitation) who wish to pursue Self Employment as a career goal. It describes many of the Department's policies, as well as offering guidance on how to succeed in the business development process.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

DRS Guide to Supported Employment and Job Coach Training Services

“The purpose of the Guide to Supported Employment and Job Coach Training Services is to provide practical and specific information to supplement the Virginia DRS Policy and Procedure Manual. Where possible, the Guide seeks to illustrate evolving best practices gleaned from case examples and data gathered in Virginia. Specifically, the Guide is intended to provide supported employment practitioners with guidance in:

Achieving a customer-oriented environment that promotes consumer choice and participation, individual responsibility, practitioner excellence and sensitive delivery of quality services; Enhancing understanding of operational procedures and the need for cooperation, collaboration, and coordination; Clarifying and expanding on the roles, responsibilities, and expectations among supported employment practitioners; and Planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating supported employment programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Report of the Independent Reviewer on Compliance with the Consent Agreement US v. VA, Civil Action No. 3:12 CV 059 - 10/07/2014

“The IR reported in the last Report to the Court that the Commonwealth had achieved compliance with certain requirements of the Agreement. During this, the sixth review period, the Commonwealth through its lead agency, DBHDS, and its sister agencies has maintained compliance with these same provisions and has come into compliance with additional requirements. The Commonwealths leaders have continued to meet regularly and to collaborate to develop and implement plans to address the Agreement’s requirements and to improve people’s lives. The IR also reported in the last Report to the Court that the Commonwealth lagged significantly behind schedule. It continues to do so. There have been significant delays in the it’s (sic) compliance with requirements that are critical to an effective community-based services system for individuals with ID/DD. For two years, the Commonwealth’s primary strategy to come into compliance has been the redesign of it HCBS waiver program."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other

Virginia Consent Decree allowing for more waivers and less training Centers - 08/23/2012

“Under the proposed settlement, Virginia has agreed to provide 4170 additional waiver slots, divided among current Training Center residents, disabled people in various segregated facilities other than the Training Centers, and people on the waiting list for services…The settlement also prescribes in great detail how Virginia will administer the services it provides to disabled citizens. This process will be a shared responsibility of the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services and local community service boards ("CSBs")...”“The decree also provides for changed procedures at the Training Centers and spells out how the Commonwealth will assist the CSBs with technical assistance. Each Training Center resident will have a discharge plan crafted by the professionals at the facility. Virginia will set up case-management teams, crisis teams, and plans for supported day services in the community. Essentially, the Commonwealth's efforts—and those of the CSBs—will all be focused on keeping disabled people in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ADA Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 01/26/2012

“The fundamental goals of the Agreement are to prevent the unnecessary institutionalization of individuals with developmental disabilities who are living in the community, including thousands of individuals on waitlists for community-based services, and ensure that people who are currently in institutions - at the Commonwealth's training centers or in other private but state-funded facilities - have a meaningful opportunity to receive services that meet their needs in the community…Pursuant to the Interim Settlement Agreement, the State and City will give TTP and Birch service recipients the opportunity to receive integrated supported employment and integrated daytime services that will enable them to interact with the broader community to the fullest extent possible.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

TEEOP Employment Supports - 10/18/2018

~~“Training, education, employment and othercommunity engagement opportunities (TEEOP) Employment SupportsThe web link includes information about how the State will provide assessments and referrals for employment.Employment Support Services for MedicaidParticipants to Achieve Self-Sufficiency” (COMPASS) Waiver.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Commonwealth Coordinated Care (CCC) Plus Waiver - 08/01/2018

~~The CCC Plus Waiver (also known as the Commonwealth Coordinated Care Plus Waiver), is a combination of the formerly known waivers titled: EDCD (Elderly or Disabled with Consumer Direction) waiver and the Technology Assisted (Tech) waiver. All of the waivers offer CD or AD services depending on individualized needs and program criteria met.

From the Fact Sheet:“The Commonwealth Coordinated Care (CCC) Plus Waiver [1915 (c)] provides care in the home and community rather than in a  nursing facility (NF) or other specialized care medical facility “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

VA Community Living Waiver (0372.R03.00) - 07/01/2014

~~Waiver Authority 1915 (c)Date Originally Approved 07/01/2001Implementation Date 07/01/2014Expiration Date 06/30/2019Summary Provides day support, personal assistance, prevocational, residential support, respite, supported employment, consumer directed services facilitation, assistive technology, companion services, crisis stabilization, crisis supervision, environmental mods, PERS, skilled nursing, therapeutic consultation, transition for individuals w/IID ages 0 - no max age

From the Fact Sheet:“Formerly the Intellectual Disability Waiver, the purpose of the Community Living home and community-based 1915 (c) waiveris to provide support in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) or related condition.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Building Independence home and community-based 1915 (c) waiver (0430.R02.00) - 07/01/2013

~~Waiver Authority1915 (c)Date Originally Approved07/01/2005Implementation Date07/01/2013Expiration Date06/30/2018Summary Provides day support, prevocational, supported employment for individuals w/ID ages 6 - no max age

From the Fact Sheet:“Formerly called the Day Support Waiver, the purpose of this Building Independence home and community-based 1915 (c) waiver is to provide support in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disability (ICF/IID”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Family and Individual Support home and community-based (1915(c)) waiver (0358.R03.00) - 07/01/2013

~~Expiration Date06/30/2018Summary Provides day support, in-home residential, personal care, prevocational, respite care, supported employment - group/individual, services facilitation, adult companion, assistive technology, crisis stablization, crisis supervision, environmental mods, family/caregiver training, PERS, skilled nursing, therapeutic consultation, transition for individuals w/autism and DD ages 6 - no max age

Formerly the Individual and Family Developmental Disabilities Support Waiver, the purpose of the Family and Individual Support home and community-based (1915(c)) waiver is to provide supports and services in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) or related condition.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia Department of Education ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/27/2012

“For students with disabilities who have the most intensive support needs, there are two model initiatives supported by the Virginia Department of Education: Project SEARCH and the Post-High School Community College Program. Project SEARCH, a business-led model, is a collaborative between school divisions and local businesses that provide employability skills training and workplace internships that occur entirely in the workplace. The Post-High School Community College Program is a supported education model that provides individualized supports to students with significant disabilities seeking postsecondary education to enhance their skills for employment, in an age-appropriate setting. The Department of Education provides support and technical assistance to increase the number of partnerships between school divisions and institutions of higher education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

MEDICAID WORKS (Virginia Medicaid Buy-in)

“MEDICAID WORKS is a work incentive opportunity offered by the Virginia Medicaid program for individuals with disabilities who are employed or who want to go to work. MEDICAID WORKS is a Medicaid plan option that will enable workers with disabilities to earn higher income and retain more in savings, or resources, while ensuring continued Medicaid coverage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Virginia Olmstead Settlement Agreement

“The Commonwealth shall establish a state policy on Employment First for the target population and include a term in the CSB Performance Contract requiring application of this policy. The Employment First policy shall, at a minimum, be based on the following principles: (1) individual supported employment in integrated work settings is the first and priority service option for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities receiving day program or employment services from or funded by the Commonwealth; (2) the goal of employment services is to support individuals in integrated work settings where they are paid minimum or competitive wages; and (3) employment services and goals must be developed and discussed at least annually through a person-centered planning process and included in ISPs. The Commonwealth shall have at least one employment service coordinator to monitor implementation of Employment First practices for individuals in the target population

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

Note: This program ended on December 31, 2009 according to this site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Virginia Statewide HCBS Transition Plan

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule for home and community based services (HCBS) that requires states to review and evaluate home and community based (HCB) settings, including residential and non-residential settings. The HCBS final regulation requires states to prepare and submit a Statewide Transition Plan. CMS asks that statewide transition plans specifically address only the setting requirements of the final rule for home and community based services (The Rule).  Therefore, this Statewide Transition Plan is specific to the analysis and recommendations regarding the settings for home and community based services. 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

Known affectionately as "The Place for Lovers," individuals with disabilities in the Commonwealth have the opportunity with the right supports and services to Live Passionately by having careers in competitive integrated employment and being full participants in their communities. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.69%
Change from
2016 to 2017
8,470,020
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.77%
Change from
2016 to 2017
500,771
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.13%
Change from
2016 to 2017
204,103
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.39%
Change from
2016 to 2017
40.76%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.39%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.97%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 8,382,993 8,411,808 8,470,020
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 479,430 496,928 500,771
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 179,153 193,632 204,103
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,653,779 3,647,462 3,669,633
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 37.37% 38.97% 40.76%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.12% 78.66% 78.97%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.50% 4.00% 3.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.60% 18.10% 17.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.40% 10.10% 9.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 449,104 466,393 462,932
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 486,083 498,192 516,107
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 658,933 675,120 686,273
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 209,349 213,359 222,654
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 45,389 46,107 45,140
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,727 4,829 3,549
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 31,524 32,472 28,994
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 300 957 N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 23,693 27,133 27,801
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 8,661 10,715 9,532

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,473 6,657 6,877
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.60% 4.80% 4.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 212,711 211,614 210,694

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 14,666 14,753 14,919
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 31,199 31,011 30,594
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 73,206 77,519 70,510
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.00% 19.00% 21.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 0.70% 2.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.90% 0.60% 4.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 3.00% 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 7.80% 7.80% 43.40%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 344 388 1,243
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 496 329 2,600
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A 1,691 1,788
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 4,253 4,485 25,180

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 13,591 12,668 12,496
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 109 150 150
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 60 85 80
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 57.00% 53.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.72 1.01 0.95

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,034
7,248
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 44 44 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 438 455 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,002 1,047 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,746 2,990 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,240 2,092 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 564 620 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 39.50% 34.60% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 6,597 7,335 7,954
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 312,340 312,508 315,937
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 285 889 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 733 713 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $36,526,000 $34,044,000 $35,381,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $19,130,000 $18,506,000 $19,799,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $137,771,000 $145,494,000 $151,457,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00% 26.00% 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 631 928 898
Number of people served in facility based work. 598 724 683
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 9,546 10,112 9,455
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 40.60 49.40 48.60

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 62.79% 63.36% 64.01%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.01% 11.15% 10.87%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.06% 4.16% 4.26%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.76% 99.17% 99.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 34.13% 34.45% 32.85%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 63.24% 64.81% 63.10%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 72.57% 73.03% 71.98%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.11% 30.36% 30.25%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 5,052,830
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 7,757
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 168,108
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 3,289,332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,457,440
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 339
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,546
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,885
AbilityOne wages (products). $831,106
AbilityOne wages (services). $43,925,206

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 21 27 19
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 22 28 19
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 14 14 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,398 1,579 1,274
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,412 1,593 1,274

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

(10) Supporting Virginia’s Employment First initiative and implementation of the Department of Justice Settlement agreement by collaborating with the Department for Behavioral Health and Developmental Services to establish staff positions specializing in caseloads of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to enhance their employment. (Page 286)

(10) Supporting Virginia’s Employment First initiative and implementation of the Department of Justice Settlement agreement by collaborating with the Department for Behavioral Health and Developmental Services to establish staff positions specializing in caseloads of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to enhance their employment.

(11) Providing IPAD Pros for use by Rehabilitation Engineers and Assistive Technology Specialists in a “tele–rehab” environment which allows them to provide more effective on–site services to VR consumers needing these services and to interface more effectively with rehabilitation and assistive technology staff at WWRC. (Page 333) 

Customized Employment

(6) DARS, working closely with the VCU Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention, identified the need for training job coaches in basics responsibilities that would be reasonable in terms of time away from the job. VCU responded with the following: 

  1. Supported Employment Web–based Certificate Series (ACRE–certified);
  2. Supported Competitive Employment for Individuals with Mental Illness (ACRE–certified);
  3. Customized Employment; and
  4. Promoting an active network of inter–agency and inter–organizational professionals working with mutual supported employment consumers, with an emphasis on increasing linkages with rehabilitation engineering and technology experts and enhancing current linkages with employers, consumers, the education community and family members; (Page 258)

DARS is actively engaged at both the state and local level in the Workforce Development System. DARS is represented on the state Career Pathways Workgroup which advises the Governor’s Office and Workforce Board on the Workforce System issues and participates on the WIOA implementation team. A memorandum of understanding is in place with each Local Workforce Development Board and DARS works closely with the American Job Centers to assure access to individuals with disabilities. The VR program currently is co–located as a One–Stop partner in Charlottesville, Roanoke, Martinsville, Danville and South Boston. DARS also has a physical presence in other Workforce Board AJC’s. DARS is directly involved with both the state Workforce partners and local AJC’s in the Department of Labor Disability Employment Initiative grant and is lead on an RSA Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant. In the coming year, DARS will support training on career counseling, motivational interviewing as well as Customized Employment for our workforce partners.

No mechanism has been identified to track jointly enrolled Title I and VR clients. DARS is currently in the process of “on–boarding” VR RSA 911 information to the Virginia Longitudinal Data System (VLDS) to create a process to identify jointly enrolled clients. (Page 272)

(12) Providing training and implementing seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment (CE) across Virginia. This strategy is based on needs assessment and focus group recommendations from DARS Partnerships with Transcen, Inc. and George Washington University. By November 1, 2016, DARS will select and train key VR Counselors and Evaluators, AT Specialists, Business Placement and Self–Employment staff, and Partnering Employment Specialists, Behavioral Specialists, and Facilities Personnel in key concepts to implement CE approaches to DARS clients exiting institutions, sheltered workshops, high schools and adults for whom traditional supported employment services have not yielded successful outcomes. DARS will serve 20 or more clients with diverse backgrounds in order to assimilate Customized Employment best practices into our menu of services for these targeted populations. Options for self–employment will also be explored under this approach. (Page 286)

Provide training and implement seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment across Virginia.

Educate our VR counselors, vocational evaluators, consumers, and their parents (as applicable) on the current and future labor market, the availability of competitively–waged jobs and the skills needed to obtain those jobs.

Implement the Career Pathways grant to include the use of motivational interviewing techniques with our VR consumers. (Page 289)

The time limited supported employment services funded with federal/state VR Case service dollars include: 

  1. Vocational Assessment, job development, job placement, job coach training services, and training for blind, vision impaired, or deafblind individuals with most significant disabilities, including youth, who require more extensive supports than traditional VR services. The goal in providing SE services is competitive integrated employment.
  2. Support services such as adaptive equipment and assistive technology devices, interpreter services for persons with dual–sensory impairments, and other approved VR services needed to sustain the individual during the time limited phase of supported employment.

VR sponsorship for time limited SE services occurs when the individual has competitive integrated employment, including customized employment, and their VR case has been closed. Indication that it is time to end the time–limited SE phase occurs when the individual and the employer are satisfied with the individual’s job performance, when the SE services have been provided, and when job coach intervention time is less than 20 percent of the individual’s working hours over a 30 to 60–day period.

An individual’s VR case is closed when competitive integrated employment is performed for the established hours per week for a period of ninety days after the transition from the time–limited phase to the extended services phase, as specified on the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). (Page 307)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

The successful execution of this plan requires Virginia to commit to the professional development of workforce practitioners, and to the braiding and management of financial resources in new ways. The Commonwealth is committed to developing staff to capitalize on investments in technology, and to realize the benefits from a common agenda with workforce system partners. Careful investments in human and financial resources ultimately reflect value to customers and to their communities across the state. (Page 78)

Implement “Integrated Resource” team service delivery strategy for multiple–barrier customers 

  • Coordinate workforce partners around and employment/training goal for an individual customer, with no modification to provider service models;
  • Enhance cross program collaboration and service alignment by braiding and leveraging partner resources, funding and services;
  • Develop and integrated career plan that aligns with service goals;
  • Conduct partner cross–training for strategy implementation;
  • Design plan to record best practices for broader dissemination across workforce system partners;
  • Embed practices into procedures; and
  • Apply CPI. (Page 84)
DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

Virginia is fortunate to have a long standing collaborative relationship with Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and other key state partners. This partnership history facilitated the leveraging and coordination of existing and added resources provided via the six DOL Workforce Disability Initiatives, the latest of which are the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants. Whereas, significant strides have been made to ensure our One-Stop Service Delivery System is accessible to all job seekers, including those with disabilities and other challenges to employment, we are committed to continuous quality improvement. These efforts are focused on physical, programmatic and communication access. We will continue these efforts and build on our existing infrastructure to encourage shared ownership; foster systems integration through cross-agency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. (Page 154)

The following are examples of local level practices implemented to enhance access for job seekers with disabilities made possible by leveraging the resources from the DOL Disability grants and state level cross agency partnerships:

Installed Universal Computer Workstations with Assistive Technology devices and software and conducted staff trainings in pilot LWDBAs; expanded the web-based Common Screening Tool to better identify job seekers with disabilities, track customer flow and service referrals. (The data indicated an on average a 15% increase of self-identification where this tool was piloted); incorporated Disability Resources and disseminated announcements for various activities that would benefit individuals with disabilities, such as: disability trainings and IRS free tax assistance and site locations, dedicated a page to post information about disability resources on the Virginia’s Workforce Development website, Elevate Virginia; integrated DEI strategies by adding four modules into Virginia’s Workforce Development Systems Course, which is a requirement for all front-line staff co-located at the Centers to complete. (The optional modules are Welcoming All Customers/Universal Strategies, Asset Development, Integrated Resource Teams with a Person Centered Planning approach and Mystery Shopper); coordinated local/statewide trainings (on line, in person and at state conferences) for One-Stop staff and partners and also utilized resources through the Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. Some of the topics covered were: ADA Accessibility requirements, Disability Etiquette, Access for All - Welcoming Customers at workforce centers and accommodations; implemented Social Security (SSA) - Ticket To Work Program to expand employment opportunities for SSA beneficiaries in 6 LWDB areas; facilitated certification trainings for Work Incentives Specialist Advocates who advise beneficiaries on work incentives; promoted asset development and financial capability strategies to enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency, including financial literacy training, the use of individual development accounts, tax and work incentives, and other strategies for encouraging economic advancement; and trained and provided technical assistance to businesses/employers about the use of effective hiring practices and job accommodations, including Assistive Technology trainings in collaboration with Virginia Assistive Technology System and Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center.

As a result, DEI Round I efforts and collaborative workforce partnerships, Virginia statewide data from October 2010 through March 2014, indicated participants with disabilities active with WIA (now WIOA) intensive services increased from 1.8% to 4.9%. (Page 155)

3.4 Provide 7 Disability Resource Coordinators/Disability Program Navigators to increase access to programs and services for vocational rehabilitation consumers. DARS currently provides three Disability Resource Coordinators to two local American Job Centers (AJCs) as a part of DOL Disability Employment Initiative Round IV grant project efforts in collaboration with the VCCS/Workforce Services Division (Title I Administrator). In addition, through an Innovation and Expansion project, DARS has co–located a previous Disability Program Navigator as a VR Counselor housed in an AJC and providing VR services. Also, three workforce areas previously participating in DOL DPN/DEI grant efforts have retained three DARS staff to provide services to individuals with disabilities in AJCs. As a result DEI Round I efforts and collaborative workforce partnerships, Virginia statewide data from October 2010 through March 2014, indicated participants with disabilities active with WIA (now WIOA) intensive services increased from 1.8% to 4.9%. (Page 294)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

On October 1, 2014, VCCS was awarded Workforce Investment Act, Workforce Innovation funds in the amount of $11,196,152 by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration to implement the Working Families Success Network Model with 6 American Job Center (also known as One-Stop Center) sites in Virginia for 1800 participants. The model of bundled service delivery comprises three services:

  1. Workforce and education services resulting in career advancement: education and training, employability skills, job placement;
  2. Income and work supports: access to student financial aid, public benefits, free tax preparation;
  3. Financial services and asset building: financial education, financial coaching. 

A Coach will be available at each of the sites to coordinate the services. As a study project, services will be determined with a randomized control process and to those who consent to participate starting October 1, 2015 in Workforce Development Areas 3-Western Virginia, 6-Piedmont, 8-South Central, 11-Northern Virginia, 16-Hampton Roads, and 17-West Piedmont. Services will be delivered through September 30, 2018. (Page 110)

Virginia’s Workforce Development Systems Course, which is a requirement for all front-line staff co-located at the Centers to complete. (The optional modules are Welcoming All Customers/Universal Strategies, Asset Development, Integrated Resource Teams with a Person Centered Planning approach and Mystery Shopper); coordinated local/statewide trainings (on line, in person and at state conferences) for One-Stop staff and partners and also utilized resources through the Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. Some of the topics covered were: ADA Accessibility requirements, Disability Etiquette, Access for All - Welcoming Customers at workforce centers and accommodations; implemented Social Security (SSA) - Ticket To Work Program to expand employment opportunities for SSA beneficiaries in 6 LWDB areas; facilitated certification trainings for Work Incentives Specialist Advocates who advise beneficiaries on work incentives; promoted asset development and financial capability strategies to enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency, including financial literacy training, the use of individual development accounts, tax and work incentives, and other strategies for encouraging economic advancement; and trained and provided technical assistance to businesses/employers about the use of effective hiring practices and job accommodations, including Assistive Technology trainings in collaboration with Virginia Assistive Technology System and Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. (Page 155)   

School to Work Transition

School personnel represented the largest number of respondents (50%), followed by: Supported Employment Vendors–ESO’s (23.6%), Community Service Boards (17%), Centers for Independent Living (4.7%) Advocates (4.7%), individuals with a disability (3.8%), parents of children with disabilities (1.9%), and Brain Injury Organization Members (1%).

Respondents rated consumers’ barriers to employment. Transportation emerged as the number one “very significant” barrier to employment with a 73% agreement followed by: lack of jobs (61%), financial support for services (60%), housing (40%), lack of marketable job skills (35%), financial or benefits disincentives (33%), inadequate training opportunities (28%), lack of networking opportunities (28%), lack of service providers (26%), family influence (21%), and consumers unrealistic goals (16%).

Approximately, 89% of DARS consumers are most significantly disabled. DARS supplements its Title VI Supported Employment funds with Title I funds to ensure that every consumer who needs Supported Employment services receive this service. (Page 270)

Two percent of the respondents gave DARS an excellent rating regarding students’ experience with DARS. Twelve percent rated DARS as “good”, 9% “fair” and 13% responded “unsatisfactory”. The services identified as most needed were: job coaching (80%), internships (66%), job placement services (74%), skills training (66%), job seeking skills training (61%), vocational evaluation (57%), independent living skills training (54%), guidance and counseling from a vocational rehabilitation counselor (53%), college education (38%), assistive technology (38%), benefits planning (36%), physical restoration (8%) and mental restoration (7%). Fifty eight percent of the respondents stated that students did not have the skills to obtain employment in the community. Thirty percent believed the students did have the training for community employment and twelve percent did not answer the question. (Page 273)

(4) Assure a full range of choices are available in order to meet the vocational needs of consumers requiring supported employment services. Virginia uses all supported employment models, including the individual placement model, the enclave model, the entrepreneurial model and mobile work crews. Individual placement is the most widely used, and generally offers higher wage rates, better benefits and more flexibility in meeting the needs of customers and employers in an integrated work setting. The group models are important options that provide for the constant presence of the Employment Specialist at the job site to support customers who need intensive supervision in order to maintain employment. (Page 283-284)

DARS requires that each of Virginia’s ESOs vendored to provide VR services be nationally accredited through the Rehabilitation Accreditation Commission (CARF). CARF accreditation provides a host of benefits to DARS as a state–funding source, as well as to DARS consumers, and taxpayers. In addition to assuring accountability and consistent quality levels, national accreditation allows DARS to focus on program expansion, improvement and accountability.

DARS currently purchase services through 87 ESOs throughout the state. During FY 2015, these organizations provided supported employment services over 3,000 individuals, including youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 303)

The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) provides services and supports to individuals who have developmental disabilities, intellectual disabilities, and mental health concerns, also known as behavioral health in Virginia. Services to these individuals are provided by regional and local Community Services Boards (CSBs). DBVI will establish or reestablish collaborative relationships with Virginia DBHDS and CSBs to include participating in interagency workgroups with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the Intellectual Disability (ID)/Developmental Disability (DD) CSB Case Managers with the goal of providing information related to allowable employment activities including Virginia’s Employment First initiative, Medicaid Waiver programs, and the provision of supported and extended support services. Collaboration with DBHDS also provides information on services and resources that support pre-employment transition programs and positive employment outcomes. The DBVI Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor will work with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the ID/DD CSB Case Managers to specifically ensure that issues related to work benefits, supports, and available resources are addressed. (Page 333)

Lack of transportation, affordable housing, marketable work skills and training were all identified as major barriers to employment for individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind in Virginia; 

  • The Supported Employment model is not frequently used, and when it is used, it is not typically the standard SE model;
  • A large majority of individuals served receive SSA benefits and fear of benefit loss affects their return–to–work behavior; and
  • Independent living skills are a major need of individuals served. The Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired (VRCBVI) meets this need for a small percentage of individuals served, but many people would like to see VRCBVI expand its reach and provide low vision services. (Page 343)
  1. Any individuals, including all minor caretakers, under 16 years of age;
  2. Any individual at least 16, but no more than 19 years of age, who is enrolled full–time in elementary or secondary school, including vocational or technical school programs. The vocational or technical school must be equivalent to secondary school;
  3. Any individual unable to participate because of a temporary medical condition that prevents entry into at least 20 hours per week of employment or training, as determined by a medical professional;
  4. Any individual who is incapacitated, as determined by receipt of Social Security Disability benefits or Supplemental Security Income;
  5. Any individual 60 years of age or older;
  6. Any individual who is the sole care giver of another member of the household who is incapacitated, and whose presence is essential for the care of the member on a substantially continuous basis, shall be exempt from participation in VIEW. Incapacity is determined by receipt of Social Security Disability benefits or Supplemental Security Income. The sole other condition under which an individual may be determined incapacitated is by a written medical statement from a physician; and
  7. A parent or caretaker of a child under 12 months of age who personally provides care for the child. (Page 506)
Career Pathways

To enhance and facilitate job–readiness skills and career planning for students to make a successful transition from school to work and to greater independence, students will be referred to DBVI Workforce Specialists and to Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) (also known in Virginia as Employment Services Organizations (ESOs)). Workforce Specialists will complement pre–employment transition services by delivering workplace readiness training to establish skills necessary for entry into career pathways, competitive integrated employment, and by coordinating with schools and networking with employers to establish paid and unpaid internships, including apprenticeships, specifically matched to the student’s needs, skills, interests, abilities, and informed choice. Transition services purchased from CRPs may also include On–The–Job support and extended support services for students and youth needing additional supports in the work experience setting or on the job. (Page 331)

Work Incentives & Benefits

Across Virginia’s workforce system, partner agencies are engaged in operationalizing several workforce initiatives stemming from grants obtained from the federal government for specific workforce innovations. These grants include:

  • The Disability Employment Initiative Grants (The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, the Virginia Employment Commission, Virginia’s Community College System, and five Local Workforce Development Boards)
  • The Veterans’ Demonstration Grant (Virginia’s Community College System, the Virginia Employment Commission, and the Department of Veterans’ Services)
  • Local Apprenticeship Grants (Shenandoah Valley Workforce Region, the Department of Labor and Industry, and Virginia’s Community College System)
  • The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Department of the Blind and Vision Impaired jointly received a RSA funded CPID grant The grant collaborates with multiple workforce partners including adult education and two local workforce boards, other DOL grants and the Virginia Manufacturers Association to enhance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. project goals include helping individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations; enhancing the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities; (Page 88)

Manufacturers Association to enhance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. project goals include helping individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations; enhancing the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities; enhancing access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities. (Page 98)

  • The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Department of the Blind and Vision Impaired jointly received a RSA funded CPID grant The grant collaborates with multiple workforce partners including adult education and two local workforce boards, other DOL grants and the Virginia Manufacturers Association to enhance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. project goals include helping individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations; enhancing the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities; enhancing access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities. (Page 103)

DARS is actively engaged at both the state and local level in the Workforce Development System. DARS is represented on the state Career Pathways Workgroup which advises the Governor’s Office and Workforce Board on the Workforce System issues and participates on the WIOA implementation team. A memorandum of understanding is in place with each Local Workforce Development Board and DARS works closely with the American Job Centers to assure access to individuals with disabilities. The VR program currently is co–located as a One–Stop partner in Charlottesville, Roanoke, Martinsville, Danville and South Boston. DARS also has a physical presence in other Workforce Board AJC’s. DARS is directly involved with both the state Workforce partners and local AJC’s in the Department of Labor Disability Employment Initiative grant and is lead on an RSA Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant. In the coming year, DARS will support training on career counseling, motivational interviewing as well as Customized Employment for our workforce partners. (Page 272)

Provide training and implement seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment across Virginia.

Educate our VR counselors, vocational evaluators, consumers, and their parents (as applicable) on the current and future labor market, the availability of competitively–waged jobs and the skills needed to obtain those jobs.

Implement the Career Pathways grant to include the use of motivational interviewing techniques with our VR consumers.

Implement the five year Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (CPID) model demonstration program to create new career pathways and/or use existing career pathways in high–demand occupations. (Page 289)

WWRC has formalized its evolving partnership with the DARS Business Development Managers to connect classrooms to workplace standards and expectations and modify curriculum to increase the likelihood of successful placements for training graduates, with long–term retention opportunities. This has resulted in the development of several collaborative workforce initiatives with industry professional organizations and corporate networks directly benefitting VR consumer employment goals. The Hershey model is one example of this, with other corporate bodies expressing interest in replication within their organizations. The DARS partnership with the Hershey apprenticeship program offered individuals with disabilities a six–month work experience on the production line. During the apprenticeship, DARS clients could access any needed supports from WWRC to help them complete the program as long as they were able to perform the required duties at the end of the six months. During FFY 2015, an evolving partnership with CVS Health resulted in the set–up of a mock store within WWRC Materials Handling Training Program to prepare VR consumers for direct employment and career pathways within the CVS Health System across the Commonwealth of Virginia. CVS Health donated all supplies and equipment for the mock store and worked with WWRC Instructors to refine the curriculum and develop community internships to prepare students to work in the CVS Health System. (Page 298)

To enhance and facilitate job–readiness skills and career planning for students to make a successful transition from school to work and to greater independence, students will be referred to DBVI Workforce Specialists and to Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) (also known in Virginia as Employment Services Organizations (ESOs)). Workforce Specialists will complement pre–employment transition services by delivering workplace readiness training to establish skills necessary for entry into career pathways, competitive integrated employment, and by coordinating with schools and networking with employers to establish paid and unpaid internships, including apprenticeships, specifically matched to the student’s needs, skills, interests, abilities, and informed choice. Transition services purchased from CRPs may also include On–The–Job support and extended support services for students and youth needing additional supports in the work experience setting or on the job. (Page 331)

DBVI will conduct a monthly training program designed to ensure that new and seasoned VRCs and Regional Managers have a 21st Century understanding of the evolving labor force and the needs of individuals with disabilities. To facilitate this learning, DBVI will continue its Video Teleconferencing– based program entitled, ”Making a Difference” (MAD), which is conducted on a monthly basis by trainers, internal and external to the agency. Topics include a broad range of subjects including, but not limited to, the use of vocational evaluations, job placement, rehabilitation technology, vocational counseling, the Business Enterprise program, Social Security and Ticket to Work program, Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired changes and summer programs, update information regarding Workforce Development activities, utilization of Career Pathways, Medicaid Waivers, Supported Employment, review of the VR eligibility process, ethics, conflict management, self–employment, and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014. During FFY 2016, (Page 339)

  1. Expanding and enhancing workforce development activities to develop and maintain effective working relationships with Virginia business and industry at the local, regional, and state level to develop partnerships that facilitate industry recognized credential attainment, skill development, and entry into career pathways for eligible individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind leading to competitive integrated employment. (Page 348)

Goals 1 and 2 of DBVI’s six goals identifies strategies and measures that apply to methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind.

Goal 1. Expanding and enhancing workforce development activities to develop and maintain effective working relationships with Virginia business and industry at the local, regional, and state level to develop partnerships that facilitate industry recognized credential attainment, skill development, and entry into career pathways for eligible individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind leading to competitive integrated employment.

Strategy 1.1: To fully engage personnel and financial resources of DBVI’s newly established Workforce Unit to implement business support and outreach services. Personnel in the Workforce Unit include one Workforce Coordinator, four Regional Workforce Specialists, and one Director of Workforce/Vocational Rehabilitation. (Page 354)

Strategy 1.3: To establish and enhance entry into career pathways, DBVI will utilize personnel and funds associated Virginia’s Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Grant which was jointly awarded DBVI and the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) in 2015. DBVI will:

  • Help individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high–demand, high–quality occupations;
  • Enhance the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities;
  • Enhance access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities; and
  • Strengthen the alignment of Virginia’s VR programs with the other core programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and other Federally–funded career pathways initiatives providing self–advocacy skills training that is critical to the achievement of individuals’ personal and vocational goals. (Page 355)

Strategy 1.3: To establish and enhance entry into career pathways, DBVI will utilize personnel and funds associated Virginia’s Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Grant which was jointly awarded DBVI and the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) in 2015. DBVI will:

  • help individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high–demand, high–quality occupations;
  • enhance the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities;
  • enhance access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities; and
  • strengthen the alignment of Virginia’s VR programs with the other core programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and other Federally–funded career pathways initiatives providing self–advocacy skills training that is critical to the achievement of individuals’ personal and vocational goals.

Measures: Other first–year activities will include working with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling to develop and implement career pathways–focused career counseling training for VR counselors and other workforce professionals that incorporates use of labor market information and motivational interviewing techniques. (Page 362)

Employer/ Business

3.5   Enter into an Administrative Employment Network Agreement with two Employment Networks to determine the feasibility of this model for funding long term employment supports. During this reporting period, there were administrative Employment Network (EN) agreements established with two different groups so that potential EN partners in Virginia would have options when considering participation in Partnership Plus. This has resulted in seven new administrative EN agreements that will support DARS ticket holders after case closure from VR. Preliminary indication is that the administrative EN option seems to be a viable option for long term employment supports for partners that do not have the volume of tickets or administrative infrastructure to support the ticket to work program. (Page 295)

511

System-wide Data Collection and Reporting 

Virginia does not currently have the capability to get a system-wide, global view of workforce data across the various programs and agency. Data is still largely confined to programmatic siloes, and - with a few notable exceptions - agency staff is reticent about sharing data with partner agencies. WIOA has given the Commonwealth the opportunity to adopt standards data collection systems and portals, and establish protocols by which data and information can be shared responsibly. These protocols will be developed collaboratively over the coming months. (Page 119)

Commonwealth of Virginia Process for Identifying Regions: 

Reference: VBWD Policy 200-06, Designation of Regions and Planning Requirements, http://www.elevatevirginia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Policy-200-06-Designation-of-Regions-and-Planning-Requirements-FINAL-Signed.pdf

In order to identify regions, WIOA requires the state to identify factors to be used, which, when applying, may or may not align to current local workforce development areas. In Virginia, the factors were used to promote a collaborative process whereby the data collection and analysis of the factors for determination of regions are shared between state and local workforce partners. Virginia utilized the following factors in determining regions:

  1. Single Labor Market;
  2. Common Economic Development Area;
  3. Federal and Non-Federal Resources to Carry Out WIOA Activities;
  4. Population Centers;
  5. Commuting Patterns;
  6. Industrial Composition and Sector Alignment;
  7. Community College Regions. 

Utilizing these seven factors, various regional alignments may be considered and proposed by a number of workforce system stakeholders such as state policymakers, State and Local Board members, state and local workforce staff, partner program staff, business and industry partners and workforce and education associations. In order for Virginia to consider and designate regions, a formal proposal shall be submitted to the Virginia Board of Workforce Development that includes a recommendation for region designation, a rationale for the region designation recommended using the seven factors, and a description of why the regional alignment proposed is in the best interests of the state, business and industry, and workers and job seekers. (Page 167)

DARS’ policies require that for students with disabilities who

  1. are receiving special education services from a public school, and
  2. also are determined eligible for VR services (and able to be served if DARS is on an order of selection), the Individualized Plan for Employment shall be completed and signed within 90 days of the eligibility determination and before the student leaves the school setting. 

DARS continues to be a stakeholder in the review of data that DOE collects to report to the Office on Special Education Programs (OSEP) to support and accomplish respective post school and employment outcomes required by the federal government and to provide meaningful data collection by each agency. (Page 251)

DARS continues to be a stakeholder in the review of data that DOE collects to report to the Office on Special Education Programs (OSEP) to support and accomplish respective post school and employment outcomes required by the federal government and to provide meaningful data collection by each agency.

Additional DARS and DOE collaborative activities include co–chairing the Virginia Interagency Transition Council (VITC) and the regional Virginia Transition Practitioners Councils (TPC). TPC provides a forum for transition practitioners and other interested stakeholders from school divisions, adult agencies, and community partners to engage in professional development activities, networking opportunities, and collaborative efforts that enhance the implementation of quality transition services for secondary school students with disabilities. The VITC is comprised of representatives from 14 state agencies who have leadership roles and transition as part of their responsibility in serving youth with disabilities. The Council works to stay abreast of current transition information, to identify gaps in resources, and avoid duplication of transition services. VITC has set a priority to improve communication between the state, regional, and local transition councils. It is anticipated that information will be shared with and by VITC through the regional and local Councils. This flow of communication allows for improved responses to identified needs, as well as recommendations for future efforts.( Page 253)

Data collection efforts solicited input from a broad spectrum of individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind, service providers, DBVI staff, and some businesses. (Page 342)

The needs assessment approach was designed to elicit quantitative and qualitative data about the needs of persons who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind. Focus group and key informant interview activities yielded qualitative data that may be used to complement and lend depth to the findings of the survey efforts and the analysis of extant data. The use of multiple data collection strategies, both quantitative and qualitative, facilitates data collection that captures both the breadth and the depth of concerns relevant to individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or vision impaired in Virginia. (Page 343)

Measure: The DBVI/DARS project team will work with staff from the American Institutes for Research (AIR, the planned project evaluator) to develop and implement the project evaluation design and data collection plan.

Measures: Other first–year activities will include working with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling to develop and implement career pathways–focused career counseling training for VR counselors and other workforce professionals that incorporates use of labor market information and motivational interviewing techniques. (Page 353)

Measure: The DBVI/DARS project team will work with staff from the American Institutes for Research (AIR, the planned project evaluator) to develop and implement the project evaluation design and data collection plan.

Measures: Other first–year activities will include working with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling to develop and implement career pathways–focused career counseling training for VR counselors and other workforce professionals that incorporates use of labor market information and motivational interviewing techniques. (Page 362)

Mental Health

Virginia is fortunate to have a long standing collaborative relationship with Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and other key state partners. This partnership history facilitated the leveraging and coordination of existing and added resources provided via the six DOL Workforce Disability Initiatives, the latest of which are the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants. Whereas, significant strides have been made to ensure our One-Stop Service Delivery System is accessible to all job seekers, including those with disabilities and other challenges to employment, we are committed to continuous quality improvement. These efforts are focused on physical, programmatic and communication access. We will continue these efforts and build on our existing infrastructure to encourage shared ownership; foster systems integration through cross-agency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. (Page 154)

Expected outcomes are the following: a revised ADA Accessibility guidelines and one-stop center certification process that incorporates the WIOA Section 188 Disability Reference Guide checklist for program and physical accessibility; system standards for accessible devices and software located in workforce centers to facilitate consistency; review of all policies and guidance to ensure alignment and consistency; a schedule for cross- agency training for survey providers, end users, one-stop operators and partner staff. The efforts of this Team will improve compliance and enhance communication, coordination and professional development across Virginia’s workforce system. (Page 156)

This a administrative guidance document provides a reasonable guarantee that all of Virginia’s WIOA Title I financially assisted programs, activities and recipients comply with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements stipulated under Section 188 of the WIOA. (Page 171)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 63

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services State Board Policy 1036 - 12/04/2012

“It is the policy of the Board that in the development and implementation of policies and procedures and the delivery of services, the Department and CSBs shall ensure that community-based individual supported employment in integrated work settings is presented as the first and priority service option among available day service options offered by case managers and support coordinators to individuals receiving mental health, developmental, or substance abuse day support or employment services and shall expand access to integrated, community-based employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders, intellectual disability, or co-occurring disabilities…”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order (Executive Order #55 (2012)) - 11/16/2012 - 11/16/2012

“The last United States Census concluded that out of 3.6 million Virginia residents who were employed, 154,985 Virginians with disabilities were included in that total. These numbers indicate an under representation of people with disabilities among the gainfully employed. The Commonwealth of Virginia should work to provide a Commonwealth of Opportunity for all Virginians; therefore it is appropriate to initiate steps in order to expand employment opportunities for its citizens who are disabled….”

“By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor by Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth…and in conjunction with… the Code of Virginia which states that it is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities, including our wounded soldiers, to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment, with the goal of enhancing the employment opportunities for Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia DBHDS: Strategic Plan for Employment First - 10/01/2012

To facilitate interagency collaboration the Strategic Plan for Employment First establishes an Employment First Summit Meeting, which will gather leadership from various department committed to upholding Employment First principles, and orders for the creation of a high level administrative leadership body including (DBHDS, DARS, DOE, DMAS, Virginia Employment Commission (VEC), Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council) and Virginia Community College System (VCCS).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Virginia State Employment Leadership Network - 10/01/2012

Virginia is a part of this multi-state technical assistance collaborative whose aim is to improve integrated employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities. “In 2008, DBHDS joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) sponsored by the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services and the University of Massachusetts-Boston Institute for Community Inclusion. DBHDS developed a Virginia-specific SELN Advisory Group made up of over 30 members representing a variety of organizations involved in providing employment services to Virginians. Members include community service boards (CSBs), the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (VBPD), the Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention (VCU/RRTC), and vendor organizations such as the Virginia Association of Community Rehabilitation Programs (vaACCSES), the Arc of Virginia, and the Virginia Association of Providers of Supported Employment (VaAPSE). DBHDS continues to be an active, contributing participant in the monthly National SELN web-based meetings. Virginia is now one of 30 states in the SELN. The Virginia SELN Advisory Group, made up of advocates, providers, and state agencies, continues to identify roadblocks and disincentives in our state system. The group is developing specific strategies for implementation of a system that prioritizes employment as an outcome of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services Employment First Strategic Plan - 10/01/2012

“This document outlines the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services’ (DBHDS or ‘the department’) Strategic Plan for Employment First. The strategic plan was formulated in response to efforts in recent years to build and expand integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in Virginia. DBHDS supports individuals with serious mental illness, substance use disorders, and intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The strategic plan establishes annual goals for DBHDS to collaborate with other state agencies and organizations to expand opportunities for employment for all Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Consent Decree allowing for more waivers and less training Centers - 08/23/2012

“Under the proposed settlement, Virginia has agreed to provide 4170 additional waiver slots, divided among current Training Center residents, disabled people in various segregated facilities other than the Training Centers, and people on the waiting list for services…The settlement also prescribes in great detail how Virginia will administer the services it provides to disabled citizens. This process will be a shared responsibility of the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services and local community service boards ("CSBs")...”“The decree also provides for changed procedures at the Training Centers and spells out how the Commonwealth will assist the CSBs with technical assistance. Each Training Center resident will have a discharge plan crafted by the professionals at the facility. Virginia will set up case-management teams, crisis teams, and plans for supported day services in the community. Essentially, the Commonwealth's efforts—and those of the CSBs—will all be focused on keeping disabled people in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Education ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/27/2012

“For students with disabilities who have the most intensive support needs, there are two model initiatives supported by the Virginia Department of Education: Project SEARCH and the Post-High School Community College Program. Project SEARCH, a business-led model, is a collaborative between school divisions and local businesses that provide employability skills training and workplace internships that occur entirely in the workplace. The Post-High School Community College Program is a supported education model that provides individualized supports to students with significant disabilities seeking postsecondary education to enhance their skills for employment, in an age-appropriate setting. The Department of Education provides support and technical assistance to increase the number of partnerships between school divisions and institutions of higher education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia 2012 Senate Joint Resolution No. 127 - 02/25/2012

“Encouraging the Secretary of Health and Human Resources and the Superintendent of Public Instruction to adopt and implement Employment First practices...” Employment First is defined as a policy is grounded in a framework of increased integration, independence, productivity and employment that is based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, abilities, and informed choice of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ADA Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 01/26/2012

“The fundamental goals of the Agreement are to prevent the unnecessary institutionalization of individuals with developmental disabilities who are living in the community, including thousands of individuals on waitlists for community-based services, and ensure that people who are currently in institutions - at the Commonwealth's training centers or in other private but state-funded facilities - have a meaningful opportunity to receive services that meet their needs in the community…Pursuant to the Interim Settlement Agreement, the State and City will give TTP and Birch service recipients the opportunity to receive integrated supported employment and integrated daytime services that will enable them to interact with the broader community to the fullest extent possible.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Virginia 2012 House Joint Resolution No. 23 - 01/11/2012

“WHEREAS, implementation of an Employment First initiative in Virginia will lead to increased employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, resulting in benefits for individuals, families, employers, and communities across the Commonwealth; now, therefore, be it resolved by the House of Delegates, the Senate concurring, That the Secretary of Health and Human Resources be requested to develop and implement an Employment First initiative in the Commonwealth, which shall identify employment in an integrated, community setting earning an amount that is equal to or greater than minimum-wage rates as the first goal for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving services through state agencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Virginia Acts of Assembly: An Act to Amend and Reenact §§ 51.5-41, 51.5-120, 51.5-163, 51.5-164, and 51.5-172 through 51.5-176 of the Code of Virginia - 02/25/2016

Discrimination against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities by employers prohibited A.No employer shall discriminate in employment or promotion practices against an otherwise qualified person with a disability solely because of such disability. For the purposes of this section, an "otherwise qualified person with a disability" means a person qualified to perform the duties of a particular job or position and whose disability is unrelated to the person's ability to perform such duties or position or is unrelated to the person's qualifications for employment or promotion. B. It is the policy of the Commonwealth that persons with disabilities shall be employed in the state service, the service of the political subdivisions of the Commonwealth, in the public schools, and in all other employment supported in whole or in part by public funds on the same terms and conditions as other persons unless it is shown that the particular disability prevents the performance of the work involved. C. An employer shall make reasonable accommodation to the known physical and mental impairments of an otherwise qualified person with a disability, if necessary to assist such person in performing a particular job, unless the employer can demonstrate that the accommodation would impose an undue burden on the employer. For the purposes of this section, "mental impairment" does not include active alcoholism or current drug addiction and does not include any mental impairment, disease, or defect that has been successfully asserted by an individual as a defense to any criminal charge. 1. Individualized plan for employment. A written individualized plan for employment for each recipient of vocational rehabilitation services provided or funded by the Department, in whole or in part, shall be developed within a reasonable time and as soon as possible, but not later than 90 days after the due date of the determination of eligibility, unless an extension is agreed to by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and the Department. The plan shall be agreed to and signed by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and a qualified vocational rehabilitation counselor employed by the Department

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia SB 1404 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia HB 2306 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia 2012 Senate Joint Resolution No. 127 - 02/25/2012

“Encouraging the Secretary of Health and Human Resources and the Superintendent of Public Instruction to adopt and implement Employment First practices...” Employment First is defined as a policy is grounded in a framework of increased integration, independence, productivity and employment that is based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, abilities, and informed choice of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia 2012 House Joint Resolution No. 23 - 01/11/2012

“WHEREAS, implementation of an Employment First initiative in Virginia will lead to increased employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, resulting in benefits for individuals, families, employers, and communities across the Commonwealth; now, therefore, be it resolved by the House of Delegates, the Senate concurring, That the Secretary of Health and Human Resources be requested to develop and implement an Employment First initiative in the Commonwealth, which shall identify employment in an integrated, community setting earning an amount that is equal to or greater than minimum-wage rates as the first goal for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving services through state agencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Virginians with Disabilities Act ( 51.5-1) of 1989 - 05/01/1989

“ It is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment. To these ends, the General Assembly directs the Governor, the Virginia Office for Protection and Advocacy, the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities, the Departments of Education, Health, Housing and Community Development, Behavioral Health and Developmental Services, and Social Services, and the Departments for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, the Blind and Vision Impaired, and the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing and such other agencies as the Governor deems appropriate, to provide, in a comprehensive and coordinated manner which makes the best use of available resources, those services necessary to assure equal opportunity to persons with disabilities in the Commonwealth.The provisions of this title shall be known and may be cited as “‘The Virginians with Disabilities Act.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/01/2018

~~"WHEREAS, all Virginians should be given the opportunity to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment to drive Virginia’s economy;NOW, THEREFORE, I, Ralph S. Northam, do hereby recognize October 2018 as DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH in our COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, and I call this observance to the attention of all our citizens." 

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order Number One (2018) Equal Opportunity - 01/13/2018

~~‘By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor, I hereby declare that it is the firm and unwavering policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to ensure equal opportunity in all facets of state government.  The foundational tenet of this Executive Order is premised upon a steadfast commitment to foster a culture of inclusion, diversity, and mutual respect for all Virginians. This policy specifically prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, political affiliation, or against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities.  The policy permits appropriate employment preferences for veterans and specifically prohibits discrimination against veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 46: Supporting Virginians with Disabilities in the New Virginia Economy - 07/27/2015

“The Chief Workforce Development Advisor, in conjunction with the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, shall work with DARS and DBVI to offer to all executive branch agencies (including institutions of higher education, boards, and commissions) training designed to expand existing efforts to recruit, accommodate, retain and advance Virginians with disabilities in the Commonwealth’s workforce. Training shall commence no later than October 1, 2015...”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order (Executive Order #55 (2012)) - 11/16/2012 - 11/16/2012

“The last United States Census concluded that out of 3.6 million Virginia residents who were employed, 154,985 Virginians with disabilities were included in that total. These numbers indicate an under representation of people with disabilities among the gainfully employed. The Commonwealth of Virginia should work to provide a Commonwealth of Opportunity for all Virginians; therefore it is appropriate to initiate steps in order to expand employment opportunities for its citizens who are disabled….”

“By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor by Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth…and in conjunction with… the Code of Virginia which states that it is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities, including our wounded soldiers, to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment, with the goal of enhancing the employment opportunities for Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired Business Relations Services - 10/15/2017

“The Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) is pleased to announce the addition of the new DBVI Business Relations Unit. The unit will have a statewide impact on individuals with vision impairments in reaching their career goal of sustainable employment. The Business Relations Specialists will work with employers in recruiting a highly skilled, pre-screened pipeline of talent. The team is well versed in services for employers including, federal contractor hiring (503c), corporate initiatives, workforce diversity and inclusion, worksite consultations, job retention and the many incentives for hiring individuals with abilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia Board for People with Disabilities State Plan 2017-2021 - 10/01/2016

“The Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (the Board) serves as the Commonwealth’s Developmental Disabilities (DD) Planning Council and as the Governor’s Advisory Council on issues affecting individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Under the federal law, each state is authorized to establish a DD Council, which receives funds to carry out initiatives for systems change, capacity-building, and advocacy. Through these activities, the Board seeks to impact the independence, productivity, inclusion, and integration of people with disabilities in their communities.

The Board’s activities are organized in a five-year State Plan which serves as a framework for the Board’s funding initiatives, staff work priorities, and Board member activities. The state plan was developed through Board and stakeholder input, which included focus groups and a survey of people with DD, their families, advocacy organizations and state agencies to assess how well Virginia is doing in supporting children and their families to lead the lives they want with the support they need. The Board was also informed by the findings and recommendations contained in its 2014 Assessment of the Disability Services System in Virginia.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia Dept of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services Employment First Policy Statement - 12/04/2012

“It is the policy of the Board that in the development and implementation of policies and procedures and the delivery of services, the Department and CSB shall ensure that community-based individual supported employment in integrated work settings is presented as the first and priority service option among available day service options offered by case managers and support coordinators to individuals receiving mental health, developmental, or substance abuse day support or employment services and shall expand access to integrated, community-based employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders, intellectual disability, or co-occurring disabilities. … 

Provide training and consultation to service providers on implementing evidence-based supported employment practice models and establishing integrated supported employment teams that include CSBs, the Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), and employment services organizations (ESOs) and work with CSBs and ESOs to incorporate evidence-based supported employment practice models in the day services  they offer, including psychosocial rehabilitation;   

Work with the Department of Medical Assistance Services (DMAS) to identify ways to incorporate integrated, community-based employment services in the Medicaid Intellectual Disability and Individual and Family Developmental Disability Services Waivers."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services State Board Policy 1036 - 12/04/2012

“It is the policy of the Board that in the development and implementation of policies and procedures and the delivery of services, the Department and CSBs shall ensure that community-based individual supported employment in integrated work settings is presented as the first and priority service option among available day service options offered by case managers and support coordinators to individuals receiving mental health, developmental, or substance abuse day support or employment services and shall expand access to integrated, community-based employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders, intellectual disability, or co-occurring disabilities…”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services Employment First Strategic Plan - 10/01/2012

“This document outlines the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services’ (DBHDS or ‘the department’) Strategic Plan for Employment First. The strategic plan was formulated in response to efforts in recent years to build and expand integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in Virginia. DBHDS supports individuals with serious mental illness, substance use disorders, and intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The strategic plan establishes annual goals for DBHDS to collaborate with other state agencies and organizations to expand opportunities for employment for all Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia - A Plan for Advancing Community Focused Services in Virginia. - 06/25/2010

An overall strategic plan with 12 foci that includes an outline that addresses the need for, objectives in, and priorities for creating employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders and those with developmental disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DRS Policy and Procedure Manual: Chapter 8.17. - Self Employment and SEE

This chapter of the Virginia Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (Vocational Rehabilitation) manual precisely defines how to deliver Self-Employment and Supported Self Employment services to customers of the system. Including how to approve and fund such services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Supported Employment

~~“Supported employment is one of many effective ways of assisting persons with disabilities in gaining and maintaining employment.  DARS partners with over 75 Employment Service Organizations in providing situational assessment, job development, placement and training services and long term follow along.DARS provides supported employment or job coach training services, if appropriate and with agreement of their DARS counselor, to eligible consumers regardless of an individual’s impairment or disability cause.All Employment Service Organizations that provide supported employment and job coaching services are CARF accredited to ensure that consumers are receiving quality services"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Virginia Intercommunity Transition Council (VITC)

 “The mission of the Virginia's Intercommunity Transition Council is to promote successful transition outcomes for youth and young adults with disabilities by providing leadership and innovation in employment, education, training, living independently, community participation, and community support systems that influence success for all students.” Contains fact sheets to “assist others in understanding the various facets that promote exemplary transition for Virginia’s youth.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Services for Students with Disabilities

“VDOE's Transition Services website provides support, information and resources designed to improve the outcomes of students with disabilities in transition from middle / secondary education to postsecondary education and employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Review of Virginia’s Plan to Increase Employment First Plan: FY 2016-FY2018-Goals, Strategies, and Action Items - 12/13/2018

~~“DBHDS, with the input of the E1AG (formerly the SELN-VA Advisory Committee) has revised the FY16-FY18 plan to increase employment opportunities. It was provided with the Status Report as of 6/30/18. The Plan includes five goal areas each of which has sub-goals. The plan’s goals and status in achieving goals can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia DBHDS: Strategic Plan for Employment First - 10/01/2012

To facilitate interagency collaboration the Strategic Plan for Employment First establishes an Employment First Summit Meeting, which will gather leadership from various department committed to upholding Employment First principles, and orders for the creation of a high level administrative leadership body including (DBHDS, DARS, DOE, DMAS, Virginia Employment Commission (VEC), Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council) and Virginia Community College System (VCCS).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Virginia State Employment Leadership Network - 10/01/2012

Virginia is a part of this multi-state technical assistance collaborative whose aim is to improve integrated employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities. “In 2008, DBHDS joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) sponsored by the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services and the University of Massachusetts-Boston Institute for Community Inclusion. DBHDS developed a Virginia-specific SELN Advisory Group made up of over 30 members representing a variety of organizations involved in providing employment services to Virginians. Members include community service boards (CSBs), the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (VBPD), the Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention (VCU/RRTC), and vendor organizations such as the Virginia Association of Community Rehabilitation Programs (vaACCSES), the Arc of Virginia, and the Virginia Association of Providers of Supported Employment (VaAPSE). DBHDS continues to be an active, contributing participant in the monthly National SELN web-based meetings. Virginia is now one of 30 states in the SELN. The Virginia SELN Advisory Group, made up of advocates, providers, and state agencies, continues to identify roadblocks and disincentives in our state system. The group is developing specific strategies for implementation of a system that prioritizes employment as an outcome of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Intercommunity Transition Council

Virginia's Intercommunity Transition Council is committed to promoting partnerships and influencing linkages that result in transition service networks for coordinating person-centered services. Their fact sheet on employment cites Customized Employment as a successful strategy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Olmstead Settlement Agreement

“The Commonwealth shall establish a state policy on Employment First for the target population and include a term in the CSB Performance Contract requiring application of this policy. The Employment First policy shall, at a minimum, be based on the following principles: (1) individual supported employment in integrated work settings is the first and priority service option for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities receiving day program or employment services from or funded by theCommonwealth; (2) the goal of employment services is to support individuals in integrated work settings where they are paid minimum or competitive wages; and (3) employment services and goals must be developed and discussed at least annually through a person-centered planning process and included in ISPs. The Commonwealth shall have at least one employment service coordinator to monitor implementation of Employment First practices for individuals in the target population”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Virginia Disability Employment Initiative Round VIII - 10/01/2017

“VA DEI will fund four Disability Resource Coordinators and implement activities in the Northern Virginia Region that will build on existing career pathways with a focus on the Information Technology (IT) sector that have been developed by the local partners. The project will also expand on work currently underway by Northern Virginia Community College and its adult education partners to customize a bridge program that will connect low-skilled adults to college level IT programming through an integrated education and training program. Key activities will include the analysis of existing adult education and community college IT curricula and instructional practices to ensure accessibility according to Universal Design Principles, development of fully accessible career assessments for use by local partners, and alignment across all instructional programs that lead to ever higher levels of credential attainment among program participants. The regional industry sector model will be applicable to other career pathways. Targeted industry sectors will include Information Technology.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Virginia Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities - 07/18/2017

“Led by the Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, this grant will help nearly 500 Virginians with disabilities, including young adults and veterans, gain new skills and credentials through Career Pathways to seek employment in competitive, high-demand, high-quality occupations.

Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities has 10 project partners in education, workforce development and business. These partners focus on strategies to:

meet business needs in high-demand occupations meet career seekers' needs to attain marketable credentials and find middle-skilled jobs train vocational rehabilitation counselors to work with potential clients”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Virginia No Wrong Door System Grant - 10/01/2015

~~“Virginia will provide a high-quality, sustainable, person-centered, single statewide No Wrong Door system of long-term services and supports. No Wrong Door will support individuals of all ages  and disabilities in achieving their unique goals for community living; streamline access to community supports; and promote efficiencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia: Fairfax Customized Employment Grant - 07/01/2007

“The Customized Employment grant initiative was a product of the Northern Virginia Workforce Investment Board. The goal of the group was to build the capacity of the local One-Stop Center to use Customized Employment services to increase employment outcomes, choice, and wages for people with disabilities who resided in Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the cities of Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas, and Manassas Park.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Disability Employment Initiative (Round Four)

As a past Round 1 grantee, VA DEI will continue to build on existing infrastructure to develop shared ownership; foster systems integration, through cross-interagency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. Three Disability Resource Coordinators and a DRC State Lead will facilitate the implementation of the service delivery strategies. The pilot sites will receive the services of a Ticket consultant, who has been successful at engaging Round I pilot LWIBs in the EN process and in increasing ticket activity. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Virginia Ticket to Work

“Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for people with disabilities who want to work. Social Security disability beneficiaries age 18 through 64 qualify. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket Program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence…“The Ticket program is a good fit for people who want to improve their earning potential and who are committed to preparing for long-term success in the workforce. Ticket to Work offers beneficiaries with disabilities access to meaningful employment with the assistance of Ticket to Work employment service providers.”Virginia has had Ticket to Work Since 2002.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Virginia National Association of State Mental Health Program Director’s (NASMHPD) Employment Development Initiative (EDI)

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).”

“This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

Virginia is using its funds to support their Employment First Initiative. They have conducted multiple Employment First Summits, and developed an Employment First Advisory group.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Virginia Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

Note: This program ended on December 31, 2009 according to this site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Virginia - Richmond Customized Employment Project

“The grant worked to strengthen the linkages of the Richmond-area One-Stop system with schools, VR, and the Virginia Business Leadership Network, a business-directed group designed to encourage other businesses to hire people with disabilities. The project focused on expanding the reach and scope of existing service programs, such as a WIA youth project, to make them more appropriate for job seekers with multiple barriers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Virginia Disability Employment Initiative (Round One)

“The Virginia Community College System, the administrator of the Workforce Investment Act in Virginia, will enter into a Memorandum of Agreement with the Virginia Department of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) to provide co-leadership in order to coordinate DEI project activities with DRS-funded Disability Program Navigators (DPNs). The DEI project will build on the strengths and lessons learned from the activities of its DPNs and will support the continuation of those activities in conjunction with the enhanced activities related to five strategic components. DEI flexible funding will be used as the “first dollar down” to leverage partner funds and services. The Virginia DEI will incorporate resource mapping in each workforce area to identify all available resources and career assessment vehicles to support the needs of the job seeker, and will assure quality services through the deployment of mystery shopper protocols. Participating Workforce Investment Boards will be fully engaged as Employment Networks under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Veteran Entrepreneurship - 11/07/2018

~~“The Virginia Department of Veterans Services is excited to announce the hiring of a Veteran Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Coordinator (VEEC).  The VEEC will connect veterans and military spouses to a plethora of entrepreneurship resources and events! Whether you are a seasoned entrepreneur or just considering what that path may look like, the VEEC can share an extensive list of programs, events and resources all for entrepreneurs.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Special Education Technical Assistance & Professional Development

“These resources were developed to provide professional development and technical assistance to parents, school personnel and other consumers. All resources are intended to provide guidance for addressing the regulatory requirements and instructional elements needed for a student’s free appropriate public education (FAPE).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Virginia Transition Services for Students with Disabilities

“VDOE's Transition Services website provides support, information and resources designed to improve the outcomes of students with disabilities in transition from middle / secondary education to postsecondary education and employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Consumer's Guide to Self-Employment

This guide is written for consumers within the Virginia Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (Vocational Rehabilitation) who wish to pursue Self Employment as a career goal. It describes many of the Department's policies, as well as offering guidance on how to succeed in the business development process.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

DRS Guide to Supported Employment and Job Coach Training Services

“The purpose of the Guide to Supported Employment and Job Coach Training Services is to provide practical and specific information to supplement the Virginia DRS Policy and Procedure Manual. Where possible, the Guide seeks to illustrate evolving best practices gleaned from case examples and data gathered in Virginia. Specifically, the Guide is intended to provide supported employment practitioners with guidance in:

Achieving a customer-oriented environment that promotes consumer choice and participation, individual responsibility, practitioner excellence and sensitive delivery of quality services; Enhancing understanding of operational procedures and the need for cooperation, collaboration, and coordination; Clarifying and expanding on the roles, responsibilities, and expectations among supported employment practitioners; and Planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating supported employment programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Report of the Independent Reviewer on Compliance with the Consent Agreement US v. VA, Civil Action No. 3:12 CV 059 - 10/07/2014

“The IR reported in the last Report to the Court that the Commonwealth had achieved compliance with certain requirements of the Agreement. During this, the sixth review period, the Commonwealth through its lead agency, DBHDS, and its sister agencies has maintained compliance with these same provisions and has come into compliance with additional requirements. The Commonwealths leaders have continued to meet regularly and to collaborate to develop and implement plans to address the Agreement’s requirements and to improve people’s lives. The IR also reported in the last Report to the Court that the Commonwealth lagged significantly behind schedule. It continues to do so. There have been significant delays in the it’s (sic) compliance with requirements that are critical to an effective community-based services system for individuals with ID/DD. For two years, the Commonwealth’s primary strategy to come into compliance has been the redesign of it HCBS waiver program."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other

Virginia Consent Decree allowing for more waivers and less training Centers - 08/23/2012

“Under the proposed settlement, Virginia has agreed to provide 4170 additional waiver slots, divided among current Training Center residents, disabled people in various segregated facilities other than the Training Centers, and people on the waiting list for services…The settlement also prescribes in great detail how Virginia will administer the services it provides to disabled citizens. This process will be a shared responsibility of the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services and local community service boards ("CSBs")...”“The decree also provides for changed procedures at the Training Centers and spells out how the Commonwealth will assist the CSBs with technical assistance. Each Training Center resident will have a discharge plan crafted by the professionals at the facility. Virginia will set up case-management teams, crisis teams, and plans for supported day services in the community. Essentially, the Commonwealth's efforts—and those of the CSBs—will all be focused on keeping disabled people in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ADA Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 01/26/2012

“The fundamental goals of the Agreement are to prevent the unnecessary institutionalization of individuals with developmental disabilities who are living in the community, including thousands of individuals on waitlists for community-based services, and ensure that people who are currently in institutions - at the Commonwealth's training centers or in other private but state-funded facilities - have a meaningful opportunity to receive services that meet their needs in the community…Pursuant to the Interim Settlement Agreement, the State and City will give TTP and Birch service recipients the opportunity to receive integrated supported employment and integrated daytime services that will enable them to interact with the broader community to the fullest extent possible.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

TEEOP Employment Supports - 10/18/2018

~~“Training, education, employment and othercommunity engagement opportunities (TEEOP) Employment SupportsThe web link includes information about how the State will provide assessments and referrals for employment.Employment Support Services for MedicaidParticipants to Achieve Self-Sufficiency” (COMPASS) Waiver.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Commonwealth Coordinated Care (CCC) Plus Waiver - 08/01/2018

~~The CCC Plus Waiver (also known as the Commonwealth Coordinated Care Plus Waiver), is a combination of the formerly known waivers titled: EDCD (Elderly or Disabled with Consumer Direction) waiver and the Technology Assisted (Tech) waiver. All of the waivers offer CD or AD services depending on individualized needs and program criteria met.

From the Fact Sheet:“The Commonwealth Coordinated Care (CCC) Plus Waiver [1915 (c)] provides care in the home and community rather than in a  nursing facility (NF) or other specialized care medical facility “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

VA Community Living Waiver (0372.R03.00) - 07/01/2014

~~Waiver Authority 1915 (c)Date Originally Approved 07/01/2001Implementation Date 07/01/2014Expiration Date 06/30/2019Summary Provides day support, personal assistance, prevocational, residential support, respite, supported employment, consumer directed services facilitation, assistive technology, companion services, crisis stabilization, crisis supervision, environmental mods, PERS, skilled nursing, therapeutic consultation, transition for individuals w/IID ages 0 - no max age

From the Fact Sheet:“Formerly the Intellectual Disability Waiver, the purpose of the Community Living home and community-based 1915 (c) waiveris to provide support in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) or related condition.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Building Independence home and community-based 1915 (c) waiver (0430.R02.00) - 07/01/2013

~~Waiver Authority1915 (c)Date Originally Approved07/01/2005Implementation Date07/01/2013Expiration Date06/30/2018Summary Provides day support, prevocational, supported employment for individuals w/ID ages 6 - no max age

From the Fact Sheet:“Formerly called the Day Support Waiver, the purpose of this Building Independence home and community-based 1915 (c) waiver is to provide support in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disability (ICF/IID”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Family and Individual Support home and community-based (1915(c)) waiver (0358.R03.00) - 07/01/2013

~~Expiration Date06/30/2018Summary Provides day support, in-home residential, personal care, prevocational, respite care, supported employment - group/individual, services facilitation, adult companion, assistive technology, crisis stablization, crisis supervision, environmental mods, family/caregiver training, PERS, skilled nursing, therapeutic consultation, transition for individuals w/autism and DD ages 6 - no max age

Formerly the Individual and Family Developmental Disabilities Support Waiver, the purpose of the Family and Individual Support home and community-based (1915(c)) waiver is to provide supports and services in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) or related condition.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia Department of Education ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/27/2012

“For students with disabilities who have the most intensive support needs, there are two model initiatives supported by the Virginia Department of Education: Project SEARCH and the Post-High School Community College Program. Project SEARCH, a business-led model, is a collaborative between school divisions and local businesses that provide employability skills training and workplace internships that occur entirely in the workplace. The Post-High School Community College Program is a supported education model that provides individualized supports to students with significant disabilities seeking postsecondary education to enhance their skills for employment, in an age-appropriate setting. The Department of Education provides support and technical assistance to increase the number of partnerships between school divisions and institutions of higher education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

MEDICAID WORKS (Virginia Medicaid Buy-in)

“MEDICAID WORKS is a work incentive opportunity offered by the Virginia Medicaid program for individuals with disabilities who are employed or who want to go to work. MEDICAID WORKS is a Medicaid plan option that will enable workers with disabilities to earn higher income and retain more in savings, or resources, while ensuring continued Medicaid coverage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Virginia Olmstead Settlement Agreement

“The Commonwealth shall establish a state policy on Employment First for the target population and include a term in the CSB Performance Contract requiring application of this policy. The Employment First policy shall, at a minimum, be based on the following principles: (1) individual supported employment in integrated work settings is the first and priority service option for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities receiving day program or employment services from or funded by the Commonwealth; (2) the goal of employment services is to support individuals in integrated work settings where they are paid minimum or competitive wages; and (3) employment services and goals must be developed and discussed at least annually through a person-centered planning process and included in ISPs. The Commonwealth shall have at least one employment service coordinator to monitor implementation of Employment First practices for individuals in the target population

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

Note: This program ended on December 31, 2009 according to this site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Virginia Statewide HCBS Transition Plan

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule for home and community based services (HCBS) that requires states to review and evaluate home and community based (HCB) settings, including residential and non-residential settings. The HCBS final regulation requires states to prepare and submit a Statewide Transition Plan. CMS asks that statewide transition plans specifically address only the setting requirements of the final rule for home and community based services (The Rule).  Therefore, this Statewide Transition Plan is specific to the analysis and recommendations regarding the settings for home and community based services. 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

Known affectionately as "The Place for Lovers," individuals with disabilities in the Commonwealth have the opportunity with the right supports and services to Live Passionately by having careers in competitive integrated employment and being full participants in their communities. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.69%
Change from
2016 to 2017
8,470,020
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.77%
Change from
2016 to 2017
500,771
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.13%
Change from
2016 to 2017
204,103
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.39%
Change from
2016 to 2017
40.76%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.39%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.97%

State Data

General

2015 2016 2017
Population. 8,382,993 8,411,808 8,470,020
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 479,430 496,928 500,771
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 179,153 193,632 204,103
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,653,779 3,647,462 3,669,633
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 37.37% 38.97% 40.76%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.12% 78.66% 78.97%
State/National unemployment rate. 4.50% 4.00% 3.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.60% 18.10% 17.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 10.40% 10.10% 9.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 449,104 466,393 462,932
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 486,083 498,192 516,107
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 658,933 675,120 686,273
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 209,349 213,359 222,654
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 45,389 46,107 45,140
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 2,727 4,829 3,549
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 31,524 32,472 28,994
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 300 957 N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 23,693 27,133 27,801
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 8,661 10,715 9,532

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,473 6,657 6,877
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.60% 4.80% 4.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 212,711 211,614 210,694

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 14,666 14,753 14,919
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 31,199 31,011 30,594
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 73,206 77,519 70,510
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 20.00% 19.00% 21.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.60% 0.70% 2.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 0.90% 0.60% 4.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A 3.00% 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 7.80% 7.80% 43.40%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 344 388 1,243
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 496 329 2,600
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. N/A 1,691 1,788
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 4,253 4,485 25,180

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 13,591 12,668 12,496
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05 0.05 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2013 2014 2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 109 150 150
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 60 85 80
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 55.00% 57.00% 53.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.72 1.01 0.95

 

VR OUTCOMES

2015 2016 2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
7,034
7,248
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 44 44 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 438 455 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 1,002 1,047 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 2,746 2,990 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,240 2,092 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 564 620 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 39.50% 34.60% N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 6,597 7,335 7,954
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 312,340 312,508 315,937
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). 285 889 N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 733 713 N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $36,526,000 $34,044,000 $35,381,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $19,130,000 $18,506,000 $19,799,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $137,771,000 $145,494,000 $151,457,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0 $0 $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 24.00% 26.00% 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 631 928 898
Number of people served in facility based work. 598 724 683
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 9,546 10,112 9,455
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 40.60 49.40 48.60

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 62.79% 63.36% 64.01%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 11.01% 11.15% 10.87%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.06% 4.16% 4.26%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 98.76% 99.17% 99.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 34.13% 34.45% 32.85%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 63.24% 64.81% 63.10%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 72.57% 73.03% 71.98%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.11% 30.36% 30.25%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 5,052,830
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 7,757
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 168,108
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 3,289,332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,457,440
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 339
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,546
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,885
AbilityOne wages (products). $831,106
AbilityOne wages (services). $43,925,206

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2017 2018 2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 21 27 19
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 22 28 19
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 14 14 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,398 1,579 1,274
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0 0 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,412 1,593 1,274

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

(10) Supporting Virginia’s Employment First initiative and implementation of the Department of Justice Settlement agreement by collaborating with the Department for Behavioral Health and Developmental Services to establish staff positions specializing in caseloads of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to enhance their employment. (Page 286)

(10) Supporting Virginia’s Employment First initiative and implementation of the Department of Justice Settlement agreement by collaborating with the Department for Behavioral Health and Developmental Services to establish staff positions specializing in caseloads of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to enhance their employment.

(11) Providing IPAD Pros for use by Rehabilitation Engineers and Assistive Technology Specialists in a “tele–rehab” environment which allows them to provide more effective on–site services to VR consumers needing these services and to interface more effectively with rehabilitation and assistive technology staff at WWRC. (Page 333) 

Customized Employment

(6) DARS, working closely with the VCU Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention, identified the need for training job coaches in basics responsibilities that would be reasonable in terms of time away from the job. VCU responded with the following: 

  1. Supported Employment Web–based Certificate Series (ACRE–certified);
  2. Supported Competitive Employment for Individuals with Mental Illness (ACRE–certified);
  3. Customized Employment; and
  4. Promoting an active network of inter–agency and inter–organizational professionals working with mutual supported employment consumers, with an emphasis on increasing linkages with rehabilitation engineering and technology experts and enhancing current linkages with employers, consumers, the education community and family members; (Page 258)

DARS is actively engaged at both the state and local level in the Workforce Development System. DARS is represented on the state Career Pathways Workgroup which advises the Governor’s Office and Workforce Board on the Workforce System issues and participates on the WIOA implementation team. A memorandum of understanding is in place with each Local Workforce Development Board and DARS works closely with the American Job Centers to assure access to individuals with disabilities. The VR program currently is co–located as a One–Stop partner in Charlottesville, Roanoke, Martinsville, Danville and South Boston. DARS also has a physical presence in other Workforce Board AJC’s. DARS is directly involved with both the state Workforce partners and local AJC’s in the Department of Labor Disability Employment Initiative grant and is lead on an RSA Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant. In the coming year, DARS will support training on career counseling, motivational interviewing as well as Customized Employment for our workforce partners.

No mechanism has been identified to track jointly enrolled Title I and VR clients. DARS is currently in the process of “on–boarding” VR RSA 911 information to the Virginia Longitudinal Data System (VLDS) to create a process to identify jointly enrolled clients. (Page 272)

(12) Providing training and implementing seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment (CE) across Virginia. This strategy is based on needs assessment and focus group recommendations from DARS Partnerships with Transcen, Inc. and George Washington University. By November 1, 2016, DARS will select and train key VR Counselors and Evaluators, AT Specialists, Business Placement and Self–Employment staff, and Partnering Employment Specialists, Behavioral Specialists, and Facilities Personnel in key concepts to implement CE approaches to DARS clients exiting institutions, sheltered workshops, high schools and adults for whom traditional supported employment services have not yielded successful outcomes. DARS will serve 20 or more clients with diverse backgrounds in order to assimilate Customized Employment best practices into our menu of services for these targeted populations. Options for self–employment will also be explored under this approach. (Page 286)

Provide training and implement seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment across Virginia.

Educate our VR counselors, vocational evaluators, consumers, and their parents (as applicable) on the current and future labor market, the availability of competitively–waged jobs and the skills needed to obtain those jobs.

Implement the Career Pathways grant to include the use of motivational interviewing techniques with our VR consumers. (Page 289)

The time limited supported employment services funded with federal/state VR Case service dollars include: 

  1. Vocational Assessment, job development, job placement, job coach training services, and training for blind, vision impaired, or deafblind individuals with most significant disabilities, including youth, who require more extensive supports than traditional VR services. The goal in providing SE services is competitive integrated employment.
  2. Support services such as adaptive equipment and assistive technology devices, interpreter services for persons with dual–sensory impairments, and other approved VR services needed to sustain the individual during the time limited phase of supported employment.

VR sponsorship for time limited SE services occurs when the individual has competitive integrated employment, including customized employment, and their VR case has been closed. Indication that it is time to end the time–limited SE phase occurs when the individual and the employer are satisfied with the individual’s job performance, when the SE services have been provided, and when job coach intervention time is less than 20 percent of the individual’s working hours over a 30 to 60–day period.

An individual’s VR case is closed when competitive integrated employment is performed for the established hours per week for a period of ninety days after the transition from the time–limited phase to the extended services phase, as specified on the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). (Page 307)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

The successful execution of this plan requires Virginia to commit to the professional development of workforce practitioners, and to the braiding and management of financial resources in new ways. The Commonwealth is committed to developing staff to capitalize on investments in technology, and to realize the benefits from a common agenda with workforce system partners. Careful investments in human and financial resources ultimately reflect value to customers and to their communities across the state. (Page 78)

Implement “Integrated Resource” team service delivery strategy for multiple–barrier customers 

  • Coordinate workforce partners around and employment/training goal for an individual customer, with no modification to provider service models;
  • Enhance cross program collaboration and service alignment by braiding and leveraging partner resources, funding and services;
  • Develop and integrated career plan that aligns with service goals;
  • Conduct partner cross–training for strategy implementation;
  • Design plan to record best practices for broader dissemination across workforce system partners;
  • Embed practices into procedures; and
  • Apply CPI. (Page 84)
DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

Virginia is fortunate to have a long standing collaborative relationship with Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and other key state partners. This partnership history facilitated the leveraging and coordination of existing and added resources provided via the six DOL Workforce Disability Initiatives, the latest of which are the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants. Whereas, significant strides have been made to ensure our One-Stop Service Delivery System is accessible to all job seekers, including those with disabilities and other challenges to employment, we are committed to continuous quality improvement. These efforts are focused on physical, programmatic and communication access. We will continue these efforts and build on our existing infrastructure to encourage shared ownership; foster systems integration through cross-agency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. (Page 154)

The following are examples of local level practices implemented to enhance access for job seekers with disabilities made possible by leveraging the resources from the DOL Disability grants and state level cross agency partnerships:

Installed Universal Computer Workstations with Assistive Technology devices and software and conducted staff trainings in pilot LWDBAs; expanded the web-based Common Screening Tool to better identify job seekers with disabilities, track customer flow and service referrals. (The data indicated an on average a 15% increase of self-identification where this tool was piloted); incorporated Disability Resources and disseminated announcements for various activities that would benefit individuals with disabilities, such as: disability trainings and IRS free tax assistance and site locations, dedicated a page to post information about disability resources on the Virginia’s Workforce Development website, Elevate Virginia; integrated DEI strategies by adding four modules into Virginia’s Workforce Development Systems Course, which is a requirement for all front-line staff co-located at the Centers to complete. (The optional modules are Welcoming All Customers/Universal Strategies, Asset Development, Integrated Resource Teams with a Person Centered Planning approach and Mystery Shopper); coordinated local/statewide trainings (on line, in person and at state conferences) for One-Stop staff and partners and also utilized resources through the Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. Some of the topics covered were: ADA Accessibility requirements, Disability Etiquette, Access for All - Welcoming Customers at workforce centers and accommodations; implemented Social Security (SSA) - Ticket To Work Program to expand employment opportunities for SSA beneficiaries in 6 LWDB areas; facilitated certification trainings for Work Incentives Specialist Advocates who advise beneficiaries on work incentives; promoted asset development and financial capability strategies to enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency, including financial literacy training, the use of individual development accounts, tax and work incentives, and other strategies for encouraging economic advancement; and trained and provided technical assistance to businesses/employers about the use of effective hiring practices and job accommodations, including Assistive Technology trainings in collaboration with Virginia Assistive Technology System and Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center.

As a result, DEI Round I efforts and collaborative workforce partnerships, Virginia statewide data from October 2010 through March 2014, indicated participants with disabilities active with WIA (now WIOA) intensive services increased from 1.8% to 4.9%. (Page 155)

3.4 Provide 7 Disability Resource Coordinators/Disability Program Navigators to increase access to programs and services for vocational rehabilitation consumers. DARS currently provides three Disability Resource Coordinators to two local American Job Centers (AJCs) as a part of DOL Disability Employment Initiative Round IV grant project efforts in collaboration with the VCCS/Workforce Services Division (Title I Administrator). In addition, through an Innovation and Expansion project, DARS has co–located a previous Disability Program Navigator as a VR Counselor housed in an AJC and providing VR services. Also, three workforce areas previously participating in DOL DPN/DEI grant efforts have retained three DARS staff to provide services to individuals with disabilities in AJCs. As a result DEI Round I efforts and collaborative workforce partnerships, Virginia statewide data from October 2010 through March 2014, indicated participants with disabilities active with WIA (now WIOA) intensive services increased from 1.8% to 4.9%. (Page 294)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

On October 1, 2014, VCCS was awarded Workforce Investment Act, Workforce Innovation funds in the amount of $11,196,152 by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration to implement the Working Families Success Network Model with 6 American Job Center (also known as One-Stop Center) sites in Virginia for 1800 participants. The model of bundled service delivery comprises three services:

  1. Workforce and education services resulting in career advancement: education and training, employability skills, job placement;
  2. Income and work supports: access to student financial aid, public benefits, free tax preparation;
  3. Financial services and asset building: financial education, financial coaching. 

A Coach will be available at each of the sites to coordinate the services. As a study project, services will be determined with a randomized control process and to those who consent to participate starting October 1, 2015 in Workforce Development Areas 3-Western Virginia, 6-Piedmont, 8-South Central, 11-Northern Virginia, 16-Hampton Roads, and 17-West Piedmont. Services will be delivered through September 30, 2018. (Page 110)

Virginia’s Workforce Development Systems Course, which is a requirement for all front-line staff co-located at the Centers to complete. (The optional modules are Welcoming All Customers/Universal Strategies, Asset Development, Integrated Resource Teams with a Person Centered Planning approach and Mystery Shopper); coordinated local/statewide trainings (on line, in person and at state conferences) for One-Stop staff and partners and also utilized resources through the Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. Some of the topics covered were: ADA Accessibility requirements, Disability Etiquette, Access for All - Welcoming Customers at workforce centers and accommodations; implemented Social Security (SSA) - Ticket To Work Program to expand employment opportunities for SSA beneficiaries in 6 LWDB areas; facilitated certification trainings for Work Incentives Specialist Advocates who advise beneficiaries on work incentives; promoted asset development and financial capability strategies to enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency, including financial literacy training, the use of individual development accounts, tax and work incentives, and other strategies for encouraging economic advancement; and trained and provided technical assistance to businesses/employers about the use of effective hiring practices and job accommodations, including Assistive Technology trainings in collaboration with Virginia Assistive Technology System and Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. (Page 155)   

School to Work Transition

School personnel represented the largest number of respondents (50%), followed by: Supported Employment Vendors–ESO’s (23.6%), Community Service Boards (17%), Centers for Independent Living (4.7%) Advocates (4.7%), individuals with a disability (3.8%), parents of children with disabilities (1.9%), and Brain Injury Organization Members (1%).

Respondents rated consumers’ barriers to employment. Transportation emerged as the number one “very significant” barrier to employment with a 73% agreement followed by: lack of jobs (61%), financial support for services (60%), housing (40%), lack of marketable job skills (35%), financial or benefits disincentives (33%), inadequate training opportunities (28%), lack of networking opportunities (28%), lack of service providers (26%), family influence (21%), and consumers unrealistic goals (16%).

Approximately, 89% of DARS consumers are most significantly disabled. DARS supplements its Title VI Supported Employment funds with Title I funds to ensure that every consumer who needs Supported Employment services receive this service. (Page 270)

Two percent of the respondents gave DARS an excellent rating regarding students’ experience with DARS. Twelve percent rated DARS as “good”, 9% “fair” and 13% responded “unsatisfactory”. The services identified as most needed were: job coaching (80%), internships (66%), job placement services (74%), skills training (66%), job seeking skills training (61%), vocational evaluation (57%), independent living skills training (54%), guidance and counseling from a vocational rehabilitation counselor (53%), college education (38%), assistive technology (38%), benefits planning (36%), physical restoration (8%) and mental restoration (7%). Fifty eight percent of the respondents stated that students did not have the skills to obtain employment in the community. Thirty percent believed the students did have the training for community employment and twelve percent did not answer the question. (Page 273)

(4) Assure a full range of choices are available in order to meet the vocational needs of consumers requiring supported employment services. Virginia uses all supported employment models, including the individual placement model, the enclave model, the entrepreneurial model and mobile work crews. Individual placement is the most widely used, and generally offers higher wage rates, better benefits and more flexibility in meeting the needs of customers and employers in an integrated work setting. The group models are important options that provide for the constant presence of the Employment Specialist at the job site to support customers who need intensive supervision in order to maintain employment. (Page 283-284)

DARS requires that each of Virginia’s ESOs vendored to provide VR services be nationally accredited through the Rehabilitation Accreditation Commission (CARF). CARF accreditation provides a host of benefits to DARS as a state–funding source, as well as to DARS consumers, and taxpayers. In addition to assuring accountability and consistent quality levels, national accreditation allows DARS to focus on program expansion, improvement and accountability.

DARS currently purchase services through 87 ESOs throughout the state. During FY 2015, these organizations provided supported employment services over 3,000 individuals, including youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 303)

The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) provides services and supports to individuals who have developmental disabilities, intellectual disabilities, and mental health concerns, also known as behavioral health in Virginia. Services to these individuals are provided by regional and local Community Services Boards (CSBs). DBVI will establish or reestablish collaborative relationships with Virginia DBHDS and CSBs to include participating in interagency workgroups with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the Intellectual Disability (ID)/Developmental Disability (DD) CSB Case Managers with the goal of providing information related to allowable employment activities including Virginia’s Employment First initiative, Medicaid Waiver programs, and the provision of supported and extended support services. Collaboration with DBHDS also provides information on services and resources that support pre-employment transition programs and positive employment outcomes. The DBVI Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor will work with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the ID/DD CSB Case Managers to specifically ensure that issues related to work benefits, supports, and available resources are addressed. (Page 333)

Lack of transportation, affordable housing, marketable work skills and training were all identified as major barriers to employment for individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind in Virginia; 

  • The Supported Employment model is not frequently used, and when it is used, it is not typically the standard SE model;
  • A large majority of individuals served receive SSA benefits and fear of benefit loss affects their return–to–work behavior; and
  • Independent living skills are a major need of individuals served. The Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired (VRCBVI) meets this need for a small percentage of individuals served, but many people would like to see VRCBVI expand its reach and provide low vision services. (Page 343)
  1. Any individuals, including all minor caretakers, under 16 years of age;
  2. Any individual at least 16, but no more than 19 years of age, who is enrolled full–time in elementary or secondary school, including vocational or technical school programs. The vocational or technical school must be equivalent to secondary school;
  3. Any individual unable to participate because of a temporary medical condition that prevents entry into at least 20 hours per week of employment or training, as determined by a medical professional;
  4. Any individual who is incapacitated, as determined by receipt of Social Security Disability benefits or Supplemental Security Income;
  5. Any individual 60 years of age or older;
  6. Any individual who is the sole care giver of another member of the household who is incapacitated, and whose presence is essential for the care of the member on a substantially continuous basis, shall be exempt from participation in VIEW. Incapacity is determined by receipt of Social Security Disability benefits or Supplemental Security Income. The sole other condition under which an individual may be determined incapacitated is by a written medical statement from a physician; and
  7. A parent or caretaker of a child under 12 months of age who personally provides care for the child. (Page 506)
Career Pathways

To enhance and facilitate job–readiness skills and career planning for students to make a successful transition from school to work and to greater independence, students will be referred to DBVI Workforce Specialists and to Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) (also known in Virginia as Employment Services Organizations (ESOs)). Workforce Specialists will complement pre–employment transition services by delivering workplace readiness training to establish skills necessary for entry into career pathways, competitive integrated employment, and by coordinating with schools and networking with employers to establish paid and unpaid internships, including apprenticeships, specifically matched to the student’s needs, skills, interests, abilities, and informed choice. Transition services purchased from CRPs may also include On–The–Job support and extended support services for students and youth needing additional supports in the work experience setting or on the job. (Page 331)

Work Incentives & Benefits

Across Virginia’s workforce system, partner agencies are engaged in operationalizing several workforce initiatives stemming from grants obtained from the federal government for specific workforce innovations. These grants include:

  • The Disability Employment Initiative Grants (The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, the Virginia Employment Commission, Virginia’s Community College System, and five Local Workforce Development Boards)
  • The Veterans’ Demonstration Grant (Virginia’s Community College System, the Virginia Employment Commission, and the Department of Veterans’ Services)
  • Local Apprenticeship Grants (Shenandoah Valley Workforce Region, the Department of Labor and Industry, and Virginia’s Community College System)
  • The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Department of the Blind and Vision Impaired jointly received a RSA funded CPID grant The grant collaborates with multiple workforce partners including adult education and two local workforce boards, other DOL grants and the Virginia Manufacturers Association to enhance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. project goals include helping individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations; enhancing the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities; (Page 88)

Manufacturers Association to enhance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. project goals include helping individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations; enhancing the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities; enhancing access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities. (Page 98)

  • The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Department of the Blind and Vision Impaired jointly received a RSA funded CPID grant The grant collaborates with multiple workforce partners including adult education and two local workforce boards, other DOL grants and the Virginia Manufacturers Association to enhance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. project goals include helping individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations; enhancing the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities; enhancing access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities. (Page 103)

DARS is actively engaged at both the state and local level in the Workforce Development System. DARS is represented on the state Career Pathways Workgroup which advises the Governor’s Office and Workforce Board on the Workforce System issues and participates on the WIOA implementation team. A memorandum of understanding is in place with each Local Workforce Development Board and DARS works closely with the American Job Centers to assure access to individuals with disabilities. The VR program currently is co–located as a One–Stop partner in Charlottesville, Roanoke, Martinsville, Danville and South Boston. DARS also has a physical presence in other Workforce Board AJC’s. DARS is directly involved with both the state Workforce partners and local AJC’s in the Department of Labor Disability Employment Initiative grant and is lead on an RSA Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant. In the coming year, DARS will support training on career counseling, motivational interviewing as well as Customized Employment for our workforce partners. (Page 272)

Provide training and implement seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment across Virginia.

Educate our VR counselors, vocational evaluators, consumers, and their parents (as applicable) on the current and future labor market, the availability of competitively–waged jobs and the skills needed to obtain those jobs.

Implement the Career Pathways grant to include the use of motivational interviewing techniques with our VR consumers.

Implement the five year Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (CPID) model demonstration program to create new career pathways and/or use existing career pathways in high–demand occupations. (Page 289)

WWRC has formalized its evolving partnership with the DARS Business Development Managers to connect classrooms to workplace standards and expectations and modify curriculum to increase the likelihood of successful placements for training graduates, with long–term retention opportunities. This has resulted in the development of several collaborative workforce initiatives with industry professional organizations and corporate networks directly benefitting VR consumer employment goals. The Hershey model is one example of this, with other corporate bodies expressing interest in replication within their organizations. The DARS partnership with the Hershey apprenticeship program offered individuals with disabilities a six–month work experience on the production line. During the apprenticeship, DARS clients could access any needed supports from WWRC to help them complete the program as long as they were able to perform the required duties at the end of the six months. During FFY 2015, an evolving partnership with CVS Health resulted in the set–up of a mock store within WWRC Materials Handling Training Program to prepare VR consumers for direct employment and career pathways within the CVS Health System across the Commonwealth of Virginia. CVS Health donated all supplies and equipment for the mock store and worked with WWRC Instructors to refine the curriculum and develop community internships to prepare students to work in the CVS Health System. (Page 298)

To enhance and facilitate job–readiness skills and career planning for students to make a successful transition from school to work and to greater independence, students will be referred to DBVI Workforce Specialists and to Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) (also known in Virginia as Employment Services Organizations (ESOs)). Workforce Specialists will complement pre–employment transition services by delivering workplace readiness training to establish skills necessary for entry into career pathways, competitive integrated employment, and by coordinating with schools and networking with employers to establish paid and unpaid internships, including apprenticeships, specifically matched to the student’s needs, skills, interests, abilities, and informed choice. Transition services purchased from CRPs may also include On–The–Job support and extended support services for students and youth needing additional supports in the work experience setting or on the job. (Page 331)

DBVI will conduct a monthly training program designed to ensure that new and seasoned VRCs and Regional Managers have a 21st Century understanding of the evolving labor force and the needs of individuals with disabilities. To facilitate this learning, DBVI will continue its Video Teleconferencing– based program entitled, ”Making a Difference” (MAD), which is conducted on a monthly basis by trainers, internal and external to the agency. Topics include a broad range of subjects including, but not limited to, the use of vocational evaluations, job placement, rehabilitation technology, vocational counseling, the Business Enterprise program, Social Security and Ticket to Work program, Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired changes and summer programs, update information regarding Workforce Development activities, utilization of Career Pathways, Medicaid Waivers, Supported Employment, review of the VR eligibility process, ethics, conflict management, self–employment, and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014. During FFY 2016, (Page 339)

  1. Expanding and enhancing workforce development activities to develop and maintain effective working relationships with Virginia business and industry at the local, regional, and state level to develop partnerships that facilitate industry recognized credential attainment, skill development, and entry into career pathways for eligible individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind leading to competitive integrated employment. (Page 348)

Goals 1 and 2 of DBVI’s six goals identifies strategies and measures that apply to methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind.

Goal 1. Expanding and enhancing workforce development activities to develop and maintain effective working relationships with Virginia business and industry at the local, regional, and state level to develop partnerships that facilitate industry recognized credential attainment, skill development, and entry into career pathways for eligible individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind leading to competitive integrated employment.

Strategy 1.1: To fully engage personnel and financial resources of DBVI’s newly established Workforce Unit to implement business support and outreach services. Personnel in the Workforce Unit include one Workforce Coordinator, four Regional Workforce Specialists, and one Director of Workforce/Vocational Rehabilitation. (Page 354)

Strategy 1.3: To establish and enhance entry into career pathways, DBVI will utilize personnel and funds associated Virginia’s Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Grant which was jointly awarded DBVI and the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) in 2015. DBVI will:

  • Help individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high–demand, high–quality occupations;
  • Enhance the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities;
  • Enhance access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities; and
  • Strengthen the alignment of Virginia’s VR programs with the other core programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and other Federally–funded career pathways initiatives providing self–advocacy skills training that is critical to the achievement of individuals’ personal and vocational goals. (Page 355)

Strategy 1.3: To establish and enhance entry into career pathways, DBVI will utilize personnel and funds associated Virginia’s Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Grant which was jointly awarded DBVI and the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) in 2015. DBVI will:

  • help individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high–demand, high–quality occupations;
  • enhance the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities;
  • enhance access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities; and
  • strengthen the alignment of Virginia’s VR programs with the other core programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and other Federally–funded career pathways initiatives providing self–advocacy skills training that is critical to the achievement of individuals’ personal and vocational goals.

Measures: Other first–year activities will include working with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling to develop and implement career pathways–focused career counseling training for VR counselors and other workforce professionals that incorporates use of labor market information and motivational interviewing techniques. (Page 362)

Employer/ Business

3.5   Enter into an Administrative Employment Network Agreement with two Employment Networks to determine the feasibility of this model for funding long term employment supports. During this reporting period, there were administrative Employment Network (EN) agreements established with two different groups so that potential EN partners in Virginia would have options when considering participation in Partnership Plus. This has resulted in seven new administrative EN agreements that will support DARS ticket holders after case closure from VR. Preliminary indication is that the administrative EN option seems to be a viable option for long term employment supports for partners that do not have the volume of tickets or administrative infrastructure to support the ticket to work program. (Page 295)

511

System-wide Data Collection and Reporting 

Virginia does not currently have the capability to get a system-wide, global view of workforce data across the various programs and agency. Data is still largely confined to programmatic siloes, and - with a few notable exceptions - agency staff is reticent about sharing data with partner agencies. WIOA has given the Commonwealth the opportunity to adopt standards data collection systems and portals, and establish protocols by which data and information can be shared responsibly. These protocols will be developed collaboratively over the coming months. (Page 119)

Commonwealth of Virginia Process for Identifying Regions: 

Reference: VBWD Policy 200-06, Designation of Regions and Planning Requirements, http://www.elevatevirginia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Policy-200-06-Designation-of-Regions-and-Planning-Requirements-FINAL-Signed.pdf

In order to identify regions, WIOA requires the state to identify factors to be used, which, when applying, may or may not align to current local workforce development areas. In Virginia, the factors were used to promote a collaborative process whereby the data collection and analysis of the factors for determination of regions are shared between state and local workforce partners. Virginia utilized the following factors in determining regions:

  1. Single Labor Market;
  2. Common Economic Development Area;
  3. Federal and Non-Federal Resources to Carry Out WIOA Activities;
  4. Population Centers;
  5. Commuting Patterns;
  6. Industrial Composition and Sector Alignment;
  7. Community College Regions. 

Utilizing these seven factors, various regional alignments may be considered and proposed by a number of workforce system stakeholders such as state policymakers, State and Local Board members, state and local workforce staff, partner program staff, business and industry partners and workforce and education associations. In order for Virginia to consider and designate regions, a formal proposal shall be submitted to the Virginia Board of Workforce Development that includes a recommendation for region designation, a rationale for the region designation recommended using the seven factors, and a description of why the regional alignment proposed is in the best interests of the state, business and industry, and workers and job seekers. (Page 167)

DARS’ policies require that for students with disabilities who

  1. are receiving special education services from a public school, and
  2. also are determined eligible for VR services (and able to be served if DARS is on an order of selection), the Individualized Plan for Employment shall be completed and signed within 90 days of the eligibility determination and before the student leaves the school setting. 

DARS continues to be a stakeholder in the review of data that DOE collects to report to the Office on Special Education Programs (OSEP) to support and accomplish respective post school and employment outcomes required by the federal government and to provide meaningful data collection by each agency. (Page 251)

DARS continues to be a stakeholder in the review of data that DOE collects to report to the Office on Special Education Programs (OSEP) to support and accomplish respective post school and employment outcomes required by the federal government and to provide meaningful data collection by each agency.

Additional DARS and DOE collaborative activities include co–chairing the Virginia Interagency Transition Council (VITC) and the regional Virginia Transition Practitioners Councils (TPC). TPC provides a forum for transition practitioners and other interested stakeholders from school divisions, adult agencies, and community partners to engage in professional development activities, networking opportunities, and collaborative efforts that enhance the implementation of quality transition services for secondary school students with disabilities. The VITC is comprised of representatives from 14 state agencies who have leadership roles and transition as part of their responsibility in serving youth with disabilities. The Council works to stay abreast of current transition information, to identify gaps in resources, and avoid duplication of transition services. VITC has set a priority to improve communication between the state, regional, and local transition councils. It is anticipated that information will be shared with and by VITC through the regional and local Councils. This flow of communication allows for improved responses to identified needs, as well as recommendations for future efforts.( Page 253)

Data collection efforts solicited input from a broad spectrum of individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind, service providers, DBVI staff, and some businesses. (Page 342)

The needs assessment approach was designed to elicit quantitative and qualitative data about the needs of persons who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind. Focus group and key informant interview activities yielded qualitative data that may be used to complement and lend depth to the findings of the survey efforts and the analysis of extant data. The use of multiple data collection strategies, both quantitative and qualitative, facilitates data collection that captures both the breadth and the depth of concerns relevant to individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or vision impaired in Virginia. (Page 343)

Measure: The DBVI/DARS project team will work with staff from the American Institutes for Research (AIR, the planned project evaluator) to develop and implement the project evaluation design and data collection plan.

Measures: Other first–year activities will include working with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling to develop and implement career pathways–focused career counseling training for VR counselors and other workforce professionals that incorporates use of labor market information and motivational interviewing techniques. (Page 353)

Measure: The DBVI/DARS project team will work with staff from the American Institutes for Research (AIR, the planned project evaluator) to develop and implement the project evaluation design and data collection plan.

Measures: Other first–year activities will include working with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling to develop and implement career pathways–focused career counseling training for VR counselors and other workforce professionals that incorporates use of labor market information and motivational interviewing techniques. (Page 362)

Mental Health

Virginia is fortunate to have a long standing collaborative relationship with Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and other key state partners. This partnership history facilitated the leveraging and coordination of existing and added resources provided via the six DOL Workforce Disability Initiatives, the latest of which are the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants. Whereas, significant strides have been made to ensure our One-Stop Service Delivery System is accessible to all job seekers, including those with disabilities and other challenges to employment, we are committed to continuous quality improvement. These efforts are focused on physical, programmatic and communication access. We will continue these efforts and build on our existing infrastructure to encourage shared ownership; foster systems integration through cross-agency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. (Page 154)

Expected outcomes are the following: a revised ADA Accessibility guidelines and one-stop center certification process that incorporates the WIOA Section 188 Disability Reference Guide checklist for program and physical accessibility; system standards for accessible devices and software located in workforce centers to facilitate consistency; review of all policies and guidance to ensure alignment and consistency; a schedule for cross- agency training for survey providers, end users, one-stop operators and partner staff. The efforts of this Team will improve compliance and enhance communication, coordination and professional development across Virginia’s workforce system. (Page 156)

This a administrative guidance document provides a reasonable guarantee that all of Virginia’s WIOA Title I financially assisted programs, activities and recipients comply with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements stipulated under Section 188 of the WIOA. (Page 171)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 63

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services State Board Policy 1036 - 12/04/2012

“It is the policy of the Board that in the development and implementation of policies and procedures and the delivery of services, the Department and CSBs shall ensure that community-based individual supported employment in integrated work settings is presented as the first and priority service option among available day service options offered by case managers and support coordinators to individuals receiving mental health, developmental, or substance abuse day support or employment services and shall expand access to integrated, community-based employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders, intellectual disability, or co-occurring disabilities…”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order (Executive Order #55 (2012)) - 11/16/2012 - 11/16/2012

“The last United States Census concluded that out of 3.6 million Virginia residents who were employed, 154,985 Virginians with disabilities were included in that total. These numbers indicate an under representation of people with disabilities among the gainfully employed. The Commonwealth of Virginia should work to provide a Commonwealth of Opportunity for all Virginians; therefore it is appropriate to initiate steps in order to expand employment opportunities for its citizens who are disabled….”

“By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor by Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth…and in conjunction with… the Code of Virginia which states that it is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities, including our wounded soldiers, to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment, with the goal of enhancing the employment opportunities for Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia DBHDS: Strategic Plan for Employment First - 10/01/2012

To facilitate interagency collaboration the Strategic Plan for Employment First establishes an Employment First Summit Meeting, which will gather leadership from various department committed to upholding Employment First principles, and orders for the creation of a high level administrative leadership body including (DBHDS, DARS, DOE, DMAS, Virginia Employment Commission (VEC), Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council) and Virginia Community College System (VCCS).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Virginia State Employment Leadership Network - 10/01/2012

Virginia is a part of this multi-state technical assistance collaborative whose aim is to improve integrated employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities. “In 2008, DBHDS joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) sponsored by the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services and the University of Massachusetts-Boston Institute for Community Inclusion. DBHDS developed a Virginia-specific SELN Advisory Group made up of over 30 members representing a variety of organizations involved in providing employment services to Virginians. Members include community service boards (CSBs), the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (VBPD), the Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention (VCU/RRTC), and vendor organizations such as the Virginia Association of Community Rehabilitation Programs (vaACCSES), the Arc of Virginia, and the Virginia Association of Providers of Supported Employment (VaAPSE). DBHDS continues to be an active, contributing participant in the monthly National SELN web-based meetings. Virginia is now one of 30 states in the SELN. The Virginia SELN Advisory Group, made up of advocates, providers, and state agencies, continues to identify roadblocks and disincentives in our state system. The group is developing specific strategies for implementation of a system that prioritizes employment as an outcome of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services Employment First Strategic Plan - 10/01/2012

“This document outlines the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services’ (DBHDS or ‘the department’) Strategic Plan for Employment First. The strategic plan was formulated in response to efforts in recent years to build and expand integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in Virginia. DBHDS supports individuals with serious mental illness, substance use disorders, and intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The strategic plan establishes annual goals for DBHDS to collaborate with other state agencies and organizations to expand opportunities for employment for all Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Consent Decree allowing for more waivers and less training Centers - 08/23/2012

“Under the proposed settlement, Virginia has agreed to provide 4170 additional waiver slots, divided among current Training Center residents, disabled people in various segregated facilities other than the Training Centers, and people on the waiting list for services…The settlement also prescribes in great detail how Virginia will administer the services it provides to disabled citizens. This process will be a shared responsibility of the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services and local community service boards ("CSBs")...”“The decree also provides for changed procedures at the Training Centers and spells out how the Commonwealth will assist the CSBs with technical assistance. Each Training Center resident will have a discharge plan crafted by the professionals at the facility. Virginia will set up case-management teams, crisis teams, and plans for supported day services in the community. Essentially, the Commonwealth's efforts—and those of the CSBs—will all be focused on keeping disabled people in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Education ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/27/2012

“For students with disabilities who have the most intensive support needs, there are two model initiatives supported by the Virginia Department of Education: Project SEARCH and the Post-High School Community College Program. Project SEARCH, a business-led model, is a collaborative between school divisions and local businesses that provide employability skills training and workplace internships that occur entirely in the workplace. The Post-High School Community College Program is a supported education model that provides individualized supports to students with significant disabilities seeking postsecondary education to enhance their skills for employment, in an age-appropriate setting. The Department of Education provides support and technical assistance to increase the number of partnerships between school divisions and institutions of higher education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia 2012 Senate Joint Resolution No. 127 - 02/25/2012

“Encouraging the Secretary of Health and Human Resources and the Superintendent of Public Instruction to adopt and implement Employment First practices...” Employment First is defined as a policy is grounded in a framework of increased integration, independence, productivity and employment that is based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, abilities, and informed choice of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ADA Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 01/26/2012

“The fundamental goals of the Agreement are to prevent the unnecessary institutionalization of individuals with developmental disabilities who are living in the community, including thousands of individuals on waitlists for community-based services, and ensure that people who are currently in institutions - at the Commonwealth's training centers or in other private but state-funded facilities - have a meaningful opportunity to receive services that meet their needs in the community…Pursuant to the Interim Settlement Agreement, the State and City will give TTP and Birch service recipients the opportunity to receive integrated supported employment and integrated daytime services that will enable them to interact with the broader community to the fullest extent possible.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Virginia 2012 House Joint Resolution No. 23 - 01/11/2012

“WHEREAS, implementation of an Employment First initiative in Virginia will lead to increased employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, resulting in benefits for individuals, families, employers, and communities across the Commonwealth; now, therefore, be it resolved by the House of Delegates, the Senate concurring, That the Secretary of Health and Human Resources be requested to develop and implement an Employment First initiative in the Commonwealth, which shall identify employment in an integrated, community setting earning an amount that is equal to or greater than minimum-wage rates as the first goal for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving services through state agencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Virginia Acts of Assembly: An Act to Amend and Reenact §§ 51.5-41, 51.5-120, 51.5-163, 51.5-164, and 51.5-172 through 51.5-176 of the Code of Virginia - 02/25/2016

Discrimination against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities by employers prohibited A.No employer shall discriminate in employment or promotion practices against an otherwise qualified person with a disability solely because of such disability. For the purposes of this section, an "otherwise qualified person with a disability" means a person qualified to perform the duties of a particular job or position and whose disability is unrelated to the person's ability to perform such duties or position or is unrelated to the person's qualifications for employment or promotion. B. It is the policy of the Commonwealth that persons with disabilities shall be employed in the state service, the service of the political subdivisions of the Commonwealth, in the public schools, and in all other employment supported in whole or in part by public funds on the same terms and conditions as other persons unless it is shown that the particular disability prevents the performance of the work involved. C. An employer shall make reasonable accommodation to the known physical and mental impairments of an otherwise qualified person with a disability, if necessary to assist such person in performing a particular job, unless the employer can demonstrate that the accommodation would impose an undue burden on the employer. For the purposes of this section, "mental impairment" does not include active alcoholism or current drug addiction and does not include any mental impairment, disease, or defect that has been successfully asserted by an individual as a defense to any criminal charge. 1. Individualized plan for employment. A written individualized plan for employment for each recipient of vocational rehabilitation services provided or funded by the Department, in whole or in part, shall be developed within a reasonable time and as soon as possible, but not later than 90 days after the due date of the determination of eligibility, unless an extension is agreed to by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and the Department. The plan shall be agreed to and signed by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and a qualified vocational rehabilitation counselor employed by the Department

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia SB 1404 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia HB 2306 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia 2012 Senate Joint Resolution No. 127 - 02/25/2012

“Encouraging the Secretary of Health and Human Resources and the Superintendent of Public Instruction to adopt and implement Employment First practices...” Employment First is defined as a policy is grounded in a framework of increased integration, independence, productivity and employment that is based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, abilities, and informed choice of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia 2012 House Joint Resolution No. 23 - 01/11/2012

“WHEREAS, implementation of an Employment First initiative in Virginia will lead to increased employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, resulting in benefits for individuals, families, employers, and communities across the Commonwealth; now, therefore, be it resolved by the House of Delegates, the Senate concurring, That the Secretary of Health and Human Resources be requested to develop and implement an Employment First initiative in the Commonwealth, which shall identify employment in an integrated, community setting earning an amount that is equal to or greater than minimum-wage rates as the first goal for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving services through state agencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Virginians with Disabilities Act ( 51.5-1) of 1989 - 05/01/1989

“ It is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment. To these ends, the General Assembly directs the Governor, the Virginia Office for Protection and Advocacy, the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities, the Departments of Education, Health, Housing and Community Development, Behavioral Health and Developmental Services, and Social Services, and the Departments for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, the Blind and Vision Impaired, and the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing and such other agencies as the Governor deems appropriate, to provide, in a comprehensive and coordinated manner which makes the best use of available resources, those services necessary to assure equal opportunity to persons with disabilities in the Commonwealth.The provisions of this title shall be known and may be cited as “‘The Virginians with Disabilities Act.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/01/2018

~~"WHEREAS, all Virginians should be given the opportunity to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment to drive Virginia’s economy;NOW, THEREFORE, I, Ralph S. Northam, do hereby recognize October 2018 as DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH in our COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, and I call this observance to the attention of all our citizens." 

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order Number One (2018) Equal Opportunity - 01/13/2018

~~‘By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor, I hereby declare that it is the firm and unwavering policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to ensure equal opportunity in all facets of state government.  The foundational tenet of this Executive Order is premised upon a steadfast commitment to foster a culture of inclusion, diversity, and mutual respect for all Virginians. This policy specifically prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, political affiliation, or against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities.  The policy permits appropriate employment preferences for veterans and specifically prohibits discrimination against veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 46: Supporting Virginians with Disabilities in the New Virginia Economy - 07/27/2015

“The Chief Workforce Development Advisor, in conjunction with the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, shall work with DARS and DBVI to offer to all executive branch agencies (including institutions of higher education, boards, and commissions) training designed to expand existing efforts to recruit, accommodate, retain and advance Virginians with disabilities in the Commonwealth’s workforce. Training shall commence no later than October 1, 2015...”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order (Executive Order #55 (2012)) - 11/16/2012 - 11/16/2012

“The last United States Census concluded that out of 3.6 million Virginia residents who were employed, 154,985 Virginians with disabilities were included in that total. These numbers indicate an under representation of people with disabilities among the gainfully employed. The Commonwealth of Virginia should work to provide a Commonwealth of Opportunity for all Virginians; therefore it is appropriate to initiate steps in order to expand employment opportunities for its citizens who are disabled….”

“By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor by Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth…and in conjunction with… the Code of Virginia which states that it is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities, including our wounded soldiers, to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment, with the goal of enhancing the employment opportunities for Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired Business Relations Services - 10/15/2017

“The Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) is pleased to announce the addition of the new DBVI Business Relations Unit. The unit will have a statewide impact on individuals with vision impairments in reaching their career goal of sustainable employment. The Business Relations Specialists will work with employers in recruiting a highly skilled, pre-screened pipeline of talent. The team is well versed in services for employers including, federal contractor hiring (503c), corporate initiatives, workforce diversity and inclusion, worksite consultations, job retention and the many incentives for hiring individuals with abilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia Board for People with Disabilities State Plan 2017-2021 - 10/01/2016

“The Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (the Board) serves as the Commonwealth’s Developmental Disabilities (DD) Planning Council and as the Governor’s Advisory Council on issues affecting individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Under the federal law, each state is authorized to establish a DD Council, which receives funds to carry out initiatives for systems change, capacity-building, and advocacy. Through these activities, the Board seeks to impact the independence, productivity, inclusion, and integration of people with disabilities in their communities.

The Board’s activities are organized in a five-year State Plan which serves as a framework for the Board’s funding initiatives, staff work priorities, and Board member activities. The state plan was developed through Board and stakeholder input, which included focus groups and a survey of people with DD, their families, advocacy organizations and state agencies to assess how well Virginia is doing in supporting children and their families to lead the lives they want with the support they need. The Board was also informed by the findings and recommendations contained in its 2014 Assessment of the Disability Services System in Virginia.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia Dept of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services Employment First Policy Statement - 12/04/2012

“It is the policy of the Board that in the development and implementation of policies and procedures and the delivery of services, the Department and CSB shall ensure that community-based individual supported employment in integrated work settings is presented as the first and priority service option among available day service options offered by case managers and support coordinators to individuals receiving mental health, developmental, or substance abuse day support or employment services and shall expand access to integrated, community-based employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders, intellectual disability, or co-occurring disabilities. … 

Provide training and consultation to service providers on implementing evidence-based supported employment practice models and establishing integrated supported employment teams that include CSBs, the Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), and employment services organizations (ESOs) and work with CSBs and ESOs to incorporate evidence-based supported employment practice models in the day services  they offer, including psychosocial rehabilitation;   

Work with the Department of Medical Assistance Services (DMAS) to identify ways to incorporate integrated, community-based employment services in the Medicaid Intellectual Disability and Individual and Family Developmental Disability Services Waivers."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services State Board Policy 1036 - 12/04/2012

“It is the policy of the Board that in the development and implementation of policies and procedures and the delivery of services, the Department and CSBs shall ensure that community-based individual supported employment in integrated work settings is presented as the first and priority service option among available day service options offered by case managers and support coordinators to individuals receiving mental health, developmental, or substance abuse day support or employment services and shall expand access to integrated, community-based employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders, intellectual disability, or co-occurring disabilities…”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services Employment First Strategic Plan - 10/01/2012

“This document outlines the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services’ (DBHDS or ‘the department’) Strategic Plan for Employment First. The strategic plan was formulated in response to efforts in recent years to build and expand integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in Virginia. DBHDS supports individuals with serious mental illness, substance use disorders, and intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The strategic plan establishes annual goals for DBHDS to collaborate with other state agencies and organizations to expand opportunities for employment for all Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia - A Plan for Advancing Community Focused Services in Virginia. - 06/25/2010

An overall strategic plan with 12 foci that includes an outline that addresses the need for, objectives in, and priorities for creating employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders and those with developmental disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DRS Policy and Procedure Manual: Chapter 8.17. - Self Employment and SEE

This chapter of the Virginia Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (Vocational Rehabilitation) manual precisely defines how to deliver Self-Employment and Supported Self Employment services to customers of the system. Including how to approve and fund such services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Supported Employment

~~“Supported employment is one of many effective ways of assisting persons with disabilities in gaining and maintaining employment.  DARS partners with over 75 Employment Service Organizations in providing situational assessment, job development, placement and training services and long term follow along.DARS provides supported employment or job coach training services, if appropriate and with agreement of their DARS counselor, to eligible consumers regardless of an individual’s impairment or disability cause.All Employment Service Organizations that provide supported employment and job coaching services are CARF accredited to ensure that consumers are receiving quality services"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Virginia Intercommunity Transition Council (VITC)

 “The mission of the Virginia's Intercommunity Transition Council is to promote successful transition outcomes for youth and young adults with disabilities by providing leadership and innovation in employment, education, training, living independently, community participation, and community support systems that influence success for all students.” Contains fact sheets to “assist others in understanding the various facets that promote exemplary transition for Virginia’s youth.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Services for Students with Disabilities

“VDOE's Transition Services website provides support, information and resources designed to improve the outcomes of students with disabilities in transition from middle / secondary education to postsecondary education and employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Review of Virginia’s Plan to Increase Employment First Plan: FY 2016-FY2018-Goals, Strategies, and Action Items - 12/13/2018

~~“DBHDS, with the input of the E1AG (formerly the SELN-VA Advisory Committee) has revised the FY16-FY18 plan to increase employment opportunities. It was provided with the Status Report as of 6/30/18. The Plan includes five goal areas each of which has sub-goals. The plan’s goals and status in achieving goals can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia DBHDS: Strategic Plan for Employment First - 10/01/2012

To facilitate interagency collaboration the Strategic Plan for Employment First establishes an Employment First Summit Meeting, which will gather leadership from various department committed to upholding Employment First principles, and orders for the creation of a high level administrative leadership body including (DBHDS, DARS, DOE, DMAS, Virginia Employment Commission (VEC), Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council) and Virginia Community College System (VCCS).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Virginia State Employment Leadership Network - 10/01/2012

Virginia is a part of this multi-state technical assistance collaborative whose aim is to improve integrated employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities. “In 2008, DBHDS joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) sponsored by the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services and the University of Massachusetts-Boston Institute for Community Inclusion. DBHDS developed a Virginia-specific SELN Advisory Group made up of over 30 members representing a variety of organizations involved in providing employment services to Virginians. Members include community service boards (CSBs), the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (VBPD), the Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention (VCU/RRTC), and vendor organizations such as the Virginia Association of Community Rehabilitation Programs (vaACCSES), the Arc of Virginia, and the Virginia Association of Providers of Supported Employment (VaAPSE). DBHDS continues to be an active, contributing participant in the monthly National SELN web-based meetings. Virginia is now one of 30 states in the SELN. The Virginia SELN Advisory Group, made up of advocates, providers, and state agencies, continues to identify roadblocks and disincentives in our state system. The group is developing specific strategies for implementation of a system that prioritizes employment as an outcome of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Intercommunity Transition Council

Virginia's Intercommunity Transition Council is committed to promoting partnerships and influencing linkages that result in transition service networks for coordinating person-centered services. Their fact sheet on employment cites Customized Employment as a successful strategy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Olmstead Settlement Agreement

“The Commonwealth shall establish a state policy on Employment First for the target population and include a term in the CSB Performance Contract requiring application of this policy. The Employment First policy shall, at a minimum, be based on the following principles: (1) individual supported employment in integrated work settings is the first and priority service option for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities receiving day program or employment services from or funded by theCommonwealth; (2) the goal of employment services is to support individuals in integrated work settings where they are paid minimum or competitive wages; and (3) employment services and goals must be developed and discussed at least annually through a person-centered planning process and included in ISPs. The Commonwealth shall have at least one employment service coordinator to monitor implementation of Employment First practices for individuals in the target population”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Virginia Disability Employment Initiative Round VIII - 10/01/2017

“VA DEI will fund four Disability Resource Coordinators and implement activities in the Northern Virginia Region that will build on existing career pathways with a focus on the Information Technology (IT) sector that have been developed by the local partners. The project will also expand on work currently underway by Northern Virginia Community College and its adult education partners to customize a bridge program that will connect low-skilled adults to college level IT programming through an integrated education and training program. Key activities will include the analysis of existing adult education and community college IT curricula and instructional practices to ensure accessibility according to Universal Design Principles, development of fully accessible career assessments for use by local partners, and alignment across all instructional programs that lead to ever higher levels of credential attainment among program participants. The regional industry sector model will be applicable to other career pathways. Targeted industry sectors will include Information Technology.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Virginia Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities - 07/18/2017

“Led by the Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, this grant will help nearly 500 Virginians with disabilities, including young adults and veterans, gain new skills and credentials through Career Pathways to seek employment in competitive, high-demand, high-quality occupations.

Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities has 10 project partners in education, workforce development and business. These partners focus on strategies to:

meet business needs in high-demand occupations meet career seekers' needs to attain marketable credentials and find middle-skilled jobs train vocational rehabilitation counselors to work with potential clients”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • WIOA

Virginia No Wrong Door System Grant - 10/01/2015

~~“Virginia will provide a high-quality, sustainable, person-centered, single statewide No Wrong Door system of long-term services and supports. No Wrong Door will support individuals of all ages  and disabilities in achieving their unique goals for community living; streamline access to community supports; and promote efficiencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia: Fairfax Customized Employment Grant - 07/01/2007

“The Customized Employment grant initiative was a product of the Northern Virginia Workforce Investment Board. The goal of the group was to build the capacity of the local One-Stop Center to use Customized Employment services to increase employment outcomes, choice, and wages for people with disabilities who resided in Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties and the cities of Fairfax, Falls Church, Manassas, and Manassas Park.”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Disability Employment Initiative (Round Four)

As a past Round 1 grantee, VA DEI will continue to build on existing infrastructure to develop shared ownership; foster systems integration, through cross-interagency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. Three Disability Resource Coordinators and a DRC State Lead will facilitate the implementation of the service delivery strategies. The pilot sites will receive the services of a Ticket consultant, who has been successful at engaging Round I pilot LWIBs in the EN process and in increasing ticket activity. 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

Virginia Ticket to Work

“Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for people with disabilities who want to work. Social Security disability beneficiaries age 18 through 64 qualify. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. The Ticket Program helps people with disabilities progress toward financial independence…“The Ticket program is a good fit for people who want to improve their earning potential and who are committed to preparing for long-term success in the workforce. Ticket to Work offers beneficiaries with disabilities access to meaningful employment with the assistance of Ticket to Work employment service providers.”Virginia has had Ticket to Work Since 2002.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Citations

Virginia National Association of State Mental Health Program Director’s (NASMHPD) Employment Development Initiative (EDI)

“In an effort to assist State Mental Health Authorities, in close collaboration with Single State Authorities, in planning and implementing activities to foster increased employment opportunities for people with mental health and/or substance use disorders, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) created the Employment Development Initiative (EDI).”

“This initiative provides, on a competitive basis, modest funding awards in the form of fixed-price subcontracts between the Contractor, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD), and the States, Territories and District of Columbia. In addition, each awardee will receive two consultant technical assistance visits coordinated and paid through the Contractor's portion of the project.”

Virginia is using its funds to support their Employment First Initiative. They have conducted multiple Employment First Summits, and developed an Employment First Advisory group.

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
Topics
  • Mental Health

Virginia Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

Note: This program ended on December 31, 2009 according to this site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies

Virginia - Richmond Customized Employment Project

“The grant worked to strengthen the linkages of the Richmond-area One-Stop system with schools, VR, and the Virginia Business Leadership Network, a business-directed group designed to encourage other businesses to hire people with disabilities. The project focused on expanding the reach and scope of existing service programs, such as a WIA youth project, to make them more appropriate for job seekers with multiple barriers.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Virginia Disability Employment Initiative (Round One)

“The Virginia Community College System, the administrator of the Workforce Investment Act in Virginia, will enter into a Memorandum of Agreement with the Virginia Department of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) to provide co-leadership in order to coordinate DEI project activities with DRS-funded Disability Program Navigators (DPNs). The DEI project will build on the strengths and lessons learned from the activities of its DPNs and will support the continuation of those activities in conjunction with the enhanced activities related to five strategic components. DEI flexible funding will be used as the “first dollar down” to leverage partner funds and services. The Virginia DEI will incorporate resource mapping in each workforce area to identify all available resources and career assessment vehicles to support the needs of the job seeker, and will assure quality services through the deployment of mystery shopper protocols. Participating Workforce Investment Boards will be fully engaged as Employment Networks under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging
Displaying 1 - 5 of 5

Veteran Entrepreneurship - 11/07/2018

~~“The Virginia Department of Veterans Services is excited to announce the hiring of a Veteran Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Coordinator (VEEC).  The VEEC will connect veterans and military spouses to a plethora of entrepreneurship resources and events! Whether you are a seasoned entrepreneur or just considering what that path may look like, the VEEC can share an extensive list of programs, events and resources all for entrepreneurs.”

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Special Education Technical Assistance & Professional Development

“These resources were developed to provide professional development and technical assistance to parents, school personnel and other consumers. All resources are intended to provide guidance for addressing the regulatory requirements and instructional elements needed for a student’s free appropriate public education (FAPE).”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

Virginia Transition Services for Students with Disabilities

“VDOE's Transition Services website provides support, information and resources designed to improve the outcomes of students with disabilities in transition from middle / secondary education to postsecondary education and employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

The Consumer's Guide to Self-Employment

This guide is written for consumers within the Virginia Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (Vocational Rehabilitation) who wish to pursue Self Employment as a career goal. It describes many of the Department's policies, as well as offering guidance on how to succeed in the business development process.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

DRS Guide to Supported Employment and Job Coach Training Services

“The purpose of the Guide to Supported Employment and Job Coach Training Services is to provide practical and specific information to supplement the Virginia DRS Policy and Procedure Manual. Where possible, the Guide seeks to illustrate evolving best practices gleaned from case examples and data gathered in Virginia. Specifically, the Guide is intended to provide supported employment practitioners with guidance in:

Achieving a customer-oriented environment that promotes consumer choice and participation, individual responsibility, practitioner excellence and sensitive delivery of quality services; Enhancing understanding of operational procedures and the need for cooperation, collaboration, and coordination; Clarifying and expanding on the roles, responsibilities, and expectations among supported employment practitioners; and Planning, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating supported employment programs.”
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
Displaying 1 - 3 of 3

Report of the Independent Reviewer on Compliance with the Consent Agreement US v. VA, Civil Action No. 3:12 CV 059 - 10/07/2014

“The IR reported in the last Report to the Court that the Commonwealth had achieved compliance with certain requirements of the Agreement. During this, the sixth review period, the Commonwealth through its lead agency, DBHDS, and its sister agencies has maintained compliance with these same provisions and has come into compliance with additional requirements. The Commonwealths leaders have continued to meet regularly and to collaborate to develop and implement plans to address the Agreement’s requirements and to improve people’s lives. The IR also reported in the last Report to the Court that the Commonwealth lagged significantly behind schedule. It continues to do so. There have been significant delays in the it’s (sic) compliance with requirements that are critical to an effective community-based services system for individuals with ID/DD. For two years, the Commonwealth’s primary strategy to come into compliance has been the redesign of it HCBS waiver program."

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other

Virginia Consent Decree allowing for more waivers and less training Centers - 08/23/2012

“Under the proposed settlement, Virginia has agreed to provide 4170 additional waiver slots, divided among current Training Center residents, disabled people in various segregated facilities other than the Training Centers, and people on the waiting list for services…The settlement also prescribes in great detail how Virginia will administer the services it provides to disabled citizens. This process will be a shared responsibility of the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services and local community service boards ("CSBs")...”“The decree also provides for changed procedures at the Training Centers and spells out how the Commonwealth will assist the CSBs with technical assistance. Each Training Center resident will have a discharge plan crafted by the professionals at the facility. Virginia will set up case-management teams, crisis teams, and plans for supported day services in the community. Essentially, the Commonwealth's efforts—and those of the CSBs—will all be focused on keeping disabled people in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ADA Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 01/26/2012

“The fundamental goals of the Agreement are to prevent the unnecessary institutionalization of individuals with developmental disabilities who are living in the community, including thousands of individuals on waitlists for community-based services, and ensure that people who are currently in institutions - at the Commonwealth's training centers or in other private but state-funded facilities - have a meaningful opportunity to receive services that meet their needs in the community…Pursuant to the Interim Settlement Agreement, the State and City will give TTP and Birch service recipients the opportunity to receive integrated supported employment and integrated daytime services that will enable them to interact with the broader community to the fullest extent possible.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services
Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

TEEOP Employment Supports - 10/18/2018

~~“Training, education, employment and othercommunity engagement opportunities (TEEOP) Employment SupportsThe web link includes information about how the State will provide assessments and referrals for employment.Employment Support Services for MedicaidParticipants to Achieve Self-Sufficiency” (COMPASS) Waiver.”

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Resource Leveraging

Commonwealth Coordinated Care (CCC) Plus Waiver - 08/01/2018

~~The CCC Plus Waiver (also known as the Commonwealth Coordinated Care Plus Waiver), is a combination of the formerly known waivers titled: EDCD (Elderly or Disabled with Consumer Direction) waiver and the Technology Assisted (Tech) waiver. All of the waivers offer CD or AD services depending on individualized needs and program criteria met.

From the Fact Sheet:“The Commonwealth Coordinated Care (CCC) Plus Waiver [1915 (c)] provides care in the home and community rather than in a  nursing facility (NF) or other specialized care medical facility “

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

VA Community Living Waiver (0372.R03.00) - 07/01/2014

~~Waiver Authority 1915 (c)Date Originally Approved 07/01/2001Implementation Date 07/01/2014Expiration Date 06/30/2019Summary Provides day support, personal assistance, prevocational, residential support, respite, supported employment, consumer directed services facilitation, assistive technology, companion services, crisis stabilization, crisis supervision, environmental mods, PERS, skilled nursing, therapeutic consultation, transition for individuals w/IID ages 0 - no max age

From the Fact Sheet:“Formerly the Intellectual Disability Waiver, the purpose of the Community Living home and community-based 1915 (c) waiveris to provide support in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) or related condition.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Building Independence home and community-based 1915 (c) waiver (0430.R02.00) - 07/01/2013

~~Waiver Authority1915 (c)Date Originally Approved07/01/2005Implementation Date07/01/2013Expiration Date06/30/2018Summary Provides day support, prevocational, supported employment for individuals w/ID ages 6 - no max age

From the Fact Sheet:“Formerly called the Day Support Waiver, the purpose of this Building Independence home and community-based 1915 (c) waiver is to provide support in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disability (ICF/IID”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Family and Individual Support home and community-based (1915(c)) waiver (0358.R03.00) - 07/01/2013

~~Expiration Date06/30/2018Summary Provides day support, in-home residential, personal care, prevocational, respite care, supported employment - group/individual, services facilitation, adult companion, assistive technology, crisis stablization, crisis supervision, environmental mods, family/caregiver training, PERS, skilled nursing, therapeutic consultation, transition for individuals w/autism and DD ages 6 - no max age

Formerly the Individual and Family Developmental Disabilities Support Waiver, the purpose of the Family and Individual Support home and community-based (1915(c)) waiver is to provide supports and services in the community rather than in an Intermediate Care Facility for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF/IID) or related condition.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia Department of Education ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/27/2012

“For students with disabilities who have the most intensive support needs, there are two model initiatives supported by the Virginia Department of Education: Project SEARCH and the Post-High School Community College Program. Project SEARCH, a business-led model, is a collaborative between school divisions and local businesses that provide employability skills training and workplace internships that occur entirely in the workplace. The Post-High School Community College Program is a supported education model that provides individualized supports to students with significant disabilities seeking postsecondary education to enhance their skills for employment, in an age-appropriate setting. The Department of Education provides support and technical assistance to increase the number of partnerships between school divisions and institutions of higher education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

MEDICAID WORKS (Virginia Medicaid Buy-in)

“MEDICAID WORKS is a work incentive opportunity offered by the Virginia Medicaid program for individuals with disabilities who are employed or who want to go to work. MEDICAID WORKS is a Medicaid plan option that will enable workers with disabilities to earn higher income and retain more in savings, or resources, while ensuring continued Medicaid coverage.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Virginia Olmstead Settlement Agreement

“The Commonwealth shall establish a state policy on Employment First for the target population and include a term in the CSB Performance Contract requiring application of this policy. The Employment First policy shall, at a minimum, be based on the following principles: (1) individual supported employment in integrated work settings is the first and priority service option for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities receiving day program or employment services from or funded by the Commonwealth; (2) the goal of employment services is to support individuals in integrated work settings where they are paid minimum or competitive wages; and (3) employment services and goals must be developed and discussed at least annually through a person-centered planning process and included in ISPs. The Commonwealth shall have at least one employment service coordinator to monitor implementation of Employment First practices for individuals in the target population

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation

Medicaid Infrastructure Grant

“The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Program is authorized under Section 203 of the Ticket-to-Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. The 11-year competitive grant program provides funding to states for Medicaid infrastructure development that will build supports for people with disabilities who would like to be employed. States are encouraged to use grant funding to implement and develop the optional working disabled eligibility group (Medicaid buy-in), increase the availability of statewide personal assistance services, form linkages with other state and local agencies that provide employment related supports, and create a seamless infrastructure that will maximize the employment potential of all people with disabilities.”

Note: This program ended on December 31, 2009 according to this site.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • 14(c)/Income Security

Virginia Statewide HCBS Transition Plan

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule for home and community based services (HCBS) that requires states to review and evaluate home and community based (HCB) settings, including residential and non-residential settings. The HCBS final regulation requires states to prepare and submit a Statewide Transition Plan. CMS asks that statewide transition plans specifically address only the setting requirements of the final rule for home and community based services (The Rule).  Therefore, this Statewide Transition Plan is specific to the analysis and recommendations regarding the settings for home and community based services. 

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

Known affectionately as "The Place for Lovers," individuals with disabilities in the Commonwealth have the opportunity with the right supports and services to Live Passionately by having careers in competitive integrated employment and being full participants in their communities. 

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon Virginia’s VR Rates and Services

2017 State Population.
0.69%
Change from
2016 to 2017
8,470,020
2017 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
0.77%
Change from
2016 to 2017
500,771
2017 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
5.13%
Change from
2016 to 2017
204,103
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
4.39%
Change from
2016 to 2017
40.76%
2017 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
0.39%
Change from
2016 to 2017
78.97%

State Data

General

2017
Population. 8,470,020
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 500,771
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 204,103
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,669,633
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 40.76%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 78.97%
State/National unemployment rate. 3.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 17.60%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 9.80%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 462,932
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 516,107
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 686,273
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 222,654
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 45,140
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 3,549
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 28,994
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of persons of two or more races with disabilities (all ages) 27,801
Number of persons of some other race alone with disabilities (all ages) 9,532

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2017
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 6,877
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 4.90%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 210,694

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2017
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 14,919
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 30,594
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 70,510
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 21.20%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). 2.10%
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.50%
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 3.10%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). 43.40%
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. 1,243
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. 2,600
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 1,788
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. 25,180

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 12,496
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.05

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2015
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 150
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 80
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 53.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.95

 

VR OUTCOMES

2017
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 7,954
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 315,937
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2015
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $35,381,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $19,799,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $151,457,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $0
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 27.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 898
Number of people served in facility based work. 683
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 9,455
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 48.60

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2016
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 64.01%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 10.87%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 4.26%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 99.37%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 32.85%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 63.10%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 71.98%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 30.25%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 5,052,830
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 7,757
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 168,108
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 3,289,332
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 3,457,440
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 339
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 3,546
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 3,885
AbilityOne wages (products). $831,106
AbilityOne wages (services). $43,925,206

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2019
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 19
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 19
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate-holding businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 1,274
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 0
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 1,274

 

WIOA Profile

WIOA Profile

 

The material cited below is taken directly from each state’s plan for WIOA implementation. These sections of the state plan were selected because of their relevance to youth and adults with disabilities. However, all programs and services under WIOA must be physically and programmatically accessible to individuals with disabilities.

Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP)

(10) Supporting Virginia’s Employment First initiative and implementation of the Department of Justice Settlement agreement by collaborating with the Department for Behavioral Health and Developmental Services to establish staff positions specializing in caseloads of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to enhance their employment. (Page 286)

(10) Supporting Virginia’s Employment First initiative and implementation of the Department of Justice Settlement agreement by collaborating with the Department for Behavioral Health and Developmental Services to establish staff positions specializing in caseloads of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities to enhance their employment.

(11) Providing IPAD Pros for use by Rehabilitation Engineers and Assistive Technology Specialists in a “tele–rehab” environment which allows them to provide more effective on–site services to VR consumers needing these services and to interface more effectively with rehabilitation and assistive technology staff at WWRC. (Page 333) 

Customized Employment

(6) DARS, working closely with the VCU Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention, identified the need for training job coaches in basics responsibilities that would be reasonable in terms of time away from the job. VCU responded with the following: 

  1. Supported Employment Web–based Certificate Series (ACRE–certified);
  2. Supported Competitive Employment for Individuals with Mental Illness (ACRE–certified);
  3. Customized Employment; and
  4. Promoting an active network of inter–agency and inter–organizational professionals working with mutual supported employment consumers, with an emphasis on increasing linkages with rehabilitation engineering and technology experts and enhancing current linkages with employers, consumers, the education community and family members; (Page 258)

DARS is actively engaged at both the state and local level in the Workforce Development System. DARS is represented on the state Career Pathways Workgroup which advises the Governor’s Office and Workforce Board on the Workforce System issues and participates on the WIOA implementation team. A memorandum of understanding is in place with each Local Workforce Development Board and DARS works closely with the American Job Centers to assure access to individuals with disabilities. The VR program currently is co–located as a One–Stop partner in Charlottesville, Roanoke, Martinsville, Danville and South Boston. DARS also has a physical presence in other Workforce Board AJC’s. DARS is directly involved with both the state Workforce partners and local AJC’s in the Department of Labor Disability Employment Initiative grant and is lead on an RSA Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant. In the coming year, DARS will support training on career counseling, motivational interviewing as well as Customized Employment for our workforce partners.

No mechanism has been identified to track jointly enrolled Title I and VR clients. DARS is currently in the process of “on–boarding” VR RSA 911 information to the Virginia Longitudinal Data System (VLDS) to create a process to identify jointly enrolled clients. (Page 272)

(12) Providing training and implementing seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment (CE) across Virginia. This strategy is based on needs assessment and focus group recommendations from DARS Partnerships with Transcen, Inc. and George Washington University. By November 1, 2016, DARS will select and train key VR Counselors and Evaluators, AT Specialists, Business Placement and Self–Employment staff, and Partnering Employment Specialists, Behavioral Specialists, and Facilities Personnel in key concepts to implement CE approaches to DARS clients exiting institutions, sheltered workshops, high schools and adults for whom traditional supported employment services have not yielded successful outcomes. DARS will serve 20 or more clients with diverse backgrounds in order to assimilate Customized Employment best practices into our menu of services for these targeted populations. Options for self–employment will also be explored under this approach. (Page 286)

Provide training and implement seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment across Virginia.

Educate our VR counselors, vocational evaluators, consumers, and their parents (as applicable) on the current and future labor market, the availability of competitively–waged jobs and the skills needed to obtain those jobs.

Implement the Career Pathways grant to include the use of motivational interviewing techniques with our VR consumers. (Page 289)

The time limited supported employment services funded with federal/state VR Case service dollars include: 

  1. Vocational Assessment, job development, job placement, job coach training services, and training for blind, vision impaired, or deafblind individuals with most significant disabilities, including youth, who require more extensive supports than traditional VR services. The goal in providing SE services is competitive integrated employment.
  2. Support services such as adaptive equipment and assistive technology devices, interpreter services for persons with dual–sensory impairments, and other approved VR services needed to sustain the individual during the time limited phase of supported employment.

VR sponsorship for time limited SE services occurs when the individual has competitive integrated employment, including customized employment, and their VR case has been closed. Indication that it is time to end the time–limited SE phase occurs when the individual and the employer are satisfied with the individual’s job performance, when the SE services have been provided, and when job coach intervention time is less than 20 percent of the individual’s working hours over a 30 to 60–day period.

An individual’s VR case is closed when competitive integrated employment is performed for the established hours per week for a period of ninety days after the transition from the time–limited phase to the extended services phase, as specified on the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). (Page 307)

Blending/ Braiding Resources

The successful execution of this plan requires Virginia to commit to the professional development of workforce practitioners, and to the braiding and management of financial resources in new ways. The Commonwealth is committed to developing staff to capitalize on investments in technology, and to realize the benefits from a common agenda with workforce system partners. Careful investments in human and financial resources ultimately reflect value to customers and to their communities across the state. (Page 78)

Implement “Integrated Resource” team service delivery strategy for multiple–barrier customers 

  • Coordinate workforce partners around and employment/training goal for an individual customer, with no modification to provider service models;
  • Enhance cross program collaboration and service alignment by braiding and leveraging partner resources, funding and services;
  • Develop and integrated career plan that aligns with service goals;
  • Conduct partner cross–training for strategy implementation;
  • Design plan to record best practices for broader dissemination across workforce system partners;
  • Embed practices into procedures; and
  • Apply CPI. (Page 84)
DEI/Disability Resource Coordinators

Virginia is fortunate to have a long standing collaborative relationship with Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and other key state partners. This partnership history facilitated the leveraging and coordination of existing and added resources provided via the six DOL Workforce Disability Initiatives, the latest of which are the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants. Whereas, significant strides have been made to ensure our One-Stop Service Delivery System is accessible to all job seekers, including those with disabilities and other challenges to employment, we are committed to continuous quality improvement. These efforts are focused on physical, programmatic and communication access. We will continue these efforts and build on our existing infrastructure to encourage shared ownership; foster systems integration through cross-agency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. (Page 154)

The following are examples of local level practices implemented to enhance access for job seekers with disabilities made possible by leveraging the resources from the DOL Disability grants and state level cross agency partnerships:

Installed Universal Computer Workstations with Assistive Technology devices and software and conducted staff trainings in pilot LWDBAs; expanded the web-based Common Screening Tool to better identify job seekers with disabilities, track customer flow and service referrals. (The data indicated an on average a 15% increase of self-identification where this tool was piloted); incorporated Disability Resources and disseminated announcements for various activities that would benefit individuals with disabilities, such as: disability trainings and IRS free tax assistance and site locations, dedicated a page to post information about disability resources on the Virginia’s Workforce Development website, Elevate Virginia; integrated DEI strategies by adding four modules into Virginia’s Workforce Development Systems Course, which is a requirement for all front-line staff co-located at the Centers to complete. (The optional modules are Welcoming All Customers/Universal Strategies, Asset Development, Integrated Resource Teams with a Person Centered Planning approach and Mystery Shopper); coordinated local/statewide trainings (on line, in person and at state conferences) for One-Stop staff and partners and also utilized resources through the Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. Some of the topics covered were: ADA Accessibility requirements, Disability Etiquette, Access for All - Welcoming Customers at workforce centers and accommodations; implemented Social Security (SSA) - Ticket To Work Program to expand employment opportunities for SSA beneficiaries in 6 LWDB areas; facilitated certification trainings for Work Incentives Specialist Advocates who advise beneficiaries on work incentives; promoted asset development and financial capability strategies to enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency, including financial literacy training, the use of individual development accounts, tax and work incentives, and other strategies for encouraging economic advancement; and trained and provided technical assistance to businesses/employers about the use of effective hiring practices and job accommodations, including Assistive Technology trainings in collaboration with Virginia Assistive Technology System and Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center.

As a result, DEI Round I efforts and collaborative workforce partnerships, Virginia statewide data from October 2010 through March 2014, indicated participants with disabilities active with WIA (now WIOA) intensive services increased from 1.8% to 4.9%. (Page 155)

3.4 Provide 7 Disability Resource Coordinators/Disability Program Navigators to increase access to programs and services for vocational rehabilitation consumers. DARS currently provides three Disability Resource Coordinators to two local American Job Centers (AJCs) as a part of DOL Disability Employment Initiative Round IV grant project efforts in collaboration with the VCCS/Workforce Services Division (Title I Administrator). In addition, through an Innovation and Expansion project, DARS has co–located a previous Disability Program Navigator as a VR Counselor housed in an AJC and providing VR services. Also, three workforce areas previously participating in DOL DPN/DEI grant efforts have retained three DARS staff to provide services to individuals with disabilities in AJCs. As a result DEI Round I efforts and collaborative workforce partnerships, Virginia statewide data from October 2010 through March 2014, indicated participants with disabilities active with WIA (now WIOA) intensive services increased from 1.8% to 4.9%. (Page 294)

Financial Literacy /Economic Advancement

On October 1, 2014, VCCS was awarded Workforce Investment Act, Workforce Innovation funds in the amount of $11,196,152 by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration to implement the Working Families Success Network Model with 6 American Job Center (also known as One-Stop Center) sites in Virginia for 1800 participants. The model of bundled service delivery comprises three services:

  1. Workforce and education services resulting in career advancement: education and training, employability skills, job placement;
  2. Income and work supports: access to student financial aid, public benefits, free tax preparation;
  3. Financial services and asset building: financial education, financial coaching. 

A Coach will be available at each of the sites to coordinate the services. As a study project, services will be determined with a randomized control process and to those who consent to participate starting October 1, 2015 in Workforce Development Areas 3-Western Virginia, 6-Piedmont, 8-South Central, 11-Northern Virginia, 16-Hampton Roads, and 17-West Piedmont. Services will be delivered through September 30, 2018. (Page 110)

Virginia’s Workforce Development Systems Course, which is a requirement for all front-line staff co-located at the Centers to complete. (The optional modules are Welcoming All Customers/Universal Strategies, Asset Development, Integrated Resource Teams with a Person Centered Planning approach and Mystery Shopper); coordinated local/statewide trainings (on line, in person and at state conferences) for One-Stop staff and partners and also utilized resources through the Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. Some of the topics covered were: ADA Accessibility requirements, Disability Etiquette, Access for All - Welcoming Customers at workforce centers and accommodations; implemented Social Security (SSA) - Ticket To Work Program to expand employment opportunities for SSA beneficiaries in 6 LWDB areas; facilitated certification trainings for Work Incentives Specialist Advocates who advise beneficiaries on work incentives; promoted asset development and financial capability strategies to enhance long-term economic self-sufficiency, including financial literacy training, the use of individual development accounts, tax and work incentives, and other strategies for encouraging economic advancement; and trained and provided technical assistance to businesses/employers about the use of effective hiring practices and job accommodations, including Assistive Technology trainings in collaboration with Virginia Assistive Technology System and Mid-Atlantic ADA Business Technical Assistance Center. (Page 155)   

School to Work Transition

School personnel represented the largest number of respondents (50%), followed by: Supported Employment Vendors–ESO’s (23.6%), Community Service Boards (17%), Centers for Independent Living (4.7%) Advocates (4.7%), individuals with a disability (3.8%), parents of children with disabilities (1.9%), and Brain Injury Organization Members (1%).

Respondents rated consumers’ barriers to employment. Transportation emerged as the number one “very significant” barrier to employment with a 73% agreement followed by: lack of jobs (61%), financial support for services (60%), housing (40%), lack of marketable job skills (35%), financial or benefits disincentives (33%), inadequate training opportunities (28%), lack of networking opportunities (28%), lack of service providers (26%), family influence (21%), and consumers unrealistic goals (16%).

Approximately, 89% of DARS consumers are most significantly disabled. DARS supplements its Title VI Supported Employment funds with Title I funds to ensure that every consumer who needs Supported Employment services receive this service. (Page 270)

Two percent of the respondents gave DARS an excellent rating regarding students’ experience with DARS. Twelve percent rated DARS as “good”, 9% “fair” and 13% responded “unsatisfactory”. The services identified as most needed were: job coaching (80%), internships (66%), job placement services (74%), skills training (66%), job seeking skills training (61%), vocational evaluation (57%), independent living skills training (54%), guidance and counseling from a vocational rehabilitation counselor (53%), college education (38%), assistive technology (38%), benefits planning (36%), physical restoration (8%) and mental restoration (7%). Fifty eight percent of the respondents stated that students did not have the skills to obtain employment in the community. Thirty percent believed the students did have the training for community employment and twelve percent did not answer the question. (Page 273)

(4) Assure a full range of choices are available in order to meet the vocational needs of consumers requiring supported employment services. Virginia uses all supported employment models, including the individual placement model, the enclave model, the entrepreneurial model and mobile work crews. Individual placement is the most widely used, and generally offers higher wage rates, better benefits and more flexibility in meeting the needs of customers and employers in an integrated work setting. The group models are important options that provide for the constant presence of the Employment Specialist at the job site to support customers who need intensive supervision in order to maintain employment. (Page 283-284)

DARS requires that each of Virginia’s ESOs vendored to provide VR services be nationally accredited through the Rehabilitation Accreditation Commission (CARF). CARF accreditation provides a host of benefits to DARS as a state–funding source, as well as to DARS consumers, and taxpayers. In addition to assuring accountability and consistent quality levels, national accreditation allows DARS to focus on program expansion, improvement and accountability.

DARS currently purchase services through 87 ESOs throughout the state. During FY 2015, these organizations provided supported employment services over 3,000 individuals, including youth with the most significant disabilities. (Page 303)

The Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) provides services and supports to individuals who have developmental disabilities, intellectual disabilities, and mental health concerns, also known as behavioral health in Virginia. Services to these individuals are provided by regional and local Community Services Boards (CSBs). DBVI will establish or reestablish collaborative relationships with Virginia DBHDS and CSBs to include participating in interagency workgroups with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the Intellectual Disability (ID)/Developmental Disability (DD) CSB Case Managers with the goal of providing information related to allowable employment activities including Virginia’s Employment First initiative, Medicaid Waiver programs, and the provision of supported and extended support services. Collaboration with DBHDS also provides information on services and resources that support pre-employment transition programs and positive employment outcomes. The DBVI Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor will work with the DBHDS Employment Specialist and the ID/DD CSB Case Managers to specifically ensure that issues related to work benefits, supports, and available resources are addressed. (Page 333)

Lack of transportation, affordable housing, marketable work skills and training were all identified as major barriers to employment for individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind in Virginia; 

  • The Supported Employment model is not frequently used, and when it is used, it is not typically the standard SE model;
  • A large majority of individuals served receive SSA benefits and fear of benefit loss affects their return–to–work behavior; and
  • Independent living skills are a major need of individuals served. The Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired (VRCBVI) meets this need for a small percentage of individuals served, but many people would like to see VRCBVI expand its reach and provide low vision services. (Page 343)
  1. Any individuals, including all minor caretakers, under 16 years of age;
  2. Any individual at least 16, but no more than 19 years of age, who is enrolled full–time in elementary or secondary school, including vocational or technical school programs. The vocational or technical school must be equivalent to secondary school;
  3. Any individual unable to participate because of a temporary medical condition that prevents entry into at least 20 hours per week of employment or training, as determined by a medical professional;
  4. Any individual who is incapacitated, as determined by receipt of Social Security Disability benefits or Supplemental Security Income;
  5. Any individual 60 years of age or older;
  6. Any individual who is the sole care giver of another member of the household who is incapacitated, and whose presence is essential for the care of the member on a substantially continuous basis, shall be exempt from participation in VIEW. Incapacity is determined by receipt of Social Security Disability benefits or Supplemental Security Income. The sole other condition under which an individual may be determined incapacitated is by a written medical statement from a physician; and
  7. A parent or caretaker of a child under 12 months of age who personally provides care for the child. (Page 506)
Career Pathways

To enhance and facilitate job–readiness skills and career planning for students to make a successful transition from school to work and to greater independence, students will be referred to DBVI Workforce Specialists and to Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) (also known in Virginia as Employment Services Organizations (ESOs)). Workforce Specialists will complement pre–employment transition services by delivering workplace readiness training to establish skills necessary for entry into career pathways, competitive integrated employment, and by coordinating with schools and networking with employers to establish paid and unpaid internships, including apprenticeships, specifically matched to the student’s needs, skills, interests, abilities, and informed choice. Transition services purchased from CRPs may also include On–The–Job support and extended support services for students and youth needing additional supports in the work experience setting or on the job. (Page 331)

Work Incentives & Benefits

Across Virginia’s workforce system, partner agencies are engaged in operationalizing several workforce initiatives stemming from grants obtained from the federal government for specific workforce innovations. These grants include:

  • The Disability Employment Initiative Grants (The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, the Virginia Employment Commission, Virginia’s Community College System, and five Local Workforce Development Boards)
  • The Veterans’ Demonstration Grant (Virginia’s Community College System, the Virginia Employment Commission, and the Department of Veterans’ Services)
  • Local Apprenticeship Grants (Shenandoah Valley Workforce Region, the Department of Labor and Industry, and Virginia’s Community College System)
  • The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Department of the Blind and Vision Impaired jointly received a RSA funded CPID grant The grant collaborates with multiple workforce partners including adult education and two local workforce boards, other DOL grants and the Virginia Manufacturers Association to enhance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. project goals include helping individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations; enhancing the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities; (Page 88)

Manufacturers Association to enhance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. project goals include helping individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations; enhancing the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities; enhancing access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities. (Page 98)

  • The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Department of the Blind and Vision Impaired jointly received a RSA funded CPID grant The grant collaborates with multiple workforce partners including adult education and two local workforce boards, other DOL grants and the Virginia Manufacturers Association to enhance employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. project goals include helping individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high-demand, high-quality occupations; enhancing the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities; enhancing access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities. (Page 103)

DARS is actively engaged at both the state and local level in the Workforce Development System. DARS is represented on the state Career Pathways Workgroup which advises the Governor’s Office and Workforce Board on the Workforce System issues and participates on the WIOA implementation team. A memorandum of understanding is in place with each Local Workforce Development Board and DARS works closely with the American Job Centers to assure access to individuals with disabilities. The VR program currently is co–located as a One–Stop partner in Charlottesville, Roanoke, Martinsville, Danville and South Boston. DARS also has a physical presence in other Workforce Board AJC’s. DARS is directly involved with both the state Workforce partners and local AJC’s in the Department of Labor Disability Employment Initiative grant and is lead on an RSA Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities grant. In the coming year, DARS will support training on career counseling, motivational interviewing as well as Customized Employment for our workforce partners. (Page 272)

Provide training and implement seven (one per District) teams to pilot and implement Customized Employment across Virginia.

Educate our VR counselors, vocational evaluators, consumers, and their parents (as applicable) on the current and future labor market, the availability of competitively–waged jobs and the skills needed to obtain those jobs.

Implement the Career Pathways grant to include the use of motivational interviewing techniques with our VR consumers.

Implement the five year Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities (CPID) model demonstration program to create new career pathways and/or use existing career pathways in high–demand occupations. (Page 289)

WWRC has formalized its evolving partnership with the DARS Business Development Managers to connect classrooms to workplace standards and expectations and modify curriculum to increase the likelihood of successful placements for training graduates, with long–term retention opportunities. This has resulted in the development of several collaborative workforce initiatives with industry professional organizations and corporate networks directly benefitting VR consumer employment goals. The Hershey model is one example of this, with other corporate bodies expressing interest in replication within their organizations. The DARS partnership with the Hershey apprenticeship program offered individuals with disabilities a six–month work experience on the production line. During the apprenticeship, DARS clients could access any needed supports from WWRC to help them complete the program as long as they were able to perform the required duties at the end of the six months. During FFY 2015, an evolving partnership with CVS Health resulted in the set–up of a mock store within WWRC Materials Handling Training Program to prepare VR consumers for direct employment and career pathways within the CVS Health System across the Commonwealth of Virginia. CVS Health donated all supplies and equipment for the mock store and worked with WWRC Instructors to refine the curriculum and develop community internships to prepare students to work in the CVS Health System. (Page 298)

To enhance and facilitate job–readiness skills and career planning for students to make a successful transition from school to work and to greater independence, students will be referred to DBVI Workforce Specialists and to Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) (also known in Virginia as Employment Services Organizations (ESOs)). Workforce Specialists will complement pre–employment transition services by delivering workplace readiness training to establish skills necessary for entry into career pathways, competitive integrated employment, and by coordinating with schools and networking with employers to establish paid and unpaid internships, including apprenticeships, specifically matched to the student’s needs, skills, interests, abilities, and informed choice. Transition services purchased from CRPs may also include On–The–Job support and extended support services for students and youth needing additional supports in the work experience setting or on the job. (Page 331)

DBVI will conduct a monthly training program designed to ensure that new and seasoned VRCs and Regional Managers have a 21st Century understanding of the evolving labor force and the needs of individuals with disabilities. To facilitate this learning, DBVI will continue its Video Teleconferencing– based program entitled, ”Making a Difference” (MAD), which is conducted on a monthly basis by trainers, internal and external to the agency. Topics include a broad range of subjects including, but not limited to, the use of vocational evaluations, job placement, rehabilitation technology, vocational counseling, the Business Enterprise program, Social Security and Ticket to Work program, Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired changes and summer programs, update information regarding Workforce Development activities, utilization of Career Pathways, Medicaid Waivers, Supported Employment, review of the VR eligibility process, ethics, conflict management, self–employment, and the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014. During FFY 2016, (Page 339)

  1. Expanding and enhancing workforce development activities to develop and maintain effective working relationships with Virginia business and industry at the local, regional, and state level to develop partnerships that facilitate industry recognized credential attainment, skill development, and entry into career pathways for eligible individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind leading to competitive integrated employment. (Page 348)

Goals 1 and 2 of DBVI’s six goals identifies strategies and measures that apply to methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind.

Goal 1. Expanding and enhancing workforce development activities to develop and maintain effective working relationships with Virginia business and industry at the local, regional, and state level to develop partnerships that facilitate industry recognized credential attainment, skill development, and entry into career pathways for eligible individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind leading to competitive integrated employment.

Strategy 1.1: To fully engage personnel and financial resources of DBVI’s newly established Workforce Unit to implement business support and outreach services. Personnel in the Workforce Unit include one Workforce Coordinator, four Regional Workforce Specialists, and one Director of Workforce/Vocational Rehabilitation. (Page 354)

Strategy 1.3: To establish and enhance entry into career pathways, DBVI will utilize personnel and funds associated Virginia’s Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Grant which was jointly awarded DBVI and the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) in 2015. DBVI will:

  • Help individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high–demand, high–quality occupations;
  • Enhance the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities;
  • Enhance access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities; and
  • Strengthen the alignment of Virginia’s VR programs with the other core programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and other Federally–funded career pathways initiatives providing self–advocacy skills training that is critical to the achievement of individuals’ personal and vocational goals. (Page 355)

Strategy 1.3: To establish and enhance entry into career pathways, DBVI will utilize personnel and funds associated Virginia’s Career Pathways for Individuals with Disabilities Grant which was jointly awarded DBVI and the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) in 2015. DBVI will:

  • help individuals with disabilities acquire marketable skills and credentials that enable them to secure competitive integrated employment in high–demand, high–quality occupations;
  • enhance the capacity of existing career pathways programs in Virginia to effectively serve individuals with disabilities;
  • enhance access to and use of existing career pathways in selected occupational clusters (including advanced manufacturing) by individuals with disabilities; and
  • strengthen the alignment of Virginia’s VR programs with the other core programs authorized by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and other Federally–funded career pathways initiatives providing self–advocacy skills training that is critical to the achievement of individuals’ personal and vocational goals.

Measures: Other first–year activities will include working with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling to develop and implement career pathways–focused career counseling training for VR counselors and other workforce professionals that incorporates use of labor market information and motivational interviewing techniques. (Page 362)

Employer/ Business

3.5   Enter into an Administrative Employment Network Agreement with two Employment Networks to determine the feasibility of this model for funding long term employment supports. During this reporting period, there were administrative Employment Network (EN) agreements established with two different groups so that potential EN partners in Virginia would have options when considering participation in Partnership Plus. This has resulted in seven new administrative EN agreements that will support DARS ticket holders after case closure from VR. Preliminary indication is that the administrative EN option seems to be a viable option for long term employment supports for partners that do not have the volume of tickets or administrative infrastructure to support the ticket to work program. (Page 295)

511

System-wide Data Collection and Reporting 

Virginia does not currently have the capability to get a system-wide, global view of workforce data across the various programs and agency. Data is still largely confined to programmatic siloes, and - with a few notable exceptions - agency staff is reticent about sharing data with partner agencies. WIOA has given the Commonwealth the opportunity to adopt standards data collection systems and portals, and establish protocols by which data and information can be shared responsibly. These protocols will be developed collaboratively over the coming months. (Page 119)

Commonwealth of Virginia Process for Identifying Regions: 

Reference: VBWD Policy 200-06, Designation of Regions and Planning Requirements, http://www.elevatevirginia.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Policy-200-06-Designation-of-Regions-and-Planning-Requirements-FINAL-Signed.pdf

In order to identify regions, WIOA requires the state to identify factors to be used, which, when applying, may or may not align to current local workforce development areas. In Virginia, the factors were used to promote a collaborative process whereby the data collection and analysis of the factors for determination of regions are shared between state and local workforce partners. Virginia utilized the following factors in determining regions:

  1. Single Labor Market;
  2. Common Economic Development Area;
  3. Federal and Non-Federal Resources to Carry Out WIOA Activities;
  4. Population Centers;
  5. Commuting Patterns;
  6. Industrial Composition and Sector Alignment;
  7. Community College Regions. 

Utilizing these seven factors, various regional alignments may be considered and proposed by a number of workforce system stakeholders such as state policymakers, State and Local Board members, state and local workforce staff, partner program staff, business and industry partners and workforce and education associations. In order for Virginia to consider and designate regions, a formal proposal shall be submitted to the Virginia Board of Workforce Development that includes a recommendation for region designation, a rationale for the region designation recommended using the seven factors, and a description of why the regional alignment proposed is in the best interests of the state, business and industry, and workers and job seekers. (Page 167)

DARS’ policies require that for students with disabilities who

  1. are receiving special education services from a public school, and
  2. also are determined eligible for VR services (and able to be served if DARS is on an order of selection), the Individualized Plan for Employment shall be completed and signed within 90 days of the eligibility determination and before the student leaves the school setting. 

DARS continues to be a stakeholder in the review of data that DOE collects to report to the Office on Special Education Programs (OSEP) to support and accomplish respective post school and employment outcomes required by the federal government and to provide meaningful data collection by each agency. (Page 251)

DARS continues to be a stakeholder in the review of data that DOE collects to report to the Office on Special Education Programs (OSEP) to support and accomplish respective post school and employment outcomes required by the federal government and to provide meaningful data collection by each agency.

Additional DARS and DOE collaborative activities include co–chairing the Virginia Interagency Transition Council (VITC) and the regional Virginia Transition Practitioners Councils (TPC). TPC provides a forum for transition practitioners and other interested stakeholders from school divisions, adult agencies, and community partners to engage in professional development activities, networking opportunities, and collaborative efforts that enhance the implementation of quality transition services for secondary school students with disabilities. The VITC is comprised of representatives from 14 state agencies who have leadership roles and transition as part of their responsibility in serving youth with disabilities. The Council works to stay abreast of current transition information, to identify gaps in resources, and avoid duplication of transition services. VITC has set a priority to improve communication between the state, regional, and local transition councils. It is anticipated that information will be shared with and by VITC through the regional and local Councils. This flow of communication allows for improved responses to identified needs, as well as recommendations for future efforts.( Page 253)

Data collection efforts solicited input from a broad spectrum of individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind, service providers, DBVI staff, and some businesses. (Page 342)

The needs assessment approach was designed to elicit quantitative and qualitative data about the needs of persons who are blind, vision impaired, or deafblind. Focus group and key informant interview activities yielded qualitative data that may be used to complement and lend depth to the findings of the survey efforts and the analysis of extant data. The use of multiple data collection strategies, both quantitative and qualitative, facilitates data collection that captures both the breadth and the depth of concerns relevant to individuals who are blind, vision impaired, or vision impaired in Virginia. (Page 343)

Measure: The DBVI/DARS project team will work with staff from the American Institutes for Research (AIR, the planned project evaluator) to develop and implement the project evaluation design and data collection plan.

Measures: Other first–year activities will include working with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling to develop and implement career pathways–focused career counseling training for VR counselors and other workforce professionals that incorporates use of labor market information and motivational interviewing techniques. (Page 353)

Measure: The DBVI/DARS project team will work with staff from the American Institutes for Research (AIR, the planned project evaluator) to develop and implement the project evaluation design and data collection plan.

Measures: Other first–year activities will include working with the George Washington University (GWU) Center for Rehabilitation Counseling to develop and implement career pathways–focused career counseling training for VR counselors and other workforce professionals that incorporates use of labor market information and motivational interviewing techniques. (Page 362)

Mental Health

Virginia is fortunate to have a long standing collaborative relationship with Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and other key state partners. This partnership history facilitated the leveraging and coordination of existing and added resources provided via the six DOL Workforce Disability Initiatives, the latest of which are the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) grants. Whereas, significant strides have been made to ensure our One-Stop Service Delivery System is accessible to all job seekers, including those with disabilities and other challenges to employment, we are committed to continuous quality improvement. These efforts are focused on physical, programmatic and communication access. We will continue these efforts and build on our existing infrastructure to encourage shared ownership; foster systems integration through cross-agency collaboration at all levels; and design access to services from a customer’s perspective. (Page 154)

Expected outcomes are the following: a revised ADA Accessibility guidelines and one-stop center certification process that incorporates the WIOA Section 188 Disability Reference Guide checklist for program and physical accessibility; system standards for accessible devices and software located in workforce centers to facilitate consistency; review of all policies and guidance to ensure alignment and consistency; a schedule for cross- agency training for survey providers, end users, one-stop operators and partner staff. The efforts of this Team will improve compliance and enhance communication, coordination and professional development across Virginia’s workforce system. (Page 156)

This a administrative guidance document provides a reasonable guarantee that all of Virginia’s WIOA Title I financially assisted programs, activities and recipients comply with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity requirements stipulated under Section 188 of the WIOA. (Page 171)

Policies and Initiatives

Displaying 31 - 40 of 63

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services State Board Policy 1036 - 12/04/2012

“It is the policy of the Board that in the development and implementation of policies and procedures and the delivery of services, the Department and CSBs shall ensure that community-based individual supported employment in integrated work settings is presented as the first and priority service option among available day service options offered by case managers and support coordinators to individuals receiving mental health, developmental, or substance abuse day support or employment services and shall expand access to integrated, community-based employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders, intellectual disability, or co-occurring disabilities…”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order (Executive Order #55 (2012)) - 11/16/2012 - 11/16/2012

“The last United States Census concluded that out of 3.6 million Virginia residents who were employed, 154,985 Virginians with disabilities were included in that total. These numbers indicate an under representation of people with disabilities among the gainfully employed. The Commonwealth of Virginia should work to provide a Commonwealth of Opportunity for all Virginians; therefore it is appropriate to initiate steps in order to expand employment opportunities for its citizens who are disabled….”

“By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor by Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth…and in conjunction with… the Code of Virginia which states that it is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities, including our wounded soldiers, to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment, with the goal of enhancing the employment opportunities for Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia DBHDS: Strategic Plan for Employment First - 10/01/2012

To facilitate interagency collaboration the Strategic Plan for Employment First establishes an Employment First Summit Meeting, which will gather leadership from various department committed to upholding Employment First principles, and orders for the creation of a high level administrative leadership body including (DBHDS, DARS, DOE, DMAS, Virginia Employment Commission (VEC), Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council) and Virginia Community College System (VCCS).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Virginia State Employment Leadership Network - 10/01/2012

Virginia is a part of this multi-state technical assistance collaborative whose aim is to improve integrated employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities. “In 2008, DBHDS joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) sponsored by the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services and the University of Massachusetts-Boston Institute for Community Inclusion. DBHDS developed a Virginia-specific SELN Advisory Group made up of over 30 members representing a variety of organizations involved in providing employment services to Virginians. Members include community service boards (CSBs), the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (VBPD), the Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention (VCU/RRTC), and vendor organizations such as the Virginia Association of Community Rehabilitation Programs (vaACCSES), the Arc of Virginia, and the Virginia Association of Providers of Supported Employment (VaAPSE). DBHDS continues to be an active, contributing participant in the monthly National SELN web-based meetings. Virginia is now one of 30 states in the SELN. The Virginia SELN Advisory Group, made up of advocates, providers, and state agencies, continues to identify roadblocks and disincentives in our state system. The group is developing specific strategies for implementation of a system that prioritizes employment as an outcome of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services Employment First Strategic Plan - 10/01/2012

“This document outlines the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services’ (DBHDS or ‘the department’) Strategic Plan for Employment First. The strategic plan was formulated in response to efforts in recent years to build and expand integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in Virginia. DBHDS supports individuals with serious mental illness, substance use disorders, and intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The strategic plan establishes annual goals for DBHDS to collaborate with other state agencies and organizations to expand opportunities for employment for all Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Consent Decree allowing for more waivers and less training Centers - 08/23/2012

“Under the proposed settlement, Virginia has agreed to provide 4170 additional waiver slots, divided among current Training Center residents, disabled people in various segregated facilities other than the Training Centers, and people on the waiting list for services…The settlement also prescribes in great detail how Virginia will administer the services it provides to disabled citizens. This process will be a shared responsibility of the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services and local community service boards ("CSBs")...”“The decree also provides for changed procedures at the Training Centers and spells out how the Commonwealth will assist the CSBs with technical assistance. Each Training Center resident will have a discharge plan crafted by the professionals at the facility. Virginia will set up case-management teams, crisis teams, and plans for supported day services in the community. Essentially, the Commonwealth's efforts—and those of the CSBs—will all be focused on keeping disabled people in the community.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Education ESEA Flexibility Request - 02/27/2012

“For students with disabilities who have the most intensive support needs, there are two model initiatives supported by the Virginia Department of Education: Project SEARCH and the Post-High School Community College Program. Project SEARCH, a business-led model, is a collaborative between school divisions and local businesses that provide employability skills training and workplace internships that occur entirely in the workplace. The Post-High School Community College Program is a supported education model that provides individualized supports to students with significant disabilities seeking postsecondary education to enhance their skills for employment, in an age-appropriate setting. The Department of Education provides support and technical assistance to increase the number of partnerships between school divisions and institutions of higher education.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia 2012 Senate Joint Resolution No. 127 - 02/25/2012

“Encouraging the Secretary of Health and Human Resources and the Superintendent of Public Instruction to adopt and implement Employment First practices...” Employment First is defined as a policy is grounded in a framework of increased integration, independence, productivity and employment that is based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, abilities, and informed choice of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

ADA Olmstead Settlement Agreement - 01/26/2012

“The fundamental goals of the Agreement are to prevent the unnecessary institutionalization of individuals with developmental disabilities who are living in the community, including thousands of individuals on waitlists for community-based services, and ensure that people who are currently in institutions - at the Commonwealth's training centers or in other private but state-funded facilities - have a meaningful opportunity to receive services that meet their needs in the community…Pursuant to the Interim Settlement Agreement, the State and City will give TTP and Birch service recipients the opportunity to receive integrated supported employment and integrated daytime services that will enable them to interact with the broader community to the fullest extent possible.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Virginia 2012 House Joint Resolution No. 23 - 01/11/2012

“WHEREAS, implementation of an Employment First initiative in Virginia will lead to increased employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, resulting in benefits for individuals, families, employers, and communities across the Commonwealth; now, therefore, be it resolved by the House of Delegates, the Senate concurring, That the Secretary of Health and Human Resources be requested to develop and implement an Employment First initiative in the Commonwealth, which shall identify employment in an integrated, community setting earning an amount that is equal to or greater than minimum-wage rates as the first goal for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving services through state agencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Virginia Acts of Assembly: An Act to Amend and Reenact §§ 51.5-41, 51.5-120, 51.5-163, 51.5-164, and 51.5-172 through 51.5-176 of the Code of Virginia - 02/25/2016

Discrimination against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities by employers prohibited A.No employer shall discriminate in employment or promotion practices against an otherwise qualified person with a disability solely because of such disability. For the purposes of this section, an "otherwise qualified person with a disability" means a person qualified to perform the duties of a particular job or position and whose disability is unrelated to the person's ability to perform such duties or position or is unrelated to the person's qualifications for employment or promotion. B. It is the policy of the Commonwealth that persons with disabilities shall be employed in the state service, the service of the political subdivisions of the Commonwealth, in the public schools, and in all other employment supported in whole or in part by public funds on the same terms and conditions as other persons unless it is shown that the particular disability prevents the performance of the work involved. C. An employer shall make reasonable accommodation to the known physical and mental impairments of an otherwise qualified person with a disability, if necessary to assist such person in performing a particular job, unless the employer can demonstrate that the accommodation would impose an undue burden on the employer. For the purposes of this section, "mental impairment" does not include active alcoholism or current drug addiction and does not include any mental impairment, disease, or defect that has been successfully asserted by an individual as a defense to any criminal charge. 1. Individualized plan for employment. A written individualized plan for employment for each recipient of vocational rehabilitation services provided or funded by the Department, in whole or in part, shall be developed within a reasonable time and as soon as possible, but not later than 90 days after the due date of the determination of eligibility, unless an extension is agreed to by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and the Department. The plan shall be agreed to and signed by the client, his parents or guardian, if appropriate, and a qualified vocational rehabilitation counselor employed by the Department

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia SB 1404 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia HB 2306 - 03/17/2015

"An Act to amend and reenact §§ 23-38.7523-38.7623-38.7723-38.8023-38.81, and 58.1-322 of the Code of Virginia, relating to establishing Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to assist individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities."

" 'ABLE savings trust account' means an account established pursuant to this chapter to assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities to maintain health, independence, and quality of life, with such account used to apply distributions for qualified disability expenses for an eligible individual, both as defined in § 529A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or other applicable federal law."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Virginia 2012 Senate Joint Resolution No. 127 - 02/25/2012

“Encouraging the Secretary of Health and Human Resources and the Superintendent of Public Instruction to adopt and implement Employment First practices...” Employment First is defined as a policy is grounded in a framework of increased integration, independence, productivity and employment that is based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, abilities, and informed choice of an individual.

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia 2012 House Joint Resolution No. 23 - 01/11/2012

“WHEREAS, implementation of an Employment First initiative in Virginia will lead to increased employment opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, resulting in benefits for individuals, families, employers, and communities across the Commonwealth; now, therefore, be it resolved by the House of Delegates, the Senate concurring, That the Secretary of Health and Human Resources be requested to develop and implement an Employment First initiative in the Commonwealth, which shall identify employment in an integrated, community setting earning an amount that is equal to or greater than minimum-wage rates as the first goal for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities receiving services through state agencies.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

The Virginians with Disabilities Act ( 51.5-1) of 1989 - 05/01/1989

“ It is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment. To these ends, the General Assembly directs the Governor, the Virginia Office for Protection and Advocacy, the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities, the Departments of Education, Health, Housing and Community Development, Behavioral Health and Developmental Services, and Social Services, and the Departments for Aging and Rehabilitative Services, the Blind and Vision Impaired, and the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing and such other agencies as the Governor deems appropriate, to provide, in a comprehensive and coordinated manner which makes the best use of available resources, those services necessary to assure equal opportunity to persons with disabilities in the Commonwealth.The provisions of this title shall be known and may be cited as “‘The Virginians with Disabilities Act.’”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 1 - 4 of 4

Disability Employment Awareness Month - 10/01/2018

~~"WHEREAS, all Virginians should be given the opportunity to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment to drive Virginia’s economy;NOW, THEREFORE, I, Ralph S. Northam, do hereby recognize October 2018 as DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH in our COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA, and I call this observance to the attention of all our citizens." 

Systems
  • Other

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order Number One (2018) Equal Opportunity - 01/13/2018

~~‘By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor, I hereby declare that it is the firm and unwavering policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to ensure equal opportunity in all facets of state government.  The foundational tenet of this Executive Order is premised upon a steadfast commitment to foster a culture of inclusion, diversity, and mutual respect for all Virginians. This policy specifically prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, sex, color, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, age, political affiliation, or against otherwise qualified persons with disabilities.  The policy permits appropriate employment preferences for veterans and specifically prohibits discrimination against veterans.”

Systems
  • Other

Executive Order 46: Supporting Virginians with Disabilities in the New Virginia Economy - 07/27/2015

“The Chief Workforce Development Advisor, in conjunction with the Secretary of Health and Human Resources, shall work with DARS and DBVI to offer to all executive branch agencies (including institutions of higher education, boards, and commissions) training designed to expand existing efforts to recruit, accommodate, retain and advance Virginians with disabilities in the Commonwealth’s workforce. Training shall commence no later than October 1, 2015...”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Governor’s Executive Order (Executive Order #55 (2012)) - 11/16/2012 - 11/16/2012

“The last United States Census concluded that out of 3.6 million Virginia residents who were employed, 154,985 Virginians with disabilities were included in that total. These numbers indicate an under representation of people with disabilities among the gainfully employed. The Commonwealth of Virginia should work to provide a Commonwealth of Opportunity for all Virginians; therefore it is appropriate to initiate steps in order to expand employment opportunities for its citizens who are disabled….”

“By virtue of the authority vested in me as Governor by Article V of the Constitution of Virginia and under the laws of the Commonwealth…and in conjunction with… the Code of Virginia which states that it is the policy of the Commonwealth to encourage and enable persons with disabilities, including our wounded soldiers, to participate fully and equally in the social and economic life of the Commonwealth and to engage in remunerative employment, with the goal of enhancing the employment opportunities for Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
Displaying 11 - 20 of 20

Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired Business Relations Services - 10/15/2017

“The Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) is pleased to announce the addition of the new DBVI Business Relations Unit. The unit will have a statewide impact on individuals with vision impairments in reaching their career goal of sustainable employment. The Business Relations Specialists will work with employers in recruiting a highly skilled, pre-screened pipeline of talent. The team is well versed in services for employers including, federal contractor hiring (503c), corporate initiatives, workforce diversity and inclusion, worksite consultations, job retention and the many incentives for hiring individuals with abilities.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

Virginia Board for People with Disabilities State Plan 2017-2021 - 10/01/2016

“The Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (the Board) serves as the Commonwealth’s Developmental Disabilities (DD) Planning Council and as the Governor’s Advisory Council on issues affecting individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Under the federal law, each state is authorized to establish a DD Council, which receives funds to carry out initiatives for systems change, capacity-building, and advocacy. Through these activities, the Board seeks to impact the independence, productivity, inclusion, and integration of people with disabilities in their communities.

The Board’s activities are organized in a five-year State Plan which serves as a framework for the Board’s funding initiatives, staff work priorities, and Board member activities. The state plan was developed through Board and stakeholder input, which included focus groups and a survey of people with DD, their families, advocacy organizations and state agencies to assess how well Virginia is doing in supporting children and their families to lead the lives they want with the support they need. The Board was also informed by the findings and recommendations contained in its 2014 Assessment of the Disability Services System in Virginia.”

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

Virginia Dept of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services Employment First Policy Statement - 12/04/2012

“It is the policy of the Board that in the development and implementation of policies and procedures and the delivery of services, the Department and CSB shall ensure that community-based individual supported employment in integrated work settings is presented as the first and priority service option among available day service options offered by case managers and support coordinators to individuals receiving mental health, developmental, or substance abuse day support or employment services and shall expand access to integrated, community-based employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders, intellectual disability, or co-occurring disabilities. … 

Provide training and consultation to service providers on implementing evidence-based supported employment practice models and establishing integrated supported employment teams that include CSBs, the Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), and employment services organizations (ESOs) and work with CSBs and ESOs to incorporate evidence-based supported employment practice models in the day services  they offer, including psychosocial rehabilitation;   

Work with the Department of Medical Assistance Services (DMAS) to identify ways to incorporate integrated, community-based employment services in the Medicaid Intellectual Disability and Individual and Family Developmental Disability Services Waivers."

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services State Board Policy 1036 - 12/04/2012

“It is the policy of the Board that in the development and implementation of policies and procedures and the delivery of services, the Department and CSBs shall ensure that community-based individual supported employment in integrated work settings is presented as the first and priority service option among available day service options offered by case managers and support coordinators to individuals receiving mental health, developmental, or substance abuse day support or employment services and shall expand access to integrated, community-based employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders, intellectual disability, or co-occurring disabilities…”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services Employment First Strategic Plan - 10/01/2012

“This document outlines the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services’ (DBHDS or ‘the department’) Strategic Plan for Employment First. The strategic plan was formulated in response to efforts in recent years to build and expand integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in Virginia. DBHDS supports individuals with serious mental illness, substance use disorders, and intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The strategic plan establishes annual goals for DBHDS to collaborate with other state agencies and organizations to expand opportunities for employment for all Virginians with disabilities.”

Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia - A Plan for Advancing Community Focused Services in Virginia. - 06/25/2010

An overall strategic plan with 12 foci that includes an outline that addresses the need for, objectives in, and priorities for creating employment opportunities for individuals with mental health or substance use disorders and those with developmental disabilities. 

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DRS Policy and Procedure Manual: Chapter 8.17. - Self Employment and SEE

This chapter of the Virginia Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (Vocational Rehabilitation) manual precisely defines how to deliver Self-Employment and Supported Self Employment services to customers of the system. Including how to approve and fund such services.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Self-Employment

Supported Employment

~~“Supported employment is one of many effective ways of assisting persons with disabilities in gaining and maintaining employment.  DARS partners with over 75 Employment Service Organizations in providing situational assessment, job development, placement and training services and long term follow along.DARS provides supported employment or job coach training services, if appropriate and with agreement of their DARS counselor, to eligible consumers regardless of an individual’s impairment or disability cause.All Employment Service Organizations that provide supported employment and job coaching services are CARF accredited to ensure that consumers are receiving quality services"

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation

Virginia Intercommunity Transition Council (VITC)

 “The mission of the Virginia's Intercommunity Transition Council is to promote successful transition outcomes for youth and young adults with disabilities by providing leadership and innovation in employment, education, training, living independently, community participation, and community support systems that influence success for all students.” Contains fact sheets to “assist others in understanding the various facets that promote exemplary transition for Virginia’s youth.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Transition Services for Students with Disabilities

“VDOE's Transition Services website provides support, information and resources designed to improve the outcomes of students with disabilities in transition from middle / secondary education to postsecondary education and employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
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Review of Virginia’s Plan to Increase Employment First Plan: FY 2016-FY2018-Goals, Strategies, and Action Items - 12/13/2018

~~“DBHDS, with the input of the E1AG (formerly the SELN-VA Advisory Committee) has revised the FY16-FY18 plan to increase employment opportunities. It was provided with the Status Report as of 6/30/18. The Plan includes five goal areas each of which has sub-goals. The plan’s goals and status in achieving goals can be found by accessing the web link.”

Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia DBHDS: Strategic Plan for Employment First - 10/01/2012

To facilitate interagency collaboration the Strategic Plan for Employment First establishes an Employment First Summit Meeting, which will gather leadership from various department committed to upholding Employment First principles, and orders for the creation of a high level administrative leadership body including (DBHDS, DARS, DOE, DMAS, Virginia Employment Commission (VEC), Developmental Disabilities Council (DD Council) and Virginia Community College System (VCCS).

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Data Sharing

Virginia State Employment Leadership Network - 10/01/2012

Virginia is a part of this multi-state technical assistance collaborative whose aim is to improve integrated employment outcomes for individuals with developmental disabilities. “In 2008, DBHDS joined the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN) sponsored by the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disability Services and the University of Massachusetts-Boston Institute for Community Inclusion. DBHDS developed a Virginia-specific SELN Advisory Group made up of over 30 members representing a variety of organizations involved in providing employment services to Virginians. Members include community service boards (CSBs), the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities (VBPD), the Virginia Commonwealth University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports and Job Retention (VCU/RRTC), and vendor organizations such as the Virginia Association of Community Rehabilitation Programs (vaACCSES), the Arc of Virginia, and the Virginia Association of Providers of Supported Employment (VaAPSE). DBHDS continues to be an active, contributing participant in the monthly National SELN web-based meetings. Virginia is now one of 30 states in the SELN. The Virginia SELN Advisory Group, made up of advocates, providers, and state agencies, continues to identify roadblocks and disincentives in our state system. The group is developing specific strategies for implementation of a system that prioritizes employment as an outcome of services.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Intercommunity Transition Council

Virginia's Intercommunity Transition Council is committed to promoting partnerships and influencing linkages that result in transition service networks for coordinating person-centered services. Their fact sheet on employment cites Customized Employment as a successful strategy.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Virginia Olmstead Settlement Agreement

“The Commonwealth shall establish a state policy on Employment First for the target population and include a term in the CSB Performance Contract requiring application of this policy. The Employment First policy shall, at a minimum, be based on the following principles: (1) individual supported employment in integrated work settings is the first and priority service option for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities receiving day program or employment services from or funded by theCommonwealth; (2) the goal of employment services is to support individuals in integrated work settings where they are paid minimum or competitive wages; and (3) employment services and goals must be developed and discussed at least annually through a person-centered planning process and included in ISPs. The Commonwealth shall have at least one employment service coordinator to monitor implementation of Employment First practices for individuals in the target population”.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • 14(c)/Income Security
  • Provider Transformation